Hospitalization: The confinement of a patient in a hospital.Mortality: All deaths reported in a given population.Hospital Mortality: A vital statistic measuring or recording the rate of death from any cause in hospitalized populations.Infant Mortality: Postnatal deaths from BIRTH to 365 days after birth in a given population. Postneonatal mortality represents deaths between 28 days and 365 days after birth (as defined by National Center for Health Statistics). Neonatal mortality represents deaths from birth to 27 days after birth.Retrospective Studies: Studies used to test etiologic hypotheses in which inferences about an exposure to putative causal factors are derived from data relating to characteristics of persons under study or to events or experiences in their past. The essential feature is that some of the persons under study have the disease or outcome of interest and their characteristics are compared with those of unaffected persons.Length of Stay: The period of confinement of a patient to a hospital or other health facility.Cause of Death: Factors which produce cessation of all vital bodily functions. They can be analyzed from an epidemiologic viewpoint.Cohort Studies: Studies in which subsets of a defined population are identified. These groups may or may not be exposed to factors hypothesized to influence the probability of the occurrence of a particular disease or other outcome. Cohorts are defined populations which, as a whole, are followed in an attempt to determine distinguishing subgroup characteristics.United StatesTreatment Outcome: Evaluation undertaken to assess the results or consequences of management and procedures used in combating disease in order to determine the efficacy, effectiveness, safety, and practicability of these interventions in individual cases or series.Prospective Studies: Observation of a population for a sufficient number of persons over a sufficient number of years to generate incidence or mortality rates subsequent to the selection of the study group.Follow-Up Studies: Studies in which individuals or populations are followed to assess the outcome of exposures, procedures, or effects of a characteristic, e.g., occurrence of disease.Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Risk Factors: An aspect of personal behavior or lifestyle, environmental exposure, or inborn or inherited characteristic, which, on the basis of epidemiologic evidence, is known to be associated with a health-related condition considered important to prevent.Infant, Newborn: An infant during the first month after birth.Incidence: The number of new cases of a given disease during a given period in a specified population. It also is used for the rate at which new events occur in a defined population. It is differentiated from PREVALENCE, which refers to all cases, new or old, in the population at a given time.Proportional Hazards Models: Statistical models used in survival analysis that assert that the effect of the study factors on the hazard rate in the study population is multiplicative and does not change over time.Age Factors: Age as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or the effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from AGING, a physiological process, and TIME FACTORS which refers only to the passage of time.Risk Assessment: The qualitative or quantitative estimation of the likelihood of adverse effects that may result from exposure to specified health hazards or from the absence of beneficial influences. (Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 1988)Child Mortality: Number of deaths of children between one year of age to 12 years of age in a given population.Heart Failure: A heterogeneous condition in which the heart is unable to pump out sufficient blood to meet the metabolic need of the body. Heart failure can be caused by structural defects, functional abnormalities (VENTRICULAR DYSFUNCTION), or a sudden overload beyond its capacity. Chronic heart failure is more common than acute heart failure which results from sudden insult to cardiac function, such as MYOCARDIAL INFARCTION.Age Distribution: The frequency of different ages or age groups in a given population. The distribution may refer to either how many or what proportion of the group. The population is usually patients with a specific disease but the concept is not restricted to humans and is not restricted to medicine.Maternal Mortality: Maternal deaths resulting from complications of pregnancy and childbirth in a given population.Survival Analysis: A class of statistical procedures for estimating the survival function (function of time, starting with a population 100% well at a given time and providing the percentage of the population still well at later times). The survival analysis is then used for making inferences about the effects of treatments, prognostic factors, exposures, and other covariates on the function.Patient Discharge: The administrative process of discharging the patient, alive or dead, from hospitals or other health facilities.Survival Rate: The proportion of survivors in a group, e.g., of patients, studied and followed over a period, or the proportion of persons in a specified group alive at the beginning of a time interval who survive to the end of the interval. It is often studied using life table methods.Patient Readmission: Subsequent admissions of a patient to a hospital or other health care institution for treatment.Prognosis: A prediction of the probable outcome of a disease based on a individual's condition and the usual course of the disease as seen in similar situations.Comorbidity: The presence of co-existing or additional diseases with reference to an initial diagnosis or with reference to the index condition that is the subject of study. Comorbidity may affect the ability of affected individuals to function and also their survival; it may be used as a prognostic indicator for length of hospital stay, cost factors, and outcome or survival.Severity of Illness Index: Levels within a diagnostic group which are established by various measurement criteria applied to the seriousness of a patient's disorder.Multivariate Analysis: A set of techniques used when variation in several variables has to be studied simultaneously. In statistics, multivariate analysis is interpreted as any analytic method that allows simultaneous study of two or more dependent variables.Sex Distribution: The number of males and females in a given population. The distribution may refer to how many men or women or what proportion of either in the group. The population is usually patients with a specific disease but the concept is not restricted to humans and is not restricted to medicine.Patient Admission: The process of accepting patients. The concept includes patients accepted for medical and nursing care in a hospital or other health care institution.Registries: The systems and processes involved in the establishment, support, management, and operation of registers, e.g., disease registers.Sex Factors: Maleness or femaleness as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from SEX CHARACTERISTICS, anatomical or physiological manifestations of sex, and from SEX DISTRIBUTION, the number of males and females in given circumstances.Cardiovascular Diseases: Pathological conditions involving the CARDIOVASCULAR SYSTEM including the HEART; the BLOOD VESSELS; or the PERICARDIUM.Hospital Costs: The expenses incurred by a hospital in providing care. The hospital costs attributed to a particular patient care episode include the direct costs plus an appropriate proportion of the overhead for administration, personnel, building maintenance, equipment, etc. Hospital costs are one of the factors which determine HOSPITAL CHARGES (the price the hospital sets for its services).Pneumonia: Infection of the lung often accompanied by inflammation.Logistic Models: Statistical models which describe the relationship between a qualitative dependent variable (that is, one which can take only certain discrete values, such as the presence or absence of a disease) and an independent variable. A common application is in epidemiology for estimating an individual's risk (probability of a disease) as a function of a given risk factor.Poisson Distribution: A distribution function used to describe the occurrence of rare events or to describe the sampling distribution of isolated counts in a continuum of time or space.Morbidity: The proportion of patients with a particular disease during a given year per given unit of population.Health Care Costs: The actual costs of providing services related to the delivery of health care, including the costs of procedures, therapies, and medications. It is differentiated from HEALTH EXPENDITURES, which refers to the amount of money paid for the services, and from fees, which refers to the amount charged, regardless of cost.Seasons: Divisions of the year according to some regularly recurrent phenomena usually astronomical or climatic. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)Myocardial Infarction: NECROSIS of the MYOCARDIUM caused by an obstruction of the blood supply to the heart (CORONARY CIRCULATION).Risk: The probability that an event will occur. It encompasses a variety of measures of the probability of a generally unfavorable outcome.Kaplan-Meier Estimate: A nonparametric method of compiling LIFE TABLES or survival tables. It combines calculated probabilities of survival and estimates to allow for observations occurring beyond a measurement threshold, which are assumed to occur randomly. Time intervals are defined as ending each time an event occurs and are therefore unequal. (From Last, A Dictionary of Epidemiology, 1995)Predictive Value of Tests: In screening and diagnostic tests, the probability that a person with a positive test is a true positive (i.e., has the disease), is referred to as the predictive value of a positive test; whereas, the predictive value of a negative test is the probability that the person with a negative test does not have the disease. Predictive value is related to the sensitivity and specificity of the test.Inpatients: Persons admitted to health facilities which provide board and room, for the purpose of observation, care, diagnosis or treatment.Regression Analysis: Procedures for finding the mathematical function which best describes the relationship between a dependent variable and one or more independent variables. In linear regression (see LINEAR MODELS) the relationship is constrained to be a straight line and LEAST-SQUARES ANALYSIS is used to determine the best fit. In logistic regression (see LOGISTIC MODELS) the dependent variable is qualitative rather than continuously variable and LIKELIHOOD FUNCTIONS are used to find the best relationship. In multiple regression, the dependent variable is considered to depend on more than a single independent variable.Ambulatory Care: Health care services provided to patients on an ambulatory basis, rather than by admission to a hospital or other health care facility. The services may be a part of a hospital, augmenting its inpatient services, or may be provided at a free-standing facility.Acute Disease: Disease having a short and relatively severe course.DenmarkPostoperative Complications: Pathologic processes that affect patients after a surgical procedure. They may or may not be related to the disease for which the surgery was done, and they may or may not be direct results of the surgery.Child, Hospitalized: Child hospitalized for short term care.Mortality, Premature: Deaths that occur before LIFE EXPECTANCY is reached within a given population.Population Surveillance: Ongoing scrutiny of a population (general population, study population, target population, etc.), generally using methods distinguished by their practicability, uniformity, and frequently their rapidity, rather than by complete accuracy.Databases, Factual: Extensive collections, reputedly complete, of facts and data garnered from material of a specialized subject area and made available for analysis and application. The collection can be automated by various contemporary methods for retrieval. The concept should be differentiated from DATABASES, BIBLIOGRAPHIC which is restricted to collections of bibliographic references.Medicare: Federal program, created by Public Law 89-97, Title XVIII-Health Insurance for the Aged, a 1965 amendment to the Social Security Act, that provides health insurance benefits to persons over the age of 65 and others eligible for Social Security benefits. It consists of two separate but coordinated programs: hospital insurance (MEDICARE PART A) and supplementary medical insurance (MEDICARE PART B). (Hospital Administration Terminology, AHA, 2d ed and A Discursive Dictionary of Health Care, US House of Representatives, 1976)Influenza, Human: An acute viral infection in humans involving the respiratory tract. It is marked by inflammation of the NASAL MUCOSA; the PHARYNX; and conjunctiva, and by headache and severe, often generalized, myalgia.Odds Ratio: The ratio of two odds. The exposure-odds ratio for case control data is the ratio of the odds in favor of exposure among cases to the odds in favor of exposure among noncases. The disease-odds ratio for a cohort or cross section is the ratio of the odds in favor of disease among the exposed to the odds in favor of disease among the unexposed. The prevalence-odds ratio refers to an odds ratio derived cross-sectionally from studies of prevalent cases.Prevalence: The total number of cases of a given disease in a specified population at a designated time. It is differentiated from INCIDENCE, which refers to the number of new cases in the population at a given time.Renal Dialysis: Therapy for the insufficient cleansing of the BLOOD by the kidneys based on dialysis and including hemodialysis, PERITONEAL DIALYSIS, and HEMODIAFILTRATION.Emergency Service, Hospital: Hospital department responsible for the administration and provision of immediate medical or surgical care to the emergency patient.Confidence Intervals: A range of values for a variable of interest, e.g., a rate, constructed so that this range has a specified probability of including the true value of the variable.Chronic Disease: Diseases which have one or more of the following characteristics: they are permanent, leave residual disability, are caused by nonreversible pathological alteration, require special training of the patient for rehabilitation, or may be expected to require a long period of supervision, observation, or care. (Dictionary of Health Services Management, 2d ed)Hospital Charges: The prices a hospital sets for its services. HOSPITAL COSTS (the direct and indirect expenses incurred by the hospital in providing the services) are one factor in the determination of hospital charges. Other factors may include, for example, profits, competition, and the necessity of recouping the costs of uncompensated care.BrazilWounds and Injuries: Damage inflicted on the body as the direct or indirect result of an external force, with or without disruption of structural continuity.Outcome Assessment (Health Care): Research aimed at assessing the quality and effectiveness of health care as measured by the attainment of a specified end result or outcome. Measures include parameters such as improved health, lowered morbidity or mortality, and improvement of abnormal states (such as elevated blood pressure).Cost of Illness: The personal cost of acute or chronic disease. The cost to the patient may be an economic, social, or psychological cost or personal loss to self, family, or immediate community. The cost of illness may be reflected in absenteeism, productivity, response to treatment, peace of mind, or QUALITY OF LIFE. It differs from HEALTH CARE COSTS, meaning the societal cost of providing services related to the delivery of health care, rather than personal impact on individuals.Kidney Failure, Chronic: The end-stage of CHRONIC RENAL INSUFFICIENCY. It is characterized by the severe irreversible kidney damage (as measured by the level of PROTEINURIA) and the reduction in GLOMERULAR FILTRATION RATE to less than 15 ml per min (Kidney Foundation: Kidney Disease Outcome Quality Initiative, 2002). These patients generally require HEMODIALYSIS or KIDNEY TRANSPLANTATION.Perinatal Mortality: Deaths occurring from the 28th week of GESTATION to the 28th day after birth in a given population.Intensive Care Units: Hospital units providing continuous surveillance and care to acutely ill patients.Chi-Square Distribution: A distribution in which a variable is distributed like the sum of the squares of any given independent random variable, each of which has a normal distribution with mean of zero and variance of one. The chi-square test is a statistical test based on comparison of a test statistic to a chi-square distribution. The oldest of these tests are used to detect whether two or more population distributions differ from one another.Epidemiologic Methods: Research techniques that focus on study designs and data gathering methods in human and animal populations.Neoplasms: New abnormal growth of tissue. Malignant neoplasms show a greater degree of anaplasia and have the properties of invasion and metastasis, compared to benign neoplasms.Spain: Parliamentary democracy located between France on the northeast and Portugual on the west and bordered by the Atlantic Ocean and the Mediterranean Sea.CaliforniaLongitudinal Studies: Studies in which variables relating to an individual or group of individuals are assessed over a period of time.Death Certificates: Official records of individual deaths including the cause of death certified by a physician, and any other required identifying information.Stroke: A group of pathological conditions characterized by sudden, non-convulsive loss of neurological function due to BRAIN ISCHEMIA or INTRACRANIAL HEMORRHAGES. Stroke is classified by the type of tissue NECROSIS, such as the anatomic location, vasculature involved, etiology, age of the affected individual, and hemorrhagic vs. non-hemorrhagic nature. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, pp777-810)Respiratory Tract DiseasesNew YorkSwedenIsraelInternational Classification of Diseases: A system of categories to which morbid entries are assigned according to established criteria. Included is the entire range of conditions in a manageable number of categories, grouped to facilitate mortality reporting. It is produced by the World Health Organization (From ICD-10, p1). The Clinical Modifications, produced by the UNITED STATES DEPT. OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES, are larger extensions used for morbidity and general epidemiological purposes, primarily in the U.S.Hospitals, Psychiatric: Special hospitals which provide care to the mentally ill patient.Fetal Mortality: Number of fetal deaths with stated or presumed gestation of 20 weeks or more in a given population. Late fetal mortality is death after of 28 weeks or more.ItalyCost-Benefit Analysis: A method of comparing the cost of a program with its expected benefits in dollars (or other currency). The benefit-to-cost ratio is a measure of total return expected per unit of money spent. This analysis generally excludes consideration of factors that are not measured ultimately in economic terms. Cost effectiveness compares alternative ways to achieve a specific set of results.Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive: A disease of chronic diffuse irreversible airflow obstruction. Subcategories of COPD include CHRONIC BRONCHITIS and PULMONARY EMPHYSEMA.Life Expectancy: Based on known statistical data, the number of years which any person of a given age may reasonably expected to live.Canada: The largest country in North America, comprising 10 provinces and three territories. Its capital is Ottawa.Gastroenteritis: INFLAMMATION of any segment of the GASTROINTESTINAL TRACT from ESOPHAGUS to RECTUM. Causes of gastroenteritis are many including genetic, infection, HYPERSENSITIVITY, drug effects, and CANCER.Rotavirus Infections: Infection with any of the rotaviruses. Specific infections include human infantile diarrhea, neonatal calf diarrhea, and epidemic diarrhea of infant mice.Sepsis: Systemic inflammatory response syndrome with a proven or suspected infectious etiology. When sepsis is associated with organ dysfunction distant from the site of infection, it is called severe sepsis. When sepsis is accompanied by HYPOTENSION despite adequate fluid infusion, it is called SEPTIC SHOCK.Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic: Works about clinical trials that involve at least one test treatment and one control treatment, concurrent enrollment and follow-up of the test- and control-treated groups, and in which the treatments to be administered are selected by a random process, such as the use of a random-numbers table.Costs and Cost Analysis: Absolute, comparative, or differential costs pertaining to services, institutions, resources, etc., or the analysis and study of these costs.Pregnancy: The status during which female mammals carry their developing young (EMBRYOS or FETUSES) in utero before birth, beginning from FERTILIZATION to BIRTH.Biological Markers: Measurable and quantifiable biological parameters (e.g., specific enzyme concentration, specific hormone concentration, specific gene phenotype distribution in a population, presence of biological substances) which serve as indices for health- and physiology-related assessments, such as disease risk, psychiatric disorders, environmental exposure and its effects, disease diagnosis, metabolic processes, substance abuse, pregnancy, cell line development, epidemiologic studies, etc.Hospitals: Institutions with an organized medical staff which provide medical care to patients.Insurance, Hospitalization: Health insurance providing benefits to cover or partly cover hospital expenses.Recurrence: The return of a sign, symptom, or disease after a remission.Community-Acquired Infections: Any infection acquired in the community, that is, contrasted with those acquired in a health care facility (CROSS INFECTION). An infection would be classified as community-acquired if the patient had not recently been in a health care facility or been in contact with someone who had been recently in a health care facility.Case-Control Studies: Studies which start with the identification of persons with a disease of interest and a control (comparison, referent) group without the disease. The relationship of an attribute to the disease is examined by comparing diseased and non-diseased persons with regard to the frequency or levels of the attribute in each group.JapanAnti-Bacterial Agents: Substances that reduce the growth or reproduction of BACTERIA.Rotavirus Vaccines: Vaccines or candidate vaccines used to prevent infection with ROTAVIRUS.Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infections: Pneumovirus infections caused by the RESPIRATORY SYNCYTIAL VIRUSES. Humans and cattle are most affected but infections in goats and sheep have been reported.Infection: Invasion of the host organism by microorganisms that can cause pathological conditions or diseases.European Continental Ancestry Group: Individuals whose ancestral origins are in the continent of Europe.Cross-Sectional Studies: Studies in which the presence or absence of disease or other health-related variables are determined in each member of the study population or in a representative sample at one particular time. This contrasts with LONGITUDINAL STUDIES which are followed over a period of time.Diabetes Mellitus: A heterogeneous group of disorders characterized by HYPERGLYCEMIA and GLUCOSE INTOLERANCE.Coronary Disease: An imbalance between myocardial functional requirements and the capacity of the CORONARY VESSELS to supply sufficient blood flow. It is a form of MYOCARDIAL ISCHEMIA (insufficient blood supply to the heart muscle) caused by a decreased capacity of the coronary vessels.Smoking: Inhaling and exhaling the smoke of burning TOBACCO.Asthma: A form of bronchial disorder with three distinct components: airway hyper-responsiveness (RESPIRATORY HYPERSENSITIVITY), airway INFLAMMATION, and intermittent AIRWAY OBSTRUCTION. It is characterized by spasmodic contraction of airway smooth muscle, WHEEZING, and dyspnea (DYSPNEA, PAROXYSMAL).Bronchiolitis: Inflammation of the BRONCHIOLES.France: A country in western Europe bordered by the Atlantic Ocean, the English Channel, the Mediterranean Sea, and the countries of Belgium, Germany, Italy, Spain, Switzerland, the principalities of Andorra and Monaco, and by the duchy of Luxembourg. Its capital is Paris.TaiwanRisk Adjustment: The use of severity-of-illness measures, such as age, to estimate the risk (measurable or predictable chance of loss, injury or death) to which a patient is subject before receiving some health care intervention. This adjustment allows comparison of performance and quality across organizations, practitioners, and communities. (from JCAHO, Lexikon, 1994)Intensive Care: Advanced and highly specialized care provided to medical or surgical patients whose conditions are life-threatening and require comprehensive care and constant monitoring. It is usually administered in specially equipped units of a health care facility.Poisoning: A condition or physical state produced by the ingestion, injection, inhalation of or exposure to a deleterious agent.Utilization Review: An organized procedure carried out through committees to review admissions, duration of stay, professional services furnished, and to evaluate the medical necessity of those services and promote their most efficient use.EuropeCross Infection: Any infection which a patient contracts in a health-care institution.Demography: Statistical interpretation and description of a population with reference to distribution, composition, or structure.Nursing Homes: Facilities which provide nursing supervision and limited medical care to persons who do not require hospitalization.EnglandHospitals, Public: Hospitals controlled by various types of government, i.e., city, county, district, state or federal.Health Services: Services for the diagnosis and treatment of disease and the maintenance of health.Urban Population: The inhabitants of a city or town, including metropolitan areas and suburban areas.Residence Characteristics: Elements of residence that characterize a population. They are applicable in determining need for and utilization of health services.Air Pollutants: Any substance in the air which could, if present in high enough concentration, harm humans, animals, vegetation or material. Substances include GASES; PARTICULATE MATTER; and volatile ORGANIC CHEMICALS.Respiratory Tract Infections: Invasion of the host RESPIRATORY SYSTEM by microorganisms, usually leading to pathological processes or diseases.Health Resources: Available manpower, facilities, revenue, equipment, and supplies to produce requisite health care and services.TennesseeModels, Statistical: Statistical formulations or analyses which, when applied to data and found to fit the data, are then used to verify the assumptions and parameters used in the analysis. Examples of statistical models are the linear model, binomial model, polynomial model, two-parameter model, etc.Diabetes Complications: Conditions or pathological processes associated with the disease of diabetes mellitus. Due to the impaired control of BLOOD GLUCOSE level in diabetic patients, pathological processes develop in numerous tissues and organs including the EYE, the KIDNEY, the BLOOD VESSELS, and the NERVE TISSUE.Critical Illness: A disease or state in which death is possible or imminent.Health Status: The level of health of the individual, group, or population as subjectively assessed by the individual or by more objective measures.GermanyOccupational Diseases: Diseases caused by factors involved in one's employment.Questionnaires: Predetermined sets of questions used to collect data - clinical data, social status, occupational group, etc. The term is often applied to a self-completed survey instrument.Linear Models: Statistical models in which the value of a parameter for a given value of a factor is assumed to be equal to a + bx, where a and b are constants. The models predict a linear regression.Veterans: Former members of the armed services.Social Class: A stratum of people with similar position and prestige; includes social stratification. Social class is measured by criteria such as education, occupation, and income.Australia: The smallest continent and an independent country, comprising six states and two territories. Its capital is Canberra.Double-Blind Method: A method of studying a drug or procedure in which both the subjects and investigators are kept unaware of who is actually getting which specific treatment.Health Services Research: The integration of epidemiologic, sociological, economic, and other analytic sciences in the study of health services. Health services research is usually concerned with relationships between need, demand, supply, use, and outcome of health services. The aim of the research is evaluation, particularly in terms of structure, process, output, and outcome. (From Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 2d ed)Influenza A Virus, H1N1 Subtype: A subtype of INFLUENZA A VIRUS with the surface proteins hemagglutinin 1 and neuraminidase 1. The H1N1 subtype was responsible for the Spanish flu pandemic of 1918.Cost Savings: Reductions in all or any portion of the costs of providing goods or services. Savings may be incurred by the provider or the consumer.Air Pollution: The presence of contaminants or pollutant substances in the air (AIR POLLUTANTS) that interfere with human health or welfare, or produce other harmful environmental effects. The substances may include GASES; PARTICULATE MATTER; or volatile ORGANIC CHEMICALS.Netherlands: Country located in EUROPE. It is bordered by the NORTH SEA, BELGIUM, and GERMANY. Constituent areas are Aruba, Curacao, Sint Maarten, formerly included in the NETHERLANDS ANTILLES.Cerebrovascular Disorders: A spectrum of pathological conditions of impaired blood flow in the brain. They can involve vessels (ARTERIES or VEINS) in the CEREBRUM, the CEREBELLUM, and the BRAIN STEM. Major categories include INTRACRANIAL ARTERIOVENOUS MALFORMATIONS; BRAIN ISCHEMIA; CEREBRAL HEMORRHAGE; and others.Diagnosis-Related Groups: A system for classifying patient care by relating common characteristics such as diagnosis, treatment, and age to an expected consumption of hospital resources and length of stay. Its purpose is to provide a framework for specifying case mix and to reduce hospital costs and reimbursements and it forms the cornerstone of the prospective payment system.AccidentsHealth Services Accessibility: The degree to which individuals are inhibited or facilitated in their ability to gain entry to and to receive care and services from the health care system. Factors influencing this ability include geographic, architectural, transportational, and financial considerations, among others.Health Services Misuse: Excessive, under or unnecessary utilization of health services by patients or physicians.WalesInjury Severity Score: An anatomic severity scale based on the Abbreviated Injury Scale (AIS) and developed specifically to score multiple traumatic injuries. It has been used as a predictor of mortality.Insurance Claim Review: Review of claims by insurance companies to determine liability and amount of payment for various services. The review may also include determination of eligibility of the claimant or beneficiary or of the provider of the benefit; determination that the benefit is covered or not payable under another policy; or determination that the service was necessary and of reasonable cost and quality.FinlandGreat BritainHeart Diseases: Pathological conditions involving the HEART including its structural and functional abnormalities.Pandemics: Epidemics of infectious disease that have spread to many countries, often more than one continent, and usually affecting a large number of people.Databases as Topic: Organized collections of computer records, standardized in format and content, that are stored in any of a variety of computer-readable modes. They are the basic sets of data from which computer-readable files are created. (from ALA Glossary of Library and Information Science, 1983)Ontario: A province of Canada lying between the provinces of Manitoba and Quebec. Its capital is Toronto. It takes its name from Lake Ontario which is said to represent the Iroquois oniatariio, beautiful lake. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p892 & Room, Brewer's Dictionary of Names, 1992, p391)Hospitals, Pediatric: Special hospitals which provide care for ill children.ScotlandDisease Outbreaks: Sudden increase in the incidence of a disease. The concept includes EPIDEMICS and PANDEMICS.Health Surveys: A systematic collection of factual data pertaining to health and disease in a human population within a given geographic area.Communicable DiseasesHospitals, University: Hospitals maintained by a university for the teaching of medical students, postgraduate training programs, and clinical research.Coronary Artery Bypass: Surgical therapy of ischemic coronary artery disease achieved by grafting a section of saphenous vein, internal mammary artery, or other substitute between the aorta and the obstructed coronary artery distal to the obstructive lesion.RomeWashingtonInfluenza Vaccines: Vaccines used to prevent infection by viruses in the family ORTHOMYXOVIRIDAE. It includes both killed and attenuated vaccines. The composition of the vaccines is changed each year in response to antigenic shifts and changes in prevalence of influenza virus strains. The vaccine is usually bivalent or trivalent, containing one or two INFLUENZAVIRUS A strains and one INFLUENZAVIRUS B strain.Pneumonia, Bacterial: Inflammation of the lung parenchyma that is caused by bacterial infections.Outcome and Process Assessment (Health Care): Evaluation procedures that focus on both the outcome or status (OUTCOMES ASSESSMENT) of the patient at the end of an episode of care - presence of symptoms, level of activity, and mortality; and the process (ASSESSMENT, PROCESS) - what is done for the patient diagnostically and therapeutically.Hospitals, Urban: Hospitals located in metropolitan areas.Health Status Indicators: The measurement of the health status for a given population using a variety of indices, including morbidity, mortality, and available health resources.Quality of Health Care: The levels of excellence which characterize the health service or health care provided based on accepted standards of quality.Quality of Life: A generic concept reflecting concern with the modification and enhancement of life attributes, e.g., physical, political, moral and social environment; the overall condition of a human life.Rural Population: The inhabitants of rural areas or of small towns classified as rural.Outpatients: Persons who receive ambulatory care at an outpatient department or clinic without room and board being provided.Developing Countries: Countries in the process of change with economic growth, that is, an increase in production, per capita consumption, and income. The process of economic growth involves better utilization of natural and human resources, which results in a change in the social, political, and economic structures.Military Personnel: Persons including soldiers involved with the armed forces.Bacterial Infections: Infections by bacteria, general or unspecified.APACHE: An acronym for Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation, a scoring system using routinely collected data and providing an accurate, objective description for a broad range of intensive care unit admissions, measuring severity of illness in critically ill patients.Suicide: The act of killing oneself.Probability: The study of chance processes or the relative frequency characterizing a chance process.MassachusettsUrban Health: The status of health in urban populations.Adrenergic beta-Antagonists: Drugs that bind to but do not activate beta-adrenergic receptors thereby blocking the actions of beta-adrenergic agonists. Adrenergic beta-antagonists are used for treatment of hypertension, cardiac arrhythmias, angina pectoris, glaucoma, migraine headaches, and anxiety.Kidney Diseases: Pathological processes of the KIDNEY or its component tissues.New Zealand: A group of islands in the southwest Pacific. Its capital is Wellington. It was discovered by the Dutch explorer Abel Tasman in 1642 and circumnavigated by Cook in 1769. Colonized in 1840 by the New Zealand Company, it became a British crown colony in 1840 until 1907 when colonial status was terminated. New Zealand is a partly anglicized form of the original Dutch name Nieuw Zeeland, new sea land, possibly with reference to the Dutch province of Zeeland. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p842 & Room, Brewer's Dictionary of Names, 1992, p378)Myocardial Ischemia: A disorder of cardiac function caused by insufficient blood flow to the muscle tissue of the heart. The decreased blood flow may be due to narrowing of the coronary arteries (CORONARY ARTERY DISEASE), to obstruction by a thrombus (CORONARY THROMBOSIS), or less commonly, to diffuse narrowing of arterioles and other small vessels within the heart. Severe interruption of the blood supply to the myocardial tissue may result in necrosis of cardiac muscle (MYOCARDIAL INFARCTION).Medical Record Linkage: The creation and maintenance of medical and vital records in multiple institutions in a manner that will facilitate the combined use of the records of identified individuals.PennsylvaniaStroke Volume: The amount of BLOOD pumped out of the HEART per beat, not to be confused with cardiac output (volume/time). It is calculated as the difference between the end-diastolic volume and the end-systolic volume.Continental Population Groups: Groups of individuals whose putative ancestry is from native continental populations based on similarities in physical appearance.
It does not appear to affect mortality or the overall hospitalization rate. Anticholinergics can cause dry mouth and urinary ... The risk is greater in those who are poor, although if this is due to poverty itself or other risk factors associated with ... Working in agriculture is also a risk. In some professions, the risks have been estimated as equivalent to that of one-half to ... A person's genetic makeup also affects the risk. The primary risk factor for COPD globally is tobacco smoking. Of those who ...
Elixhauser shows a better predictive performance for mortality risk especially beyond 30 days of hospitalization.[5] ... depending on the risk of dying associated with each one. Scores are summed to provide a total score to predict mortality. Many ... The Charlson comorbidity index[4] predicts the one-year mortality for a patient who may have a range of comorbid conditions, ... This method helps in calculating the duration of a patient's stay at a hospital and the risks of repeated admittance of the ...
Frailty more than doubles the risk of morbidity and mortality from surgery and cardiovascular conditions.[33] Assessment of ... hospitalization, and mortality. ... and the competing risk of mortality: the Women's Health And ... Osteoporosis is an age-related disease of bone that leads to an increased risk of fracture. In osteoporosis the bone mineral ... Frailty is a common geriatric syndrome that embodies an elevated risk of catastrophic declines in health and function among ...
Mortality after acute renal failure: models for prognostic stratification and risk adjustment. Kidney Int, 70(6), 1120-6, 2006 ... Early intervention improves mortality and hospitalization rates in incident hemodialysis patients: RightStart program. Clin J ... Mortality after acute renal failure: models for prognostic stratification and risk adjustment. Kidney Int, 70(6), 1120-6, 2006 ... which is associated with heightened risks of mortality in renal failure patients, and using these tests to assess different ...
... has a mortality rate of around 5%. The mortality for toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN) is 30-40%. The risk for death can be ... It is helpful to calculate a SCORTEN within the first 3 days of hospitalization. Other outcomes include organ damage/failure, ... Risk factors include HIV/AIDS and systemic lupus erythematosus. The diagnosis is based on involvement of less than 10% of the ... Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are a rare cause of SJS in adults; the risk is higher for older patients, women, ...
Exposure to PM2.5 was also associated with an increased risk of mortality from lung cancer (range: 15% to 21% per 10 microg/m3 ... Additionally, air pollution has been associated with increased hospitalization and mortality from asthma and COPD. Chronic ... A 2007 review of evidence found ambient air pollution exposure is a risk factor correlating with increased total mortality from ... increases the overall risk of non-accidental mortality by 6% per a 10 microg/m3 increase. ...
In addition to reducing the risk of mortality, the numbers of hospital visits and hospitalizations were also reduced in the ... because of the risk of coronary vasospasm.[citation needed] Though, in general, beta blockers improve mortality in patients who ... "Effects of controlled-release metoprolol on total mortality, hospitalizations, and well-being in patients with heart failure: ... The use of beta blockers around the time of cardiac surgery decreases the risk of heart dysrhythmias.[39] Starting them around ...
NSAID gastrointestinal risk is substantial, with deaths and hospitalization estimated in one publication as 3200 and 32,000 per ... "Chronic use of NSAIDs is also associated with significant morbidity and mortality. ... The overdose risk may be heightened by frequent consumption of alcohol. Paracetamol toxicity is the foremost cause of acute ... NAC was usually given following a treatment nomogram (one for people with risk factors, and one for those without) but the use ...
... hospitalization, cognitive deficits,[better source needed] and mortality. Thus, optimizing medication through targeted ... "Proton Pump Inhibitors and Risk of 1-Year Mortality and Rehospitalization in Older Patients Discharged From Acute Care ... In all of these situations, certain medications may contribute to an increased risk of adverse events, and people may benefit ... Deprescribing has been linked to lower fall risk and global improvements in health. Targeted deprescribing can improve ...
"Sedentary Time and Its Association With Risk for Disease Incidence, Mortality, and Hospitalization in Adults: A Systematic ... The risk increases the longer a person has the disease, and the worse the severity of inflammation. In these high risk groups, ... The risk of colon cancer can be reduced by maintaining a normal body weight. Aspirin and celecoxib appear to decrease the risk ... Aspirin is recommended in those who are 50 to 60 years old, do not have an increased risk of bleeding, and are at risk for ...
"Sedentary Time and Its Association With Risk for Disease Incidence, Mortality, and Hospitalization in Adults: A Systematic ... The link between heart disease and diabetes mortality and sitting is well-established, but the risk of cancer mortality is ... There is a significantly higher mortality rate among people who regularly sit for prolonged periods, and the risk is not ... The causes of mortality and morbidity include heart disease, obesity, type 2 diabetes and cancer, specifically, breast, ...
Ray KK, Seshasai SR, Erqou S, Sever P, Jukema JW, Ford I, Sattar N (June 2010). "Statins and all-cause mortality in high-risk ... the time of admission have a lower risk of major cardiac adverse events and hospital readmission two years post-hospitalization ... Several meta-analyses have found no increased risk of cancer, and some meta-analyses have found a reduced risk.[89][90][91][92] ... 10-year risk of heart disease, as calculated by the 2013 ACC/AHA Pooled Cohort algorithm.[15][16][17] Risk factors for coronary ...
"Sedentary time and its association with risk for disease incidence, mortality, and hospitalization in adults: a systematic ... Lifestyle risk factors with strong evidence include lack of exercise, cigarette smoking, alcohol, and obesity.[78][79] The risk ... Aspirin and celecoxib appear to decrease the risk of colorectal cancer in those at high risk.[91][92] Aspirin is recommended in ... Greater than 75-95% of colorectal cancer occurs in people with little or no genetic risk.[18][19] Risk factors include older ...
"Risk factors associated with mortality of infections caused by Stenotrophomonas maltophilia: a systematic review". J Hosp ... prolonged hospitalization, intensive care unit admission and broad-spectrum antibiotic use.[2][14][15][16] ... Risk factors associated with Stenotrophomonas infection include HIV infection, malignancy, cystic fibrosis, neutropenia, ... Kwa AL, Low JG, Lim TP, Leow PC, Kurup A, Tam VH (2008). "Independent predictors for mortality in patients with positive ...
... is significantly associated with morbidity and mortality among adults. The risk of being diagnosed with bacterial pneumonia is ... and particulate matter are also associated with increased hospitalization and mortality due to cardiovascular disease. ... Having a respiratory infection raise the risk of cancer and vice versa. Also, studies show that the risk of the respiratory ... www.stateoftheair.org/2013/health-risks/health-risks-ozone.html#_edn23 "Environmental Health Perspectives - Ambient Air ...
... is a cardinal sign leading to heart failure and is associated with an increased risk of cardiac morbidity and mortality. ... Heart failure is a leading cause of hospitalization and death in many countries, and an ever-increasing health burden worldwide ...
The study aimed to define an all-cause hospital mortality breakpoint for carbapenem MICs that were adjusted for risk factors. ... Exposure to antibiotics, especially fluoroquinolones, and previous hospitalization dramatically increased the risk of ... The crude mortality rate for those with the resistant bacteremia was 71.9%, and the attributable mortality rate was determined ... by the end of hospitalization. The overall in-hospital mortality rate was 48%. At Soroka Medical Center, an Israeli university ...
Countries such as Spain, have shown a rise in mortality risk, due to a large elderly population there. However, there are tools ... The Sequential Organ Failure Assessment (SOFA) score uses early lab values in a patient's hospitalization (within 24 hours) to ...
New Prediction Model Proves Promising Pneumonia Severity Index Calculator Community-Acquired Pneumonia Mortality Risk for ... The PSI/PORT score is often used to predict the need for hospitalization in people with pneumonia. This is consistent with the ... A Risk Class I or Risk Class II pneumonia patient can be sent home on oral antibiotics. A Risk Class III patient, after ... This study demonstrated that patients could be stratified into five risk categories, Risk Classes I-V, and that these classes ...
July 2006). "Chronic kidney disease and mortality risk: a systematic review". J. Am. Soc. Nephrol. 17 (7): 2034-2047. doi: ... and hospitalization". N. Engl. J. Med. 351 (13): 1296-1305. doi:10.1056/NEJMoa041031. PMID 15385656. Zethelius B, Berglund L, ... permanent dead link] Stevens LA, Levey AS (May 2005). "Chronic kidney disease in the elderly--how to assess risk". N. Engl. J. ... It has been suggested that cystatin C might predict the risk of developing chronic kidney disease, thereby signaling a state of ...
In addition, carvedilol is indicated in the treatment of hypertension and to reduce risk of mortality and hospitalizations in a ... It has been clinically shown to reduce mortality and hospitalizations in people with CHF. The mechanism behind its positive ... Taking carvedilol with food decreases the risk of orthostatic hypotension. •Tablet, Oral •Capsule Extended Release 24 Hour, ...
Specific risk factors may predict worse outcomes and a higher risk of mortality in people with ulcerative colitis, including: C ... Additional risk factors may include surgery, hospitalization, pregnancy, the use of corticosteroids and tofacitinib.[29] The ... Mortality[edit]. People with ulcerative colitis are at similar[119] or perhaps slightly increased overall risk of death ... Higher risk for smokers. Lower risk for smokers[33] Age. Usual onset between 15 and 30 years[34]. Peak incidence between. 15 ...
... slightly outperformed other rules in stratifying patients and identifying those at low risk of death during hospitalization or ... adding to the improvement in symptoms and mortality provided by ACE-I/ARB.[61][62] The mortality benefits of beta blockers in ... A person's risk of developing heart failure is inversely related to their level of physical activity. Those who achieved at ... This increases the risk of cardiac arrest (specifically due to abnormal ventricular heart rhythms) and reduces blood supply to ...
While research is ongoing on the causes of maternal mortality in Texas, maternal mortality in the US has been linked to chronic ... The Pregnancy Risk Assessment Monitoring System is one way of gauging the mental health of women after delivery, and is used by ... Callaghan, WM (2012). "Severe maternal morbidity among delivery and postpartum hospitalizations in the United States". ... The diverse demography of Texas has been identified as one factor contributing to this mortality rate, with mortality being ...
For those suffering from weight loss and undernutrition, risks include increased and longer hospitalizations, early admission ... to long term care facilities, and overall increased morbidity and mortality. Nutritional disorders with co-morbidities are the ... As well, better access to convenience stores is associated with a higher risk of obesity. A lack of plant-based foods (fruits, ... Fitzgerald N, Hromi-Fiedler A, Segura-Perez S, Perez-Escamilla R. Food insecurity is related to increased risk of type 2 ...
... and long-term mortality is decreased.[122] There however is some short-term mortality risk of less than 1% from the surgery.[ ... and increased rates of hospitalizations.[10] In the developed world, and increasingly elsewhere, type 2 diabetes is the largest ... Chen X, Yang L, Zhai SD (December 2012). "Risk of cardiovascular disease and all-cause mortality among diabetic patients ... Individuals with cancer may be at a higher risk of mortality if they also have diabetes.[47] Testosterone deficiency is also ...
Association of predialysis serum bicarbonate levels with risk of mortality and hospitalization in the Dialysis Outcomes and ... and patient risk for mortality and hospitalization.. METHODS: Data from more than 7,000 representative and randomly selected ... faced the lowest risk for mortality, whereas those with bicarbonate levels of 21.1 to 22.0 mEq/L faced the lowest risk for ... serum bicarbonate levels were associated with increased risk for mortality and hospitalization. ...
Sedentary time and its association with risk for disease incidence, mortality, and hospitalization in adults: a systematic ... Exercise as it relates to Disease/Sedentary Times Effect on Risk for Disease Incidents, All-Cause Mortality and ... The scale was between 0.5 - 2 with over 1 being considered high risk and below 1 being considered low risk.[1] ... Mortality, and Hospitalization in Adults" by Biswas et al (2015).[1] ...
... hospitalization, and discontinuation of dialysis over two years than dialysis patients not taking prescription opioids, reports ... p,​Dialysis patients taking prescription opioids have higher risks of mortality, ... In Dialysis Patients, Opioids Linked to Higher Mortality, Hospitalization, Dialysis Discontinuation Risks. November 30, 2016 , ... Dialysis patients taking prescription opioids have higher risks of mortality, hospitalization, and discontinuation of dialysis ...
HOPE Center Research: Study Reviews Risk of Hospitalizations and Mortality by Alzheimer Disease Medications. ... used real-world evidence to review how the risk of hospitalization and mortality differed by Alzheimer disease (AD) medication ... titled Alzheimers disease medication and risk of all-cause mortality and all-cause hospitalization: A retrospective cohort ... Hospitalization risk differed by type of Alzheimers disease medication initiation in intention-to-treat analysis ...
Risk Factors for Mortality and Cardiopulmonary Hospitalization in Systemic Sclerosis Patients At Risk for Pulmonary ... Risk Factors for Mortality and Cardiopulmonary Hospitalization in Systemic Sclerosis Patients At Risk for Pulmonary ... Risk Factors for Mortality and Cardiopulmonary Hospitalization in Systemic Sclerosis Patients At Risk for Pulmonary ... Risk Factors for Mortality and Cardiopulmonary Hospitalization in Systemic Sclerosis Patients At Risk for Pulmonary ...
The primary study outcome was all-cause mortality or the first hospitalization for fatal or nonfatal AMI (ICD9CM codes 410.x) ... 2005) Impact of medication adherence on hospitalization risk and healthcare cost. Medical Care, 43, 521-530. doi:10.1097/01.mlr ... 2006) Effect of medication nonadherence on hospitalization and mortality among patients with diabetes mellitus. Archives of ... In diabetic patients only an adherence > 80% contribute to reduce the risk of outcomes, while in high risk patients increasing ...
Sedentary Time and Its Association With Risk for Disease Incidence, Mortality, and Hospitalization in Adults: A Systematic ... Sedentary Time and Its Association With Risk for Disease Incidence, Mortality, and Hospitalization in Adults: A Systematic ...
... but may reduce hospitalization risk associated with AD genetic risk. ... Education did not convey differential survival advantages to individuals with higher genetic risk of AD, ... Reserve and Alzheimers disease genetic risk: Effects on hospitalization and mortality Teresa Jenica Filshtein 1 , Willa D ... Reserve and Alzheimers disease genetic risk: Effects on hospitalization and mortality Teresa Jenica Filshtein et al. ...
Polygenetic risk for coronary artery disease increases hospitalization burden and mortality.. Sjögren M1, Almgren P1, Melander ... The association between hospitalizations was calculated by negative binomial regression and risk of mortality was calculated by ... These individuals had highly increased risk of CVD mortality (HR: 1.44 [1.25-1.66], p = 6.56 × 10-7) but not the risk of ... To investigate whether GRS for CAD can predict hospitalization and mortality.. Methods: 23,594 individuals without CAD at ...
... the risk for hospitalization or death varies by the regimen ... Short-term hospitalization, mortality risk varies by palliative ... As reported in Cancer, the chemotherapy regimen was significantly associated with the risk for hospitalization or death after ... They conclude that "[i]nformation about hospitalization risk may provide valuable context for evaluating real-world cancer ... have found that the risk for hospitalization or death may be predicted by the cytotoxic regimen used. ...
Men who drink alcohol moderately risk increased mortality, hospitalization: study. * As travel returns, hotels use ...
... fewer hospitalizations, and fewer deaths. Health care providers should take adva … ... Influenza vaccination was associated with fewer hospitalizations for pneumonia and influenza (adjusted risk ratio, 0.48 [95% CI ... Relation between influenza vaccination and outpatient visits, hospitalization, and mortality in elderly persons with chronic ... Among unvaccinated persons, hospitalization rates for pneumonia and influenza were twice as high in the influenza seasons as ...
Secondary outcomes included hospitalizations, ED visits, and mortality. With 100 patients per group, the study had 80% power to ... In elderly patients at high risk for hospitalization, does home telemonitoring reduce hospitalizations and emergency department ... In high-risk elderly patients, telemonitoring did not reduce hospitalizations or emergency department visits compared with ... Telemonitoring did not reduce hospitalizations or ED visits in high-risk elderly patients. Ann Intern Med. 2012;157:JC3-8. doi ...
But if digoxin risk varies with serum levels in AF, maybe serum level checks would help keep them in a safe range. ... Could its risks outweigh benefits in atrial fibrillation? Another study argues yes. ... That report read, in part, that AFFIRM provides "no evidence of an increased risk of mortality or hospitalization among those ... Mortality and the risk for sudden death in particular were significantly increased in the new digoxin users. ...
... overweight and obesity as risk factors for mortality and hospitalizatio were found in PRIME PubMed. Download Prime PubMed App ... "Underweight, Overweight and Obesity as Risk Factors for Mortality and Hospitalization." Scandinavian Journal of Public Health, ... Ringbäck Weitoft G, Eliasson M, Rosén M. Underweight, overweight and obesity as risk factors for mortality and hospitalization ... Ringbäck Weitoft G, Eliasson M, Rosén M. Underweight, Overweight and Obesity as Risk Factors for Mortality and Hospitalization ...
Sedentary Time and Its Association With Risk for Disease Incidence, Mortality, and Hospitalization in Adults: A Systematic ... Sedentary Time and Its Association With Risk for Disease Incidence, Mortality, and Hospitalization in Adults: A Systematic ... Review: In HF with reduced EF, nurse-led titration of HF drugs reduces hospitalizations and mortality Annals of Internal ... In type 2 diabetes with CVD and kidney disease, empagliflozin reduced mortality and hospitalization Annals of Internal Medicine ...
... who require hospitalization; or who are at greater risk for influenza-related complications. Additional information on ... Influenza-Associated Pediatric Mortality. No influenza-associated pediatric deaths were reported to CDC during week 41. ... Influenza-Associated Hospitalizations. The Influenza Hospitalization Network (FluSurv-NET) conducts population-based ... During week 41, 6.4% of all deaths reported through the 122-Cities Mortality Reporting System were due to P&I. This percentage ...
... cardiovascular hospitalizations, and heart failure hospitalizations were examined using cause-specific hazard competing-risks ... Conclusions - Quantitative echocardiographic LVEF stratified the risk of death and hospitalization in a wide range of clinical ... Association of left ventricular ejection fraction with mortality and hospitalizations. Angaran P, Dorian P, Ha ACT, ... The rate of mortality and hospitalizations increased comparably with greater reductions in LVEF during both inpatient cardiac ...
Pressure ulcers that develop during acute hospitalization are not associated with reduced 1-year survival among high risk older ... Objective: To evaluate the impact of in-hospital pressure ulcer development on mortality among older, high-risk, hospitalized ... Pressure ulcers that develop during acute hospitalization are not associated with reduced 1-year survival among high risk older ... Hospital-acquired pressure ulcers and risk of death J Am Geriatr Soc. 1996 Dec;44(12):1435-40. doi: 10.1111/j.1532-5415.1996. ...
Risk factors for mortality (e.g. past medical history, medications, lifestyle). *Symptoms and duration ... Hospitalization duration. *Sequelae (e.g. persistent signs and symptoms, complications). *Outcome (e.g. recovered, long-term ... Trained staff on COVID-19 risk communication and providing risk communication educational material to travelers ... 2020). Risk Communication and Community Engagement (RCCE) Action Plan Guidance: COVID-19 Preparedness and Responseexternal icon ...
Heart failure patients who experience low health literacy have higher risk of death of hospitalization, mortality Patients with ... Heart damage among hospitalized COVID-19 patients linked to higher risk of mortality Mount Sinai researchers have found that ... heart failure who experience low health literacy are at an increased risk of hospitalization and mortality. ... Polygenic risk scores may improve clinical assessment of patients with elevated heart attack risk Genetic variants have been ...
Early estimation of the risk factors for hospitalization and mortality by COVID-19 in Mexi ... Early estimation of the risk factors for hospitalization and mortality by COVID-19 in Mexico. ... Hospitalization, intubation and pneumonia entail a higher risk of dying (OR 5.02, p. information on mild (asymptomatic) or ... The present study aims to estimate the risk factors for hospitalization and death in the Mexican population infected by SARS- ...
... reduced significantly the mortality and first hospitalization rate when compared to drug therapy alone. CRT-D also ... Studies identify risk factors for colon cancer in women In new studies presented today at Digestive Disease Week in New Orleans ... CRT implantable defibrillators significantly reduce hospitalization rates and extend lives Researchers at the University of ... may delay or prevent proper colorectal screenings due to a lack of females in the field and diabetes may be a significant risk ...
Risk for bias was assessed by using validated tools, and results were synthesized by using a narrative approach. Seventeen of ... However, evidence was insufficient for us to confidently extrapolate this to other at-risk patient groups. ... We assessed evidence for the effectiveness of vaccinating HCWs to provide indirect protection for patients at risk for severe ... Measures of hospitalization in a review of the vaccination of health care workers to protect patients at risk for acute ...
  • While the overall morbidity and mortality of patients with hemoglobin SS (Hb SS) and hemoglobin SB0 thalassemia is greater than patients with Hb SC and Hb SB+ thalassemia, individuals with these "milder" phenotypes can suffer from their disease and require therapeutic interventions. (dovepress.com)
  • Amgen also announced results from a prespecified pooled analysis including these data and data from a second Phase 2 study presented in March 2006 at the American College of Cardiology (ACC) Scientific Session showing that treatment with Aranesp may decrease the risk of heart failure hospitalization and all-cause mortality, and improve symptoms (Abstract #60731). (amgen.com)
  • CONCLUSION: Using wall thinning as a criterion for patient selection, the technique of off-pump anteroapical aneurysm plication can be performed with low operative mortality and provides good symptomatic relief and long-term survival. (biomedsearch.com)
  • Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common sustained arrhythmia treated in clinical practice and is associated with substantial morbidity including frequent emergency department visits and hospitalizations for symptoms secondary to AF and an increased risk for stroke. (redorbit.com)
  • We recommend that in most patients at low risk of stroke (CHADS 2 = 1) should receive either Warfarin (INR 2 "" 3) or Dabigatran. (redorbit.com)
  • Following this, the United States Food and Drug Administration, being made aware of an increased risk of stroke in pooled data from 29 trials of tiotropium through a report supplied to it by the manufacturer, issued an early warning in March 2008. (bmj.com)
  • Background and Purpose- Recent evidence suggests that psychological distress, including the symptoms of psychiatric illness, may acutely increase the risk of stroke. (ahajournals.org)
  • Among underweight men, the adjusted RR for all-cause mortality was 2.4 (95% confidence interval 1.6-3.6), and among underweight women it was 2.0 (1.5-2.7), but population attributable risks (PARs) were small, at 1.2% and 2.7%, respectively. (unboundmedicine.com)
  • A two-SNP haplotype in ALDH1A1 was associated with an increased risk of grade 3 and 4 hematological toxicity (odds ratio=1.44, 95% confidence interval=1.16-1.78), which remained significant after correction for multiple comparisons. (nature.com)
  • The odds ratio for mortality between patients identified as high and low risk was 12.9 (95% confidence interval, 10.4-15.9) and similar results were seen when this risk stratification was applied prospectively to the validation cohort. (nih.gov)
  • The total number of hospitalizations by the 90-day mark was numerically lower in the carboplatin-pemetrexed than carboplatin-paclitaxel group (585 vs 647), but this difference was not statistically significant, report Gabriel Brooks (Geisel School of Medicine, Lebanon, New Hampshire, USA) and co-researchers. (medicinematters.com)
  • More important, researchers need to clarify whether increasing albuminuria is a causal risk factor for CV disease or simply a marker of diffuse endothelial disease characteristic of early atherosclerosis. (acpjc.org)
  • Patients undergoing colon surgery at teaching hospitals have a higher mortality rate than those having the procedure performed elsewhere, researchers found. (medpagetoday.com)
  • Experimental and some clinical data suggest that metabolic acidosis contributes to poor nutritional status, a strong predictor for mortality in hemodialysis patients. (nih.gov)
  • To develop a practical user-friendly bedside tool for risk stratification for patients hospitalized with ADHF. (nih.gov)
  • Inpatient telemetry does not need to be used in the management of older patients hospitalized with chest pain at low risk for in-hospital coronary events and mortality. (biomedsearch.com)
  • For elderly persons with chronic lung disease, influenza is associated with significant adverse health effects and influenza vaccination is associated with substantial health benefits, including fewer outpatient visits, fewer hospitalizations, and fewer deaths. (nih.gov)
  • This study supports the findings of other studies, in that overweight seems to be an exaggerated risk factor for all-cause mortality, but is related to other chronic disease. (unboundmedicine.com)
  • Due to a high prevalence of chronic non-degenerative diseases , it is suspected that COVID 19 poses a high risk of fatal complications for the Mexican population . (bvsalud.org)
  • The present study points out that in Mexico , where an important proportion of the population has two or more chronic conditions simultaneously, a high mortality rate is a serious risk for those infected by SARS-CoV-2 . (bvsalud.org)
  • 5 , 6 Before the widespread use of conjugated pneumococcal vaccines, children younger than 2 years old, children of certain racial and ethnic groups, those who attend day care, and children within certain chronic medical conditions were recognized to be at higher risk for IPD. (aappublications.org)
  • 8 Nonetheless, children with certain chronic conditions remain at higher risk for IPD despite vaccine coverage exceeding 85% in young children. (aappublications.org)
  • Corlanor is specifically indicated to reduce the risk of hospitalization for worsening heart failure in patients with stable, symptomatic chronic heart failure with left ventricular ejection fraction ≤ 35%, who are in sinus rhythm with resting heart rate ≥ 70 beats per minute and either are on maximally tolerated doses of betablockers or have a contraindication to beta-blocker use. (centerwatch.com)
  • A substantial body of research shows that family members who provide care to individuals with chronic or disabling conditions are themselves at risk. (caregiver.org)
  • Caregivers who experience chronic stress may be at greater risk for cognitive decline including loss in short-term memory, attention and verbal IQ. (caregiver.org)
  • Specifically, cyclophosphamide, when used in combination with docetaxel or doxorubicin, increased the risk of this endpoint by a significant 2.71- and 2.45-fold, respectively, compared with capecitabine, as did gemcitabine and docetaxel, by a corresponding 3.51- and 2.49-fold. (medicinematters.com)
  • there was no favorable effect on the mortality component of the primary endpoint. (centerwatch.com)
  • Does the drug raise mortality beyond its capacity for good in such patients, or is it safe enough to be routinely used in AF alongside other rate-control drugs? (medscape.com)
  • Women with MDD had the greatest mortality rate and died a median of 15 years earlier than women in the referent group. (ices.on.ca)
  • for example, if the aim of an intervention were to reduce the rate of exacerbation related admission, then a study can be designed by including primarily patients at higher risk of that outcome. (redorbit.com)
  • We found that lower glucose level, impaired renal function, lower calcium and PLT, increased RDW and neutrophile, lower lymphocyte, coexisting DM, CAD, HT, malignancy and to use OAD are risk factors for mortality of geriatric patients with hypoglycemia. (omicsonline.org)
  • 3 Empagliflozin is U.S. Food and Drug Administration pregnancy risk category C and should be avoided in the late second and third trimesters, during fetal renal development. (aafp.org)
  • Specifically, his work involves identifying reliable and practical tests for protein-caloric malnutrition, which is associated with heightened risks of mortality in renal failure patients, and using these tests to assess different treatment strategies. (wikipedia.org)
  • While most children infected with the novel coronavirus have mild symptoms, a subset requires hospitalization and a small number require intensive care. (news-medical.net)
  • In this report we discuss ONJ from a consumer point of view, describing the warning signs and symptoms to look for, and more importantly, what can be done to minimize the risk of ONJ if currently taking any of these drugs. (earthlink.net)
  • In this article, I will be talking about the causes and symptoms of Parkinson's disease in addition to highlighting who is at risk of developing it. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • Patients with hemoglobin SC (Hb SC) and hemoglobin SB+ (Hb SB+) thalassemia suffer from frequent hospitalizations yet strong evidence of a clinical benefit of hydroxyurea (HU) in this population is lacking. (dovepress.com)
  • By dividing the study population according to the relative ASMM/FM% tertiles, no groups showed an increased risk of worsening disability. (frontiersin.org)
  • AF is an emerging epidemic as the population ages and indeed, the lifetime risk of developing AF in individuals older than 40 years of age is one in four. (redorbit.com)
  • Cognitive Decline after Hospitalization in a Community Population of Older Persons ," published last month in Neurology , found that patients' global cognitive score declined a mean of 0.031 units per year before the first hospitalization, compared with 0.075 units per year thereafter, a more-than-twofold increase. (the-hospitalist.org)