Office Visits: Visits made by patients to health service providers' offices for diagnosis, treatment, and follow-up.Men's Health: The concept covering the physical and mental conditions of men.Child Health Services: Organized services to provide health care for children.Questionnaires: Predetermined sets of questions used to collect data - clinical data, social status, occupational group, etc. The term is often applied to a self-completed survey instrument.Cross-Sectional Studies: Studies in which the presence or absence of disease or other health-related variables are determined in each member of the study population or in a representative sample at one particular time. This contrasts with LONGITUDINAL STUDIES which are followed over a period of time.Mass Screening: Organized periodic procedures performed on large groups of people for the purpose of detecting disease.Health Status: The level of health of the individual, group, or population as subjectively assessed by the individual or by more objective measures.Primary Health Care: Care which provides integrated, accessible health care services by clinicians who are accountable for addressing a large majority of personal health care needs, developing a sustained partnership with patients, and practicing in the context of family and community. (JAMA 1995;273(3):192)Risk Factors: An aspect of personal behavior or lifestyle, environmental exposure, or inborn or inherited characteristic, which, on the basis of epidemiologic evidence, is known to be associated with a health-related condition considered important to prevent.Age Factors: Age as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or the effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from AGING, a physiological process, and TIME FACTORS which refers only to the passage of time.Public Health: Branch of medicine concerned with the prevention and control of disease and disability, and the promotion of physical and mental health of the population on the international, national, state, or municipal level.Health Care Surveys: Statistical measures of utilization and other aspects of the provision of health care services including hospitalization and ambulatory care.Prevalence: The total number of cases of a given disease in a specified population at a designated time. It is differentiated from INCIDENCE, which refers to the number of new cases in the population at a given time.Delivery of Health Care: The concept concerned with all aspects of providing and distributing health services to a patient population.Health Services Accessibility: The degree to which individuals are inhibited or facilitated in their ability to gain entry to and to receive care and services from the health care system. Factors influencing this ability include geographic, architectural, transportational, and financial considerations, among others.Health Services: Services for the diagnosis and treatment of disease and the maintenance of health.Health Policy: Decisions, usually developed by government policymakers, for determining present and future objectives pertaining to the health care system.Health Surveys: A systematic collection of factual data pertaining to health and disease in a human population within a given geographic area.Health Promotion: Encouraging consumer behaviors most likely to optimize health potentials (physical and psychosocial) through health information, preventive programs, and access to medical care.Quality of Health Care: The levels of excellence which characterize the health service or health care provided based on accepted standards of quality.Health Care Reform: Innovation and improvement of the health care system by reappraisal, amendment of services, and removal of faults and abuses in providing and distributing health services to patients. It includes a re-alignment of health services and health insurance to maximum demographic elements (the unemployed, indigent, uninsured, elderly, inner cities, rural areas) with reference to coverage, hospitalization, pricing and cost containment, insurers' and employers' costs, pre-existing medical conditions, prescribed drugs, equipment, and services.Insurance, Health: Insurance providing coverage of medical, surgical, or hospital care in general or for which there is no specific heading.Health Expenditures: The amounts spent by individuals, groups, nations, or private or public organizations for total health care and/or its various components. These amounts may or may not be equivalent to the actual costs (HEALTH CARE COSTS) and may or may not be shared among the patient, insurers, and/or employers.Mental Health: The state wherein the person is well adjusted.Ambulatory Care: Health care services provided to patients on an ambulatory basis, rather than by admission to a hospital or other health care facility. The services may be a part of a hospital, augmenting its inpatient services, or may be provided at a free-standing facility.Health Services Research: The integration of epidemiologic, sociological, economic, and other analytic sciences in the study of health services. Health services research is usually concerned with relationships between need, demand, supply, use, and outcome of health services. The aim of the research is evaluation, particularly in terms of structure, process, output, and outcome. (From Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 2d ed)United StatesHealth: The state of the organism when it functions optimally without evidence of disease.Physician-Patient Relations: The interactions between physician and patient.Attitude to Health: Public attitudes toward health, disease, and the medical care system.Health Maintenance Organizations: Organized systems for providing comprehensive prepaid health care that have five basic attributes: (1) provide care in a defined geographic area; (2) provide or ensure delivery of an agreed-upon set of basic and supplemental health maintenance and treatment services; (3) provide care to a voluntarily enrolled group of persons; (4) require their enrollees to use the services of designated providers; and (5) receive reimbursement through a predetermined, fixed, periodic prepayment made by the enrollee without regard to the degree of services provided. (From Facts on File Dictionary of Health Care Management, 1988)Physician's Practice Patterns: Patterns of practice related to diagnosis and treatment as especially influenced by cost of the service requested and provided.Patient Acceptance of Health Care: The seeking and acceptance by patients of health service.Health Planning: Planning for needed health and/or welfare services and facilities.Health Behavior: Behaviors expressed by individuals to protect, maintain or promote their health status. For example, proper diet, and appropriate exercise are activities perceived to influence health status. Life style is closely associated with health behavior and factors influencing life style are socioeconomic, educational, and cultural.Health Records, Personal: Longitudinal patient-maintained records of individual health history and tools that allow individual control of access.Health Personnel: Men and women working in the provision of health services, whether as individual practitioners or employees of health institutions and programs, whether or not professionally trained, and whether or not subject to public regulation. (From A Discursive Dictionary of Health Care, 1976)Managed Care Programs: Health insurance plans intended to reduce unnecessary health care costs through a variety of mechanisms, including: economic incentives for physicians and patients to select less costly forms of care; programs for reviewing the medical necessity of specific services; increased beneficiary cost sharing; controls on inpatient admissions and lengths of stay; the establishment of cost-sharing incentives for outpatient surgery; selective contracting with health care providers; and the intensive management of high-cost health care cases. The programs may be provided in a variety of settings, such as HEALTH MAINTENANCE ORGANIZATIONS and PREFERRED PROVIDER ORGANIZATIONS.Health Services Needs and Demand: Health services required by a population or community as well as the health services that the population or community is able and willing to pay for.Practice Management, Medical: The organization and operation of the business aspects of a physician's practice.World Health: The concept pertaining to the health status of inhabitants of the world.Health Education: Education that increases the awareness and favorably influences the attitudes and knowledge relating to the improvement of health on a personal or community basis.Insurance Claim Reporting: The design, completion, and filing of forms with the insurer.Oral Health: The optimal state of the mouth and normal functioning of the organs of the mouth without evidence of disease.Electronic Health Records: Media that facilitate transportability of pertinent information concerning patient's illness across varied providers and geographic locations. Some versions include direct linkages to online consumer health information that is relevant to the health conditions and treatments related to a specific patient.Attitude of Health Personnel: Attitudes of personnel toward their patients, other professionals, toward the medical care system, etc.Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice: Knowledge, attitudes, and associated behaviors which pertain to health-related topics such as PATHOLOGIC PROCESSES or diseases, their prevention, and treatment. This term refers to non-health workers and health workers (HEALTH PERSONNEL).Outcome Assessment (Health Care): Research aimed at assessing the quality and effectiveness of health care as measured by the attainment of a specified end result or outcome. Measures include parameters such as improved health, lowered morbidity or mortality, and improvement of abnormal states (such as elevated blood pressure).Preventive Health Services: Services designed for HEALTH PROMOTION and prevention of disease.Public Health Administration: Management of public health organizations or agencies.Cost Sharing: Provisions of an insurance policy that require the insured to pay some portion of covered expenses. Several forms of sharing are in use, e.g., deductibles, coinsurance, and copayments. Cost sharing does not refer to or include amounts paid in premiums for the coverage. (From Dictionary of Health Services Management, 2d ed)Occupational Health: The promotion and maintenance of physical and mental health in the work environment.Patient Access to Records: The freedom of patients to review their own medical, genetic, or other health-related records.Patient Satisfaction: The degree to which the individual regards the health care service or product or the manner in which it is delivered by the provider as useful, effective, or beneficial.Socioeconomic Factors: Social and economic factors that characterize the individual or group within the social structure.Preferred Provider Organizations: Arrangements negotiated between a third-party payer (often a self-insured company or union trust fund) and a group of health-care providers (hospitals and physicians) who furnish services at lower than usual fees, and, in return, receive prompt payment and an expectation of an increased volume of patients.TennesseeTime Management: Planning and control of time to improve efficiency and effectiveness.Insurance, Health, Reimbursement: Payment by a third-party payer in a sum equal to the amount expended by a health care provider or facility for health services rendered to an insured or program beneficiary. (From Facts on File Dictionary of Health Care Management, 1988)Family Practice: A medical specialty concerned with the provision of continuing, comprehensive primary health care for the entire family.Environmental Health: The science of controlling or modifying those conditions, influences, or forces surrounding man which relate to promoting, establishing, and maintaining health.Health Status Disparities: Variation in rates of disease occurrence and disabilities between population groups defined by socioeconomic characteristics such as age, ethnicity, economic resources, or gender and populations identified geographically or similar measures.Dental Offices: The room or rooms in which the dentist and dental staff provide care. Offices include all rooms in the dentist's office suite.National Health Programs: Components of a national health care system which administer specific services, e.g., national health insurance.Retrospective Studies: Studies used to test etiologic hypotheses in which inferences about an exposure to putative causal factors are derived from data relating to characteristics of persons under study or to events or experiences in their past. The essential feature is that some of the persons under study have the disease or outcome of interest and their characteristics are compared with those of unaffected persons.Mental Health Services: Organized services to provide mental health care.Delivery of Health Care, Integrated: A health care system which combines physicians, hospitals, and other medical services with a health plan to provide the complete spectrum of medical care for its customers. In a fully integrated system, the three key elements - physicians, hospital, and health plan membership - are in balance in terms of matching medical resources with the needs of purchasers and patients. (Coddington et al., Integrated Health Care: Reorganizing the Physician, Hospital and Health Plan Relationship, 1994, p7)Pediatrics: A medical specialty concerned with maintaining health and providing medical care to children from birth to adolescence.Health Care Rationing: Planning for the equitable allocation, apportionment, or distribution of available health resources.Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Public Health Practice: The activities and endeavors of the public health services in a community on any level.Medicine: The art and science of studying, performing research on, preventing, diagnosing, and treating disease, as well as the maintenance of health.Community Health Services: Diagnostic, therapeutic and preventive health services provided for individuals in the community.Drug Costs: The amount that a health care institution or organization pays for its drugs. It is one component of the final price that is charged to the consumer (FEES, PHARMACEUTICAL or PRESCRIPTION FEES).Health Priorities: Preferentially rated health-related activities or functions to be used in establishing health planning goals. This may refer specifically to PL93-641.Physicians' Offices: The room or rooms in which the physician and staff provide patient care. The offices include all rooms in the physician's office suite.Rural Health: The status of health in rural populations.Physicians: Individuals licensed to practice medicine.Women's Health: The concept covering the physical and mental conditions of women.Specialization: An occupation limited in scope to a subsection of a broader field.Drug Utilization: The utilization of drugs as reported in individual hospital studies, FDA studies, marketing, or consumption, etc. This includes drug stockpiling, and patient drug profiles.Urban Health: The status of health in urban populations.Communication: The exchange or transmission of ideas, attitudes, or beliefs between individuals or groups.Health Care Sector: Economic sector concerned with the provision, distribution, and consumption of health care services and related products.Logistic Models: Statistical models which describe the relationship between a qualitative dependent variable (that is, one which can take only certain discrete values, such as the presence or absence of a disease) and an independent variable. A common application is in epidemiology for estimating an individual's risk (probability of a disease) as a function of a given risk factor.Patient Education as Topic: The teaching or training of patients concerning their own health needs.Insurance Claim Review: Review of claims by insurance companies to determine liability and amount of payment for various services. The review may also include determination of eligibility of the claimant or beneficiary or of the provider of the benefit; determination that the benefit is covered or not payable under another policy; or determination that the service was necessary and of reasonable cost and quality.World Health Organization: A specialized agency of the United Nations designed as a coordinating authority on international health work; its aim is to promote the attainment of the highest possible level of health by all peoples.Rural Health Services: Health services, public or private, in rural areas. The services include the promotion of health and the delivery of health care.Medicaid: Federal program, created by Public Law 89-97, Title XIX, a 1965 amendment to the Social Security Act, administered by the states, that provides health care benefits to indigent and medically indigent persons.Health Literacy: Degree to which individuals have the capacity to obtain, process, and understand basic health information and services needed to make appropriate health decisions.Electronic Mail: Messages between computer users via COMPUTER COMMUNICATION NETWORKS. This feature duplicates most of the features of paper mail, such as forwarding, multiple copies, and attachments of images and other file types, but with a speed advantage. The term also refers to an individual message sent in this way.District of Columbia: A federal area located between Maryland and Virginia on the Potomac river; it is coextensive with Washington, D.C., which is the capital of the United States.Prospective Studies: Observation of a population for a sufficient number of persons over a sufficient number of years to generate incidence or mortality rates subsequent to the selection of the study group.Infant, Newborn: An infant during the first month after birth.Counseling: The giving of advice and assistance to individuals with educational or personal problems.Physicians, Primary Care: Providers of initial care for patients. These PHYSICIANS refer patients when appropriate for secondary or specialist care.Health Facilities: Institutions which provide medical or health-related services.Office Automation: Use of computers or computer systems for doing routine clerical work, e.g., billing, records pertaining to the administration of the office, etc.Community Health Centers: Facilities which administer the delivery of health care services to people living in a community or neighborhood.Quality Assurance, Health Care: Activities and programs intended to assure or improve the quality of care in either a defined medical setting or a program. The concept includes the assessment or evaluation of the quality of care; identification of problems or shortcomings in the delivery of care; designing activities to overcome these deficiencies; and follow-up monitoring to ensure effectiveness of corrective steps.Drug Prescriptions: Directions written for the obtaining and use of DRUGS.Cost-Benefit Analysis: A method of comparing the cost of a program with its expected benefits in dollars (or other currency). The benefit-to-cost ratio is a measure of total return expected per unit of money spent. This analysis generally excludes consideration of factors that are not measured ultimately in economic terms. Cost effectiveness compares alternative ways to achieve a specific set of results.Diagnosis-Related Groups: A system for classifying patient care by relating common characteristics such as diagnosis, treatment, and age to an expected consumption of hospital resources and length of stay. Its purpose is to provide a framework for specifying case mix and to reduce hospital costs and reimbursements and it forms the cornerstone of the prospective payment system.Outpatients: Persons who receive ambulatory care at an outpatient department or clinic without room and board being provided.Office Management: Planning, organizing, and administering activities in an office.Follow-Up Studies: Studies in which individuals or populations are followed to assess the outcome of exposures, procedures, or effects of a characteristic, e.g., occurrence of disease.Costs and Cost Analysis: Absolute, comparative, or differential costs pertaining to services, institutions, resources, etc., or the analysis and study of these costs.Community Health Planning: Planning that has the goals of improving health, improving accessibility to health services, and promoting efficiency in the provision of services and resources on a comprehensive basis for a whole community. (From Facts on File Dictionary of Health Care Management, 1988, p299)Health Resources: Available manpower, facilities, revenue, equipment, and supplies to produce requisite health care and services.Cohort Studies: Studies in which subsets of a defined population are identified. These groups may or may not be exposed to factors hypothesized to influence the probability of the occurrence of a particular disease or other outcome. Cohorts are defined populations which, as a whole, are followed in an attempt to determine distinguishing subgroup characteristics.Health Care Costs: The actual costs of providing services related to the delivery of health care, including the costs of procedures, therapies, and medications. It is differentiated from HEALTH EXPENDITURES, which refers to the amount of money paid for the services, and from fees, which refers to the amount charged, regardless of cost.Referral and Consultation: The practice of sending a patient to another program or practitioner for services or advice which the referring source is not prepared to provide.Regional Health Planning: Planning for health resources at a regional or multi-state level.Medical Records Systems, Computerized: Computer-based systems for input, storage, display, retrieval, and printing of information contained in a patient's medical record.Medicare: Federal program, created by Public Law 89-97, Title XVIII-Health Insurance for the Aged, a 1965 amendment to the Social Security Act, that provides health insurance benefits to persons over the age of 65 and others eligible for Social Security benefits. It consists of two separate but coordinated programs: hospital insurance (MEDICARE PART A) and supplementary medical insurance (MEDICARE PART B). (Hospital Administration Terminology, AHA, 2d ed and A Discursive Dictionary of Health Care, US House of Representatives, 1976)Patient Compliance: Voluntary cooperation of the patient in following a prescribed regimen.Pilot Projects: Small-scale tests of methods and procedures to be used on a larger scale if the pilot study demonstrates that these methods and procedures can work.Hospitalization: The confinement of a patient in a hospital.Health Manpower: The availability of HEALTH PERSONNEL. It includes the demand and recruitment of both professional and allied health personnel, their present and future supply and distribution, and their assignment and utilization.OhioTreatment Outcome: Evaluation undertaken to assess the results or consequences of management and procedures used in combating disease in order to determine the efficacy, effectiveness, safety, and practicability of these interventions in individual cases or series.Guideline Adherence: Conformity in fulfilling or following official, recognized, or institutional requirements, guidelines, recommendations, protocols, pathways, or other standards.Public Health Nursing: A nursing specialty concerned with promoting and protecting the health of populations, using knowledge from nursing, social, and public health sciences to develop local, regional, state, and national health policy and research. It is population-focused and community-oriented, aimed at health promotion and disease prevention through educational, diagnostic, and preventive programs.Maternal Health Services: Organized services to provide health care to expectant and nursing mothers.Physicians, Family: Those physicians who have completed the education requirements specified by the American Academy of Family Physicians.Regression Analysis: Procedures for finding the mathematical function which best describes the relationship between a dependent variable and one or more independent variables. In linear regression (see LINEAR MODELS) the relationship is constrained to be a straight line and LEAST-SQUARES ANALYSIS is used to determine the best fit. In logistic regression (see LOGISTIC MODELS) the dependent variable is qualitative rather than continuously variable and LIKELIHOOD FUNCTIONS are used to find the best relationship. In multiple regression, the dependent variable is considered to depend on more than a single independent variable.Physician's Role: The expected function of a member of the medical profession.Health Benefit Plans, Employee: Health insurance plans for employees, and generally including their dependents, usually on a cost-sharing basis with the employer paying a percentage of the premium.Insurance, Pharmaceutical Services: Insurance providing for payment of services rendered by the pharmacist. Services include the preparation and distribution of medical products.Physical Examination: Systematic and thorough inspection of the patient for physical signs of disease or abnormality.Interviews as Topic: Conversations with an individual or individuals held in order to obtain information about their background and other personal biographical data, their attitudes and opinions, etc. It includes school admission or job interviews.Practice Guidelines as Topic: Directions or principles presenting current or future rules of policy for assisting health care practitioners in patient care decisions regarding diagnosis, therapy, or related clinical circumstances. The guidelines may be developed by government agencies at any level, institutions, professional societies, governing boards, or by the convening of expert panels. The guidelines form a basis for the evaluation of all aspects of health care and delivery.Occupational Health Services: Health services for employees, usually provided by the employer at the place of work.Patient Participation: Patient involvement in the decision-making process in matters pertaining to health.Reproductive Health: The physical condition of human reproductive systems.Health Occupations: Professions or other business activities directed to the cure and prevention of disease. For occupations of medical personnel who are not physicians but who are working in the fields of medical technology, physical therapy, etc., ALLIED HEALTH OCCUPATIONS is available.Emergency Service, Hospital: Hospital department responsible for the administration and provision of immediate medical or surgical care to the emergency patient.Population Surveillance: Ongoing scrutiny of a population (general population, study population, target population, etc.), generally using methods distinguished by their practicability, uniformity, and frequently their rapidity, rather than by complete accuracy.Health Services for the Aged: Services for the diagnosis and treatment of diseases in the aged and the maintenance of health in the elderly.Great BritainDecision Making: The process of making a selective intellectual judgment when presented with several complex alternatives consisting of several variables, and usually defining a course of action or an idea.Internal Medicine: A medical specialty concerned with the diagnosis and treatment of diseases of the internal organ systems of adults.Urban Health Services: Health services, public or private, in urban areas. The services include the promotion of health and the delivery of health care.National Institutes of Health (U.S.): An operating division of the US Department of Health and Human Services. It is concerned with the overall planning, promoting, and administering of programs pertaining to health and medical research. Until 1995, it was an agency of the United States PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE.Outcome and Process Assessment (Health Care): Evaluation procedures that focus on both the outcome or status (OUTCOMES ASSESSMENT) of the patient at the end of an episode of care - presence of symptoms, level of activity, and mortality; and the process (ASSESSMENT, PROCESS) - what is done for the patient diagnostically and therapeutically.Pregnancy: The status during which female mammals carry their developing young (EMBRYOS or FETUSES) in utero before birth, beginning from FERTILIZATION to BIRTH.Quality Indicators, Health Care: Norms, criteria, standards, and other direct qualitative and quantitative measures used in determining the quality of health care.State Health Plans: State plans prepared by the State Health Planning and Development Agencies which are made up from plans submitted by the Health Systems Agencies and subject to review and revision by the Statewide Health Coordinating Council.Quality of Life: A generic concept reflecting concern with the modification and enhancement of life attributes, e.g., physical, political, moral and social environment; the overall condition of a human life.Data Collection: Systematic gathering of data for a particular purpose from various sources, including questionnaires, interviews, observation, existing records, and electronic devices. The process is usually preliminary to statistical analysis of the data.Public Health Informatics: The systematic application of information and computer sciences to public health practice, research, and learning.Poverty: A situation in which the level of living of an individual, family, or group is below the standard of the community. It is often related to a specific income level.Catchment Area (Health): A geographic area defined and served by a health program or institution.Sex Factors: Maleness or femaleness as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from SEX CHARACTERISTICS, anatomical or physiological manifestations of sex, and from SEX DISTRIBUTION, the number of males and females in given circumstances.Program Evaluation: Studies designed to assess the efficacy of programs. They may include the evaluation of cost-effectiveness, the extent to which objectives are met, or impact.Diagnostic Tests, Routine: Diagnostic procedures, such as laboratory tests and x-rays, routinely performed on all individuals or specified categories of individuals in a specified situation, e.g., patients being admitted to the hospital. These include routine tests administered to neonates.Longitudinal Studies: Studies in which variables relating to an individual or group of individuals are assessed over a period of time.Politics: Activities concerned with governmental policies, functions, etc.Health Plan Implementation: Those actions designed to carry out recommendations pertaining to health plans or programs.Mental Disorders: Psychiatric illness or diseases manifested by breakdowns in the adaptational process expressed primarily as abnormalities of thought, feeling, and behavior producing either distress or impairment of function.Rural Population: The inhabitants of rural areas or of small towns classified as rural.Chronic Disease: Diseases which have one or more of the following characteristics: they are permanent, leave residual disability, are caused by nonreversible pathological alteration, require special training of the patient for rehabilitation, or may be expected to require a long period of supervision, observation, or care. (Dictionary of Health Services Management, 2d ed)United States Dept. of Health and Human Services: A cabinet department in the Executive Branch of the United States Government concerned with administering those agencies and offices having programs pertaining to health and human services.Women's Health Services: Organized services to provide health care to women. It excludes maternal care services for which MATERNAL HEALTH SERVICES is available.Healthcare Disparities: Differences in access to or availability of medical facilities and services.Health Services Administration: The organization and administration of health services dedicated to the delivery of health care.Insurance Coverage: Generally refers to the amount of protection available and the kind of loss which would be paid for under an insurance contract with an insurer. (Slee & Slee, Health Care Terms, 2d ed)Reproducibility of Results: The statistical reproducibility of measurements (often in a clinical context), including the testing of instrumentation or techniques to obtain reproducible results. The concept includes reproducibility of physiological measurements, which may be used to develop rules to assess probability or prognosis, or response to a stimulus; reproducibility of occurrence of a condition; and reproducibility of experimental results.Reproductive Health Services: Health care services related to human REPRODUCTION and diseases of the reproductive system. Services are provided to both sexes and usually by physicians in the medical or the surgical specialties such as REPRODUCTIVE MEDICINE; ANDROLOGY; GYNECOLOGY; OBSTETRICS; and PERINATOLOGY.Workplace: Place or physical location of work or employment.EnglandHypertension: Persistently high systemic arterial BLOOD PRESSURE. Based on multiple readings (BLOOD PRESSURE DETERMINATION), hypertension is currently defined as when SYSTOLIC PRESSURE is consistently greater than 140 mm Hg or when DIASTOLIC PRESSURE is consistently 90 mm Hg or more.Needs Assessment: Systematic identification of a population's needs or the assessment of individuals to determine the proper level of services needed.Family Health: The health status of the family as a unit including the impact of the health of one member of the family on the family as a unit and on individual family members; also, the impact of family organization or disorganization on the health status of its members.Health Services, Indigenous: Health care provided to specific cultural or tribal peoples which incorporates local customs, beliefs, and taboos.Ambulatory Care Facilities: Those facilities which administer health services to individuals who do not require hospitalization or institutionalization.Qualitative Research: Any type of research that employs nonnumeric information to explore individual or group characteristics, producing findings not arrived at by statistical procedures or other quantitative means. (Qualitative Inquiry: A Dictionary of Terms Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications, 1997)Ontario: A province of Canada lying between the provinces of Manitoba and Quebec. Its capital is Toronto. It takes its name from Lake Ontario which is said to represent the Iroquois oniatariio, beautiful lake. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p892 & Room, Brewer's Dictionary of Names, 1992, p391)Urban Population: The inhabitants of a city or town, including metropolitan areas and suburban areas.Decision Support Techniques: Mathematical or statistical procedures used as aids in making a decision. They are frequently used in medical decision-making.Health Care Coalitions: Voluntary groups of people representing diverse interests in the community such as hospitals, businesses, physicians, and insurers, with the principal objective to improve health care cost effectiveness.Government Agencies: Administrative units of government responsible for policy making and management of governmental activities.Educational Status: Educational attainment or level of education of individuals.Health Planning Guidelines: Recommendations for directing health planning functions and policies. These may be mandated by PL93-641 and issued by the Department of Health and Human Services for use by state and local planning agencies.Allied Health Personnel: Health care workers specially trained and licensed to assist and support the work of health professionals. Often used synonymously with paramedical personnel, the term generally refers to all health care workers who perform tasks which must otherwise be performed by a physician or other health professional.Program Development: The process of formulating, improving, and expanding educational, managerial, or service-oriented work plans (excluding computer program development).Incidence: The number of new cases of a given disease during a given period in a specified population. It also is used for the rate at which new events occur in a defined population. It is differentiated from PREVALENCE, which refers to all cases, new or old, in the population at a given time.House Calls: Visits to the patient's home by professional personnel for the purpose of diagnosis and/or treatment.Consumer Participation: Community or individual involvement in the decision-making process.School Health Services: Preventive health services provided for students. It excludes college or university students.Comprehensive Health Care: Providing for the full range of personal health services for diagnosis, treatment, follow-up and rehabilitation of patients.Community Mental Health Services: Diagnostic, therapeutic and preventive mental health services provided for individuals in the community.Travel: Aspects of health and disease related to travel.Policy Making: The decision process by which individuals, groups or institutions establish policies pertaining to plans, programs or procedures.Social Justice: An interactive process whereby members of a community are concerned for the equality and rights of all.Outpatient Clinics, Hospital: Organized services in a hospital which provide medical care on an outpatient basis.Adolescent Health Services: Organized services to provide health care to adolescents, ages ranging from 13 through 18 years.Social Class: A stratum of people with similar position and prestige; includes social stratification. Social class is measured by criteria such as education, occupation, and income.Health Planning Support: Financial resources provided for activities related to health planning and development.Occupational Diseases: Diseases caused by factors involved in one's employment.
The Department of Veterans Affairs' Office of Patient Care Services has a Primary Care Program Office that has implemented a ... and issues prompts reminding doctors to make routine checks. This technology has helped the VHA achieve cost controls and care ... Patients have a home page that have boxes for allergies and medications, records every visit, call and note, ... Adult Day Health Care. The adult day health care (ADHC) program is a therapeutic day care program, providing medical and ...
People may request modesty in medical settings when the health care provider examines them. ... or needing additional office visits. The study found no effect on the risk of illness, but did find evidence suggesting that ... Routine physicals[edit]. Routine physicals are physical examinations performed on asymptomatic patients for medical screening ... General health checks, including physical examinations performed when the patient reported no health concerns, often include ...
In addition to diagnosing and treating illness, they also provide preventive care, including routine checkups, health-risk ... nearly one in four of all office visits are made to family physicians. That is 208 million office visits each year - nearly 83 ... Family practice is a division of primary care that provides continuing and comprehensive health care for the individual and ... Family medicine (FM), formerly family practice (FP), is a specialty devoted to comprehensive health care for people of all ages ...
... established its own Office of Women's Health (OWH), which was formally authorised by the 2010 Affordable Health Care Act (ACA). ... Improvements in maternal health, in addition to professional assistance at delivery, will require routine antenatal care, basic ... This is despite the WHO setting standards, such as a minimum of four antenatal visits.[178] A lack of healthcare providers, ... Women also need health care more and access the health care system more than do men. While part of this is due to their ...
Visits [Health Affairs, September 2008] Health Care in the Express Lane: The Emergence of Retail Clinics (California HealthCare ... 95 in doctor's office, $135 at urgent care, $184 in an emergency room.[Dead link] A 2015 Report released by Manatt and the ... the reduced cost of retail settings is a viable option for routine care. For example, according to one analysis, the typical ... Walk-In Health Care" Healthcare 311 - Searchable database of US retail clinics Healthcare 311 News - Healthcare 311 publisher's ...
Women in this study also visited the health care facility more often than their male counterparts and reported being healthy ... In these cases, routine GYN care falls to the general nurse practitioner or Medical Director. In addition to the lack of staff ... To have a man take us into an office the size of a closet... stripped down... [it's] rough and hurts us... it takes us right ... There is also a trend towards privatizing health care by hiring outside, for-profit health care companies to provide medical ...
Doctor's visit / Nursing Philosophy of healthcare Community health service / Community health centers in the United States ... or bill for each service in the office. Examples of direct primary care practices include Foundation Health in Colorado and ... as patients usually prefer to consult the same practitioner for routine check-ups and preventive care, health education, and ... Health care reform in the United States / Unnecessary health care Health insurance / Insurance / Right to health /Social health ...
David Lawder, Budget office says GOP health care plan would leave millions uninsured, Reuters (March 13, 2017). Alexander ... he never would have made had he not had health insurance at the time. As a result of the visit and the early detection, King ... In 1973, when he was 29, King was diagnosed with an aggressive form of malignant melanoma during a routine doctor's appointment ... federal dollars pay for other health care services provided by the group, such as contraception and screenings for cancer and ...
In addition to revising the city's health code, she also implemented routine inspections of the city's many restaurant kitchens ... slaughterhouses and day-care facilities. She was instrumental in garnering funding for public health research and a premature ... It was during this time, in depression-era New York, that Baumgartner began making home visits in the city's poorest areas. In ... In 1962, she was appointed by President John F. Kennedy to head the Office of Technical Cooperation and Research at the United ...
In 2004, Jones was visiting with some children in the Nyalenda slum in Kisumu, Kenya, where they asked him if he would wear ... "CRF Medical Care". CRF. Retrieved 10 October 2016. "ECFA". ECFA. Retrieved 18 October 2016. "CRF Clean Water". CRF. Retrieved ... Through various medical clinics worldwide, CRF provides healthcare, and in many of these areas, the CRF clinics are the only ... he was swept back into his daily routine. Some time later, Baxter remembered his promise to John and called for information on ...
When Kevin leaves his only pair of shoes in the care of hotel staff, the management decides to incinerate them as a health ... Michael later visits Meemaw in her hotel room. Despite his indelicate approach to the subject of sex, he establishes an instant ... The guests interrupt the ceremony by recreating the dance routines featured in the JK Wedding Entrance Dance. Jim and Pam react ... "The Office wedding episode Q&A with Mindy Kaling". OfficeTally. Retrieved December 14, 2010. "The Office wedding episode Q&A ...
... to be seen at doctor's offices or private clinics while a large percentage depend on emergency rooms and urgent care visits.[ ... "Office of Mine Safety and Health Research, National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health. 28 October 2014. Retrieved 5 ... there are many parking restrictions and safety concerns in trying to incorporate exercise into the daily routine.[103] ... Health care costs are substantially higher for overweight and obese individuals, so obesity in the truck driver population puts ...
"Medical Care During Pregnancy". Kids Health from Nemours. Retrieved April 1, 2012. Health Care Guideline: Routine Prenatal Care ... The Office of Minority Health. "Health Status of African American Women". U.S. Department of Health & Human Services. The ... Monthly visits to a health care professional for weeks 1 through 28 -(up to month 6) Visits twice a month from 28 to 36 weeks ... Unless otherwise given in boxes, reference for prenatal care schedule is:Health Care Guideline: Routine Prenatal Care. ...
... still is no conclusive evidence that a temporary rise in blood pressure during office visits has an adverse effect on health. ... These methods often involve an interface with health care professionals and frequently results are tarnished by a list of ... despite taking into account stresses of everyday life when taken during the patient's daily routine, are still susceptible to ... "A survey showed that 96% of primary care physicians habitually use a cuff size too small," adding to the difficulty in making ...
... and health care executive Bradley King. SIB promotes an upbeat and informal office culture. One longstanding company policy ... By settling into the routine of leaving home and visiting a working environment every day, Schneider hatched the idea of a ... "New office design boosting employee morale". WCSC. Retrieved 25 March 2014. Bowers, Paul. "The $50,000 Five-Year Bonus". ... SIB employs analysts who conduct reviews in its Charleston, SC office, but also employs specialists with industry-specific ...
New child care and Maternity center where Dr. Harsh Jain (Deputed by Govt.)and his team was acknowledged for treating 10,716, ... Separate Pay & Accounts Office has been sanctioned by the Government exclusively for the High Court on its premises. ... Facilitated educational visits of eminent international scholars. During his tenure students from renowned university of United ... He has broadly categorized his scope of work beyond the routine set of functions and activities which are regularly organised ...
Health Care Guideline: Routine Prenatal Care. Fourteenth Edition. By the Institute for Clinical Systems Improvement July 2010. ... Also, many physicians will do the pre-conception screening during a regular office visit or gynecological visit if the woman ... Pre-conception counseling is a meeting with a health-care professional (generally a physician or midwife) by a woman before ... It is recommended to screen for domestic violence at a preconception visit, because domestic violence during pregnancy a risk ...
In 2013, the Florida Agency for Health Care Administration concluded in a routine audit that Sharief's firm overbilled Medicaid ... The agreement says her "mistakes were unintentional." The Office of the State Attorney also cleared Sharief of any wrongdoing ... While Sharief has stated that she has not visited a mosque since she was a teenager, she considers her position as Broward ... an amount that includes the Medicaid overcharges as well as additional fines and costs According to the Agency for Health Care ...
Modernizing a Pediatric Health Policy to Reflect a Changing Health Care System. Center for Health Care Strategies. 2008. Olson ... and routine communication can assist providers in delivering high-quality well-child visits financed through EPSDT, as well as ... U.S. Government Accountability Office (GAO). Stronger Efforts Needed to Ensure Children's Access to Health Screening Services ... Providing health care for low-income children: reconciling child health goals with child health financing realities. Milbank ...
During her undergraduate studies she held internships at UNICEF in New York City and travelled to learn about the health care ... Protesting students noted that Liberi visited them and said she had raised their plight with the local government. However, she ... In spring 2015, there were protests over President Pierre Nkurunziza's bid for third term in office. ... Fear and Uncertainty Become Routine as an Election Nears in Burundi The New York Times, June 26, 2015 [U.S. to review Burundi ...
... a nurse assistant and two primary health care workers. The current Director of Health is Dr. Nese Ituaso-Conway (MBBS (Fiji); ... It offers basic routine medical, surgical, obstetric and gynaecologic services. There is also an Intensive Care Unit (ICU), a ... Visiting surgical teams performed 29% of these procedures. Fifty percent of the procedures related to obstetrical and ... Lambert, Sylvester M. "Office and Dispensary, Funafuti". Special Collections & Archives, UC San Diego. Retrieved 25 January ...
The company's successes on the state level include landmark legislation in health care, especially diabetes and chronic health ... He also proposed One-Stop business licensing through the Corporations Filing Office of the Office of Secretary of State, an ... Babbage initiated the idea of organizing a visit by Kentucky leaders to Washington, D.C. for meetings with the state's ... Babbage established guidelines and procedures for routine audits of the Lottery. In 2014 the Kentucky Lottery had total sales ...
He settled on a large farm in Kinderhook, New York where he was often visited by his nephews Christopher, Tony S, and Tony B ... However, when Tony oversees the completion of the job, the two Tonys fall back into their old routine of picking on Chris. He ... Afterwards, Tony is remorseful, and gives Paulie a wad of bills and insists that he make sure Georgie receives the best care. ... Tony S and Tony B's uncle who was given an early retirement from the DiMeo crime family because of health issues. ...
"Obama returns to Iowa to sell merits of health care law". USA Today. Retrieved 25 March 2010. "Obama makes unannounced visit to ... Lawrence K. Altman & Jeff Zeleny (March 1, 2010). "President in 'Excellent Health,' Routine Checkup Finds". New York Times. CS1 ... Remarks by the President on the Economy, White House Office of the Press Secretary (May 13, 2010). "Remarks by the President at ... Obama's Health Care Push Is Personal". The New York Times. Retrieved 15 March 2010. "Obama lobbies hard on eve of health vote ...
... and in children's access to health care, education, and proper nutrition. Paraguay is a signatory of the 1980 Hague Convention ... Certain prisoners demand bribes from visitors in order to arrange contact with the inmates they are visiting. As of 2010. about ... The committee also expressed concern that the office of ombudsman had insufficient resources, and called on Paraguay to "equip ... The report refers to "routine incidents of police involvement in homicide, arms and narcotics trafficking, car theft, robbery, ...
In fact, it isn't even at the bottom of the NU.nl homepage, which is the most-visited news site of our country (and voted to be ... He wouldn't meet criteria A (in a high ranking office of power at the time of death) and B (a key figure in their field of ... He was a) not in power at the time of his death, b) not really sudden or tragic (being 93, and having health problems for the ... But, if no one from East and Southeast Asia care enough about this, this name change should not be on ITN. --PFHLai 14:34, 18 ...
Office visit (for routine or preventive care). These costs reflect data from HealthPartners, Blue Cross Blue Shield, ... Care. Were in the process of creating a new website. Visit the site to learn more about everyday care - routine physicals, ... Care. Were in the process of creating a new website. Visit the site to learn more about specialty care - the expertise we ... For example, lets say you go to the doctor for a routine preventive care visit. While youre there, you ask the doctor to look ...
Office visit (for routine or preventive care). These costs reflect data from HealthPartners, Blue Cross Blue Shield, ... For example, lets say you go to the doctor for a routine preventive care visit. While youre there, you ask the doctor to look ... She has a $25 copay for office visits, so that is what shell pay for this visit. ... Office visit for new patients. Description. CPT. Average. Range. Medicare. MHCP. Self-Pay. ...
Encourage patients and health care professionals to discuss SCD during routine medical office visits. ... Educate the public and health care professionals about brain health and the burden of SCD. ... Researchers have found that few adults with SCD discussed their confusion or memory loss with a health care professional.7-9 In ... The percentage of those who discussed SCD with a health care professional varies by race and ethnicity. Among Whites, 46.0% ...
Periodic, preferably annually, at time of routine preventative care or health assessment; ... Office measurement; Diagnosis based on at least 2 readings at 2 separate visits; Consider home blood pressure monitoring or 24 ... Summary health statistics for U.S. adults: National Health Interview Survey, 2008. Vital Health Stat 10. 2009 Dec. No. 242:1- ... Office measurement;. Diagnosis based on 2 readings at 2 separate visits; For patients where diagnosis remains uncertain, home ...
See the cost of care for procedures at Park Nicollet clinics. Then use information from your insurance plan to estimate the ... Office visit (for routine or preventive care) These costs reflect data from HealthPartners, Blue Cross Blue Shield, ... MHCP: If you have insurance from a Minnesota Health Care Program (MHCP) from the state of Minnesota, this is the most youll ... Cost of Care at Park Nicollet Clinics. Our Know Your Cost team members walk you through the cost of office visits surgical ...
... a little education and access to health information as part of workplace wellness efforts can mitigate the need to visit a ... Is Self-Care the New Health Care? Many minor, routine conditions dont require a doctors visit ... Ten percent of visits to the doctors office are unnecessary, according to the Consumer Healthcare Products Association (CHPA ... Self-care is defined by the World Health Organization as "personal health maintenance to improve or restore health and to treat ...
The big bucks are in triple coronary bypass surgery, not routine visits to the doctors office; and very, very few people can ... I can to the same realization about health care a long time ago. When you need health care in an emergency there is no such ... The reason why there is price discrimination in health care is that health care has so much variety to it, and is not just one ... How do we pay for everyones health care needs.. Free markets work well for commodities. Health care is not a commodity. We ...
The health care provider usually finds an increased head size in a baby during a routine well-baby exam. ... What to Expect at Your Office Visit. A careful physical exam will be done. Other milestones for growth and development will be ... U.S. National Library of Medicine 8600 Rockville Pike, Bethesda, MD 20894 U.S. Department of Health and Human Services National ... A.D.A.M. is among the first to achieve this important distinction for online health information and services. Learn more about ...
Most often, microcephaly is diagnosed at birth or during routine well-baby exams. Talk to your health care provider if you ... What to Expect at Your Office Visit. Most of the time, microcephaly is discovered during a routine exam. Head measurements are ... U.S. National Library of Medicine 8600 Rockville Pike, Bethesda, MD 20894 U.S. Department of Health and Human Services National ... A.D.A.M. is among the first to achieve this important distinction for online health information and services. Learn more about ...
We recommend that our patients keep their scheduled clinic appointments and do not postpone their care, unless recommended by ... is continuing to provide care for our patients. ... We have taken unprecedented steps to ensure office visits and ... Most routine lab testing and radiology exams can be scheduled and performed. Our clinicians are available during normal clinic ... Safe Care Commitment:Expert care during COVID-19; In-person and virtual visits.Learn more ...
Routine office visits for ongoing training and assurance of contractual compliance. *Annual seminars on general and specific ... Health Programs for Members * Resources & Guidelines * Health Care Performance Measures * Health Care Fraud and Abuse ... Routine correspondence and communication. Interested in joining our network? Contact our Provider Relations department at 888- ... Delivering quality medical services to our members is the hallmark of Johns Hopkins HealthCare LLC (JHHC), and we rely on our ...
... and records of routine hospital visits.. As of November 2016, DeepMind and the Trust have replaced the old agreement with a new ... belief has taken hold in some parts of the health and care system that if you believe what you are doing is direct care, you ... The original deal is being investigated by the Information Commissioners Office (ICO), which has yet to report any findings ... Although direct care would clearly apply to those monitored for AKI, the records that DeepMind received covered every other ...
There are now enough studies identifying the obesity-cancer link for it to be discussed during routine office visits. Any ... CaregivingFood & NutritionFitness & ExerciseHealth Care & InsuranceMens HealthWomens Health. RESOURCES. Coronavirus (COVID-19 ... Remedy Health Media, LLC ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. Remedy Health Media SitesPrivacy PolicyTerms of UseDo Not Sell My InfoSecurity ... HEALTH CONDITIONS & TOPICS. Bipolar DisorderBreast CancerCancerCrohns DiseaseDepressionDiabetesMenopauseMultiple Sclerosis ...
Routine Checkups. All children need early and regular dental care. During well-child visits the doctor will check your childs ... Some parents dread their childs first visit to the dentists office. You can make a trip to the dentist more positive for your ... As an Adventist health care organization, Adventist HealthCare acts in accordance with the ethical and religious directives for ... For more information on routine checkups and tooth care, see the topics Basic Dental Care and Tooth Decay. ...
These recommendations are intended for children receiving appropriate care from parents and with no health problems whose ... has updated its recommendations for preventive pediatric health care (Periodicity Schedule). ... Screening for maternal depression is recommended during office visits at one, two, four, and six months postpartum. ... Routine depression screening is now recommended starting at 12 years of age, matching guidance from the U.S. Preventive ...
The nurse can answer your questions and may save you a visit to an emergency room or urgent care center in the middle of the ... Boston Childrens Health Physicians. Administrative Offices. 40 Sunshine Cottage Road. Skyline Suite 1N-C26. Valhalla, NY 10595 ... Questions about routine appointments and prescription refills will be handled only during regular office hours. ... Well visits. We can schedule well visits up to three months in advance. When you call for these visits, we will make every ...
"Our study findings support routine dietary counselling as part of a doctors office visit, especially with mental health ... This relationship goes beyond the effect of diet on your body size or other aspects of health that can in turn affect your mood ... This is of importance at a patients level, but also at public health level, especially in a context where poor diet is now ... There is also emerging evidence that shows that the relationship between the gut and brain plays a key role in mental health ...
Children and families seeking care at primary care offices typically have not framed the visit as "mental health"-related. They ... may be seeking routine health supervision, acute care for a physical complaint, help with a challenging behavior, or simply ... Care coordination in the medical home: integrating health and related systems of care for children with special health care ... Borowsky IW, Mozayeny S. Ireland M. Brief psychosocial screening at health supervision and acute care visits. Pediatrics.2003; ...
If you are unable to visit a loved one in the hospital, you can let them know you are thinking of them by sending a Care Card. ... This reduces the spread of disease to other patients and the staff in our offices.. If cases of COVID 19 are reported in the ... Northern Kentucky Area and you have a chronic illness we recommend you consider rescheduling any routine appointments. Check ... Elizabeth Healthcare.. *All rights reserved. St. Elizabeth Healthcare is a registered 501(c)(3) non-profit corporation serving ...
Check with your primary care physician or specialist to see if Video Visits are an option until cases of the virus subside. We ... This reduces the spread of disease to other patients and the staff in our offices.. If cases of COVID 19 are reported in the ... Northern Kentucky Area and you have a chronic illness we recommend you consider rescheduling any routine appointments. ... Elizabeth Healthcare.. *All rights reserved. St. Elizabeth Healthcare is a registered 501(c)(3) non-profit corporation serving ...
Typical primary care visits are inconvenient and often costly. A visit to ones doctor, even for routine care, requires that ... After patients travel to their physicians office, they must queue in a waiting room. In many cases, ones primary care ... For more information on the BEA Health Care Satellite Account, please visithttp://www.bea.gov/national/health_care_satellite_ ... He is a leading expert on U.S., California, and international health care systems and focuses on health care reform, insurance ...
Family medicine advanced practitioners will conduct routine exams for all family members. Physician office visit fees will ... See Details about BLS for Healthcare Provider CPR Newborn Care. Childbirth Education ... Preventive health screens to detect risk factors for heart disease, stroke, and other serious illnesses ... This American Heart Association course is for the healthcare provider in and out of hospital settings in need of CPR ...
OH Health Care Facilities near you to help you pick the right pro Health Care Provider. ... With MD2U, patients receive quality healthcare in the comfort of their own homes. Everything from routine checkups to lab work ... Our two main offices are in the Washington DC area and the Jacksonville, FL area. We represent over 200 insurance companies and ... MD2Us unique program helps patients live independently longer, with less emergency room visits and less hospitalizations. MD2U ...
The URMC Center for Primary Care is a community of physicians who work to combine the science of medicine with the art of ... Routine physical exams and health screenings. *Sick visits. *Treatment and management of chronic diseases (such as diabetes and ... Most insurance plans require prior approval of all emergency room visits. Please call the office at (585) 787-0720 before ... We are committed to providing excellent health care for everyone. Financial hardships should never stop you from getting the ...
... home health care, hospital indemnity, and accident insurance policies. ... These health insurance policies include medicare supplement insurance, critical illness coverage, supplemental outpatient, ... Reserve National provides a number of health care services to best fit the needs of their customers. ... Supplemental outpatient - covers expenses of outpatient treatment such as emergency room, x-rays, lab work and office visits ...
  • With the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) and private payers trying to figure out if and how they will reimburse providers, many early adopters today simply take cash for virtual visits. (forbes.com)
  • At East Jordan, Bellaire and Central Lake Family Health Centers, our staff is dedicated to treating you like family. (ejchamber.org)
  • Our health centers are designed to provide quality affordable healthcare with a commitment you can count on. (ejchamber.org)
  • The Family Health Centers located in East Jordan, Bellaire and Central Lake combine federal assistance, patient fees, community resources and your support to offer quality, affordable medical services. (ejchamber.org)
  • Researchers at the center combed government statistics from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's National Center for Health Statistics for 2008 - the most recent data available at the time. (reuters.com)
  • You'll find free online coupons for teeth whitening, discount gym memberships and massage therapists, discounts to your local drugstore or 24-hour pharmacy and even urgent care medical centers. (valpak.com)
  • The Veterans Health Administration (VHA) is the component of the United States Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) led by the Under Secretary of Veterans Affairs for Health that implements the medical assistance program of the VA through the administration and operation of numerous VA Medical Centers (VAMC), Outpatient Clinics (OPC), Community Based Outpatient Clinics (CBOC), and VA Community Living Centers (VA Nursing Home) Programs. (wikipedia.org)
  • Some cognitive decline can occur as adults age, but frequently forgetting how to perform routine tasks, for example, is not a normal part of aging and can affect a person's ability to live and function independently. (cdc.gov)
  • By educating people about modifiable risk factors, encouraging early assessment and intervention, and understanding its impact on adults and their families, the health and well-being of many older adults may be improved. (cdc.gov)
  • What percentage of adults with SCD have discussed their memory loss or confusion with a health care professional? (cdc.gov)
  • What percentage of adults with SCD also report issues with their mental health? (cdc.gov)
  • Vaccination of other susceptible adolescents and adults is desirable and may be offered during routine health-care visits. (cdc.gov)
  • 5 Without a consistent source of care, young adults have significantly lower rates of overall health services usage, lower rates of office-based utilization, 6 and higher rates of emergency department visits. (aappublications.org)
  • Systematic immunization programs can be incorporated into routine care of high-risk adults. (cdc.gov)
  • The ACTION program utilized dedicated care coordinators to provide health coaching and self-management skills to vulnerable older adults. (ijic.org)
  • 2 Healthy People 2020 lists 3 adolescent health indicators, which focus on the proportion of adolescents who have (1) well visits, (2) medical insurance, and (3) vaccination coverage. (aappublications.org)
  • Looking forward, healthcare expenditure is expected to triple from S$4 billion in 2011 to S$12 billion in 2020 [ 3 ], driven mainly by inpatient cost. (ijic.org)
  • The promise of these tools is that their prudent use can help flatten healthcare spending and potentially even hold it at 18% of GDP by 2020. (bain.com)
  • Since then, their core content has remained a continuing debate concerning the optimal unchanged except for the introduction of provider--an obstetrician or a midwife-- certain new technologies due to advances for routine prenatal and intrapartum care in medical knowledge in industrialized for low-risk pregnant women [ 7-9 ]. (who.int)
  • More recently, the US Public to the model of industrialized countries, in Health Service Expert Panel on the Content the absence of any standard guidelines or of Prenatal Care noted that many of the evidence-based practices. (who.int)
  • The original deal is being investigated by the Information Commissioner's Office (ICO), which has yet to report any findings publicly. (cam.ac.uk)
  • The findings, Frosch said, raise more questions than they answer, and researchers have only begun to untangle the complex reasons behind recurrent ER visits for non-emergency psychiatric problems. (healthcanal.com)
  • The findings come after the U.S. Supreme Court recently upheld President Barack Obama's healthcare overhaul but allowed states to opt out of the law's provision opening Medicaid to more people. (reuters.com)
  • The findings help reinforce what many health experts have been saying: health care costs more in the United States to a large degree because doctors, hospitals, drug and medical device companies charge more. (medpagetoday.com)
  • Varicella virus vaccine should be administered to susceptible children during the routine immunization visit at 11-12 years of age but may be administered at any time during childhood. (cdc.gov)
  • Immunization is a key preventive cornerstone of pediatric care. (aappublications.org)
  • Among the topics discussed were improving implementation of the current U.S. Public Health Service (PHS) Immunization Practices Advisory Committee (ACIP) recommendations for prevention and control of influenza among persons in the high-priority groups for annual vaccination (1) and broadening those recommendations to include persons not currently included in the ACIP's high-priority groups. (cdc.gov)
  • Mental health issues, chiefly depression. (shrm.org)
  • But all of these conditions (excluding mental health) are ripe for self-treatment, Sullivan said. (shrm.org)
  • There is compelling evidence to show that there is a relationship between the quality of your diet and your mental health. (ucl.ac.uk)
  • There is also emerging evidence that shows that the relationship between the gut and brain plays a key role in mental health and that this axis is modulated by gastrointestinal bacteria, which can be modified by our diet. (ucl.ac.uk)
  • The authors note that while the relationship between healthy diet and lower depression risk is now well-established, there is an urgent need for more intervention studies examining the ability of dietary change to improve mental health. (ucl.ac.uk)
  • and partnering with families, schools, agencies, and mental health specialists to plan assessment and care. (aappublications.org)
  • The term also encompasses somatic manifestations of mental health issues, such as eating disorders and functional gastrointestinal symptoms. (aappublications.org)
  • Most ERs are neither designed nor staffed to deliver effective, coordinated mental health care, the investigators said. (healthcanal.com)
  • The policy statement also points out that that youth in prison have higher rates of substance abuse and mental health disorders and urges pediatricians to advocate for interventions that will be linked to continued care in the community following prison release. (rwjf.org)
  • Pay attention to your mental health. (weillcornell.org)
  • It's normal for teenagers to experience occasional mood swings and stress, but it's important for parents to recognize signs of mental health issues that may need attention. (iuhealth.org)
  • The program captures data on clients' health and quality of life in the past six months, including details on medical adherence, housing status, mental health status, CD4 count, and viral load. (healthypeople.gov)
  • Most of all, they are deeply committed to protecting the environment, from the senior attorney who wins a ground-breaking lawsuit protecting whales to the program assistant who starts an eco-committee to enhance recycling practices in the office. (nrdc.org)
  • Therefore, it is of paramount importance that the evaluation and implementation of transitional care programs are reported in literature and centres learn from best practices and evidence. (ijic.org)
  • Visit the site to learn more about our nationally recognized hospitals. (parknicollet.com)
  • One day later, Sutter Health, which controls a network of 12 hospitals in the region, including the recently opened CPMC Van Ness Campus in San Francisco, canceled all elective surgeries, an order that has been extended through May 5. (sfchronicle.com)
  • Medicaid would help them receive routine medical care and avoid costly hospitals, proponents argue. (reuters.com)
  • Neil Silverman , a clinical professor of obstetrics and gynecology at the David Geffen School of Medicine at the University of California, Los Angeles, adds that hospitals are already ramping up to increase the capacity to care for pregnant women. (scpr.org)
  • With five hospitals throughout central Alabama, hundreds of specialists, and countless ways to customize your experience, Brookwood Baptist Health is a community of care dedicated to making your new beginning a happy one. (birminghamparent.com)
  • Visit www.Medicare.gov or www.cdc.gov for more information. (times-herald.com)
  • Home health care companies made an average 19.4% profit in 2010, a report released Thursday shows, prompting the independent board that oversees Medicare to again ask Congress to lower reimbursement rates for these companies (Kennedy, 3/16). (news-medical.net)
  • You want to know how much your medical care will cost before you see the doctor or get the bill. (parknicollet.com)
  • The cost of presenteeism is higher than the combined costs of medical care, prescription drugs and absenteeism. (shrm.org)
  • But I just think that we've long since reached the stage that it's immoral to put people in a situation where they cannot get the medical care they need because their incomes aren't high enough. (grahamazon.com)
  • Talk with your doctor about medical care questions you may have. (floridahealthfinder.gov)
  • After all, sharing personal health information and receiving medical care via a smartphone isn't quite the same as FaceTiming with your mom. (forbes.com)
  • During this time (before and during The Great Depression), medical care was available on a fee-for-service basis and technology was minimal by today s standards. (proliberty.com)
  • In May 2014, major problems with scheduling timely access to medical care became public. (wikipedia.org)
  • Bureaucracy sucks, Chuck, but even if healthcare did go that way, is there really any possible way it could be worse than the system we have now? (grahamazon.com)
  • On the front page of Yahoo a couple of minutes ago they were delineating some of the biggest reasons for waste or excessive expenditures in our current health care system. (blogspot.com)
  • That introductory post also includes links to all the posts in this series on what makes our health care system so expensive. (theincidentaleconomist.com)
  • By accepting this new CPT code, the AMA's CPT Editorial panel has established a billing code for an AI-enabled system, which can help foster further adoption of autonomous AI technologies in healthcare. (prweb.com)
  • The company's first product, IDx-DR, is an FDA-cleared AI-based diagnostic system designed for use at the front lines of care to detect diabetic retinopathy. (prweb.com)
  • You don't have to be a wacko like Michael Moore in Sicko [amazon.com] to admire the benefits of a public health system. (slashdot.org)
  • Increasingly, people are asking why the smartphones and computers that enable us to get directions, transfer money, or book a vacation are unable to also help us answer routine questions about our health, solve our health problems, and guide us through the maze of the U.S. health care system. (commonwealthfund.org)
  • By submitting false claims to this program, Dr. Mathews undermined the system and contributed to the growing epidemic of health care fraud. (justice.gov)
  • Everything you always wanted to know about the Health Care system. (thehealthcareblog.com)
  • Multiple myeloma can cause a number of serious health problems affecting the bones, immune system, kidneys and red blood cell count, with some of the more common symptoms including bone pain and fatigue, a symptom of anemia. (ntbinfo.no)
  • This was first care system that is highly medicalized and recognized by Cochrane who recommend- expensive. (who.int)
  • In addition to personal steps, Jamieson notes that it is important to consider how such a widespread outbreak could strain the health system, leading to disruptions in normal care. (scpr.org)
  • I have stories that would curl your toes on how terrible the medical system is in a country with government run healthcare. (thehealthcareblog.com)
  • This concept elicited a strong response from DPC leaders that summarizes their perspective on DPC and the rest of the healthcare system. (forbes.com)
  • The VHA is distinct from the U.S. Department of Defense Military Health System of which it is not a part. (wikipedia.org)
  • As a result, the VA health system was able to serve a much larger population of veterans than it had served in previous years. (wikipedia.org)
  • An investigation of delays in treatment throughout the Veterans Health Administration system was conducted by the Veterans Affairs Inspector General, but it only found six deaths caused by the delay. (wikipedia.org)
  • Regarding evaluation of psychosocial or behavioral conditions, assessment should be performed from the newborn period on, should be focused on the family, and can include evaluation of the child's emotional health, depression in the parent, or social determinants of health. (aafp.org)
  • if a child does not have a dental home, risk assessment should be performed and a referral made ( https://www.aap.org/en-us/Documents/oralhealth_RiskAssessmentTool.pdf ). (aafp.org)
  • If Student Health is closed and you need evaluation for COVID-19 after-hours, you may call the VUMC COVID-19 hotline at (888) 312-0847 for information about after-hours assessment site availability. (vumc.org)
  • Additional booster recommendations are included in the policy statement for children who received the vaccine earlier due to certain health conditions and who are at increased risk of disease. (rwjf.org)
  • So maybe we just need to do away with all these high dolla procedures and return to the old ways with doctors with their stethescopes making house calls in their horse and buggy without all that newfangled stuff just making us live longer so we can get parkinsons and alzheimers…and keep the care homes full doing away with the F-22 fighter planes was a start. (nytimes.com)
  • Althouse: Why aren't we hearing more from doctors about why we need the proposed health care reform? (blogspot.com)
  • Those additional visits caused an increase of 45 minutes per month of additional time doctors spent on those visits. (healthcareitnews.com)
  • Each plan may have different requirements about visiting out-of-network doctors, getting preapproval for procedures, getting referrals to specialists, etc. (kiplinger.com)
  • The good news is that thus far there hasn't been any indication that pregnant women are more severely affected" by the novel virus, says Denise Jamieson , chair of the Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics at Emory University Healthcare and a senior author of a prepress review paper slated to publish in the American Journal of Obstetrics & Gynecology . (scpr.org)