Soybeans: An annual legume. The SEEDS of this plant are edible and used to produce a variety of SOY FOODS.Basidiomycota: A phylum of fungi that produce their sexual spores (basidiospores) on the outside of the basidium. It includes forms commonly known as mushrooms, boletes, puffballs, earthstars, stinkhorns, bird's-nest fungi, jelly fungi, bracket or shelf fungi, and rust and smut fungi.Soybean Proteins: Proteins which are present in or isolated from SOYBEANS.Soybean Oil: Oil from soybean or soybean plant.Plant Diseases: Diseases of plants.Triticum: A plant genus of the family POACEAE that is the source of EDIBLE GRAIN. A hybrid with rye (SECALE CEREALE) is called TRITICALE. The seed is ground into FLOUR and used to make BREAD, and is the source of WHEAT GERM AGGLUTININS.Plant Leaves: Expanded structures, usually green, of vascular plants, characteristically consisting of a bladelike expansion attached to a stem, and functioning as the principal organ of photosynthesis and transpiration. (American Heritage Dictionary, 2d ed)Genes, Plant: The functional hereditary units of PLANTS.Hordeum: A plant genus of the family POACEAE. The EDIBLE GRAIN, barley, is widely used as food.Plant Stems: Parts of plants that usually grow vertically upwards towards the light and support the leaves, buds, and reproductive structures. (From Concise Dictionary of Biology, 1990)Plant Proteins: Proteins found in plants (flowers, herbs, shrubs, trees, etc.). The concept does not include proteins found in vegetables for which VEGETABLE PROTEINS is available.Chromosomes, Plant: Complex nucleoprotein structures which contain the genomic DNA and are part of the CELL NUCLEUS of PLANTS.Spores, Fungal: Reproductive bodies produced by fungi.Trypsin Inhibitor, Kunitz Soybean: A high-molecular-weight protein (approximately 22,500) containing 198 amino acid residues. It is a strong inhibitor of trypsin and human plasmin.Vegetable Proteins: Proteins which are present in or isolated from vegetables or vegetable products used as food. The concept is distinguished from PLANT PROTEINS which refers to non-dietary proteins from plants.Fungi: A kingdom of eukaryotic, heterotrophic organisms that live parasitically as saprobes, including MUSHROOMS; YEASTS; smuts, molds, etc. They reproduce either sexually or asexually, and have life cycles that range from simple to complex. Filamentous fungi, commonly known as molds, refer to those that grow as multicellular colonies.Trypsin Inhibitor, Bowman-Birk Soybean: A low-molecular-weight protein (minimum molecular weight 8000) which has the ability to inhibit trypsin as well as chymotrypsin at independent binding sites. It is characterized by a high cystine content and the absence of glycine.Plant Immunity: The inherent or induced capacity of plants to withstand or ward off biological attack by pathogens.Vicia faba: A plant species of the genus VICIA, family FABACEAE. The edible beans are well known but they cause FAVISM in some individuals with GLUCOSEPHOSPHATE DEHYDROGENASE DEFICIENCY. This plant contains vicine, convicine, Vicia lectins, unknown seed protein, AAP2 transport protein, and Vicia faba DNA-binding protein 1.Host-Pathogen Interactions: The interactions between a host and a pathogen, usually resulting in disease.Gene Expression Regulation, Plant: Any of the processes by which nuclear, cytoplasmic, or intercellular factors influence the differential control of gene action in plants.Plants, Genetically Modified: PLANTS, or their progeny, whose GENOME has been altered by GENETIC ENGINEERING.Bradyrhizobium: A genus of gram-negative, aerobic, rod-shaped bacteria usually containing granules of poly-beta-hydroxybutyrate. They characteristically invade the root hairs of leguminous plants and act as intracellular symbionts.Ribes: A plant genus of the family GROSSULARIACEAE. GAMMA-LINOLENIC ACID is obtained from the black currant oil of the seeds.Lolium: Common member of the Gramineae family used as cattle FODDER. It harbors several fungi and other parasites toxic to livestock and people and produces allergenic compounds, especially in its pollen. The most commonly seen varieties are L. perenne, L. multiflorum, and L. rigidum.Molecular Sequence Data: Descriptions of specific amino acid, carbohydrate, or nucleotide sequences which have appeared in the published literature and/or are deposited in and maintained by databanks such as GENBANK, European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), National Biomedical Research Foundation (NBRF), or other sequence repositories.Xylopia: A plant genus of the family ANNONACEAE. Members contain DITERPENES.Animal Feed: Foodstuff used especially for domestic and laboratory animals, or livestock.Fabaceae: The large family of plants characterized by pods. Some are edible and some cause LATHYRISM or FAVISM and other forms of poisoning. Other species yield useful materials like gums from ACACIA and various LECTINS like PHYTOHEMAGGLUTININS from PHASEOLUS. Many of them harbor NITROGEN FIXATION bacteria on their roots. Many but not all species of "beans" belong to this family.Larix: A plant genus in the family PINACEAE, order Pinales, class Pinopsida, division Coniferophyta.Coffea: A plant genus of the family RUBIACEAE. It is best known for the COFFEE beverage prepared from the beans (SEEDS).Immunity, Innate: The capacity of a normal organism to remain unaffected by microorganisms and their toxins. It results from the presence of naturally occurring ANTI-INFECTIVE AGENTS, constitutional factors such as BODY TEMPERATURE and immediate acting immune cells such as NATURAL KILLER CELLS.Poaceae: A large family of narrow-leaved herbaceous grasses of the order Cyperales, subclass Commelinidae, class Liliopsida (monocotyledons). Food grains (EDIBLE GRAIN) come from members of this family. RHINITIS, ALLERGIC, SEASONAL can be induced by POLLEN of many of the grasses.Hemerocallis: A plant genus of the family LILIACEAE. Members contain steroidal saponins.Fungicides, Industrial: Chemicals that kill or inhibit the growth of fungi in agricultural applications, on wood, plastics, or other materials, in swimming pools, etc.Berberis: A plant genus in the family BERBERIDACEAE. The common names of Barberry or Oregon Grape are also used for MAHONIA. The similar-named Bayberry is the unrelated MYRICA. Oregon Grape was classified by Pursh as a Berberis but Nuttall claimed it is different enough to call it a new genus, MAHONIA. Botanists insist on this name while horticulturists stay with Mahonia. They are shrubs with yellow wood and usually three-branched spines at the base of leafstalks. Flowers are yellow, six-petaled and fruit is a berry with one to several seeds. Members contain BERBERINE.Seed Storage Proteins: One or more types of plant seed proteins providing the large amounts of AMINO ACIDS utilized in GERMINATION and SEEDLING growth. As seeds are the major food source from AGRICULTURAL CROPS, seed storage proteins are a major source of DIETARY PROTEINS.Myrtaceae: The myrtle plant family of the order Myrtales. It includes several aromatic medicinal plants such as EUCALYPTUS.Seeds: The encapsulated embryos of flowering plants. They are used as is or for animal feed because of the high content of concentrated nutrients like starches, proteins, and fats. Rapeseed, cottonseed, and sunflower seed are also produced for the oils (fats) they yield.Hemoglobinuria: The presence of free HEMOGLOBIN in the URINE, indicating hemolysis of ERYTHROCYTES within the vascular system. After saturating the hemoglobin-binding proteins (HAPTOGLOBINS), free hemoglobin begins to appear in the urine.Rhododendron: A plant genus of the family ERICACEAE.Populus: A plant genus of the family SALICACEAE. Balm of Gilead is a common name used for P. candicans, or P. gileadensis, or P. jackii, and sometimes also used for ABIES BALSAMEA or for COMMIPHORA.Oomycetes: Eukaryotes in the group STRAMENOPILES, formerly considered FUNGI, whose exact taxonomic level is unsettled. Many consider Oomycetes (Oomycota) a phylum in the kingdom Stramenopila, or alternatively, as Pseudofungi in the phylum Heterokonta of the kingdom Chromista. They are morphologically similar to fungi but have no close phylogenetic relationship to them. Oomycetes are found in both fresh and salt water as well as in terrestrial environments. (Alexopoulos et al., Introductory Mycology, 4th ed, pp683-4). They produce flagellated, actively motile spores (zoospores) that are pathogenic to many crop plants and FISHES.Zea mays: A plant species of the family POACEAE. It is a tall grass grown for its EDIBLE GRAIN, corn, used as food and animal FODDER.Crosses, Genetic: Deliberate breeding of two different individuals that results in offspring that carry part of the genetic material of each parent. The parent organisms must be genetically compatible and may be from different varieties or closely related species.Avena sativa: A plant species of the family POACEAE that is widely cultivated for its edible seeds.Chromosome Mapping: Any method used for determining the location of and relative distances between genes on a chromosome.Digestion: The process of breakdown of food for metabolism and use by the body.Seedling: Very young plant after GERMINATION of SEEDS.Quantitative Trait Loci: Genetic loci associated with a QUANTITATIVE TRAIT.Pinus taeda: A plant species of the genus PINUS which is the subject of genetic study.Genetic Markers: A phenotypically recognizable genetic trait which can be used to identify a genetic locus, a linkage group, or a recombination event.Amino Acid Sequence: The order of amino acids as they occur in a polypeptide chain. This is referred to as the primary structure of proteins. It is of fundamental importance in determining PROTEIN CONFORMATION.Podophyllum peltatum: A plant of the genus PODOPHYLLUM, family BERBERIDACEAE (sometimes classified as Podophyllaceae) which is the source of PODOPHYLLIN and of PODOPHYLLOTOXIN that inhibits DNA TOPOISOMERASES, TYPE II. It is different from the European mandrake, MANDRAGORA.Leghemoglobin: A hemoglobin-like oxygen-binding hemeprotein present in the nitrogen-fixing root nodules of leguminous plants. The red pigment has a molecular weight approximately 1/4 that of hemoglobin and has been suggested to act as an oxido-reduction catalyst in symbiotic nitrogen fixation.Inheritance Patterns: The different ways GENES and their ALLELES interact during the transmission of genetic traits that effect the outcome of GENE EXPRESSION.Elymus: A plant genus of the family POACEAE. The common name of wild rye is used with some other grasses.Ascomycota: A phylum of fungi which have cross-walls or septa in the mycelium. The perfect state is characterized by the formation of a saclike cell (ascus) containing ascospores. Most pathogenic fungi with a known perfect state belong to this phylum.Alnus: A plant genus of the family BETULACEAE that is distinguished from birch (BETULA) by its usually stalked winter buds and by cones that remain on the branches after the small, winged nutlets are released.Genome, Plant: The genetic complement of a plant (PLANTS) as represented in its DNA.Pinaceae: A plant family of the order Pinales, class Pinopsida, division Coniferophyta, known for the various conifers.Pterocarpans: A group of compounds which can be described as benzo-pyrano-furano-benzenes which can be formed from ISOFLAVONES by internal coupling of the B ring to the 4-ketone position. Members include medicarpin, phaseolin, and pisatin which are found in FABACEAE.Trypsin Inhibitors: Serine proteinase inhibitors which inhibit trypsin. They may be endogenous or exogenous compounds.Expressed Sequence Tags: Partial cDNA (DNA, COMPLEMENTARY) sequences that are unique to the cDNAs from which they were derived.beta-Amylase: An enzyme that catalyzes the hydrolysis of 1,4-alpha-glycosidic linkages in starch, glycogen, and related polysaccharides and oligosaccharides so as to remove successive beta-maltose units from the non-reducing ends of the chains. EC 3.2.1.2.Brachypodium: A plant genus in the family POACEAE. Brachypodium distachyon is a model species for functional genomics studies.Dietary Proteins: Proteins obtained from foods. They are the main source of the ESSENTIAL AMINO ACIDS.Sequence Analysis, DNA: A multistage process that includes cloning, physical mapping, subcloning, determination of the DNA SEQUENCE, and information analysis.Plant Root Nodulation: The formation of a nitrogen-fixing cell mass on PLANT ROOTS following symbiotic infection by nitrogen-fixing bacteria such as RHIZOBIUM or FRANKIA.Phylogeny: The relationships of groups of organisms as reflected by their genetic makeup.Plants, Medicinal: Plants whose roots, leaves, seeds, bark, or other constituent parts possess therapeutic, tonic, purgative, curative or other pharmacologic attributes, when administered to man or animals.DNA Shuffling: The use of DNA recombination (RECOMBINATION, GENETIC) to prepare a large gene library of novel, chimeric genes from a population of randomly fragmented DNA from related gene sequences.Fungal Structures: The parts of fungi.Isoflavones: 3-Phenylchromones. Isomeric form of FLAVONOIDS in which the benzene group is attached to the 3 position of the benzopyran ring instead of the 2 position.Lipoxygenase: An enzyme of the oxidoreductase class primarily found in PLANTS. It catalyzes reactions between linoleate and other fatty acids and oxygen to form hydroperoxy-fatty acid derivatives.Species Specificity: The restriction of a characteristic behavior, anatomical structure or physical system, such as immune response; metabolic response, or gene or gene variant to the members of one species. It refers to that property which differentiates one species from another but it is also used for phylogenetic levels higher or lower than the species.Plant Roots: The usually underground portions of a plant that serve as support, store food, and through which water and mineral nutrients enter the plant. (From American Heritage Dictionary, 1982; Concise Dictionary of Biology, 1990)
  • Soybean and kudzu are the most common host plants in the United States. (osu.edu)
  • Therefore, careful and diligent scouting of both soybean fields and kudzu patches in the southern states has been extremely important for determining the threat of this disease for Ohio and other Midwestern states. (osu.edu)
  • Rust might spread within a field, then jump to a nearby patch of its alternative host, kudzu. (labmanager.com)
  • Considering how much kudzu is spread around the south, it's a good bet another soybean field is within a couple hundred feet. (labmanager.com)
  • Soybean rust was detected in kudzu patches in Amite, Pike, Walthall, and Wilkinson counties on Tuesday (5/24) and Wednesday (5/25) afternoons. (mississippi-crops.com)
  • Kudzu is an additional host for the disease and the closest soybean relative growing in MS. Estimates suggest we have approximately 500,000 acres of kudzu growing in 81 of the 82 counties in MS. However, not all kudzu is susceptible to the disease and approximately 10% of the kudzu in the state is likely resistant or immune to soybean rust, which makes scouting for the disease a difficult endeavor. (mississippi-crops.com)
  • Active soybean rust has been detected in AL (3 counties), FL (13 counties all on kudzu), GA (1 county on kudzu), LA (11 total parishes, most on kudzu and some on volunteer soybean plants from the 2015 season), and MS (3 counties on kudzu). (mississippi-crops.com)
  • Today, NCERA-208 has shifted focus from responding to soybean rust as an "emerging threat" to maintaining an ongoing program of soybean monitoring and management, said Ed Sikora, a professor and Extension plant pathologist at Auburn University. (no-tillfarmer.com)
  • So many factors potentially make the management of soybean rust different in the United States than in Asia," said Erick De Wolf, a plant pathologist at Penn State University. (baltimoresun.com)
  • But the Purdue team made its discovery looking for a genetic answer to another soybean problem, said Hughes, a U.S. Department of Agriculture plant pathologist and adjunct professor in Purdue's Department of Botany and Plant Pathology. (purdue.edu)
  • Farmers preparing for spring planting would do well to renew their commitment to managing soybean cyst nematodes, according to an Iowa State University plant pathologist, Dr. Greg Tylka. (iastate.edu)
  • This study also measured the effect of controlling soybean rust by adding a fixed concentration, 1 % v/v of two adjuvants into the three fungicide formulations and then varying the concentration of the two adjuvants at 0.5, 1.0, and 1.5 % into a tebuconazole formulation only. (astm.org)
  • Avozani A, Reis EM, Tonin RB (2014) Sensitivity loss by Corynespora cassiicola , isolated from soybean, to the fungicide carbendazim. (springer.com)
  • however, making a fungicide application to a vegetative soybean plant would not be beneficial. (mississippi-crops.com)
  • Farmers with corn, soybeans, cereals, canola, peanuts and potatoes could have a new fungicide active ingredient at their fingertips. (agweb.com)
  • Valent recently acquired the rights to sell Domark fungicide in the U.S. soybean market from Isagro SpA. (fluoridealert.org)
  • Rust may first occur anywhere in the United States, but is expected to enter in the Southeast from Central America, following a similar path to what corn blight took when it entered in 1970. (msstate.edu)
  • Soybeans, most of which provide feed for poultry and livestock, accounted for $86 million in farm income in 2003 and ranked fifth in farm income behind poultry, greenhouse/nursery, dairy and corn. (baltimoresun.com)
  • These studies provide new perspectives on using screen-printed carbon electrodes based on magnetic beads, for early diagnosis of soybean rust for analysis in field. (unifi.it)
  • The Alabama soybean rust Web page provides information about surveillance, reporting, prediction, and management of soybean rust for the 2005 growing season. (aces.edu)
  • information on the identification and management of soybean rust as well as links to university and extension sites. (aces.edu)
  • With this introduction into the U.S., a workshop was organized to discuss issues related to the possible introduction of soybean rust into the continental U.S. (45). (apsnet.org)
  • United Soybean Board (USB) farmer-leaders develop and maintain partnerships with U.S. land grant universities and U.S. ag-focused research organizations such as the Plant Management Network to increase the transfer of checkoff-funded applied and practical production research information to U.S. soybean farmers. (plantmanagementnetwork.org)
  • 14 confirmed the presence of soybean rust in the U.S.A. From detection in Louisiana in 2004, it spread to nine states by 2005, and was detected in 15 states in 2006. (scielo.org.za)
  • Ohio State scientists and Extension educators have worked with colleagues from more than 30 U.S. and Canadian land-grant universities, federal agencies and industry associations in a coordinated effort - officially called NCERA (North Central Extension and Research Activity)-208 "Response to Emerging Soybean Rust Threat" - to minimize the impact of soybean rust. (no-tillfarmer.com)
  • To understand farmers' preferred varietal characteristics, knowledge of ASR and other key constraints to soybean production, a survey was conducted using a structured questionnaire in the major soybean growing areas of Kenya. (ukzn.ac.za)
  • Maryland farmers are preparing for an invasion of the dreaded soybean rust. (baltimoresun.com)
  • U.S. farmers planted 74 million acres of soybeans last year, valued at $18 billion. (baltimoresun.com)
  • Phytophthora sojae has been a problem for Indiana soybean farmers since it was first found in the state in 1948. (purdue.edu)
  • This has the potential to provide a higher profit margin for soybean farmers, as well as reducing the use of harmful chemicals and promoting a cleaner environment," Ma said. (purdue.edu)
  • Our mission is to improve soybean, common bean, and wheat to provide sustainable solutions for consumers in America and around the world. (usda.gov)
  • ADM officials said they do expect to see increased exports of wheat and soybeans out of the United States through the rest of the marketing year because of favorable supplies. (agfax.com)
  • Hartman thinks this short-distance movement has been occurring as usual this season and, barring any unusual fallout from Hurricane Harvey, he expects to see rust showing up in Illinois soybean fields late in the 2017 season. (labmanager.com)
  • Abdelsamad NA, Baumbach J, Bhattacharyya MK, Leandro LF (2017) Soybean sudden death syndrome caused by Fusarium virguliforme is impaired by prolonged flooding and anaerobic conditions. (springer.com)
  • Our simulation results suggest that substantial losses to the US soybean producers may be avoided by establishing effective soybean rust controls. (repec.org)
  • In 1984, an economic risk analysis projected that the potential losses in the U.S. would be $7.1 billion per year, once soybean rust was established in the main soybean growing area of the U.S. (24). (apsnet.org)
  • 3 Consequently, commercial losses in the first two seasons were far less than they could have been, as chemicals and protocols used in Zimbabwe were adopted until local research could support the soybean cropping industry. (scielo.org.za)
  • I think the study gives a good idea of rust spore counts in the atmosphere in and above the soybean canopy and a distance away from an infected field. (labmanager.com)
  • The objectives of this research were to map SBR resistance in plant introduction (PI) 561356 and to identify single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) haplotypes within the region on soybean chromosome 18 where the SBR resistance gene Rpp1 maps. (unl.edu)
  • A novel rust resistance gene, R 15 , derived from the cultivated sunflower HA-R8 was assigned to linkage group 8 of the sunflower genome using a genotyping-by-sequencing approach. (springer.com)
  • The rust virulence gene is co-evolving with the resistance gene in sunflower, leading to the emergence of new physiologic pathotypes. (springer.com)
  • The diagnostic labs will be receiving additional soybean rust identification training over the winter, said Jardine. (apsnet.org)