Human Body: The human being as a non-anatomical and non-zoological entity. The emphasis is on the philosophical or artistic treatment of the human being, and includes lay and social attitudes toward the body in history. (From J. Cassedy, NLM History of Medicine Division)Pediculus: Lice of the genus Pediculus, family Pediculidae. Pediculus humanus corporus is the human body louse and Pediculus humanus capitis is the human head louse.Anatomy: A branch of biology dealing with the structure of organisms.Models, Anatomic: Three-dimensional representation to show anatomic structures. Models may be used in place of intact animals or organisms for teaching, practice, and study.Body Fluids: Liquid components of living organisms.Elementary Particle Interactions: The interactions of particles responsible for their scattering and transformations (decays and reactions). Because of interactions, an isolated particle may decay into other particles. Two particles passing near each other may transform, perhaps into the same particles but with changed momenta (elastic scattering) or into other particles (inelastic scattering). Interactions fall into three groups: strong, electromagnetic, and weak. (From McGraw-Hill Encyclopedia of Science & Technology, 7th ed)Lice Infestations: Parasitic attack or subsistence on the skin by members of the order Phthiraptera, especially on humans by Pediculus humanus of the family Pediculidae. The hair of the head, eyelashes, and pubis is a frequent site of infestation. (From Dorland, 28th ed; Stedman, 26th ed)History, 16th Century: Time period from 1501 through 1600 of the common era.History, 17th Century: Time period from 1601 through 1700 of the common era.Body Burden: The total amount of a chemical, metal or radioactive substance present at any time after absorption in the body of man or animal.Solar Activity: Any type of variation in the appearance of energy output of the sun. (NASA Thesaurus, 1994)Metagenome: A collective genome representative of the many organisms, primarily microorganisms, existing in a community.Back: The rear surface of an upright primate from the shoulders to the hip, or the dorsal surface of tetrapods.Electromagnetic Radiation: Waves of oscillating electric and MAGNETIC FIELDS which move at right angles to each other and outward from the source.Earth (Planet): Planet that is the third in order from the sun. It is one of the four inner or terrestrial planets of the SOLAR SYSTEM.MuseumsMercury Compounds: Inorganic compounds that contain mercury as an integral part of the molecule.Protective Devices: Devices designed to provide personal protection against injury to individuals exposed to hazards in industry, sports, aviation, or daily activities.Bombs: A weapon designed to explode when deployed. It frequently refers to a hollow case filled with EXPLOSIVE AGENTS.Elastic Cartilage: A type of CARTILAGE whose matrix contains ELASTIC FIBERS and elastic lamellae, in addition to the normal components of HYALINE CARTILAGE matrix. Elastic cartilage is found in the EXTERNAL EAR; EUSTACHIAN TUBE; EPIGLOTTIS; and LARYNX.Posture: The position or attitude of the body.Beauty: Characteristics or attributes of persons or things which elicit pleasurable feelings.Wireless Technology: Techniques using energy such as radio frequency, infrared light, laser light, visible light, or acoustic energy to transfer information without the use of wires, over both short and long distances.Phthiraptera: An order of small, wingless parasitic insects, commonly known as lice. The suborders include ANOPLURA (sucking lice); AMBLYCERA; ISCHNOCERA; and Rhynchophthirina (elephant and warthog lice).Acceleration: An increase in the rate of speed.Anatomy, Artistic: The study of the structures of organisms for applications in art: drawing, painting, sculpture, illustration, etc.Monitoring, Ambulatory: The use of electronic equipment to observe or record physiologic processes while the patient undergoes normal daily activities.Vibration: A continuing periodic change in displacement with respect to a fixed reference. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)Bartonella quintana: A species of gram-negative bacteria in which man is the primary host and the human body louse, Pediculus humanus, the principal vector. It is the etiological agent of TRENCH FEVER.Emergency Responders: Personnel trained to provide the initial services, care, and support in EMERGENCIES or DISASTERS.History, 18th Century: Time period from 1701 through 1800 of the common era.Whole Body Imaging: The creation of a visual display of the inside of the entire body of a human or animal for the purposes of diagnostic evaluation. This is most commonly achieved by using MAGNETIC RESONANCE IMAGING; or POSITRON EMISSION TOMOGRAPHY.Sweat: The fluid excreted by the SWEAT GLANDS. It consists of water containing sodium chloride, phosphate, urea, ammonia, and other waste products.Biomechanical Phenomena: The properties, processes, and behavior of biological systems under the action of mechanical forces.Models, Biological: Theoretical representations that simulate the behavior or activity of biological processes or diseases. For disease models in living animals, DISEASE MODELS, ANIMAL is available. Biological models include the use of mathematical equations, computers, and other electronic equipment.Medical Illustration: The field which deals with illustrative clarification of biomedical concepts, as in the use of diagrams and drawings. The illustration may be produced by hand, photography, computer, or other electronic or mechanical methods.Clothing: Fabric or other material used to cover the body.Computer-Aided Design: The use of computers for designing and/or manufacturing of anything, including drugs, surgical procedures, orthotics, and prosthetics.Odors: The volatile portions of substances perceptible by the sense of smell. (Grant & Hackh's Chemical Dictionary, 5th ed)Pesticide Residues: Pesticides or their breakdown products remaining in the environment following their normal use or accidental contamination.Equipment Design: Methods of creating machines and devices.Mouth: The oval-shaped oral cavity located at the apex of the digestive tract and consisting of two parts: the vestibule and the oral cavity proper.Skin: The outer covering of the body that protects it from the environment. It is composed of the DERMIS and the EPIDERMIS.Qi: The vital life force in the body, supposedly able to be regulated by acupuncture. It corresponds roughly to the Greek pneuma, the Latin spiritus, and the ancient Indian prana. The concept of life-breath or vital energy was formulated as an indication of the awareness of man, originally directed externally toward nature or society but later turned inward to the self or life within. (From Comparison between Concepts of Life-Breath in East and West, 15th International Symposium on the Comparative History of Medicine - East and West, August 26-September 3, 1990, Shizuoka, Japan, pp. ix-x)Typhus, Epidemic Louse-Borne: The classic form of typhus, caused by RICKETTSIA PROWAZEKII, which is transmitted from man to man by the louse Pediculus humanus corporis. This disease is characterized by the sudden onset of intense headache, malaise, and generalized myalgia followed by the formation of a macular skin eruption and vascular and neurologic disturbances.Body Water: Fluids composed mainly of water found within the body.Equipment Failure Analysis: The evaluation of incidents involving the loss of function of a device. These evaluations are used for a variety of purposes such as to determine the failure rates, the causes of failures, costs of failures, and the reliability and maintainability of devices.Transducers: Any device or element which converts an input signal into an output signal of a different form. Examples include the microphone, phonographic pickup, loudspeaker, barometer, photoelectric cell, automobile horn, doorbell, and underwater sound transducer. (McGraw Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)Microbial Interactions: The inter- and intra-relationships between various microorganisms. This can include both positive (like SYMBIOSIS) and negative (like ANTIBIOSIS) interactions. Examples include virus - bacteria and bacteria - bacteria.Electromagnetic Fields: Fields representing the joint interplay of electric and magnetic forces.Bacteria: One of the three domains of life (the others being Eukarya and ARCHAEA), also called Eubacteria. They are unicellular prokaryotic microorganisms which generally possess rigid cell walls, multiply by cell division, and exhibit three principal forms: round or coccal, rodlike or bacillary, and spiral or spirochetal. Bacteria can be classified by their response to OXYGEN: aerobic, anaerobic, or facultatively anaerobic; by the mode by which they obtain their energy: chemotrophy (via chemical reaction) or PHOTOTROPHY (via light reaction); for chemotrophs by their source of chemical energy: CHEMOLITHOTROPHY (from inorganic compounds) or chemoorganotrophy (from organic compounds); and by their source for CARBON; NITROGEN; etc.; HETEROTROPHY (from organic sources) or AUTOTROPHY (from CARBON DIOXIDE). They can also be classified by whether or not they stain (based on the structure of their CELL WALLS) with CRYSTAL VIOLET dye: gram-negative or gram-positive.Face: The anterior portion of the head that includes the skin, muscles, and structures of the forehead, eyes, nose, mouth, cheeks, and jaw.Environmental Pollutants: Substances or energies, for example heat or light, which when introduced into the air, water, or land threaten life or health of individuals or ECOSYSTEMS.Dioxins: Chlorinated hydrocarbons containing heteroatoms that are present as contaminants of herbicides. Dioxins are carcinogenic, teratogenic, and mutagenic. They have been banned from use by the FDA.Computer Simulation: Computer-based representation of physical systems and phenomena such as chemical processes.Trench Fever: An intermittent fever characterized by intervals of chills, fever, and splenomegaly each of which may last as long as 40 hours. It is caused by BARTONELLA QUINTANA and transmitted by the human louse.Body Temperature Regulation: The processes of heating and cooling that an organism uses to control its temperature.Radio Waves: Electromagnetic waves with frequencies between about 3 kilohertz (very low frequency - VLF) and 300,000 megahertz (extremely high frequency - EHF). They are used in television and radio broadcasting, land and satellite communications systems, radionavigation, radiolocation, and DIATHERMY. The highest frequency radio waves are MICROWAVES.Electricity: The physical effects involving the presence of electric charges at rest and in motion.Gastrointestinal Tract: Generally refers to the digestive structures stretching from the MOUTH to ANUS, but does not include the accessory glandular organs (LIVER; BILIARY TRACT; PANCREAS).Body Composition: The relative amounts of various components in the body, such as percentage of body fat.Movement: The act, process, or result of passing from one place or position to another. It differs from LOCOMOTION in that locomotion is restricted to the passing of the whole body from one place to another, while movement encompasses both locomotion but also a change of the position of the whole body or any of its parts. Movement may be used with reference to humans, vertebrate and invertebrate animals, and microorganisms. Differentiate also from MOTOR ACTIVITY, movement associated with behavior.Telemetry: Transmission of the readings of instruments to a remote location by means of wires, radio waves, or other means. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)Metagenomics: The genomic analysis of assemblages of organisms.Radiation Dosage: The amount of radiation energy that is deposited in a unit mass of material, such as tissues of plants or animal. In RADIOTHERAPY, radiation dosage is expressed in gray units (Gy). In RADIOLOGIC HEALTH, the dosage is expressed by the product of absorbed dose (Gy) and quality factor (a function of linear energy transfer), and is called radiation dose equivalent in sievert units (Sv).Hair: A filament-like structure consisting of a shaft which projects to the surface of the SKIN from a root which is softer than the shaft and lodges in the cavity of a HAIR FOLLICLE. It is found on most surfaces of the body.Adipose Tissue: Specialized connective tissue composed of fat cells (ADIPOCYTES). It is the site of stored FATS, usually in the form of TRIGLYCERIDES. In mammals, there are two types of adipose tissue, the WHITE FAT and the BROWN FAT. Their relative distributions vary in different species with most adipose tissue being white.Body Size: The physical measurements of a body.Respiratory System: The tubular and cavernous organs and structures, by means of which pulmonary ventilation and gas exchange between ambient air and the blood are brought about.Reproducibility of Results: The statistical reproducibility of measurements (often in a clinical context), including the testing of instrumentation or techniques to obtain reproducible results. The concept includes reproducibility of physiological measurements, which may be used to develop rules to assess probability or prognosis, or response to a stimulus; reproducibility of occurrence of a condition; and reproducibility of experimental results.Imaging, Three-Dimensional: The process of generating three-dimensional images by electronic, photographic, or other methods. For example, three-dimensional images can be generated by assembling multiple tomographic images with the aid of a computer, while photographic 3-D images (HOLOGRAPHY) can be made by exposing film to the interference pattern created when two laser light sources shine on an object.Food Contamination: The presence in food of harmful, unpalatable, or otherwise objectionable foreign substances, e.g. chemicals, microorganisms or diluents, before, during, or after processing or storage.Medicine, Chinese Traditional: A system of traditional medicine which is based on the beliefs and practices of the Chinese culture.Body Temperature: The measure of the level of heat of a human or animal.Environment: The external elements and conditions which surround, influence, and affect the life and development of an organism or population.Electric Impedance: The resistance to the flow of either alternating or direct electrical current.Cadaver: A dead body, usually a human body.Anthropometry: The technique that deals with the measurement of the size, weight, and proportions of the human or other primate body.Models, Theoretical: Theoretical representations that simulate the behavior or activity of systems, processes, or phenomena. They include the use of mathematical equations, computers, and other electronic equipment.Environmental Exposure: The exposure to potentially harmful chemical, physical, or biological agents in the environment or to environmental factors that may include ionizing radiation, pathogenic organisms, or toxic chemicals.Chromatography, High Pressure Liquid: Liquid chromatographic techniques which feature high inlet pressures, high sensitivity, and high speed.Algorithms: A procedure consisting of a sequence of algebraic formulas and/or logical steps to calculate or determine a given task.Body Image: Individuals' concept of their own bodies.Occupational Exposure: The exposure to potentially harmful chemical, physical, or biological agents that occurs as a result of one's occupation.Magnetic Resonance Imaging: Non-invasive method of demonstrating internal anatomy based on the principle that atomic nuclei in a strong magnetic field absorb pulses of radiofrequency energy and emit them as radiowaves which can be reconstructed into computerized images. The concept includes proton spin tomographic techniques.Tissue Distribution: Accumulation of a drug or chemical substance in various organs (including those not relevant to its pharmacologic or therapeutic action). This distribution depends on the blood flow or perfusion rate of the organ, the ability of the drug to penetrate organ membranes, tissue specificity, protein binding. The distribution is usually expressed as tissue to plasma ratios.Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Reference Values: The range or frequency distribution of a measurement in a population (of organisms, organs or things) that has not been selected for the presence of disease or abnormality.Temporal Lobe: Lower lateral part of the cerebral hemisphere responsible for auditory, olfactory, and semantic processing. It is located inferior to the lateral fissure and anterior to the OCCIPITAL LOBE.Neoplasms: New abnormal growth of tissue. Malignant neoplasms show a greater degree of anaplasia and have the properties of invasion and metastasis, compared to benign neoplasms.JapanTemperature: The property of objects that determines the direction of heat flow when they are placed in direct thermal contact. The temperature is the energy of microscopic motions (vibrational and translational) of the particles of atoms.Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry: A microanalytical technique combining mass spectrometry and gas chromatography for the qualitative as well as quantitative determinations of compounds.Saliva: The clear, viscous fluid secreted by the SALIVARY GLANDS and mucous glands of the mouth. It contains MUCINS, water, organic salts, and ptylin.Image Processing, Computer-Assisted: A technique of inputting two-dimensional images into a computer and then enhancing or analyzing the imagery into a form that is more useful to the human observer.Hand: The distal part of the arm beyond the wrist in humans and primates, that includes the palm, fingers, and thumb.Molecular Sequence Data: Descriptions of specific amino acid, carbohydrate, or nucleotide sequences which have appeared in the published literature and/or are deposited in and maintained by databanks such as GENBANK, European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), National Biomedical Research Foundation (NBRF), or other sequence repositories.Postural Balance: A POSTURE in which an ideal body mass distribution is achieved. Postural balance provides the body carriage stability and conditions for normal functions in stationary position or in movement, such as sitting, standing, or walking.Bone and Bones: A specialized CONNECTIVE TISSUE that is the main constituent of the SKELETON. The principle cellular component of bone is comprised of OSTEOBLASTS; OSTEOCYTES; and OSTEOCLASTS, while FIBRILLAR COLLAGENS and hydroxyapatite crystals form the BONE MATRIX.
  • Certainly, data collected by government body the Gambling Commission suggests that problem gambling behaviours are on the rise, estimating in 2017 that approximately 430,000 individuals in the UK had a serious gambling problem , a rise of more than one-third over the previous three years. (sciencefocus.com)
  • and most of the research out there, Huber says, predicts dire consequences for people (and other mammals) if average global temperatures rise by 6° Celsius or more. (theatlantic.com)
  • 5. Ante-natal care and birth Caring for the newborn baby Baby needs to be kept warm: large surface area means the baby loses heat quicker than an adult Baby needs physical contact Humans have a very long 'childhood' in relation to other mammals. (slideshare.net)
  • Science never seems to move fast enough, and that is in large part due to the complexity of the human body, including systems that regulate immunity. (blindness.org)
  • He's wearing insulated clothing and lugging more than 100 pounds of gear, and thus sweating profusely as his body attempts to regulate the heat. (wired.com)
  • Five areas in particular have caught the attention of scholars in the humanities and social sciences: (1) European body culture reinforced mechanisms of social distinction and reflected assumptions about social class. (encyclopedia.com)
  • Fortunately, the human body comes well-equipped with heat-loss mechanisms. (latimes.com)
  • The body puts multiple mechanisms in place to get you back to your weight. (washingtonmonthly.com)
  • The human body has highly impressive mechanisms to protect itself from harm. (blindness.org)
  • Many of the talks focused on how we can use natural complement control mechanisms in the body to stop the damage. (blindness.org)
  • According to Stanford neuroendocrinologist Robert Sapolsky, who has studied stress in baboon troops, it is the relative safety from predators and high amounts of leisure time enjoyed by some primates - including humans - that has transformed these useful biological coping mechanisms into a source of pointless suffering and illness. (redorbit.com)
  • Purdue University climatologist Matthew Huber gets plenty of death threats, but that hasn't stopped him from exploring the outer limits of just how much global warming human beings can tolerate. (theatlantic.com)
  • By reducing our dependence on air-conditioning, we can not only save energy but also become more resilient human beings. (commondreams.org)
  • Shining a bright light during one's attempt to sleep has been linked to disturbed sleep cycles in human beings. (worldhealth.net)
  • Though the study's authors have not elaborated on the implications of their research for human beings, such information will be elaborated on in due time. (worldhealth.net)
  • As human beings we have extraordinary potentials we have hardly begun to study, much less understand. (thunderbolts.info)
  • Parties to this Convention shall protect the dignity and identity of all human beings and guarantee everyone, without discrimination, respect for their integrity and other rights and fundamental freedoms with regard to the application of biology and medicine. (coe.int)
  • In addition to this, another alarming development is the record increase in the use of depressants and the rising trend to consume these medicines as if they are a part of one's daily diet. (harunyahya.com)
  • This data could be harvested to understand the minute by minute changes in body chemistry that occur in response to medication, stress, infection, and so on. (slashdot.org)
  • In the past, humans have harnessed our fears of infection to improve public health - seeking cures, creating safe water supplies and discovering vaccines. (chicagotribune.com)
  • As a topical agent, CBD oil can be directly applied to certain areas of the body as an effective means of relieving pain and soreness, reducing inflammation, and soothing inflammatory skin conditions such as psoriasis, dermatitis, and eczema. (chiroeco.com)
  • What we see here is the opposite happened: costs have risen sharply, and at a pace that's far greater than drugs in a similar biologic class," said Daniel M. Hartung, Pharm.D., M.P.H. , lead author of the study and associate professor in the OSU/OHSU College of Pharmacy. (healthcanal.com)
  • The huge die-off "is a risk for human health in case of a possible mutation of the virus," said German biologist Stefan Austermuehle, head of another environmental group Mundo Azul. (phys.org)
  • By identifying the signals that instruct mouse progenitor cells to become cells that make tubes and later insulin-producing beta cells, we can transfer this knowledge to human stem cells to more robustly make beta cells, says Professor and Head of Department Henrik Semb from the Novo Nordisk Foundation Center for Stem Cell Biology at the Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences. (medindia.net)
  • A new study shows an "alarming rise" over the last 20 years in the costs of drugs used to slow the progression of multiple sclerosis or reduce the frequency of attacks, according to a study led by researchers at Oregon Health & Science University (OHSU) and Oregon State University (OSU). (healthcanal.com)
  • Majority of developing markets are plagued by issues of ever increasing population, alarming rise in sexually transmitted diseases and poor health and hygiene infrastructure. (sys-con.com)
  • High humidity also poses danger to human health, experts say. (nationalgeographic.com)
  • In addition to the heat, the high humidity can be dangerous to human health, noted Maryland-based meteorologist Jacks. (nationalgeographic.com)
  • The idea for the Visible Human Project came from Michael Ackerman, a biomedical engineer at the National Library of Medicine (NLM), a branch of the National Institutes of Health and the largest medical library in the world. (washingtonpost.com)
  • As another new report, the Lancet Countdown on Health and Climate Change, makes clear, warming poses a diversity of risks for human health. (chicagotribune.com)
  • Indeed, the impacts on human health could become the burning river of the 21st century. (chicagotribune.com)
  • Infectious diseases will make visceral the toll that environmental destruction takes on human health, and in doing so may become a powerful motivator. (chicagotribune.com)
  • To protect the health of our own bodies, humans must also care for the natural world around us. (chicagotribune.com)
  • It's important to know that these changes are completely normal, and understanding your body can help you better manage your health. (newsmax.com)
  • Pregnancy is the perfect time to learn more about your health and get in tune with your body. (newsmax.com)
  • New data from Nationwide , the nation's first and largest provider of pet health insurance, reveals that pet obesity is on the rise for the fifth straight year. (prnewswire.com)
  • Similar to their human counterparts, excessive body fat increases the risk of preventable health issues and shortens the life expectancy of dogs and cats. (prnewswire.com)
  • With the rise in lifestyle-related issues, it becomes extremely challenging for the human body to maintain optimal health as it ages. (financialexpress.com)
  • About Diabetes: Diabetes is a health-state of the body, where your blood-cells resist insulin supplied by the body. (pearltrees.com)
  • The March editorial for the journal Contraception frames rates of maternal mortality in the United States "not just a matter of public health, but a human rights failure. (ourbodiesourselves.org)
  • The individual investigations focus on how long-term spaceflight can impact different aspects of the human body, ranging from genetic expression to cardiovascular health to immune system response and more. (astronomy.com)
  • This Internet of Bodies could revolutionize health care and improve our quality of life. (rand.org)
  • The $170-million, federally funded Human Microbiome Project also cataloged the genes contained within this zoo of life. (latimes.com)
  • A year in space can trigger many changes in the human body - from our heads down to our genes - but most of them don't persist indefinitely. (astronomy.com)
  • They transduced mouse brain slices with genes for mutant human tau, and produced abundant neurofibrillary tangle pathology within one month. (alzforum.org)
  • Using a general promoter that targets all cells, the authors transduced the slices with several different human tau genes: wild-type, the pro-aggregant S320F mutation, a S320F/P301L, and a S320F/P301L/A152T combination. (alzforum.org)
  • 37.0 °C (98.6 °F). A rectal or vaginal measurement taken directly inside the body cavity is typically slightly higher than oral measurement, and oral measurement is somewhat higher than skin measurement. (wikipedia.org)
  • The Cells' Development Depends on their Sense of Direction The research group, which in addition to Henrik Semb consists of Ph.D. Zarah L f- hlin and assistant professor Pia Nyeng, among others, originally set out to study how the body creates the complex piping systems that transport fluids and gasses in our organs. (medindia.net)
  • Several companies are making CD-ROM or Internet-based atlases that will allow students to virtually dissect a body layer by layer, isolate structures such as muscles and organs and rotate them in three-dimensional space. (washingtonpost.com)
  • It fills the hot and dilated blood vessels throughout the body to get blood to vital organs. (gizmodo.com.au)
  • The Second Person of the Blessed Trinity took to himself a human mind and will and imagination, but also feet, hands, internal organs, muscles, veins, and bones. (ncregister.com)
  • OR it could just be something that has been happening for millennia but since weather records only go back to the mid 1600s we can only speculate what our involvement as humans has actually sped up the shift in climate or not. (wokennews.com)
  • Yet we continue to meet the rising temperatures, superstorms, drought and mega-fires brought about by climate change with relative inaction. (chicagotribune.com)
  • Climate change, pollution, and extinction of plant and animal species make us question harmful human treatment of the natural world. (uscatholic.org)
  • Australia's climate has warmed by just over 1°C since 1910 , with global temperatures on course for a 3-5°C rise this century . (gizmodo.com.au)
  • On March 9, President Barack Obama ordered that federal tax money be used to promote medical research through harvesting the stem cells of, and thus destroying, human embryos. (icr.org)
  • The human body may be the world's most wonderful machine, but it differs from nearly every other mechanical gadget in one important way: It contains essentially no empty space. (washingtonpost.com)
  • Browse over 1 million classes created by top students, professors, publishers, and experts, spanning the world's body of "learnable" knowledge. (brainscape.com)
  • It protects the body from harmful liquid toxins, generates chemicals and proteins required for digestion, regulates glycogen and recycles aged red blood cells. (worldhealth.net)
  • J, priceline pharmacy kooyong classic, action and finally both physiology and physiological chemistry con, rose pharmacy philippines price list, Suffered great and persistent mental depression in. (me.uk)
  • Human-physiology studies show that air-conditioning undermines our natural adaptation to heat and disrupts endocrine systems as well. (commondreams.org)
  • This is one of the people who recently learned that the result of these efforts is that his body is now producing hormones that make him feel hungry all the time and his metabolism has slowed to the point that he needs to consume 800 fewer calories per day than normal-weight people in order to avoid putting on pounds. (washingtonmonthly.com)
  • Oxidative stress occurs through normal aging and wear and tear on the body, but also when the body is fighting off illness or toxins. (blindness.org)
  • Rising demand to get normal sleep patterns is the major factor for the growth of this market. (openpr.com)
  • The human body regulates blood glucose levels that keep the sugar level normal. (selfgrowth.com)
  • For example, after eating level rises and then settle down to the normal after an hour. (selfgrowth.com)
  • Each person's body is made up of about 10 trillion cells - and each of us plays host to about 100 trillion bacterial cells. (harvard.edu)
  • This is the human 'body burden' - the pollution in people that permeates everyone in the world, including babies in the womb. (ewg.org)
  • Graafstra had set up shop in a booth in the middle of an exhibit hall at the Austin Convention Center in Texas' capital, where he gathered last month with several hundred others who call themselves "body hackers" - people who push the boundaries of implantable technology to improve the human body. (npr.org)
  • Across the way, Sasha Rose, who was working a meditation booth at the convention, watched the people line up to be "chipped. (npr.org)
  • In what may become the most clinically useful application, numerous companies are using the exquisitely detailed "data set" of the Visible Human cadavers to find ways to extract more information from the kinds of "imaging studies" made daily of thousands of people in hospitals or clinics. (washingtonpost.com)
  • A portion of the cave, used by the excavation team en route to the Dinaledi Chamber, is called "Superman's Crawl" because most people can fit through only by holding one arm tightly against the body and extending the other above the head, in the manner of Superman in flight. (wikipedia.org)
  • It also promises to be "people-centred, gender-sensitive, respect human rights and have a particular focus on the poorest, most vulnerable and those furthest behind. (rfsl.se)
  • Humans are not their favorite meal, but you wouldn't know that from the recent series of alarming gator attacks on people. (phys.org)
  • aesthetic surgery, cosmetics, and tattooing were just some of the means by which people changed their bodies and refashioned their selves. (encyclopedia.com)
  • This is not surprising, because the body was a locus of social meanings on which people projected their cultural anxieties as well as their social aspirations. (encyclopedia.com)
  • 5) The cultivation of the human body allowed people to create a sense of self-fulfillment and personal agency. (encyclopedia.com)
  • In humans, prions are believed to cause kuru, a much studied disease of the Fore people in New Guinea, and several hereditary forms of dementia, including Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD), which affects about one in a million people. (scientificamerican.com)
  • In this busy world, people do not have enough time to keep their body fit, so they are searching for the perfect and healthy alternative. (pearltrees.com)
  • The majority show up with flu-like symptoms and fatigue, but a small number of people develop debilitating infections that spread from the lungs to other parts of the body, including the brain. (ucsf.edu)
  • Human closeness is fundamental to our mental well-being, but many people have hurdles to human closeness. (flipboard.com)
  • The main aim of this study is to produce pancreatic beta cells from stem cells in the human body. (medindia.net)
  • Immature stem cells in the human body can be stimulated to mature into insulin-producing cells. (medindia.net)
  • Now we can use this knowledge to more efficiently turn human stem cells into beta cells in the laboratory with the hope to use them to replace lost beta cells in patients suffering from diabetes', says Henrik Semb. (medindia.net)
  • The novel is eerily relevant today as we face ethical dilemmas around appropriate use of stem cells, questions about organ donation and organ harvesting, as well as animal to human transplants. (stanford.edu)
  • As the lymph fluid moves through the body, it collects waste products and toxins and disposes of them through the bladder, bowel, lungs, and skin. (prezi.com)
  • Neural and Chemical factors control breathing in the human body, stretch receptors in the lungs detect the increase in the rate and depth of breathing. (prezi.com)
  • The ECS is responsible for regulating many systems in the body, such as the limbic, metabolic, nociceptive, and immunologic functions. (chiroeco.com)
  • They didn't really find this, but their analysis revealed that each place in the body seems to have a distinct set of metabolic abilities, be it digestion of sugars in the mouth or of complex carbohydrates in the large intestine. (latimes.com)
  • Endocannabinoids are natural chemical regulators in the body that interact with cannabinoid receptors and help maintain homeostasis. (chiroeco.com)
  • Scientists have been aware that bacteria live on the human body ever since a 17th century Dutch naturalist examined the plaque from his teeth under a microscope. (latimes.com)
  • In the second analysis, scientists sequenced every bit of DNA in the samples, producing a mix of genetic information representing every critter living at a particular body site. (latimes.com)
  • Common to all diabetes patients is that they lack the ability to produce sufficient amounts of insulin, which regulates the blood sugar in the body. (medindia.net)
  • However, glucose is the only entry in the bloodstream if the body has enough insulin. (selfgrowth.com)
  • Normally this disease occurs when there is less insulin in the body, in other words, we can say that when cells become less sensitive to insulin. (selfgrowth.com)
  • The function of the circulatory system is to deliver oxygen and nutrients to your body and remove carbon dioxide and waste products through a system of veins, arteries, and smaller blood vessels. (everydayhealth.com)
  • The oxygen-rich blood goes back to your heart and the carbon dioxide is exhaled out of your body. (everydayhealth.com)
  • However, the human body has both short-term and long-term adaptations to altitude that allow it to partially compensate for the lack of oxygen. (wikipedia.org)
  • The death zone, in mountaineering, refers to altitudes above a certain point where the amount of oxygen is insufficient to sustain human life. (wikipedia.org)
  • It is responsible for transporting oxygen, nutrients, hormones, and cellular waste products throughout the body, and is powered by the heart. (prezi.com)
  • When we exercise oxygen is depleted from the body triggering an increase in tidal volume, this happens in both aerobic and anaerobic exercise. (prezi.com)
  • 13. Oxygen is depleted from the human body resulting in more oxygen needing to get into the body. (prezi.com)
  • The study is mainly based on tests performed on mice, but the researchers decided to examine whether the same mechanism can be found in human cells. (medindia.net)
  • The researchers expect regulation of cell polarity to be key to the development of many other human cell types, for example nerve cells. (medindia.net)
  • The hardest-hit area in terms of human impact, the researchers say, will probably be densely populated northeastern India. (eurekalert.org)
  • Researchers then monitored how their bodies reacted to their differing environments. (astronomy.com)
  • These researchers identified variations of about 20 percent though they did not measure liver length during nighttime hours when body rhythms are slower. (worldhealth.net)
  • Beilock examines how attention and working memory guide human performance, how experience and practice and brain development interact to create our abilities, and how stress affects all these factors. (audible.com)
  • Another contributing factor to the increasing number of migraine patients is deficiency of vitamin D. 'Vitamin D deficiency affects the human body in various ways. (indiatimes.com)
  • Just how hot and bothered you get on the inside depends on a number of factors: body size, fitness level, intensity of exercise, the heat and humidity of the environment, and how acclimatized you are to exercising in hot weather. (latimes.com)
  • That could well happen this century: By 2100, Huber points out, the mid-range estimates predict a rise of 3°C to 4°C in average global temperatures based on current economic activities, but those studies ignore accelerating factors like the release of vast quantities of methane -- a potent greenhouse gas -- now trapped beneath permafrost and sea ice that's becoming less and less permanent. (theatlantic.com)
  • Ron Magill, spokesman for the Miami Zoo and animal behavior expert, says that humans and gators increasingly find themselves vying for the same territory. (phys.org)
  • Osborne Wiggins and psychiatrist Michael Schwartz (2004) noted that in early human history "unusual behavior" was interpreted in moral and religious (i.e., biblical) terms. (answersingenesis.org)
  • Sex crimes are forms of human sexual behavior that are crimes. (wikipedia.org)
  • Instead, the human body is teeming with bacteria. (harvard.edu)
  • But even when they succeed at that task, they inevitably cause collateral damage to bacteria that are innocent bystanders in the human body. (harvard.edu)
  • From Bacteria to Bach and Back is Daniel C. Dennett's brilliant answer, extending perspectives from his earlier work in surprising directions, exploring the deep interactions of evolution, brains, and human culture. (audible.com)
  • Some spots on the body, such as the mouth, are rain-forest-like in their diversity, inhabited by a rich community of bacteria that is fairly similar from one person to the next. (latimes.com)
  • Since the exact sequence of that gene is unique to each bacterial species, the analysis told them what types of bacteria were present at each body site, as well as how abundant each was. (latimes.com)
  • Functions: -It serves as a good protector of the internal body system and also acts as the first barrier for bacteria. (prezi.com)
  • When Christ became human, he also became part of the vast body of the cosmos. (uscatholic.org)
  • How wonderful, too, that this Christ-life is placed in the bodies of the faithful through the materiality of the sacraments: water, oil, imposed hands, transfigured bread and wine, etc. (ncregister.com)
  • She has known that, as Paul put it, our bodies become temples of the Holy Spirit, dwelling places of Christ. (ncregister.com)
  • And thus we clothe the skeleton of St. Ambrose in stately liturgical robes and we crown his skull with a bishop's miter, not be macabre or "creepy," but because we reverence his body as a place where Christ had come to dwell. (ncregister.com)
  • On 13 September 2013, while exploring the Rising Star cave system, recreational cavers Rick Hunter and Steven Tucker of the Speleological Exploration Club (SEC) found a narrow, vertically oriented "chimney" or "chute" measuring 12 m (39 ft) long with an average width of 20 cm (7.9 in). (wikipedia.org)
  • Only 20 out of 206 bones in the human body were not found in the cave as of summer in 2014. (wikipedia.org)
  • The site, designated UW-102, was found by cavers Rick Hunter and Steve Tucker on the last day of the first Rising Star Expedition, and limited excavation began in April 2014. (wikipedia.org)
  • Of Prusiner's numerous discoveries, possibly the most startling--and controversial--was that prions can reproduce without genetic material because they are forms of ubiquitous proteins found in humans and animals. (scientificamerican.com)
  • A human skull was also found and passed to local police. (telegraph.co.uk)
  • A review of male fertility data recently published in a national medical journal has found that human sperm counts are in a long-term decline. (philly.com)
  • If your body stops responding for a long time and there is no brain activity please die. (slashdot.org)
  • Viral transduction of mutant human tau produces robust tauopathy in mouse brain slices. (alzforum.org)
  • Mouse brain slices transduced with a human tau gene carrying A152T, P301L, and S320F mutations develop tau tangles as judged by Thioflavin S staining (green) by 28 days in vitro. (alzforum.org)
  • It becomes obvious that in deep meditation, when waves of alpha and theta rhythms cascade across the entire brain, a resonance is possible between the human being and the planet. (thunderbolts.info)
  • The market is driven by the growing need to avoid/postpone unwanted pregnancies, rising levels of education, sophistication, and need for pursuing career goals among young working women. (sys-con.com)
  • And most importantly: are levels of addiction on the rise, as technological advances put these enjoyable temptations in our pockets? (sciencefocus.com)
  • First, know that all hormone levels rise during pregnancy. (newsmax.com)
  • In a small pilot study of 12 subjects, results indicated that grounding the human body during sleep reduces night-time levels of cortisol and resynchronizes cortisol hormone secretion more in alignment with the natural 24-hour circadian rhythm profile. (sfgate.com)
  • Last, but not least, 36 years ago, George Engel (1977) told psychiatrists that "psychiatry's crisis revolves around the question of whether the categories of human distress with which it is concerned" are really "diseases" (p. 129), and the crisis has not yet been resolved. (answersingenesis.org)
  • Fifteen years ago I evoked a good deal of skepticism when I proposed that the infectious agents causing certain degenerative disorders of the central nervous system in animals and, more rarely, in humans might consist of protein and nothing else. (scientificamerican.com)
  • After all, the human body regulated itself for thousands of years with the daily motion of the sun. (worldhealth.net)
  • BERLIN - As the number of single households in Europe has steadily risen in recent years, so have the concerns over an issue that is not often in the focus of national political debate: loneliness, "the hidden epidemic," according to the Red Cross. (flipboard.com)
  • by: Nitya Chivukula and Roop Panesar Body Systems Skeletal System Reproductive System Urinary System Lymphatic System What is it? (prezi.com)
  • and transmission by human body lice was demonstrated, but the nature of the trench fever agent was still unknown ( 4 ). (cdc.gov)
  • Byam confirmed in 1919 the others' work, showing that "rickettsia bodies" were present in lice, their excreta, and their guts when they were collected from trench fever patients. (cdc.gov)