Dentin: The hard portion of the tooth surrounding the pulp, covered by enamel on the crown and cementum on the root, which is harder and denser than bone but softer than enamel, and is thus readily abraded when left unprotected. (From Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992)Dentin-Bonding Agents: Cements that act through infiltration and polymerization within the dentinal matrix and are used for dental restoration. They can be adhesive resins themselves, adhesion-promoting monomers, or polymerization initiators that act in concert with other agents to form a dentin-bonding system.Dentin Permeability: The property of dentin that permits passage of light, heat, cold, and chemical substances. It does not include penetration by microorganisms.Tooth Root: The part of a tooth from the neck to the apex, embedded in the alveolar process and covered with cementum. A root may be single or divided into several branches, usually identified by their relative position, e.g., lingual root or buccal root. Single-rooted teeth include mandibular first and second premolars and the maxillary second premolar teeth. The maxillary first premolar has two roots in most cases. Maxillary molars have three roots. (Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992, p690)Dental Bonding: An adhesion procedure for orthodontic attachments, such as plastic DENTAL CROWNS. This process usually includes the application of an adhesive material (DENTAL CEMENTS) and letting it harden in-place by light or chemical curing.Smear Layer: Adherent debris produced when cutting the enamel or dentin in cavity preparation. It is about 1 micron thick and its composition reflects the underlying dentin, although different quantities and qualities of smear layer can be produced by the various instrumentation techniques. Its function is presumed to be protective, as it lowers dentin permeability. However, it masks the underlying dentin and interferes with attempts to bond dental material to the dentin.Resin Cements: Dental cements composed either of polymethyl methacrylate or dimethacrylate, produced by mixing an acrylic monomer liquid with acrylic polymers and mineral fillers. The cement is insoluble in water and is thus resistant to fluids in the mouth, but is also irritating to the dental pulp. It is used chiefly as a luting agent for fabricated and temporary restorations. (Jablonski's Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992, p159)Methacrylates: Acrylic acids or acrylates which are substituted in the C-2 position with a methyl group.Tensile Strength: The maximum stress a material subjected to a stretching load can withstand without tearing. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 5th ed, p2001)Tooth Demineralization: A tooth's loss of minerals, such as calcium in hydroxyapatite from the tooth matrix, caused by acidic exposure. An example of the occurrence of demineralization is in the formation of dental caries.Materials Testing: The testing of materials and devices, especially those used for PROSTHESES AND IMPLANTS; SUTURES; TISSUE ADHESIVES; etc., for hardness, strength, durability, safety, efficacy, and biocompatibility.Acid Etching, Dental: Preparation of TOOTH surfaces and DENTAL MATERIALS with etching agents, usually phosphoric acid, to roughen the surface to increase adhesion or osteointegration.Dental Stress Analysis: The description and measurement of the various factors that produce physical stress upon dental restorations, prostheses, or appliances, materials associated with them, or the natural oral structures.Dentin Desensitizing Agents: Substances which reduce or eliminate dentinal sensitivity or the pain associated with a source of stimulus (such as touch, heat, or cold) at the orifice of exposed dentinal tubules causing the movement of tubular fluid that in turn stimulates tooth nerve receptors.Sodium Hypochlorite: It is used as an oxidizing and bleaching agent and as a disinfectant. (From Grant & Hackh's Chemical Dictionary, 5th ed)Composite Resins: Synthetic resins, containing an inert filler, that are widely used in dentistry.Phosphoric Acids: Inorganic derivatives of phosphoric acid (H3PO4). Note that organic derivatives of phosphoric acids are listed under ORGANOPHOSPHATES.Root Canal Irrigants: Chemicals used mainly to disinfect root canals after pulpectomy and before obturation. The major ones are camphorated monochlorophenol, EDTA, formocresol, hydrogen peroxide, metacresylacetate, and sodium hypochlorite. Root canal irrigants include also rinsing solutions of distilled water, sodium chloride, etc.Surface Properties: Characteristics or attributes of the outer boundaries of objects, including molecules.Microscopy, Electron, Scanning: Microscopy in which the object is examined directly by an electron beam scanning the specimen point-by-point. The image is constructed by detecting the products of specimen interactions that are projected above the plane of the sample, such as backscattered electrons. Although SCANNING TRANSMISSION ELECTRON MICROSCOPY also scans the specimen point by point with the electron beam, the image is constructed by detecting the electrons, or their interaction products that are transmitted through the sample plane, so that is a form of TRANSMISSION ELECTRON MICROSCOPY.Wettability: The quality or state of being wettable or the degree to which something can be wet. This is also the ability of any solid surface to be wetted when in contact with a liquid whose surface tension is reduced so that the liquid spreads over the surface of the solid.Bisphenol A-Glycidyl Methacrylate: The reaction product of bisphenol A and glycidyl methacrylate that undergoes polymerization when exposed to ultraviolet light or mixed with a catalyst. It is used as a bond implant material and as the resin component of dental sealants and composite restorative materials.Dental Restoration, Temporary: A prosthesis or restoration placed for a limited period, from several days to several months, which is designed to seal the tooth and maintain its position until a permanent restoration (DENTAL RESTORATION, PERMANENT) will replace it. (From Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992)Dental Cements: Substances used to bond COMPOSITE RESINS to DENTAL ENAMEL and DENTIN. These bonding or luting agents are used in restorative dentistry, ROOT CANAL THERAPY; PROSTHODONTICS; and ORTHODONTICS.Adhesives: Substances that cause the adherence of two surfaces. They include glues (properly collagen-derived adhesives), mucilages, sticky pastes, gums, resins, or latex.Dental Cementum: The bonelike rigid connective tissue covering the root of a tooth from the cementoenamel junction to the apex and lining the apex of the root canal, also assisting in tooth support by serving as attachment structures for the periodontal ligament. (Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992)Dentin SensitivityRoot Caries: Dental caries involving the tooth root, cementum, or cervical area of the tooth.Methylmethacrylates: The methyl esters of methacrylic acid that polymerize easily and are used as tissue cements, dental materials, and absorbent for biological substances.Dental Leakage: The seepage of fluids, debris, and micro-organisms between the walls of a prepared dental cavity and the restoration.Ananas: A plant genus of the family BROMELIACEAE known for the edible fruit that is the source of BROMELAINS.Malpighiaceae: A plant family of the order Polygalales, subclass Rosidae class, Magnoliopsida that are mostly shrubs and small trees. Many of the members contain indole alkaloids.Citric Acid: A key intermediate in metabolism. It is an acid compound found in citrus fruits. The salts of citric acid (citrates) can be used as anticoagulants due to their calcium chelating ability.Root Canal Preparation: Preparatory activities in ROOT CANAL THERAPY by partial or complete extirpation of diseased pulp, cleaning and sterilization of the empty canal, enlarging and shaping the canal to receive the sealing material. The cavity may be prepared by mechanical, sonic, chemical, or other means. (From Dorland, 28th ed, p1700)Electrical Equipment and Supplies: Apparatus and instruments that generate and operate with ELECTRICITY, and their electrical components.Dental Enamel: A hard thin translucent layer of calcified substance which envelops and protects the dentin of the crown of the tooth. It is the hardest substance in the body and is almost entirely composed of calcium salts. Under the microscope, it is composed of thin rods (enamel prisms) held together by cementing substance, and surrounded by an enamel sheath. (From Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992, p286)Toothpastes: Dentifrices that are formulated into a paste form. They typically contain abrasives, HUMECTANTS; DETERGENTS; FLAVORING AGENTS; and CARIOSTATIC AGENTS.Shear Strength: The internal resistance of a material to moving some parts of it parallel to a fixed plane, in contrast to stretching (TENSILE STRENGTH) or compression (COMPRESSIVE STRENGTH). Ionic crystals are brittle because, when subjected to shear, ions of the same charge are brought next to each other, which causes repulsion.Hardness: The mechanical property of material that determines its resistance to force. HARDNESS TESTS measure this property.Dental Cavity Lining: An inner coating, as of varnish or other protective substance, to cover the dental cavity wall. It is usually a resinous film-forming agent dissolved in a volatile solvent, or a suspension of calcium hydroxide in a solution of a synthetic resin. The lining seals the dentinal tubules and protects the pulp before a restoration is inserted. (Jablonski, Illustrated Dictionary of Dentistry, 1982)Adhesiveness: A property of the surface of an object that makes it stick to another surface.Plasma Gases: Ionized gases, consisting of free electrons and ionized atoms or molecules which collectively behave differently than gas, solid, or liquid. Plasma gases are used in biomedical fields in surface modification; biological decontamination; dentistry (e.g., PLASMA ARC DENTAL CURING LIGHTS); and in other treatments (e.g., ARGON PLASMA COAGULATION).Dental Materials: Materials used in the production of dental bases, restorations, impressions, prostheses, etc.Dental Pulp Cavity: The space in a tooth bounded by the dentin and containing the dental pulp. The portion of the cavity within the crown of the tooth is the pulp chamber; the portion within the root is the pulp canal or root canal.Dentin, Secondary: Dentin formed by normal pulp after completion of root end formation.Erbium: Erbium. An element of the rare earth family of metals. It has the atomic symbol Er, atomic number 68, and atomic weight 167.26.Dental Marginal Adaptation: The degree of approximation or fit of filling material or dental prosthetic to the tooth surface. A close marginal adaptation and seal at the interface is important for successful dental restorations.Toothbrushing: The act of cleaning teeth with a brush to remove plaque and prevent tooth decay. (From Webster, 3d ed)Microradiography: Production of a radiographic image of a small or very thin object on fine-grained photographic film under conditions which permit subsequent microscopic examination or enlargement of the radiograph at linear magnifications of up to several hundred and with a resolution approaching the resolving power of the photographic emulsion (about 1000 lines per millimeter).Water: A clear, odorless, tasteless liquid that is essential for most animal and plant life and is an excellent solvent for many substances. The chemical formula is hydrogen oxide (H2O). (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)Polymethacrylic Acids: Poly-2-methylpropenoic acids. Used in the manufacture of methacrylate resins and plastics in the form of pellets and granules, as absorbent for biological materials and as filters; also as biological membranes and as hydrogens. Synonyms: methylacrylate polymer; poly(methylacrylate); acrylic acid methyl ester polymer.Post and Core Technique: Use of a metal casting, usually with a post in the pulp or root canal, designed to support and retain an artificial crown.Carbon Compounds, Inorganic: Inorganic compounds that contain carbon as an integral part of the molecule but are not derived from hydrocarbons.Citrus sinensis: A plant species of the genus CITRUS, family RUTACEAE that provides the familiar orange fruit which is also a source of orange oil.Dental Cavity Preparation: An operation in which carious material is removed from teeth and biomechanically correct forms are established in the teeth to receive and retain restorations. A constant requirement is provision for prevention of failure of the restoration through recurrence of decay or inadequate resistance to applied stresses. (Boucher's Clinical Dental Terminology, 4th ed, p239-40)Root Canal Filling Materials: Materials placed inside a root canal for the purpose of obturating or sealing it. The materials may be gutta-percha, silver cones, paste mixtures, or other substances. (Dorland, 28th ed, p631 & Boucher's Clinical Dental Terminology, 4th ed, p187)Actinidia: A plant species of the family ACTINIDIACEAE, order Theales.Stress, Mechanical: A purely physical condition which exists within any material because of strain or deformation by external forces or by non-uniform thermal expansion; expressed quantitatively in units of force per unit area.Dental Enamel Permeability: The property of dental enamel to permit passage of light, heat, gases, liquids, metabolites, mineral ions and other substances. It does not include the penetration of the dental enamel by microorganisms.Molar: The most posterior teeth on either side of the jaw, totaling eight in the deciduous dentition (2 on each side, upper and lower), and usually 12 in the permanent dentition (three on each side, upper and lower). They are grinding teeth, having large crowns and broad chewing surfaces. (Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992, p821)Edetic Acid: A chelating agent that sequesters a variety of polyvalent cations such as CALCIUM. It is used in pharmaceutical manufacturing and as a food additive.Argon: Argon. A noble gas with the atomic symbol Ar, atomic number 18, and atomic weight 39.948. It is used in fluorescent tubes and wherever an inert atmosphere is desired and nitrogen cannot be used.Tooth, Deciduous: The teeth of the first dentition, which are shed and replaced by the permanent teeth.Boron Compounds: Inorganic or organic compounds that contain boron as an integral part of the molecule.Dental Restoration, Permanent: A restoration designed to remain in service for not less than 20 to 30 years, usually made of gold casting, cohesive gold, or amalgam. (Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992)Tooth Preparation: Procedures carried out with regard to the teeth or tooth structures preparatory to specified dental therapeutic and surgical measures.Silicon Compounds: Inorganic compounds that contain silicon as an integral part of the molecule.Dentin Dysplasia: An apparently hereditary disorder of dentin formation, marked by a normal appearance of coronal dentin associated with pulpal obliteration, faulty root formation, and a tendency for peripheral lesions without obvious cause. (From Dorland, 27th ed)OdontoblastsTooth Erosion: Progressive loss of the hard substance of a tooth by chemical processes that do not involve bacterial action. (Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992, p296)Acrylic ResinsDental Etching: Preparation of TOOTH surfaces, and of materials bonded to teeth or DENTAL IMPLANTS, with agents and methods which roughen the surface to facilitate adhesion. Agents include phosphoric or other acids (ACID ETCHING, DENTAL) and methods include LASERS.Cariostatic Agents: Substances that inhibit or arrest DENTAL CARIES formation. (Boucher's Clinical Dental Terminology, 4th ed)Light-Curing of Dental Adhesives: The hardening or polymerization of bonding agents (DENTAL CEMENTS) via exposure to light.Analysis of Variance: A statistical technique that isolates and assesses the contributions of categorical independent variables to variation in the mean of a continuous dependent variable.Dental Caries Activity Tests: Diagnostic tests conducted in order to measure the increment of active DENTAL CARIES over a period of time.Dental Caries: Localized destruction of the tooth surface initiated by decalcification of the enamel followed by enzymatic lysis of organic structures and leading to cavity formation. If left unchecked, the cavity may penetrate the enamel and dentin and reach the pulp.Cattle: Domesticated bovine animals of the genus Bos, usually kept on a farm or ranch and used for the production of meat or dairy products or for heavy labor.Dentinogenesis: The formation of dentin. Dentin first appears in the layer between the ameloblasts and odontoblasts and becomes calcified immediately. Formation progresses from the tip of the papilla over its slope to form a calcified cap becoming thicker by the apposition of new layers pulpward. A layer of uncalcified dentin intervenes between the calcified tissue and the odontoblast and its processes. (From Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992)Dentin Solubility: The susceptibility of the DENTIN to dissolution.Tooth Calcification: The process whereby calcium salts are deposited in the dental enamel. The process is normal in the development of bones and teeth. (Boucher's Clinical Dental Terminology, 4th ed, p43)Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Glycols: A generic grouping for dihydric alcohols with the hydroxy groups (-OH) located on different carbon atoms. They are viscous liquids with high boiling points for their molecular weights.Acids: Chemical compounds which yield hydrogen ions or protons when dissolved in water, whose hydrogen can be replaced by metals or basic radicals, or which react with bases to form salts and water (neutralization). An extension of the term includes substances dissolved in media other than water. (Grant & Hackh's Chemical Dictionary, 5th ed)Dental Pulp: A richly vascularized and innervated connective tissue of mesodermal origin, contained in the central cavity of a tooth and delimited by the dentin, and having formative, nutritive, sensory, and protective functions. (Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992)Spinal Nerve Roots: Paired bundles of NERVE FIBERS entering and leaving the SPINAL CORD at each segment. The dorsal and ventral nerve roots join to form the mixed segmental spinal nerves. The dorsal roots are generally afferent, formed by the central projections of the spinal (dorsal root) ganglia sensory cells, and the ventral roots are efferent, comprising the axons of spinal motor and PREGANGLIONIC AUTONOMIC FIBERS.Tooth: One of a set of bone-like structures in the mouth used for biting and chewing.Dentinal Fluid: The lymph or fluid of dentin. It is a transudate of extracellular fluid, mainly cytoplasm of odontoblastic processes, from the dental pulp via the dentinal tubules. It is also called dental lymph. (From Stedman, 26th ed, p665)Root Resorption: Resorption in which cementum or dentin is lost from the root of a tooth owing to cementoclastic or osteoclastic activity in conditions such as trauma of occlusion or neoplasms. (Dorland, 27th ed)Statistics, Nonparametric: A class of statistical methods applicable to a large set of probability distributions used to test for correlation, location, independence, etc. In most nonparametric statistical tests, the original scores or observations are replaced by another variable containing less information. An important class of nonparametric tests employs the ordinal properties of the data. Another class of tests uses information about whether an observation is above or below some fixed value such as the median, and a third class is based on the frequency of the occurrence of runs in the data. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed, p1284; Corsini, Concise Encyclopedia of Psychology, 1987, p764-5)Tooth Remineralization: Therapeutic technique for replacement of minerals in partially decalcified teeth.Decalcification Technique: Removal of minerals from bones during bone examination.Plant Root Cap: A cone-shaped structure in plants made up of a mass of meristematic cells that covers and protects the tip of a growing root. It is the putative site of gravity sensing in plant roots.Tooth Attrition: The wearing away of a tooth as a result of tooth-to-tooth contact, as in mastication, occurring only on the occlusal, incisal, and proximal surfaces. It is chiefly associated with aging. It is differentiated from TOOTH ABRASION (the pathologic wearing away of the tooth substance by friction, as brushing, bruxism, clenching, and other mechanical causes) and from TOOTH EROSION (the loss of substance caused by chemical action without bacterial action). (Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992, p86)Sialoglycoproteins: Glycoproteins which contain sialic acid as one of their carbohydrates. They are often found on or in the cell or tissue membranes and participate in a variety of biological activities.Incisor: Any of the eight frontal teeth (four maxillary and four mandibular) having a sharp incisal edge for cutting food and a single root, which occurs in man both as a deciduous and a permanent tooth. (Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992, p820)Tooth Cervix: The constricted part of the tooth at the junction of the crown and root or roots. It is often referred to as the cementoenamel junction (CEJ), the line at which the cementum covering the root of a tooth and the enamel of the tooth meet. (Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992, p530, p433)Tooth Crown: The upper part of the tooth, which joins the lower part of the tooth (TOOTH ROOT) at the cervix (TOOTH CERVIX) at a line called the cementoenamel junction. The entire surface of the crown is covered with enamel which is thicker at the extremity and becomes progressively thinner toward the cervix. (From Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992, p216)Dental Pulp Exposure: The result of pathological changes in the hard tissue of a tooth caused by carious lesions, mechanical factors, or trauma, which render the pulp susceptible to bacterial invasion from the external environment.Extracellular Matrix Proteins: Macromolecular organic compounds that contain carbon, hydrogen, oxygen, nitrogen, and usually, sulfur. These macromolecules (proteins) form an intricate meshwork in which cells are embedded to construct tissues. Variations in the relative types of macromolecules and their organization determine the type of extracellular matrix, each adapted to the functional requirements of the tissue. The two main classes of macromolecules that form the extracellular matrix are: glycosaminoglycans, usually linked to proteins (proteoglycans), and fibrous proteins (e.g., COLLAGEN; ELASTIN; FIBRONECTINS; and LAMININ).Molar, Third: The aftermost permanent tooth on each side in the maxilla and mandible.Dentinogenesis Imperfecta: An autosomal dominant disorder of tooth development characterized by opalescent dentin resulting in discoloration of the teeth. The dentin develops poorly with low mineral content while the pulp canal is obliterated.Root Planing: A procedure for smoothing of the roughened root surface or cementum of a tooth after subgingival curettage or scaling, as part of periodontal therapy.Dental Restoration Failure: Inability or inadequacy of a dental restoration or prosthesis to perform as expected.Tooth Apex: The tip or terminal end of the root of a tooth. (Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992, p62)Root Canal Obturation: Phase of endodontic treatment in which a root canal system that has been cleaned is filled through use of special materials and techniques in order to prevent reinfection.Tooth Fractures: Break or rupture of a tooth or tooth root.Epoxy Resins: Polymeric resins derived from OXIRANES and characterized by strength and thermosetting properties. Epoxy resins are often used as dental materials.
Twenty dentin disks were cut from human extracted third molars. The dentin surface of the disks was etched with 6% citric acid ... Half of the roots were irrigated with a 5-mL rinse of 17% EDTA to remove the smear layer. Roots were filled with gutta-percha ( ... fractured and acid treated dentin surfaces. In vitro the penetration of bacteria into tubules of intact dentin exposed by ... Dentistry portal Brännström M, Johnson G. Effects of various conditioners and cleaning agents on prepared dentin surfaces: A ...
Once the root sheath disintegrates, the newly formed surface of root dentin comes into contact with the undifferentiated cells ... The cementoblasts then disperse to cover the root dentin area and undergo cementogenesis, laying down cementoid. During the ... Cementum grows slowly, by surface apposition, throughout life. Cementum Cementoblast Hertwig epithelial root sheath Cementum, ... The external shape of each root is fully determined by the position of the surrounding Hertwig epithelial root sheath. It is ...
This can result in sensitivity or pain from the exposed tooth root surface (dentin is more permeable and soft compared to ... The aim may be to cover exposed root surfaces or merely to augment the band of keratinized tissue. The soft tissue in the oral ... The benefits of corrective therapy often result in decreased sensitivity through coverage of the root surface in addition to a ... enamel and dentin is what makes up the tooth root). Recession may also cause there to be an unasthetic appearance especially if ...
... use of other fluoride delivery methods Caries prevention on exposed root surfaces Remineralization of lesions in root dentin ... 7 (5). Petersson, LG (Mar 2013). "The role of fluoride in the preventive management of dentin hypersensitivity and root caries ... "The role of fluoride in the preventive management of dentin hypersensitivity and root caries". Clinical Oral Investigations. 17 ... especially children 5 and younger Desensitizing agent for exposed root surfaces Fluoridated cavity varnish When a higher ...
In individuals with dentin hypersensitivity associated with exposed root surfaces, brushing twice daily with toothpaste ... Dentin hypersensitivity (abbreviated to DH,[1] or DHS,[2] and also termed sensitive dentin,[3] dentin sensitivity,[4] cervical ... To contradict this view, not all exposed dentin surfaces cause DH.[5] Others suggest that due to the presence of patent ... The main cause of DH is gingival recession (receding gums) with exposure of root surfaces, loss of the cementum layer and smear ...
... in the root area, to the outer wall of the pulp. From the outer surface of the dentine to the area nearest the pulp, these ... Secondary dentin is a layer of dentin produced after the root of the tooth is completely formed. Tertiary dentin is created in ... Circumpulpal dentin is formed before the root formation is completed. Newly secreted dentin is unmineralised and is called ... Below it lies the circumpulpal dentin, a more mineralized dentin which makes up most of the dentin layer and is secreted after ...
... including desensitizing toothpastes and protective varnishes that coat the exposed dentin surface. Treatment of the root cause ... and the central soft tissue nutrient canals within each root are root canals, exiting through one or more holes at the root end ... Petersson LG (Mar 2013). "The role of fluoride in the preventive management of dentin hypersensitivity and root caries". ... This has proved especially helpful in children where the tooth root has not yet finished developing and root canal treatments ...
... in the root area, to the outer wall of the pulp.[5] From the outer surface of the dentine to the area nearest the pulp, these ... Tertiary dentin (including reparative dentin or sclerotic dentin) - pathologicEdit. Tertiary dentin is dentin formed as a ... Secondary dentinEdit. Secondary dentin(adventitious dentin) is formed after root formation is complete, normally after the ... This appearance, specific to root dentin, is possibly due to differences in the rates of formation of coronal and root dentin. ...
Which, if in close proximity to the root surface will resorb the root surface cementum and underlying root dentin. This can ... Root resorption of secondary teeth can occur as a result of pressure on the root surface. This can be from trauma, ectopic ... vary in severity from evidence of microscopic pits in the root surface to complete devastation of the root surface. Deciduous ... Internal resorption is an unusual condition where the dentin and pulpal walls begin to resorb centrally within the root canal. ...
The attachment of the JE to the tooth surface can occur on enamel, cementum, or dentin. The position of the EA on the tooth ... creating the first tissue attached to the tooth surface. This tissue is later replaced by a definitive JE as the root is formed ... The JE attaches to the surface of the tooth by way of the EA with hemidesmosomes and is, on average, roughly 1 mm in width in ... The superficial, or suprabasal, cells of the JE serve as part of the EA of the gingiva to the tooth surface. These superficial ...
As the cementum of root surfaces is more easily demineralized than enamel surfaces, a wider variety of bacteria can cause root ... dentin. If the odontoblasts are killed, the dentin produced is called "reparative" dentin. In the case of reparative dentin, ... Because the cementum enveloping the root surface is not nearly as durable as the enamel encasing the crown, root caries tends ... This new dentin is referred to as tertiary dentin. Tertiary dentin is produced to protect the pulp for as long as possible from ...
Accessory canals are also called lateral canals, because they are usually located on the lateral surface of the roots of the ... Slight decay in tooth structure not extending to the dentin may not alarm the pulp but as the dentin gets exposed, either due ... The dental pulp is a part of the dentin-pulp complex (endodontium). The vitality of the dentin-pulp complex, both during health ... extending laterally through the dentin to the periodontal tissue seen especially in the apical third of the root. ...
Reactionary dentin is secreted at varying speeds, dependant on the speed of progression of caries in the outer dentin surface. ... which is the formation of dentin, the substance beneath the tooth enamel on the crown and the cementum on the root. ... This tertiary dentin is called reactionary dentin. This is an attempt to slow down the progress of the caries so that it does ... Tertiary dentin secreted by odontoblasts is often due to chemical attack, either by chemicals diffusing through the dentin and ...
Dentin composes most of the root, which normally has pulp canals. The roots of teeth may be single in number (single-rooted ... Surfaces nearest the junction of the crown and root are referred to as cervical, and those closest to the apex of the root are ... SurfacesEdit. Surfaces that are nearest the cheeks or lips are referred to as facial, and those nearest the tongue are known as ... Surfaces further away from the median line are described as distal.. CuspEdit. A cusp is an elevation on an occlusal surface of ...
After the initiation of the formation of dentin in the root area of the tooth, the root sheath disintegrates and moves away ... such as on a root surface. They are usually found in the area between roots, which is called a furcation, of molars. Enamel ... from the root surface so that the cells of the dental sac can come in contact with predentin to differentiate into ... The most common location of enamel pearls is the furcation areas of the maxillary and mandibular third molar roots. Enamel ...
There are three types of dentin, primary, secondary and tertiary.[18] Secondary dentin is a layer of dentin produced after root ... Enamel varies in thickness over the surface of the tooth and is often thickest at the cusp, up to 2.5mm, and thinnest at its ... The anatomic root is found below the CEJ and is covered with cementum. As with the crown, dentin composes most of the root, ... Dentin[edit]. Main article: Dentin. Dentin is the substance between enamel or cementum and the pulp chamber. It is secreted by ...
... and surface stains build up more readily. Dentinogenesis imperfecta is a defect of dentin formation, and the teeth may be ... Failure to completely clean out the necrotic soft tissue of the pulp system may cause staining, and certain root canal ... Secondary dentin is darker and more opaque than primary dentin. This gives the dentin an overall darker appearance. At the same ... The underlying dentin layer is darker than enamel, yellow-brown in color, and less transparent. Dentin forms the bulk of the ...
Internal staining of dentin can discolor the teeth from inside out. Internal bleaching can remedy this on root canal treated ... Teeth are composed of a surface enamel layer, which is whiter and semitransparent, and an underlying dentin layer, which is ... and yellow roots, as roots do not bleach as readily as crowns Sensitive gums Defective dental restorations Tooth decay. White- ... intended to remove surface stains from the tooth surface. Sometimes they contain enzymes purported to break down the biofilm on ...
The natural inhibition to root resorption provided by the lining of the root may be altered by increased amounts of Vitamin D, ... Resorbed cementum and dentin is replaced with bone-like tissue. Clinical signs of TRs are often minimal since the discomfort ... TRs clinically appear as erosions of the surface of the tooth at the gingival border. They are often covered with calculus or ... Amputation of the tooth crown without root removal has also been advocated in cases demonstrated on a radiograph to be type 2 ...
A brachydont tooth has a crown above the gingival line and a neck just below it, and at least one root. A cap of enamel covers ... The occlusal surface is rough and mostly flat, adapted for crushing and grinding plant material. The body is covered with ... The cementum and the enamel invaginate into the thick layer of dentin. The opposite condition to hypsodont is called brachydont ... The occlusal surfaces tend to be pointed, well-suited for holding prey and tearing and shredding. Zalambdodont molars have ...
The cementum is the surface layer of the tooth root, covering the dentine (which is labeled B). Rather than being a passive ... It is a chronic condition that forms a large, shallow lesion and slowly invades first the root's cementum and then dentin to ... Harvesting cementum from root surface: A new paradigm in the study of cementum and the cemento-dentinal junction, George ... Cementum thickness can increase on the root end to compensate for attritional wear of the occlusal/incisal surface and passive ...
The root of this tooth is cone-shaped with a rounded apex. Most of the surfaces are smooth, but the mesial surface of the root ... Gender differences in enamel thickness and dentin width are low. Age differences in the gingival-incisal length of maxillary ... The labial surface of the crown is convex from the crest of curvature to the incisal edge. The lingual surface of the crown is ... The cervical line, which is seen as the border between the crown and the root of the tooth, is closer to the apex of the root ...
The motor branches of spinal nerves include: ansa cervicalis, dividing into a superior root, C-1, and an inferior root, C-2 and ... They have wide surfaces that help to grind food. The white visible part of a tooth is called the crown. The rounded upper ... The inner portions of the tooth consist of the dentin, a bonelike tissue, and the pulp. The pulp is a soft tissue area ... The four parathyroid glands are situated upon the back surface of the thyroid gland. The respiratory system begins in the head ...
Dentin rates approximately 3 on the Mohs scale of mineral hardness. Cementum is slightly softer than dentin and consists of ... Cementum on the root ends surrounds the apical foramen and may extend slightly onto the inner wall of the pulp canal. "Medical ... In humans, enamel varies in thickness over the surface of the tooth, often thickest at the cusp, up to 2.5 mm, and thinnest at ... Dentin, less mineralized and less brittle, 3-4 in hardness, compensates for enamel and is necessary as a support. On ...
Dentin composes most of the root, which normally has pulp canals. The roots of teeth may be single in number (single-rooted ... Surfaces nearest the junction of the crown and root are referred to as cervical, and those closest to the apex of the root are ... The tooth is supported in bone by an attachment apparatus, known as the periodontium, which interacts with the root. Surfaces ... Surfaces further away from the median line are described as distal. A cusp is an elevation on an occlusal surface of posterior ...
Root canal *Apical foramen. *Cementoenamel junction. *Enamel. *Dental-enamel junction. *Dentin. *Dental papilla ...
Strain Distribution in Root Surface Dentin of Maxillary Central Incisors during Lateral Compaction. . Biblioteca virtual para ... Strain Distribution in Root Surface Dentin of Maxillary Central Incisors during Lateral Compaction - Descarga este documento en ... The force applied to the spreader and the strains developing in the surface root dentin were continuously recorded at a ... Strain Distribution in Root Surface Dentin of Maxillary Central Incisors during Lateral Compaction. ...
... root surfaces. Unlike the crowns of teeth, these root surfaces are not covered by enamel and are more susceptible to caries. ... Unchecked, the bacteria can penetrate the dissolved surface, attack the underlying dentin, and reach the soft pulp tissue. ... and root desensitizer (i.e., to reduce sensitivity to temperature and touch that sometimes occurs on root surfaces exposed by ... Brustman B. Impact of exposure to fluorideadequate water on root surface caries in elderly. Gerodontics 1986;2:203--7. ...
Dentin is harder than bone. enamel - the tough, shiny, white outer surface of the tooth. gums - the soft tissue that surrounds ... root - the anchor of a tooth that extends into the jawbone. The number of roots ranges from one to four. Related Pages:. Tooth ... Molars in the top jaw have 3 roots; molars in the lower jaw have 2 roots. Adults have 12 molars (6 in the top jaw and 6 in the ... canine (also called cuspid) - a type of tooth with a single point (also called canine tooth) and a single root. Cuspid teeth ...
... boundary between root and crown ,/li,,/ul,,ul,,li,Enamel - outer surface ,/li,,/ul,,ul,,li,Dentin - bone-like, but noncellular ... li,,/ul,,ul,,li,Pulp cavity - hollow with blood vessels and nerves ,/li,,/ul,,ul,,li,Root canal - canal length of root ,/li,,/ ... Structure of Teeth ,ul,,li,Crown - exposed surface of tooth ,/li,,/ul,,ul,,li,Neck - ... medial surface of mandible - drain near lingual frenulum drain posterior to lower molars ,/li,,/ul,,ul,,li,Sublingual - in ...
Influence of ethanol on dentin roughness, surface free energy, and interaction between AH Plus and root dentin ... Full text: Available Index: LILACS (Americas) Main subject: Root Canal Filling Materials / Tooth Root / Dentin / Ethanol / ... Humans , Dentin/chemistry , Dentin/drug effects , Epoxy Resins/chemistry , Ethanol/chemistry , Root Canal Filling Materials/ ... surface free energy, and contact angle between AH Plus and the root canal dentin. One hundred human maxillary anterior teeth ...
... the surface effects of various topical applications of tetracycline on the instrumented dentin root surface of human teeth. ... the surface effects of various topical applications of tetracycline on the instrumented dentin root surface of human teeth. ... the surface effects of various topical applications of tetracycline on the instrumented dentin root surface of human teeth. ... the surface effects of various topical applications of tetracycline on the instrumented dentin root surface of human teeth. ...
... depositing strong acid-resistant mineral on tooth surfaces, including dentin tubules, to relieve hypersensitivity. ... depositing strong acid-resistant mineral on tooth surfaces, including dentin tubules, to relieve hypersensitivity. ... this varnish provide the necessary calcium to achieve improvement in root and enamel density/strength for those with little to ... It is upsetting when the surface of your teeth feels rough, but at least I have the ESPE Vanish to give protection to my teeth ...
The progression from bright to faint staining in the pits on the root surface on dentin, and on cementum, highlights resorption ... The root surface, separated by a 100 μm thick PDL from the resorbed bone in the distal root-bone complex also exhibits ... Furthermore, the root exhibits a number of pits in dentin with a narrow pinch through cementum. Bone in the distal root-bone ... The colored segments on the roots represent the inclination angle of the roots. De = exposed dentin. ...
Dentin, the hard yellow part under the enamel. *Cementum, the hard tissue that covers the root and keeps your teeth in place ... Tooth decay - damage to a tooths surface, which can lead to cavities ... ClinicalTrials.gov: Root Canal Therapy (National Institutes of Health) * ClinicalTrials.gov: Sleep Bruxism (National Institutes ... Root canals for cavities or infections that affect the pulp (inside of the tooth) ...
Just beneath the enamel is dentin, a substance harder than bone. The gum surrounds the base (root) ... The outer surface of the crown is made of enamel. ... The outer surface of the crown is made of enamel. Just beneath ... The gum surrounds the base (root) of the tooth.. The root of the tooth extends down into the jawbone. The root contains blood ... the enamel is dentin, a substance harder than bone. ...
Baby-bottle tooth decay, Root caries, Gum-line cavities, Chronic dry mouth. ... Exposed root surfaces are composed of dentin.. a) Dental anatomy as it pertains to this problem.. You may not be aware of this ... Exposed root surfaces = A new set of cavity risks.. Due to gum recession and subsequent root surface exposure, a person may ... g) What can you do to help prevent root caries?. *If dental plaque doesnt accumulate on your root surfaces, cavities cant ...
A surface enamel layer covering only the crown. * An inner layer of dentin in both the crown and the root ... The dentin of the tooth is very porous and is an ineffective seal over the pulp. In Ellis II and III fractures in which the ... Dentin is less radiopaque than enamel and has a radiopacity similar to that of bone. The pulp tissue is not mineralized and ... Cover the exposed surface with a calcium hydroxide composition (eg, Dycal), a glass ionomer, or a strip of adhesive barrier (eg ...
Enamel-the hard outer surface of the tooth. *Dentin-the second softer layer beneath the enamel ... Root Canal. Tooth decay that reaches the pulp and/or root of the tooth is treated with a root canal : ... Root Canal. Tooth decay that reaches the pulp and/or root of the tooth is treated with a root canal : ... The inside of the tooth and the root (nerve) canals are cleaned and filled with a permanent filling. ...
Fluoride varnishes applied to the exposed root surface *Dentin sealers applied to the exposed root surface ... White fillings (bonding) to cover exposed root surfaces * ... a thin layer of the toothpaste on the exposed tooth roots with ... Use a soft-bristled toothbrush: This will result in less toothbrush abrasion to the tooth surface and less irritation to your ... Watch what you eat: Frequent consumption of highly acid foods can gradually dissolve tooth enamel and lead to dentin exposure. ...
Enamel-the hard outer surface of the tooth. *Dentin-the second softer layer beneath the enamel ... Root Canal. Tooth decay that reaches the pulp and/or root of the tooth is treated with a root canal: *The tooth is numbed and a ... The inside of the tooth and the root (nerve) canals are cleaned and filled with a permanent filling. ... It is applied to the chewing surfaces of teeth. Sealants usually last anywhere from 5-15 years. ...
In individuals with dentin hypersensitivity associated with exposed root surfaces, brushing twice daily with toothpaste ... Dentin hypersensitivity (abbreviated to DH,[1] or DHS,[2] and also termed sensitive dentin,[3] dentin sensitivity,[4] cervical ... To contradict this view, not all exposed dentin surfaces cause DH.[5] Others suggest that due to the presence of patent ... The main cause of DH is gingival recession (receding gums) with exposure of root surfaces, loss of the cementum layer and smear ...
root surface 521.08. *. smooth surface 521.07. *. dentin (acute) (chronic) 521.02. *. enamel (acute) (chronic) (incipient) ... Cant find a code? Start at the root of ICD-9-CM, check the 2011 ICD-9-CM Index or use the search engine at the top of this ...
It is composed of roots, apices, crown, neck, cementum, ligaments, pulp, dentin and enamel. ... Cementum: layer of boney material below the surface of the gumline, covering the root; it is attached to the bone into which ... Apex: Most terminal portion of the root. Apical Delta: Small openings in the root tip allowing tiny nerves and vessels to ... The root should be minimally handled...to preserve the integrity of the periodonal ligament *Root canal therapy...if needed... ...
In the apical part of the root, the HERS is continuous and attaches the dentin closely (W). In the root surface where HERS ... HERS cells are detectable on the surface of the root throughout root formation and do not disappear. Most of the HERS cells are ... Bsp is detectable on the surface of the root and alveolar bone (I-L).. More than 40% of the cells on the surface of the ... and dentin surface ( Y, indicated by white arrows in line).. D: dentin, PDL: periodontal ligament; OD: odontoblast, DP: dental ...
... use of other fluoride delivery methods Caries prevention on exposed root surfaces Remineralization of lesions in root dentin ... 7 (5). Petersson, LG (Mar 2013). "The role of fluoride in the preventive management of dentin hypersensitivity and root caries ... "The role of fluoride in the preventive management of dentin hypersensitivity and root caries". Clinical Oral Investigations. 17 ... especially children 5 and younger Desensitizing agent for exposed root surfaces Fluoridated cavity varnish When a higher ...
Dentin composes most of the root, which normally has pulp canals. The roots of teeth may be single in number (single-rooted ... Surfaces nearest the junction of the crown and root are referred to as cervical, and those closest to the apex of the root are ... SurfacesEdit. Surfaces that are nearest the cheeks or lips are referred to as facial, and those nearest the tongue are known as ... Surfaces further away from the median line are described as distal.. CuspEdit. A cusp is an elevation on an occlusal surface of ...
... exposing the underlying surface, the dentin, thus, reducing the protection the enamel and gums provide to the tooth and root.. ... Over the dentin lies enamel, which covers teeth above the gum; and cementum, which coats your tooth roots below the crown. ... sweet and acidic foods all stimulate the nerves through tubules in dentin that connect to the tooths surface, causing the pain ... Heres what to look for to protect these important surfaces:. Enamel Straighteners. Enamel and cementum protect the inner tooth ...
Soft root surfaces, exposed when gums have receded, develop cavities that spread to other surfaces of the tooth. The rate at ... However, this reversal occurs only at the surface layer or enamel of the tooth. Once the bacteria have reached the dentin, or ... If the spot has extended into dentin, which will be evident on the x-ray, treatment is required. Treatment depends on the size ... These toxins form a sticky mass that allows food debris and bacteria (plaque) to stick to the tooth surface. The plaque acts as ...
The gums can also recede over time, exposing the underlying root surface dentin. ... Under normal conditions, the underlying dentin of the tooth (the layer that immediately surrounds the nerve) is covered by the ... exposing the underlying root surface dentin.. The dentin contains a large numbers of pores or tubes that run from the outside ... Exposure of the dentin can occur due to a number of factors. Some of the more common reasons are:. *Gum recession due to age or ...
Root Planing: A procedure performed on tooth roots to remove dentin, bacteria, calculus, and diseased surfaces. ... Amalgam: A single surface silver filling.. *Composite: A single surface filling made of tooth-colored plastic. Usually ... Root Canal: The chamber within the root of the tooth that contains pulp. ... Tooth surfaces are slowly destroyed by acid-producing bacteria.. Cavity: An area of the tooth that is damaged by caries, ...
  • Six miniature strain gauges were bonded on the roots of fourteen recently extracted maxillary central incisors that were subjected to root canal instrumentation. (duhnnae.com)
  • Abstract This study aimed to evaluate the influence of different ethanol concentrations on dentin roughness, surface free energy, and contact angle between AH Plus and the root canal dentin . (bvsalud.org)
  • An acrylic bar was positioned between two dentin specimens and impression material was added to create a block, simulating an instrumented root canal space. (bvsalud.org)
  • A rugosimeter and a goniometer were used to verify the roughness (Ra) and to measure the surface free energy and the contact angle between the AH Plus sealer and the root canal dentin . (bvsalud.org)
  • The 70% and 100% ethanol groups showed significantly decreased roughness as well as increased surface free energy in the root canal dentin when compared to the wet and paper point groups. (bvsalud.org)
  • In addition, ethanol significantly reduced the contact angle between the AH Plus sealer and the root canal dentin . (bvsalud.org)
  • The root (nerve) canal is sealed. (denverhealth.org)
  • Tooth decay and/or tooth infection is too extensive for filling or root canal. (denverhealth.org)
  • Root canal is useful for preserving the appearance and function of a diseased tooth provided there is sufficient remaining healthy tooth (i.e. that the damage does not extend far below the gum line). (newmanveterinary.com)
  • This case report describes intratubular biomineralization in root canal, filled with calcium-enriched material after 8 years of clinical maintenance. (mdpi.com)
  • The root canal obturation material was closely adapted to root dentin surface, suggesting the possibility of chemical bonding between the two interfaces. (mdpi.com)
  • Yoo Y-J, Lee YS, Yoo JS, Perinpanayagam H, Yoo CS, Kang HS, Oh S, Chang SW, Kum K-Y. Intratubular Biomineralization in a Root Canal Filled with Calcium-Enriched Material over 8 Years. (mdpi.com)
  • The ultrasonic vibration of the tip allows the irrigation liquid to disrupt surface-adherent biofilms and to reach anatomic complexities within root canal systems. (ultradent.com)
  • The root canal bonding of chemical-cured total-etch resin cements," Journal of Endodontics , vol. 34, no. 5, pp. 583-586, 2008. (hindawi.com)
  • Effects of light penetration and smear layer removal on adhesion of post-cores to root canal dentin by self-etching adhesives," Dental Materials , vol. 25, no. 12, pp. 1484-1492, 2009. (hindawi.com)
  • Dentin morphology of root canal surface: a quantitative evaluation based on a scanning electronic microscopy study," BioMed Research International , vol. 2015, Article ID 164065, 7 pages, 2015. (hindawi.com)
  • Lennon, "Chelating agents in root canal treatment: mode of action and indications for their use," International Endodontic Journal , vol. 36, no. 12, pp. 810-830, 2003. (hindawi.com)
  • The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of multiple root canal usage on the surface topography and fracture of Twisted File (TF) and ProTaper (PT) rotary Ni-Ti file systems, using scanning electron microscope (SEM). (ijdr.in)
  • TF 25, 0.06 taper and PT F1 instruments were analyzed by SEM when new and thereafter every three root canal usages. (ijdr.in)
  • The sequential use was continued till the instrument fractured and the number of root canal usages for the file to fracture was noted. (ijdr.in)
  • PT instruments fractured at a mean root canal usage of 17.4, while TF instruments showed a mean root canal usage of 11.8. (ijdr.in)
  • Root canal instruments manufactured from nickel-titanium (Ni-Ti) alloy were introduced in 1988 to overcome the rigidity (high modulus of elasticity) of stainless steel material. (ijdr.in)
  • The superelasticity of the material allows the Ni-Ti rotary instruments to be used in continuous rotation, even in curved root canals, to produce a desirable tapered root canal form, with a low risk of transporting the original canal lumen. (ijdr.in)
  • These methods include: electropolishing, reducing the contact area between the instrument and the root canal, varying the taper over the length of the cutting blades, and the use of new alloys that provide superior mechanical properties. (ijdr.in)
  • In spite of these modifications, there is concern about the incidence of Ni-Ti instrument fractures during root canal preparation. (ijdr.in)
  • In the study presented here, Roseomonas mucosa was identified for the first time as part of the endodontic microbiota of an infected root canal and characterised in respect to growth, antibiotic susceptibility and biofilm formation. (biomedcentral.com)
  • In this communication, we describe the characterization of a Roseomonas mucosa strain isolated during treatment of an infected root canal. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Samples were collected during regular root canal treatment following informed patient consent and ethics commission approval. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Method and Materials: Thirty extracted molars received root canal treatment followed by a standardized tooth preparation (3-mm cuspal reduction and immediate dentin sealing). (quintpub.com)
  • A Field Emission SEM comparison of four post-fixation drying techniques for human dentin. (umn.edu)
  • A Morphological Field Emission SEM study of the effect of six phosphoric acid etching agents on human dentin. (umn.edu)
  • Blocks of human dentin roots (3x3 mm2) were irradiated at 9.3 µm wavelength with a 15-18 µs pulse duration laser and fluences of 0.50-1.50 J/cm2. (spie.org)
  • In this study, the distal side of the root and the adjacent alveolar bone will be referred to as the distal root bone complex (bone resorption side), and the mesial side of the root and adjacent bone as the mesial root bone complex (bone apposition side). (hindawi.com)
  • The tooth root transmits and balances occlusal forces through the periodontium to the alveolar bone. (medsci.org)
  • We found that the DF was shaped like a crescent and was located between the root apical and the alveolar bone. (medsci.org)
  • In vitro bond strengths and SEM evaluation of dentin bonding systems to different dentin substrates. (umn.edu)
  • The present study aimed to evaluate, in vitro , the influence of different treatment protocols of weakened root dentin on the bond strength (BS) of glass fiber reinforced post luted with different resin cements. (usp.br)
  • The OCT showed a potential for quantitative estimation of lesion depth and mineral loss with cavitated dentin lesions in vitro . (spiedigitallibrary.org)
  • The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate the influence of different irrigation protocols on the bond strength, at different root depths, of fiber posts cemented with a self-adhesive cement 24 hours after endodontic treatment. (agd.org)
  • Previous studies have shown that Hertwig's epithelial root sheath (HERS) plays an important role in root development, but the fate of HERS has remained unknown. (nih.gov)
  • 5′-Bromo-2′-deoxyuridine (BrdU) labeling and cytokeratin (CK) 14 and Notch2 immunostaining suggested that the inhibition of inner enamel epithelium growth and the more-active proliferation of the outer enamel epithelium and/or stellate reticulum result in Hertwig's epithelial root sheath formation. (biologists.org)
  • Other less common causes are acid erosion (e.g. related to gastroesophageal reflux disease , bulimia or excessive consumption of acidic foods and drinks), and periodontal root planing. (wikipedia.org)
  • When the environment in the mouth becomes too acidic, calcium and phosphate ions are lost from the enamel crystals that constitute the surface layer of the tooth. (healthy.net)
  • Lessen or steer clear of consumption of extremely acidic food and drinks, like lemons, limes and carbonated drinks which may gradually break down your tooth enamel eventually resulting in dentin exposure. (selfgrowth.com)
  • Dentin is harder than bone. (enchantedlearning.com)
  • Regardless, the drift of the molars causes bone resorption located on the distal side of the root and bone formation on the mesial side. (hindawi.com)
  • Numerous studies in dental research have used the rat periodontium as a model to investigate adaptation of bone, PDL, and root due to perturbations, such as disease [ 9 ] and extraneous loads [ 10 ]. (hindawi.com)
  • Just beneath the enamel is dentin, a substance harder than bone. (medlineplus.gov)
  • Dental follicle mesenchymal progenitor cells express parathyroid hormone-related peptide (PTHrP), a locally acting autocrine/paracrine ligand, and become essential skeletal cell types establishing the root-bone interface. (pnas.org)
  • Dentin is a bone-like matrix that is porous and yellow-hued material. (wikipedia.org)
  • The infection can quickly spread and travel down the root, forming an abscess, which is an infection in the bone. (thecommunityvoice.com)
  • The root extends below the gum line and supports the tooth into the bone. (apsense.com)
  • Furthermore, it has been speculated based on gene expression studies during mouse molar root development that some growth factors, including bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs), epidermal growth factors (EGFs) and transcriptional factors (i.e. (biologists.org)
  • Demineralized dentin matrix (DDM) that has osteoinductive and osteoconductive capacities was developed as potential candidate for rhBMP-2 carrier that has its endogenous growth factors and fulfils the requirements such as controlled release kinetics, biocompatibility, biodegradabilities and bone forming capacity. (intechopen.com)
  • Coronal dentin is sometimes resorbed and replaced by lamellar bone and there is often hypercementosis on root surfaces. (prolekare.cz)
  • Background: Chlorhexidine could have effect on shear bond strength of composite resin-dentin. (scirp.org)
  • Objective: The purpose of this study is to compare two methods of chlorhexidine application of shear bond strength degradation between composite resin and dentin. (scirp.org)
  • Conclusion: Method of using bonding contains chlorhexidine can increase and inhibit degradation shear bond strength between composite resin and dentin. (scirp.org)
  • Rahmayanti study in 2011 compared the effects of chlorhexidine and glutaraldehyde on shear bond strength of composite resin-dentin by the method of storage on artificial saliva for 1 and 30 days. (scirp.org)
  • Within the limitations of this study, it can be concluded that the different irrigation protocols did not influence the bond strength of self-adhesive resin cement, which presented similar behaviors at the 3 root depths studied. (agd.org)
  • Thus, while 3 of the tested hemostatic agents did not have significant effects on the bond strength of composite resin to dentin, ABS increased the bond strength of CSE Bond to dentin. (agd.org)
  • Dr. Perdigão is involved in research of new dental materials mainly in the area of dentin adhesives, composite resins, and dental whitening. (umn.edu)
  • The roots were flared using diamond bur #4137 and #720G at a depth of 12mm and filled by the lateral condensation technique with AH Plus sealer modified with 0.1% Rhodamine B. After 3 times the time required to the setting reaction of the sealer the filling was removed and the glass fiber post was relined with composite resin. (usp.br)
  • However, if the amount of surface space the tooth needs to be filled is too large for a resin composite filling, but there is adequate healthy tooth structure, then the next option is an inlay, onlay or partial crown. (centurysmile.com)