Gold: A yellow metallic element with the atomic symbol Au, atomic number 79, and atomic weight 197. It is used in jewelry, goldplating of other metals, as currency, and in dental restoration. Many of its clinical applications, such as ANTIRHEUMATIC AGENTS, are in the form of its salts.Arthropod Venoms: Venoms from animals of the phylum Arthropoda. Those most investigated are from scorpions and spiders of the class Arachnidae and from ant, bee, and wasp families of the Insecta order Hymenoptera. The venoms contain protein toxins, enzymes, and other bioactive substances and may be lethal to man.Desensitization, Immunologic: Immunosuppression by the administration of increasing doses of antigen. Though the exact mechanism is not clear, the therapy results in an increase in serum levels of allergen-specific IMMUNOGLOBULIN G, suppression of specific IgE, and an increase in suppressor T-cell activity.Hymenoptera: An extensive order of highly specialized insects including bees, wasps, and ants.Bee Venoms: Venoms obtained from Apis mellifera (honey bee) and related species. They contain various enzymes, polypeptide toxins, and other substances, some of which are allergenic or immunogenic or both. These venoms were formerly used in rheumatism to stimulate the pituitary-adrenal system.Egg Proteins, Dietary: Proteins found in eggs which are consumed as a food.Gold Sodium Thiomalate: A variable mixture of the mono- and disodium salts of gold thiomalic acid used mainly for its anti-inflammatory action in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis. It is most effective in active progressive rheumatoid arthritis and of little or no value in the presence of extensive deformities or in the treatment of other forms of arthritis.Gold Compounds: Inorganic compounds that contain gold as an integral part of the molecule.Wasp Venoms: Venoms produced by the wasp (Vespid) family of stinging insects, including hornets; the venoms contain enzymes, biogenic amines, histamine releasing factors, kinins, toxic polypeptides, etc., and are similar to bee venoms.Egg Hypersensitivity: Allergic reaction to eggs that is triggered by the immune system.Insect Bites and Stings: Bites and stings inflicted by insects.Metal Nanoparticles: Nanoparticles produced from metals whose uses include biosensors, optics, and catalysts. In biomedical applications the particles frequently involve the noble metals, especially gold and silver.Anaphylaxis: An acute hypersensitivity reaction due to exposure to a previously encountered ANTIGEN. The reaction may include rapidly progressing URTICARIA, respiratory distress, vascular collapse, systemic SHOCK, and death.ChicagoGold Alloys: Alloys that contain a high percentage of gold. They are used in restorative or prosthetic dentistry.Gold Colloid, Radioactive: A suspension of radioactive gold particles emitting negative beta particles and gamma irradiation. It was formerly used for liver scans and irradiation treatment of some metastatic malignancies.Early Growth Response Protein 1: An early growth response transcription factor that has been implicated in regulation of CELL PROLIFERATION and APOPTOSIS.Gold Radioisotopes: Unstable isotopes of gold that decay or disintegrate emitting radiation. Au 185-196, 198-201, and 203 are radioactive gold isotopes.Immunoglobulin E: An immunoglobulin associated with MAST CELLS. Overexpression has been associated with allergic hypersensitivity (HYPERSENSITIVITY, IMMEDIATE).Organogold Compounds: Organic compounds that contain GOLD as an integral part of the molecule. Some are used as ANTIRHEUMATIC AGENTS. The term chrysotherapy derives from an ancient Greek term for gold.Rabbits: The species Oryctolagus cuniculus, in the family Leporidae, order LAGOMORPHA. Rabbits are born in burrows, furless, and with eyes and ears closed. In contrast with HARES, rabbits have 22 chromosome pairs.Janus Kinase 2: A Janus kinase subtype that is involved in signaling from GROWTH HORMONE RECEPTORS; PROLACTIN RECEPTORS; and a variety of CYTOKINE RECEPTORS such as ERYTHROPOIETIN RECEPTORS and INTERLEUKIN RECEPTORS. Dysregulation of Janus kinase 2 due to GENETIC TRANSLOCATIONS have been associated with a variety of MYELOPROLIFERATIVE DISORDERS.Cognition Disorders: Disturbances in mental processes related to learning, thinking, reasoning, and judgment.Aging: The gradual irreversible changes in structure and function of an organism that occur as a result of the passage of time.Aurothioglucose: A thioglucose derivative used as an antirheumatic and experimentally to produce obesity in animals.Nanotubes: Nanometer-sized tubes composed of various substances including carbon (CARBON NANOTUBES), boron nitride, or nickel vanadate.Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Prolactin: A lactogenic hormone secreted by the adenohypophysis (PITUITARY GLAND, ANTERIOR). It is a polypeptide of approximately 23 kD. Besides its major action on lactation, in some species prolactin exerts effects on reproduction, maternal behavior, fat metabolism, immunomodulation and osmoregulation. Prolactin receptors are present in the mammary gland, hypothalamus, liver, ovary, testis, and prostate.Transcription Factors: Endogenous substances, usually proteins, which are effective in the initiation, stimulation, or termination of the genetic transcription process.Auranofin: An oral chrysotherapeutic agent for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis. Its exact mechanism of action is unknown, but it is believed to act via immunological mechanisms and alteration of lysosomal enzyme activity. Its efficacy is slightly less than that of injected gold salts, but it is better tolerated, and side effects which occur are potentially less serious.DNA-Binding Proteins: Proteins which bind to DNA. The family includes proteins which bind to both double- and single-stranded DNA and also includes specific DNA binding proteins in serum which can be used as markers for malignant diseases.Gold Sodium Thiosulfate: A sodium salt of gold thiosulfate. It has uses like the ORGANOGOLD COMPOUNDS.Neuropsychological Tests: Tests designed to assess neurological function associated with certain behaviors. They are used in diagnosing brain dysfunction or damage and central nervous system disorders or injury.Longitudinal Studies: Studies in which variables relating to an individual or group of individuals are assessed over a period of time.Immunoglobulin G: The major immunoglobulin isotype class in normal human serum. There are several isotype subclasses of IgG, for example, IgG1, IgG2A, and IgG2B.Cohort Studies: Studies in which subsets of a defined population are identified. These groups may or may not be exposed to factors hypothesized to influence the probability of the occurrence of a particular disease or other outcome. Cohorts are defined populations which, as a whole, are followed in an attempt to determine distinguishing subgroup characteristics.Progesterone: The major progestational steroid that is secreted primarily by the CORPUS LUTEUM and the PLACENTA. Progesterone acts on the UTERUS, the MAMMARY GLANDS and the BRAIN. It is required in EMBRYO IMPLANTATION; PREGNANCY maintenance, and the development of mammary tissue for MILK production. Progesterone, converted from PREGNENOLONE, also serves as an intermediate in the biosynthesis of GONADAL STEROID HORMONES and adrenal CORTICOSTEROIDS.Sensitivity and Specificity: Binary classification measures to assess test results. Sensitivity or recall rate is the proportion of true positives. Specificity is the probability of correctly determining the absence of a condition. (From Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 2d ed)MiningProtein Binding: The process in which substances, either endogenous or exogenous, bind to proteins, peptides, enzymes, protein precursors, or allied compounds. Specific protein-binding measures are often used as assays in diagnostic assessments.Electrodes: Electric conductors through which electric currents enter or leave a medium, whether it be an electrolytic solution, solid, molten mass, gas, or vacuum.Surface Properties: Characteristics or attributes of the outer boundaries of objects, including molecules.Biosensing Techniques: Any of a variety of procedures which use biomolecular probes to measure the presence or concentration of biological molecules, biological structures, microorganisms, etc., by translating a biochemical interaction at the probe surface into a quantifiable physical signal.Nanotechnology: The development and use of techniques to study physical phenomena and construct structures in the nanoscale size range or smaller.Particle Size: Relating to the size of solids.Nanostructures: Materials which have structured components with at least one dimension in the range of 1 to 100 nanometers. These include NANOCOMPOSITES; NANOPARTICLES; NANOTUBES; and NANOWIRES.Nanoshells: Nanometer range spherical cores of particular semiconductor compounds surrounded by an ultrathin metal shell that is commonly made of gold or silver. This configuration gives the nanoshells highly tunable optical properties. They have potential in biomedicine for diagnosis and therapy.Reproducibility of Results: The statistical reproducibility of measurements (often in a clinical context), including the testing of instrumentation or techniques to obtain reproducible results. The concept includes reproducibility of physiological measurements, which may be used to develop rules to assess probability or prognosis, or response to a stimulus; reproducibility of occurrence of a condition; and reproducibility of experimental results.Silver: Silver. An element with the atomic symbol Ag, atomic number 47, and atomic weight 107.87. It is a soft metal that is used medically in surgical instruments, dental prostheses, and alloys. Long-continued use of silver salts can lead to a form of poisoning known as ARGYRIA.Electrochemistry: The study of chemical changes resulting from electrical action and electrical activity resulting from chemical changes.Electrochemical Techniques: The utilization of an electrical current to measure, analyze, or alter chemicals or chemical reactions in solution, cells, or tissues.ThiomalatesSurface Plasmon Resonance: A biosensing technique in which biomolecules capable of binding to specific analytes or ligands are first immobilized on one side of a metallic film. Light is then focused on the opposite side of the film to excite the surface plasmons, that is, the oscillations of free electrons propagating along the film's surface. The refractive index of light reflecting off this surface is measured. When the immobilized biomolecules are bound by their ligands, an alteration in surface plasmons on the opposite side of the film is created which is directly proportional to the change in bound, or adsorbed, mass. Binding is measured by changes in the refractive index. The technique is used to study biomolecular interactions, such as antigen-antibody binding.
  • Klondike Gold Rush National Historical park is located in temperate rainforest areas but borders interior forest. (nps.gov)
  • Learn what birds are in this area with a comprehensive the official species list for Klondike Gold Rush National Historical Park. (nps.gov)
  • National Park Service, Klondike Gold Rush National Historical Park, George and Edna Rapuzzi Collection, KLGO 55751. (nps.gov)
  • News spread around the world and prospectors from Australia to California began arriving en masse and the first lanterns of a soon to be Johannesburg began flickering along dusty streets. (wikipedia.org)
  • In the decades that followed, prospectors traced the rich mineral deposits of the Canadian Shield westward from Ontario and Quebec, making major discoveries of base metals (as well as of gold and silver) at Flin Flon , Manitoba , in 1915 and finding rich deposits of radium in the north at Great Bear Lake in 1930. (britannica.com)
  • Realizing that prospectors would be ideal customers , he purchased a jar's worth of gold dust and travelled to the small but growing seaport of San Francisco . (everything2.com)
  • SYDNEY (Reuters) - Canada-based Kirkland Lake Gold will list its shares on the Australia bourse on Thursday after investing millions of dollars and joining dozens of other prospectors in a modern-day gold rush. (reuters.com)
  • More than 25 publicly-listed companies and legions of small prospectors are exploring for gold on the western fringe of Australia in an area known as the Pilbara, better regarded for iron ore. (reuters.com)
  • However, in the past year a record 1,896 gold prospecting licenses were granted by the Western Australia Department of Mines, many for individual prospectors known as "detectorists" trying their luck. (reuters.com)
  • Although neither Schwatka nor Ogilvie camped at Sheep Camp, it was used by many of the prospectors who headed north for gold between 1880 and 1896. (nps.gov)
  • At first, the prospectors retrieved the gold from streams and riverbeds using simple techniques, such as panning . (thefullwiki.org)
  • Through captivating and largely unedited images ranging from scenes of California's rivers to the snow-capped peaks of Yukon, this exhibition follows the hopes, dreams and illusions of an entire generation of prospectors who took to the road in search of gold. (gallery.ca)
  • The 1896 gold strike in the Klondike triggered a huge rush of prospectors warming sub-Arctic climes with visions of sudden wealth. (executedtoday.com)
  • The Klondike Gold Rush [n was a migration by an estimated 100,000 prospectors to the Klondike region of the Yukon in north-western Canada between 1896 and 1899. (worldebookfair.com)
  • When news arrived in the summer of 1899 that gold had been discovered in Nome in west Alaska, many prospectors left the Klondike for the new goldfields, marking the end of the rush. (worldebookfair.com)
  • The low investment, the high value per unit weight of gold, and the ability of gold dust and gold nuggets to serve as a medium of exchange, allow placer gold rushes to occur even in remote locations. (wikipedia.org)
  • In 1896 gold nuggets were found in a small tributary of the Klondike River , itself a tributary of the Yukon River . (britannica.com)
  • As his construction crew (made up of Mormons who had come west looking for work, having been run out of US territory ) had moved tons of gravel without happening upon any other gold, Marshall assumed the couple of nuggets he found were a fluke , and urged his men back to work. (everything2.com)
  • Out in the Pilbara, it took retired carpenter Pete Caudwell just three days to find two dozen gold nuggets - almost enough to pay for his A$6,000 metal detector. (reuters.com)
  • In Germany, researchers at the Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg found that the bacterium called Cupriavidus metallidurans eats up toxic metallic compounds, continues to live and produces tiny gold nuggets as a result . (biofuelsdigest.com)
  • I didn't see anyone show up with gold nuggets, or claim they'd found riches, but there's no doubt that many of the visitors trolling the mountains were keeping a weather eye for the shiny stuff. (equities.com)
  • The photographers manipulated their images after they were printed, adding gold dust onto streams or gold nuggets onto the sieves of the pioneers. (gallery.ca)
  • The Meningococcal Gold Rush - a report into the flawed science and bad policy of the MeNZB™ vaccine - the Ministry of Health declined to respond publicly. (scoop.co.nz)
  • Reprinted here in full is the Ministry of Health's critique of The Meningococcal Gold Rush and Ron Law and Barbara Sumner Burstyn's response. (scoop.co.nz)
  • Since publication of The Meningococcal Gold Rush the authors have continued in their investigations into the circumstances surrounding the contracting, development and implementation of the MeNZB™ vaccine. (scoop.co.nz)
  • The matters explored in detail in this new document, The Meningococcal Gold Rush , Second Edition , combined with new evidence of apparent undeclared conflicts of interest and our belief that the Ministry of Health has interfered with the independent functioning of the Health Research Council, form the basis of our call for a formal Royal Commission of Inquiry. (scoop.co.nz)
  • The issues we raise in Meningococcal Gold Rush, Second Edition , warrant a full and prompt Royal Commission of Inquiry and we suggest a number of questions that such an inquiry should answer. (scoop.co.nz)
  • While gold mining itself was unprofitable for most diggers and mine owners, some people made large fortunes, and the merchants and transportation facilities made large profits. (wikipedia.org)
  • Gold rushes extend as far back to the Roman Empire , whose gold mining was described by Diodorus Siculus and Pliny the Elder , and probably further back to Ancient Egypt . (wikipedia.org)
  • Within each mining rush there is typically a transition through progressively higher capital expenditures, larger organizations, and more specialized knowledge. (wikipedia.org)
  • Now there's a rush in the U.S. to find key components of cellphones, televisions, weapons systems, wind turbines, MRI machines and the regenerative brakes in hybrid cars, a group of versatile minerals on the periodic table called rare earth elements and old mining tailings piles just might be the answer. (yahoo.com)
  • Though there were smaller mining operations in the region, it wasn't until 1884 and the subsequent 1886 discovery at Langlaagte that the Witwatersrand gold rush got underway in earnest. (wikipedia.org)
  • FRESNO, Calif. (AP) -- California's gold rush may long be over, but mercury-contaminated soil from mining activities in the foothills of the Sierra Nevada continues to flow downstream, impacting fish and the environment, a new study suggests. (yahoo.com)
  • Then the team analyzed topographic maps, streamflow data and satellite images, and used computer modeling to show that the mercury in the Sacramento-San Joaquin River Delta and San Francisco Bay came from historic gold mining that was released during episodic floods. (yahoo.com)
  • A new study has found that gold mining has contaminated water, the soil and the air with elevated levels of heavy metals, with dire consequences for communities. (iol.co.za)
  • Robinson Lake's exceedingly high uranium levels are cited in a new 6-year study, The Cost of Gold: Environmental, Health and Human Rights Consequences of Gold Mining in South Africa's West and Central Rand, by Harvard Law School's International Human Rights Clinic. (iol.co.za)
  • The report finds that gold mining on the West and Central Rand - researchers interviewed residents from 20 communities spanning Riverlea, Meadowlands and Bekkersdal - has contaminated water, soil and air with elevated levels of heavy metals, including uranium. (iol.co.za)
  • The gold rush peaked in 1852 and after that the gold reserves were getting thinner and harder to reach so that more sophisticated methods of mining had to be employed. (historynet.com)
  • Strike it rich in this fun-filled gold mining game where you can explore and survey gold-rich lands, pull the gold from the earth, wash it, and make GOLD BARS! (appbrain.com)
  • This is more than just mining, this is an adventure - and its CHOCK full of GOLD! (appbrain.com)
  • As a result of gold mining, two highly toxic chemicals are released into the released into the environment: cyanide and mercury. (smore.com)
  • A major concern with gold mining is the emission of mercury. (smore.com)
  • Mercury was an essential commodity of gold mining, as it greatly increased the recovery efficiency of primitive mining technology. (watereducation.org)
  • Native Americans were attacked and pushed off traditional lands, and gold mining caused environmental harm. (thefullwiki.org)
  • The city, gateway park showcases a life-sized reproduction Stamp Mill, a machine used during Dahlonega's gold mining days to crush ore so the gold could be extracted. (dahlonega.org)
  • After your morning meal in the mountains, continue the Gold fun with a very short drive over to the Crisson Gold Mine (named for early Gold Mining pioneers W. R. Crisson and son E. E. Crisson). (dahlonega.org)
  • and the rest of the series will cover the following: The Early Days, Routes to California, Minorities in the Gold Rush, Mining Techniques, and Daily Life as a Miner. (teacherspayteachers.com)
  • Mining activity of the gold rush lasted until 1903 when production peaked after heavier equipment was brought in. (worldebookfair.com)
  • Bank data showed that gold and energy excluded current account posted $2.1 billion surplus, compared to $5.3 billion surplus in July 2019. (hurriyetdailynews.com)
  • Spot gold was down 2.6% to $1,475.26 per ounce at 1204 GMT, having slumped as much as 5.1% on Monday to its lowest since November 2019. (reuters.com)
  • When James Wilson Marshall saw something golden shining in the tailrace at Sutter's Mill, he not only set off a worldwide rush to California but also touched off the greatest writing and artistic frenzy in our nation's history. (ca.gov)
  • The free gold supply in stream beds would become depleted somewhat quickly, and the initial phase would be followed by prospecting for veins of lode gold that were the original source of the placer gold. (wikipedia.org)
  • Gold rushes are periods of economic boom, generally associated with large increases in expenditures aimed at securing claims near new found veins of gold. (repec.org)
  • The hidden gold veins started to shine under the flashlights. (evolutionnews.org)
  • Word of limitless gold deposits in California, Polk said, "would scarcely command belief were they not corroborated by authentic reports. (everything2.com)
  • The 'West and Central Rand' have historically contained some the biggest gold deposits on Earth. (iol.co.za)
  • In July, the bank's gold reserves - including gold deposits and, if appropriate, gold swapped - hit $43.6, climbing 11.5 percent from a month earlier. (hurriyetdailynews.com)
  • Mercury, which was plentiful from deposits in the nearby Coast Range, acts as a magnet of sorts, drawing gold to it in a ready-made, easily recoverable amalgam from rock, gravel or soil. (watereducation.org)
  • In Peru, La Rinconada is the world's highest permanent settlement at 5,100 m, and it is situated strategically between many artisanal gold deposits in the mountains. (visualcapitalist.com)
  • This month, Marindi found 63 separate pieces of gold, the biggest a 6mm nugget (1/4 inch), sending its stock up 42 percent. (reuters.com)
  • But the bacterium has another enzyme that it releases to get rid of all that unwanted copper which results in tiny gold nugget nanoparticles on the bacterial surface. (biofuelsdigest.com)
  • After a few minutes of gameplay, word arrives that gold has been found in California, and it becomes much more difficult for Jerrod to settle his affairs in Brooklyn and find a way to Sacramento. (wikipedia.org)
  • People had found gold in other parts of California previously, but the discoveries had amounted to very little. (everything2.com)
  • Marshall's Mormon laborers quickly found quite a bit of gold. (everything2.com)
  • Some new gold reserves have already been found and turned to a mine field, he added. (hurriyetdailynews.com)
  • Mayor William D. Wood resigned his post to found the Seattle and Yukon Trading Company, which sold passage by steamer from Seattle to the gold fields for $300 a head. (seattlemet.com)
  • Now a new vein of gold is being found in long-ignored RNA tags (some of them known since 1974), but it required breaking out of old dogmas. (evolutionnews.org)
  • Grabbing a plastic or metal sluice and standing in 55-degree creek water has been a thing in Colorado since gold and silver were found there in the 1800s. (equities.com)
  • Reality came to Porcupine Creek when two of the mines from the Discovery Channel series Gold Rush found themselves on the receiving end of a long list of complaints from the U.S. Mine Safety and Health Administration in August. (huliq.com)
  • Hunter, who Gold Rush fans may remember from a recent episode, cost more in fines than he did in gold found, shows up late, and he spends all of his time with his nose to his smartphone. (inquisitr.com)
  • Few reached Dawson, and fewer still found the gold they had initially set out to find. (mysteriesofcanada.com)
  • Bonanza Creek was the heart of the gold rush after Skookum Jim Mason found gold there in 1896. (beadinggem.com)
  • Parker diverts a creek to mine a pile of gold in the riverbed and Tony's crew has a meltdown over fitting the tailings conveyor. (discovery.com)
  • Tony mines near the Klondike River, where gold was first discovered on Rabbit Creek by Skookum Jim, George Carmack and Tagish Charlie in August 1896. (lonelyplanet.com)
  • Tracks that Young recalls as being written specifically for the film are "After the Gold Rush" and "Cripple Creek Ferry. (wikipedia.org)
  • Reality hit the Gold Rush Porcupine Creek gold mines hard in August, when the two mines were closed temporarily due to failing to meet federal training requirements. (huliq.com)
  • As if on cue, just as they are finishing up with the last load of rocks into the plant, Tony Beets comes out to see if Scribner Creek is really out of gold as Parker believes. (inquisitr.com)
  • The Klondike-the last of the great placer finds-was the most publicized of all the great rushes, exciting a world weary of economic hard times with stories of the long climb up the Chilkoot Pass and of red-coated Northwest Mounted Police keeping law and order on the gold-rush frontier. (britannica.com)
  • Chilkoot Pass was tough - one female gold seeker called it the "worst trail this side of hell" . (beadinggem.com)
  • The Chinese have a history of going long periods without any official announcement of its gold holding and then suddenly revealing a large increase in its reserves. (infowars.com)
  • During the initial periods of the pandemic, the price of gold futures spiked to reach a high of US$70 above the spot price. (visualcapitalist.com)
  • If the bulldozers on Tony Beets' gold mine ever break down he could just use his bare hands. (lonelyplanet.com)
  • So how do these bacteria manage to eat toxic gold compounds and convert them into the metallic form without harming itself? (biofuelsdigest.com)
  • Once the gold and copper elements get into the bacterium cells, they interact and get transported deep inside the bacterium where the bacteria employ enzymes to move the toxic metals out of their cells. (biofuelsdigest.com)
  • However, "when gold compounds are also present, the enzyme is suppressed and the toxic copper and gold compounds remain inside the cell," co-author of the study and microbiologist Dietrich H. Nies told Science Alert. (biofuelsdigest.com)
  • Gold salts are among the most toxic of therapeutic agents and must be given only under strict medical supervision. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • In December, the Chinese announced the first increase in their gold holding since 2016. (infowars.com)
  • Given the political dynamics and the ongoing trade war, it seems unlikely the Chinese suddenly stopped increasing their gold reserves in 2016. (infowars.com)
  • In Utah, Jonathan Johnson, the chairman of Overstock.com and a 2016 Republican gubernatorial candidate, in 2015 said his company had stockpiled enough small coins in gold and silver to pay employees for several months in case of bank failures or currency problems. (pewtrusts.org)
  • An estimated 26 million pounds of mercury was used for gold recovery in the Sierra Nevada and Klamath-Trinity Mountains. (yahoo.com)
  • In Northern California, Gold Rush-era mercury contaminated both sides of the Sacramento and San Joaquin valleys and is difficult to remove. (watereducation.org)
  • The sand that comes out of the flour mill is sifted and finally mixed, by hand, with shimmering globs of mercury to pull out the gold. (wwno.org)
  • Farmers across the Midwest are rushing to plant as many acres of corn as they can - even as the price of corn is skyrocketing. (niemanwatchdog.org)
  • They need to find $10,000 worth of gold within two days or the families will be sent home. (discovery.com)
  • But to find the big gold payout, they'll put their lives on the line by diving deep beneath the raging waters of one of Alaska's wildest creeks. (apple.com)
  • There's a rush in the U.S. to find key components of cellphones, televisions, weapons systems, wind turbines, MRI machines and the regenerative brakes in hybrid cars, and old mine tailings piles just might be the answer. (yahoo.com)
  • It's too hot to prospect on my own there now, but there's gold out there and I want to find it. (reuters.com)
  • We find that market rushes may account for over half the short run volatility in hours worked and a third of the short run volatility of output. (repec.org)
  • Survey, Find new Dig Sites, Lay your Claim and Mine your Gold! (appbrain.com)
  • Visitors will be able to pick their very own KITKAT GOLD straight from the wall, and potentially find the ultimate Gold Ticket, with two amazing breaks worth up to $5,000 up for grabs. (nestle.com.au)
  • Upon seeing the rate and relative ease with which the gold was had, Mason purchased about 200 ounces of gold dust and instructed Sherman to send the dust, along with a letter explaining the situation, to Washington . (everything2.com)
  • March 17 (Reuters) - Gold tumbled 3% on Tuesday, while other precious metals also extended heavy losses from the previous session, as fears over the global economic toll from the fast-spreading coronavirus prompted investors to dump most assets and hoard cash. (reuters.com)
  • At the University of Nevada-Reno and the Colorado School of Mines, USGS scientists used lasers to examine extensive samples of rocks and ore collected across the West during the gold rush days by geologists from Stanford University and Cal Tech. (yahoo.com)
  • Gold mines have to be surveyed approved before the project may go forward. (smore.com)
  • In total, 13 citations and two compliance orders were issued against the mines, both featured on the Discovery Channel reality series, Gold Rush . (huliq.com)
  • Across a swath of northern Nigeria, a humanitarian catastrophe is unfolding, as lead from illegal gold mines sickens thousands of children. (wwno.org)
  • The source of the lead is illegal gold mines, also called artisanal mines, which have risen in popularity as the price of gold has gone up in the past few years. (wwno.org)
  • Some gold mines halted production due to the high-risk to COVID-19 exposure, reducing the supply of gold. (visualcapitalist.com)
  • Grab your gear, Young Buck, there's gold in them hills just waitin' for you! (appbrain.com)
  • They may also progress from high-unit value to lower unit value minerals (from gold to silver to base metals). (wikipedia.org)
  • Unlike metals higher up on the table such as silver and gold, there's no good agent for dissolving elements so closely linked in atomic structure without destroying the target. (yahoo.com)
  • The actions make real assets worth more, and boosts the value of precious metals like gold and silver. (equities.com)
  • By the end of the year, Texas plans to open the nation's first state-supervised gold and silver depository, allowing ordinary Texans, as well as businesses, banks and others, to store their precious metals, and use the holdings in their account to make electronic payments. (pewtrusts.org)
  • Since 2003, lawmakers in 27 states have considered bills to recognize gold or silver coins issued by the federal government as legal tender or to authorize a precious metals bullion depository in the state, according to the National Conference of State Legislatures. (pewtrusts.org)
  • At first, the gold could be picked up from the ground but later on it was recovered from the streams and rivers with the use of pans. (historynet.com)
  • The book design highlights the relations between gold from the Great West and silver - two kinds of metallic salts used in photography. (gallery.ca)