Leptospira interrogans serovar pomona: A serovar of the bacterial species LEPTOSPIRA INTERROGANS, whose primary hosts include CATTLE and SWINE.Musa: A plant genus of the family Musaceae, order Zingiberales, subclass Zingiberidae, class Liliopsida.Weil Disease: A severe form of LEPTOSPIROSIS, usually caused by LEPTOSPIRA INTERROGANS SEROVAR ICTEROHAEMORRHAGIAE and occasionally other serovars. It is transmitted to humans by the rat and is characterized by hemorrhagic and renal symptoms with accompanying JAUNDICE.Zingiberales: This plant order includes 8 families, 66 genera, and about 1,800 species. These herbaceous perennials are mainly found in the wet tropics. Members include the banana family (MUSACEAE) and GINGER family (ZINGIBERACEAE).Babuvirus: A genus in the family NANOVIRIDAE infecting bananas. The type species is Banana bunchy top virus.Leptospira interrogans serovar icterohaemorrhagiae: A serovar of the bacterial species LEPTOSPIRA INTERROGANS, whose primary host is RATS.Agglutination Tests: Tests that are dependent on the clumping of cells, microorganisms, or particles when mixed with specific antiserum. (From Stedman, 26th ed)Abortion, Veterinary: Premature expulsion of the FETUS in animals.Antibodies, Bacterial: Immunoglobulins produced in a response to BACTERIAL ANTIGENS.Cattle Diseases: Diseases of domestic cattle of the genus Bos. It includes diseases of cows, yaks, and zebus.Fruit: The fleshy or dry ripened ovary of a plant, enclosing the seed or seeds.Horse Diseases: Diseases of domestic and wild horses of the species Equus caballus.Serotyping: Process of determining and distinguishing species of bacteria or viruses based on antigens they share.Badnavirus: A genus of DNA plant viruses with bacilliform morphology. Transmission in clonally-propagated plants is by vegetative propagation of infected plant materials. Transmission in nature is by mealybugs, seeds, and pollen. The type species is Commelina yellow mottle virus.Horses: Large, hoofed mammals of the family EQUIDAE. Horses are active day and night with most of the day spent seeking and consuming food. Feeding peaks occur in the early morning and late afternoon, and there are several daily periods of rest.Research: Critical and exhaustive investigation or experimentation, having for its aim the discovery of new facts and their correct interpretation, the revision of accepted conclusions, theories, or laws in the light of newly discovered facts, or the practical application of such new or revised conclusions, theories, or laws. (Webster, 3d ed)Colocasia: A plant genus of the family ARACEAE. Members contain acrid calcium oxalate and LECTINS. Polynesians prepare the root into poi. Common names of Taro and Coco Yam (Cocoyam) may be confused with other ARACEAE; XANTHOSOMA; or with common yam (DIOSCOREA).Cattle: Domesticated bovine animals of the genus Bos, usually kept on a farm or ranch and used for the production of meat or dairy products or for heavy labor.Fusarium: A mitosporic Hypocreales fungal genus, various species of which are important parasitic pathogens of plants and a variety of vertebrates. Teleomorphs include GIBBERELLA.Musaceae: A plant family of the order ZINGIBERALES, subclass Zingiberidae, class Liliopsida best known for banana (MUSA). The slender false trunk, formed by leaf sheaths of the spirally arranged leaves, may rise to 15 meters (50 feet). There is a crown of large leaves at the top.Antigens, Bacterial: Substances elaborated by bacteria that have antigenic activity.Fusaric Acid: A picolinic acid derivative isolated from various Fusarium species. It has been proposed for a variety of therapeutic applications but is primarily used as a research tool. Its mechanisms of action are poorly understood. It probably inhibits DOPAMINE BETA-HYDROXYLASE, the enzyme that converts dopamine to norepinephrine. It may also have other actions, including the inhibition of cell proliferation and DNA synthesis.Weed Control: The prevention of growth and or spread of unwanted plants.Plant Diseases: Diseases of plants.Culture Media: Any liquid or solid preparation made specifically for the growth, storage, or transport of microorganisms or other types of cells. The variety of media that exist allow for the culturing of specific microorganisms and cell types, such as differential media, selective media, test media, and defined media. Solid media consist of liquid media that have been solidified with an agent such as AGAR or GELATIN.Asepsis: The prevention of access by infecting organisms to the locus of potential infection.Aphids: A family (Aphididae) of small insects, in the suborder Sternorrhyncha, that suck the juices of plants. Important genera include Schizaphis and Myzus. The latter is known to carry more than 100 virus diseases between plants.Swine: Any of various animals that constitute the family Suidae and comprise stout-bodied, short-legged omnivorous mammals with thick skin, usually covered with coarse bristles, a rather long mobile snout, and small tail. Included are the genera Babyrousa, Phacochoerus (wart hogs), and Sus, the latter containing the domestic pig (see SUS SCROFA).Gardening: Cultivation of PLANTS; (FRUIT; VEGETABLES; MEDICINAL HERBS) on small plots of ground or in containers.Organic Agriculture: Systems of agriculture which adhere to nationally regulated standards that restrict the use of pesticides, non-organic fertilizers, genetic engineering, growth hormones, irradiation, antibiotics, and non-organic ANIMAL FEED.Islands: Tracts of land completely surrounded by water.DNA, Bacterial: Deoxyribonucleic acid that makes up the genetic material of bacteria.Triploidy: Polyploidy with three sets of chromosomes. Triploidy in humans are 69XXX, 69XXY, and 69XYY. It is associated with HOLOPROSENCEPHALY; ABNORMALITIES, MULTIPLE; PARTIAL HYDATIDIFORM MOLE; and MISCARRAGES.Plant Viruses: Viruses parasitic on plants higher than bacteria.Rabbits: The species Oryctolagus cuniculus, in the family Leporidae, order LAGOMORPHA. Rabbits are born in burrows, furless, and with eyes and ears closed. In contrast with HARES, rabbits have 22 chromosome pairs.Ethylenebis(dithiocarbamates): A class of thiocarbamate derivatives whose salts possess fungicidal activity.Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay: An immunoassay utilizing an antibody labeled with an enzyme marker such as horseradish peroxidase. While either the enzyme or the antibody is bound to an immunosorbent substrate, they both retain their biologic activity; the change in enzyme activity as a result of the enzyme-antibody-antigen reaction is proportional to the concentration of the antigen and can be measured spectrophotometrically or with the naked eye. Many variations of the method have been developed.Cultured Milk Products: Milk modified with controlled FERMENTATION. This should not be confused with KAFFIR LIME or with KAFFIR CORN.Circoviridae: A family of very small viruses containing circular, single-stranded DNA and possessing no envelope. The modes of transmission are not known.Crops, Agricultural: Cultivated plants or agricultural produce such as grain, vegetables, or fruit. (From American Heritage Dictionary, 1982)Ethylenes: Derivatives of ethylene, a simple organic gas of biological origin with many industrial and biological use.Phosphoenolpyruvate Carboxylase: An enzyme with high affinity for carbon dioxide. It catalyzes irreversibly the formation of oxaloacetate from phosphoenolpyruvate and carbon dioxide. This fixation of carbon dioxide in several bacteria and some plants is the first step in the biosynthesis of glucose. EC 4.1.1.31.Guinea: A republic in western Africa, south of SENEGAL and MALI, east of GUINEA-BISSAU. Its capital is Conakry.Waste Products: Debris resulting from a process that is of no further use to the system producing it. The concept includes materials discharged from or stored in a system in inert form as a by-product of vital activities. (From Webster's New Collegiate Dictionary, 1981)Costa RicaTonga: An archipelago in Polynesia in the southwest Pacific Ocean, comprising about 150 islands. It is a kingdom whose capital is Nukualofa. It was discovered by the Dutch in 1616, visited by Tasman in 1643, and by Captain Cook in 1773 and 1777. The modern kingdom was established during the reign of King George Tupou I, 1845-93. It became a British protectorate in 1900 and gained independence in 1970. The name Tonga may be of local origin, meaning either island or holy. Its other name, Friendly Islands, was given by Captain Cook from the welcome given him by the natives. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p1219 & Room, Brewer's Dictionary of Names, 1992, p549)Plant Lectins: Protein or glycoprotein substances of plant origin that bind to sugar moieties in cell walls or membranes. Some carbohydrate-metabolizing proteins (ENZYMES) from PLANTS also bind to carbohydrates, however they are not considered lectins. Many plant lectins change the physiology of the membrane of BLOOD CELLS to cause agglutination, mitosis, or other biochemical changes. They may play a role in plant defense mechanisms.Genome, Plant: The genetic complement of a plant (PLANTS) as represented in its DNA.Agriculture: The science, art or practice of cultivating soil, producing crops, and raising livestock.Glucan 1,3-beta-Glucosidase: An exocellulase with specificity for 1,3-beta-D-glucasidic linkages. It catalyzes hydrolysis of beta-D-glucose units from the non-reducing ends of 1,3-beta-D-glucans, releasing GLUCOSE.Muscle Cramp: A sustained and usually painful contraction of muscle fibers. This may occur as an isolated phenomenon or as a manifestation of an underlying disease process (e.g., UREMIA; HYPOTHYROIDISM; MOTOR NEURON DISEASE; etc.). (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p1398)Ecotype: Geographic variety, population, or race, within a species, that is genetically adapted to a particular habitat. An ecotype typically exhibits phenotypic differences but is capable of interbreeding with other ecotypes.Ethylenethiourea: A degradation product of ethylenebis(dithiocarbamate) fungicides. It has been found to be carcinogenic and to cause THYROID hyperplasia.Starch Synthase: An enzyme that catalyzes the transfer of glucose from ADPglucose to glucose-containing polysaccharides in 1,4-alpha-linkages. EC 2.4.1.21.Phenalenes: A group of AROMATIC HYDROCARBONS that have three rings joined as a triad around a single carbon atom so all three are conjoined, in contrast to a linear arrangement (ANTHRACENES) or angular arrangement (PHENANTHRENES).DNA, Plant: Deoxyribonucleic acid that makes up the genetic material of plants.Nanovirus: A genus in the family NANOVIRIDAE containing multiple circular single-stranded DNA molecules. The type species is Subterranean clover stunt virus.Starch: Any of a group of polysaccharides of the general formula (C6-H10-O5)n, composed of a long-chain polymer of glucose in the form of amylose and amylopectin. It is the chief storage form of energy reserve (carbohydrates) in plants.Latex Hypersensitivity: Allergic reaction to products containing processed natural rubber latex such as rubber gloves, condoms, catheters, dental dams, balloons, and sporting equipment. Both T-cell mediated (HYPERSENSITIVITY, DELAYED) and IgE antibody-mediated (HYPERSENSITIVITY, IMMEDIATE) allergic responses are possible. Delayed hypersensitivity results from exposure to antioxidants present in the rubber; immediate hypersensitivity results from exposure to a latex protein.Plant Proteins: Proteins found in plants (flowers, herbs, shrubs, trees, etc.). The concept does not include proteins found in vegetables for which VEGETABLE PROTEINS is available.Oman: A sultanate on the southeast coast of the Arabian peninsula. Its capital is Masqat. Before the 16th century it was ruled by independent emirs but was captured and controlled by the Portuguese 1508-1648. In 1741 it was recovered by a descendent of Yemen's imam. After its decline in the 19th century, it became virtually a political and economic dependency within the British Government of India, retaining close ties with Great Britain by treaty from 1939 to 1970 when it achieved autonomy. The name was recorded by Pliny in the 1st century A.D. as Omana, said to be derived from the founder of the state, Oman ben Ibrahim al-Khalil. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p890; Oman Embassy, Washington; Room, Brewer's Dictionary of Names, 1992, p391)Phylogeny: The relationships of groups of organisms as reflected by their genetic makeup.Plant Leaves: Expanded structures, usually green, of vascular plants, characteristically consisting of a bladelike expansion attached to a stem, and functioning as the principal organ of photosynthesis and transpiration. (American Heritage Dictionary, 2d ed)Zineb: An agricultural fungicide of the dithiocarbamate class. It has relatively low toxicity and there is little evidence of human injury from exposure.
Pomona roundleaf bat (Hipposideros pomona) Pratt's roundleaf bat (Hipposideros pratti) Philippine pygmy roundleaf bat ( ... Banana pipistrelle (Neoromicia nana) Rendall's serotine (Neoromicia rendalli) Rosevear's serotine (Neoromicia roseveari) White- ... Large Asian roundleaf bat (Hipposideros lekaguli) Shield-faced roundleaf bat (Hipposideros lylei) Big-eared roundleaf bat ( ... Aellen's roundleaf bat (Hipposideros marisae) Ethiopian large-eared roundleaf bat (Hipposideros megalotis) Fly River roundleaf ...
Taylor's roundleaf bat Ethiopian large-eared roundleaf bat Philippine forest roundleaf bat Biak roundleaf bat Pomona roundleaf ... Cape hairy bat Cave myotis Long-legged myotis Welwitsch's bat Yuma myotis Cape serotine Tiny serotine Malagasy serotine Banana ... bat Dayak roundleaf bat Sooty roundleaf bat Fulvus roundleaf bat Cantor's roundleaf bat Giant roundleaf bat Indian roundleaf ... Aba roundleaf bat Great roundleaf bat Dusky leaf-nosed bat Benito roundleaf bat Bicolored roundleaf bat Sundevall's roundleaf ...
Hantavirus RNA was detected in Pomona roundleaf bats (Hipposideros pomona) (family Hipposideridae), captured in Vietnam in 1997 ... and 1999, and in banana pipistrelles (Neoromicia nanus) (family Vespertilionidae), captured in Côte dIvoire in 2011. ...
The taxonomic identity of the XSV-infected Pomona roundleaf bat was confirmed by mitochondrial DNA analysis (GenBank accession ... from the banana pipistrelle and Magboi virus ([MGBV] JN037851) from the hairy slit-faced bat. ... Boldface indicates the Xuan Son virus detected in Pomona roundleaf bat, Vietnam. Representative soricomorph-borne hantaviruses ...
A novel hantavirus, designated Xuan Son virus (XSV), was detected in 1 of 5 Pomona roundleaf bats (Hipposideros pomona) by ... Sumibcay L, Kadjo B, Gu SH, Kang HJ, Lim BK, Cook JA, Divergent lineage of a novel hantavirus in the banana pipistrelle ( ... Pomona roundleaf bats are frequently found in or near limestone or sandstone caves. Their colony sizes vary from few to many ... The vast geographic distribution of the Pomona roundleaf bat throughout Vietnam and in Bangladesh, Cambodia, China, India, Laos ...
Hantavirus RNA was detected in Pomona roundleaf bats (Hipposideros pomona) (family Hipposideridae), captured in Vietnam in 1997 ... Hipposideros pomona) (family Hipposideridae), captured in Vietnam in 1997 and 1999, and in banana pipistrelles (Neoromicia ... Hantavirus RNA was detected in Pomona roundleaf bats (Hipposideros pomona) (family Hipposideridae), captured in Vietnam in 1997 ... Hantavirus RNA was detected in Pomona roundleaf bats (Hipposideros pomona) (family Hipposideridae), captured in Vietnam in 1997 ...
Pomona roundleaf bat (Hipposideros pomona) Pratts roundleaf bat (Hipposideros pratti) Philippine pygmy roundleaf bat ( ... Banana pipistrelle (Neoromicia nana) Rendalls serotine (Neoromicia rendalli) Rosevears serotine (Neoromicia roseveari) White- ... Large Asian roundleaf bat (Hipposideros lekaguli) Shield-faced roundleaf bat (Hipposideros lylei) Big-eared roundleaf bat ( ... Aellens roundleaf bat (Hipposideros marisae) Ethiopian large-eared roundleaf bat (Hipposideros megalotis) Fly River roundleaf ...
Taylors roundleaf bat Ethiopian large-eared roundleaf bat Philippine forest roundleaf bat Biak roundleaf bat Pomona roundleaf ... Cape hairy bat Cave myotis Long-legged myotis Welwitschs bat Yuma myotis Cape serotine Tiny serotine Malagasy serotine Banana ... bat Dayak roundleaf bat Sooty roundleaf bat Fulvus roundleaf bat Cantors roundleaf bat Giant roundleaf bat Indian roundleaf ... Aba roundleaf bat Great roundleaf bat Dusky leaf-nosed bat Benito roundleaf bat Bicolored roundleaf bat Sundevalls roundleaf ...
It is a well-known fact that pork is red or pink garments is doubtful soak b., packed to carry long dis 10 :Royal Dwarf Banana ... round leaf or Peruvian Yam. The moon blindness or something else. A being of variegated color it cannot saved by having dry ... top Oyster Shell Gas Lime Pomona Wholesale Nurseries.W. .. about four (rounds of cotton seed meal. and dissolved bone. In a few ... wasty and leaking condition, and this bananas :20c to U5c; 332: boxes Sicily lemons ARTICLE III.. ctettfl of offerings have to ...
Cantors roundleaf bat Brandts bat Bighead carp Jalapa toad Galea monasteriensis Hemidactylus dracaenacolus Pomona leaf-nosed ... 2 AD-2011 yellowcheek carp rusty treefrog Microdevario nana Bairds tapir Kubans nase Fejervarya cf. syhadrensis MS-2009 ... Negros-Panay Eastern hognose snake Hazels wrinkled ground frog Blood fluke brown banana frog Eastern chipmunk European pied ... FFA-2009a Lowland tapir Acanthodactylus tristrami Monkey frog Banded tetra Tanzania banana frog Pundamilia nyererei rainbow ...
  • Conjecturing that Mouyassué virus in the banana pipistrelle ( Neoromicia nanus ) in Côte d'Ivoire ( 8 ) and Magboi virus (MGBV) in the hairy split-faced bat ( Nycteris hispida ) in Sierra Leone ( 9 ) represent a much broader geographic distribution of bat-borne hantaviruses, we analyzed tissues from bats captured in Mongolia and Vietnam. (cdc.gov)
  • No additional hantavirus-infected Pomona roundleaf bats were found by RT-PCR that used XSV-specific primers. (cdc.gov)