Chamomile: Common name for several daisy-like plants (MATRICARIA; TRIPLEUROSPERMUM; ANTHEMIS; CHAMAEMELUM) native to Europe and Western Asia, now naturalized in the United States and Australia.Roman World: A historical and cultural entity dispersed across a wide geographical area under the political domination and influence of ancient Rome, bringing to the conquered people the Roman civilization and culture from 753 B.C. to the beginning of the imperial rule under Augustus in 27 B.C. The early city built on seven hills grew to conquer Sicily, Sardinia, Carthage, Gaul, Spain, Britain, Greece, Asia Minor, etc., and extended ultimately from Mesopotamia to the Atlantic. Roman medicine was almost entirely in Greek hands, but Rome, with its superior water system, remains a model of sanitation and hygiene. (From A. Castiglioni, A History of Medicine, 2d ed pp196-99; from F. H. Garrison, An Introduction to the History of Medicine, 4th ed, pp107-120)Matricaria: A plant genus of the family ASTERACEAE. M. chamomilla appears similar to Anthemis but this flower disk is conical and hollow and lacks chaffy bract scales and the odor is weaker. The common name of 'manzanilla' is confused with other meanings of the word. 'Matricaria chamomilla sensu' is classified by some as Tripleurospermum perforata. Other plants with similar common names include CHAMAEMELUM; TRIPLEUROSPERMUM and ANTHEMIS.Holy Roman Empire: Realm in central Europe consisting of a confederation of German and Italian territories under the suzerainty of an emperor and existing from the 9th or 10th century to 1806.Catholicism: The Christian faith, practice, or system of the Catholic Church, specifically the Roman Catholic, the Christian church that is characterized by a hierarchic structure of bishops and priests in which doctrinal and disciplinary authority are dependent upon apostolic succession, with the pope as head of the episcopal college. (From Webster, 3d ed; American Heritage Dictionary, 2d college ed)History, Ancient: The period of history before 500 of the common era.RomeAcari: A large, subclass of arachnids comprising the MITES and TICKS, including parasites of plants, animals, and humans, as well as several important disease vectors.SculptureMentha piperita: A plant genus of the family LAMIACEAE that is the source of peppermint oil.Mortuary Practice: Activities associated with the disposition of the dead. It excludes cultural practices such as funeral rites.Plant Components, Aerial: The above-ground plant without the roots.Oviparity: The capability of producing eggs (OVA) from which young are hatched outside the body. While mostly referring to nonmammalian species, this does include MAMMALS of the order MONOTREMATA.Plant Extracts: Concentrated pharmaceutical preparations of plants obtained by removing active constituents with a suitable solvent, which is evaporated away, and adjusting the residue to a prescribed standard.Passiflora: A plant genus of the family Passifloraceae, order Violales, subclass Dilleniidae, class Magnoliopsida. They are vines with ornamental flowers and edible fruit.Apium graveolens: A plant species of the family APIACEAE. The stalks are a food source.History, 15th Century: Time period from 1401 through 1500 of the common era.History, 17th Century: Time period from 1601 through 1700 of the common era.Arnica: A plant genus of the family ASTERACEAE. The dried flower heads of Arnica montana are used externally as a counterirritant and tincture for sprains and bruises, either as crude extract or in homeopathic dilution (HOMEOPATHY). Arnica contains volatile oils (OILS, VOLATILE), arnicin, arnisterol, FLAVONOIDS; TANNINS; and resin. The common name of Wolf's Bane is similar to the common name for ACONITUM.Sesquiterpenes, Eudesmane: SESQUITERPENES cyclized into two adjoining cyclohexane rings but with a different configuration from the ARTEMISININS.Oils, Volatile: Oils which evaporate readily. The volatile oils occur in aromatic plants, to which they give odor and other characteristics. Most volatile oils consist of a mixture of two or more TERPENES or of a mixture of an eleoptene (the more volatile constituent of a volatile oil) with a stearopten (the more solid constituent). The synonym essential oils refers to the essence of a plant, as its perfume or scent, and not to its indispensability.Archaeology: The scientific study of past societies through artifacts, fossils, etc.History, Medieval: The period of history from the year 500 through 1450 of the common era.Civilization: The distinctly human attributes and attainments of a particular society.Burial: The act or ceremony of putting a corpse into the ground or a vault, or into the sea; or the inurnment of CREMAINS.PaintingsCapsules: Hard or soft soluble containers used for the oral administration of medicine.History, 16th Century: Time period from 1501 through 1600 of the common era.Food Industry: The industry concerned with processing, preparing, preserving, distributing, and serving of foods and beverages.Plant Oils: Oils derived from plants or plant products.Anthemis: A plant genus of the family ASTERACEAE that is similar to MATRICARIA but this has tiny chaffy bract scales between each pair of florets. Members contain sesquiterpene lactones. Other plants with similar common names include FERULA; FOENICULUM; MATRICARIA; CHAMAEMELUM and TRIPLEUROSPERMUM.Manufactured Materials: Substances and materials manufactured for use in various technologies and industries and for domestic use.Laurus: A plant genus in the LAURACEAE family. Laurus nobilis L. leaves are known for use in SPICES, having a similar flavor as UMBELLULARIA.Facility Regulation and Control: Formal voluntary or governmental procedures and standards required of hospitals and health or other facilities to improve operating efficiency, and for the protection of the consumer.United States Food and Drug Administration: An agency of the PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE concerned with the overall planning, promoting, and administering of programs pertaining to maintaining standards of quality of foods, drugs, therapeutic devices, etc.Chamaemelum: A plant genus of the family ASTERACEAE that is used in folk medicine as CHAMOMILE. Other plants with similar common names include MATRICARIA; TRIPLEUROSPERMUM and ANTHEMIS.Copyright: It is a form of protection provided by law. In the United States this protection is granted to authors of original works of authorship, including literary, dramatic, musical, artistic, and certain other intellectual works. This protection is available to both published and unpublished works. (from Circular of the United States Copyright Office, 6/30/2008)Dendrobium: A plant genus of the family ORCHIDACEAE that contains dihydroayapin (COUMARINS) and phenanthraquinones.Electronic Mail: Messages between computer users via COMPUTER COMMUNICATION NETWORKS. This feature duplicates most of the features of paper mail, such as forwarding, multiple copies, and attachments of images and other file types, but with a speed advantage. The term also refers to an individual message sent in this way.Geranium: A plant genus of the family GERANIACEAE. Geranium is also used as a common name for PELARGONIUM.Distillation: A chemical process for separating the components of a liquid mixture by boiling and collecting condensed vapors.Steam: Water in its gaseous state. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)Love: Affection; in psychiatry commonly refers to pleasure, particularly as it applies to gratifying experiences between individuals.Patents as Topic: Exclusive legal rights or privileges applied to inventions, plants, etc.ThiomalatesReward: An object or a situation that can serve to reinforce a response, to satisfy a motive, or to afford pleasure.Odors: The volatile portions of substances perceptible by the sense of smell. (Grant & Hackh's Chemical Dictionary, 5th ed)Smell: The ability to detect scents or odors, such as the function of OLFACTORY RECEPTOR NEURONS.Scent Glands: Exocrine glands in animals which secrete scents which either repel or attract other animals, e.g. perianal glands of skunks, anal glands of weasels, musk glands of foxes, ventral glands of wood rats, and dorsal glands of peccaries.
  • Roman Chamomile is known to be especially helpful in combating insomnia . (aromaweb.com)
  • Roman Chamomile is wonderful for insomnia caused by stress or tension, for relieving intestinal spasms (especially when blended with Sweet Marjoram ), helpful for inflamed joints and muscle or joint pain. (naturesgift.com)
  • Chamomile oil has a soothing, calming effect on the nervous system and is a popular oil for treating insomnia, anxiety and stress related conditions. (baseformula.com)
  • Roman Essential Oil can be inhaled, and even sprayed on your pillows and bed sheets, to ease your insomnia. (paleodojo.com)
  • The relaxing properties of Roman chamomile promote healthy sleep and fight insomnia. (angelico.london)
  • Roman chamomile may cause an allergic reaction in people who are sensitive to the Asteraceae/Compositae family. (medlineplus.gov)
  • Patients with severe allergic responses to ragweed (ragwort) should be warned about the possible cross-sensitivity to chamomile and other members of the Asteraceae/Compositae family (e.g. echinacea, feverfew, milk thistle). (pfaf.org)
  • Chamomile plants are a member of the Asteraceae/Compositae family. (angelico.london)
  • Known as the "plant's physician" thanks to the healing effect it has on the plants that grow near it, Roman Chamomile is a beneficent and beloved staple in many aromatherapists' collections. (pangeaorganics.com)
  • Interestingly, Roman Chamomile is known by gardeners as the "plant's physician" due to its positive effect on plants growing nearby. (drmariza.com)
  • Known as the "plant's physician," #Roman chamomile supports nearby plants. (everythingessential.com)
  • Roman Chamomile is often referred to as the "plant's physician" because it benefits and helps nourish neighboring plants. (essential-oil-remedies.com)
  • Any sort of issue that may cause irritability in babies or children can normally be lessened by either diffusing or applying a 1:1 dilution of Roman Chamomile to the bottoms of their feet. (drmariza.com)
  • A Roman Chamomile ground cover is unique, aromatic, attractive and is well-suited for covering large areas -- making it an excellent choice as a substitute for traditional lawn grass. (seedland.com)
  • In a number of folk magic traditions, particularly those of the American south, chamomile is known as a lucky flower and, if you're a gambler, washing your hands in chamomile tea will ensure good luck at the gaming tables. (piccoloseeds.com)
  • People who are allergic to ragweed (also in the daisy family) may be allergic to chamomile due to cross-reactivity. (wikipedia.org)