Ventricular Function, Right: The hemodynamic and electrophysiological action of the right HEART VENTRICLE.Human Rights: The rights of the individual to cultural, social, economic, and educational opportunities as provided by society, e.g., right to work, right to education, and right to social security.Ventricular Dysfunction, Right: A condition in which the RIGHT VENTRICLE of the heart was functionally impaired. This condition usually leads to HEART FAILURE or MYOCARDIAL INFARCTION, and other cardiovascular complications. Diagnosis is made by measuring the diminished ejection fraction and a depressed level of motility of the right ventricular wall.Right to Die: The right of the patient or the patient's representative to make decisions with regard to the patient's dying.Hypertrophy, Right Ventricular: Enlargement of the RIGHT VENTRICLE of the heart. This increase in ventricular mass is often attributed to PULMONARY HYPERTENSION and is a contributor to cardiovascular morbidity and mortality.Atrial Function, Right: The hemodynamic and electrophysiological action of the RIGHT ATRIUM.Patient Rights: Fundamental claims of patients, as expressed in statutes, declarations, or generally accepted moral principles. (Bioethics Thesaurus) The term is used for discussions of patient rights as a group of many rights, as in a hospital's posting of a list of patient rights.Arrhythmogenic Right Ventricular Dysplasia: A congenital cardiomyopathy that is characterized by infiltration of adipose and fibrous tissue into the RIGHT VENTRICLE wall and loss of myocardial cells. Primary injuries usually are at the free wall of right ventricular and right atria resulting in ventricular and supraventricular arrhythmias.Functional Laterality: Behavioral manifestations of cerebral dominance in which there is preferential use and superior functioning of either the left or the right side, as in the preferred use of the right hand or right foot.Heart Atria: The chambers of the heart, to which the BLOOD returns from the circulation.Civil Rights: Legal guarantee protecting the individual from attack on personal liberties, right to fair trial, right to vote, and freedom from discrimination on the basis of race, color, religion, sex, age, disability, or national origin. (from http://www.usccr.gov/ accessed 1/31/2003)Magnetic Resonance Imaging: Non-invasive method of demonstrating internal anatomy based on the principle that atomic nuclei in a strong magnetic field absorb pulses of radiofrequency energy and emit them as radiowaves which can be reconstructed into computerized images. The concept includes proton spin tomographic techniques.Reproductive Rights: Reproductive rights rest on the recognition of the basic right of all couples and individuals to decide freely and responsibly the number, spacing and timing of their children and to have the information and means to do so, and the right to attain the highest standard of sexual and reproductive health. They also include the right of all to make decisions concerning reproduction free of discrimination, coercion and violence.Human Rights Abuses: Deliberate maltreatment of groups of humans beings including violations of generally-accepted fundamental rights as stated by the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, adopted and proclaimed by the United Nations General Assembly resolution 217 A (III) of 10 December 1948.Women's Rights: The rights of women to equal status pertaining to social, economic, and educational opportunities afforded by society.Tomography, X-Ray Computed: Tomography using x-ray transmission and a computer algorithm to reconstruct the image.Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Hypertension, Pulmonary: Increased VASCULAR RESISTANCE in the PULMONARY CIRCULATION, usually secondary to HEART DISEASES or LUNG DISEASES.Pulmonary Artery: The short wide vessel arising from the conus arteriosus of the right ventricle and conveying unaerated blood to the lungs.Electrocardiography: Recording of the moment-to-moment electromotive forces of the HEART as projected onto various sites on the body's surface, delineated as a scalar function of time. The recording is monitored by a tracing on slow moving chart paper or by observing it on a cardioscope, which is a CATHODE RAY TUBE DISPLAY.Treatment Outcome: Evaluation undertaken to assess the results or consequences of management and procedures used in combating disease in order to determine the efficacy, effectiveness, safety, and practicability of these interventions in individual cases or series.Echocardiography: Ultrasonic recording of the size, motion, and composition of the heart and surrounding tissues. The standard approach is transthoracic.Brain Mapping: Imaging techniques used to colocalize sites of brain functions or physiological activity with brain structures.Euthanasia: The act or practice of killing or allowing death from natural causes, for reasons of mercy, i.e., in order to release a person from incurable disease, intolerable suffering, or undignified death. (from Beauchamp and Walters, Contemporary Issues in Bioethics, 5th ed)Animal Rights: The moral and ethical bases of the protection of animals from cruelty and abuse. The rights are extended to domestic animals, laboratory animals, and wild animals.Heart Defects, Congenital: Developmental abnormalities involving structures of the heart. These defects are present at birth but may be discovered later in life.Tetralogy of Fallot: A combination of congenital heart defects consisting of four key features including VENTRICULAR SEPTAL DEFECTS; PULMONARY STENOSIS; RIGHT VENTRICULAR HYPERTROPHY; and a dextro-positioned AORTA. In this condition, blood from both ventricles (oxygen-rich and oxygen-poor) is pumped into the body often causing CYANOSIS.Heart: The hollow, muscular organ that maintains the circulation of the blood.Cardiac Pacing, Artificial: Regulation of the rate of contraction of the heart muscles by an artificial pacemaker.Dogs: The domestic dog, Canis familiaris, comprising about 400 breeds, of the carnivore family CANIDAE. They are worldwide in distribution and live in association with people. (Walker's Mammals of the World, 5th ed, p1065)Hemodynamics: The movement and the forces involved in the movement of the blood through the CARDIOVASCULAR SYSTEM.Cardiac Catheterization: Procedures in which placement of CARDIAC CATHETERS is performed for therapeutic or diagnostic procedures.Brain: The part of CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM that is contained within the skull (CRANIUM). Arising from the NEURAL TUBE, the embryonic brain is comprised of three major parts including PROSENCEPHALON (the forebrain); MESENCEPHALON (the midbrain); and RHOMBENCEPHALON (the hindbrain). The developed brain consists of CEREBRUM; CEREBELLUM; and other structures in the BRAIN STEM.Coronary Vessel Anomalies: Malformations of CORONARY VESSELS, either arteries or veins. Included are anomalous origins of coronary arteries; ARTERIOVENOUS FISTULA; CORONARY ANEURYSM; MYOCARDIAL BRIDGING; and others.Heart Neoplasms: Tumors in any part of the heart. They include primary cardiac tumors and metastatic tumors to the heart. Their interference with normal cardiac functions can cause a wide variety of symptoms including HEART FAILURE; CARDIAC ARRHYTHMIAS; or EMBOLISM.Subclavian Artery: Artery arising from the brachiocephalic trunk on the right side and from the arch of the aorta on the left side. It distributes to the neck, thoracic wall, spinal cord, brain, meninges, and upper limb.Euthanasia, Passive: Failing to prevent death from natural causes, for reasons of mercy by the withdrawal or withholding of life-prolonging treatment.Image Processing, Computer-Assisted: A technique of inputting two-dimensional images into a computer and then enhancing or analyzing the imagery into a form that is more useful to the human observer.Heart Septum: This structure includes the thin muscular atrial septum between the two HEART ATRIA, and the thick muscular ventricular septum between the two HEART VENTRICLES.Euthanasia, Active: The act or practice of killing for reasons of mercy, i.e., in order to release a person or animal from incurable disease, intolerable suffering, or undignified death. (from Beauchamp and Walters, Contemporary Issues in Bioethics, 5th ed)Fatal Outcome: Death resulting from the presence of a disease in an individual, as shown by a single case report or a limited number of patients. This should be differentiated from DEATH, the physiological cessation of life and from MORTALITY, an epidemiological or statistical concept.Heart Conduction System: An impulse-conducting system composed of modified cardiac muscle, having the power of spontaneous rhythmicity and conduction more highly developed than the rest of the heart.Follow-Up Studies: Studies in which individuals or populations are followed to assess the outcome of exposures, procedures, or effects of a characteristic, e.g., occurrence of disease.Genes, Lethal: Genes whose loss of function or gain of function MUTATION leads to the death of the carrier prior to maturity. They may be essential genes (GENES, ESSENTIAL) required for viability, or genes which cause a block of function of an essential gene at a time when the essential gene function is required for viability.Parietal Lobe: Upper central part of the cerebral hemisphere. It is located posterior to central sulcus, anterior to the OCCIPITAL LOBE, and superior to the TEMPORAL LOBES.Retrospective Studies: Studies used to test etiologic hypotheses in which inferences about an exposure to putative causal factors are derived from data relating to characteristics of persons under study or to events or experiences in their past. The essential feature is that some of the persons under study have the disease or outcome of interest and their characteristics are compared with those of unaffected persons.Myocardium: The muscle tissue of the HEART. It is composed of striated, involuntary muscle cells (MYOCYTES, CARDIAC) connected to form the contractile pump to generate blood flow.Pulmonary Valve: A valve situated at the entrance to the pulmonary trunk from the right ventricle.Analysis of Variance: A statistical technique that isolates and assesses the contributions of categorical independent variables to variation in the mean of a continuous dependent variable.Frontal Lobe: The part of the cerebral hemisphere anterior to the central sulcus, and anterior and superior to the lateral sulcus.Vena Cava, Superior: The venous trunk which returns blood from the head, neck, upper extremities and chest.Sinus of Valsalva: The dilatation of the aortic wall behind each of the cusps of the aortic valve.Double Outlet Right Ventricle: Incomplete transposition of the great vessels in which both the AORTA and the PULMONARY ARTERY arise from the RIGHT VENTRICLE. The only outlet of the LEFT VENTRICLE is a large ventricular septal defect (VENTRICULAR SEPTAL DEFECTS or VSD). The various subtypes are classified by the location of the septal defect, such as subaortic, subpulmonary, or noncommitted.Vena Cava, Inferior: The venous trunk which receives blood from the lower extremities and from the pelvic and abdominal organs.Hepatic Veins: Veins which drain the liver.Apoptosis: One of the mechanisms by which CELL DEATH occurs (compare with NECROSIS and AUTOPHAGOCYTOSIS). Apoptosis is the mechanism responsible for the physiological deletion of cells and appears to be intrinsically programmed. It is characterized by distinctive morphologic changes in the nucleus and cytoplasm, chromatin cleavage at regularly spaced sites, and the endonucleolytic cleavage of genomic DNA; (DNA FRAGMENTATION); at internucleosomal sites. This mode of cell death serves as a balance to mitosis in regulating the size of animal tissues and in mediating pathologic processes associated with tumor growth.Monocrotaline: A pyrrolizidine alkaloid and a toxic plant constituent that poisons livestock and humans through the ingestion of contaminated grains and other foods. The alkaloid causes pulmonary artery hypertension, right ventricular hypertrophy, and pathological changes in the pulmonary vasculature. Significant attenuation of the cardiopulmonary changes are noted after oral magnesium treatment.Attitude to Death: Conceptual response of the person to the various aspects of death, which are based on individual psychosocial and cultural experience.Heart Septal Defects, Ventricular: Developmental abnormalities in any portion of the VENTRICULAR SEPTUM resulting in abnormal communications between the two lower chambers of the heart. Classification of ventricular septal defects is based on location of the communication, such as perimembranous, inlet, outlet (infundibular), central muscular, marginal muscular, or apical muscular defect.Tricuspid Valve Insufficiency: Backflow of blood from the RIGHT VENTRICLE into the RIGHT ATRIUM due to imperfect closure of the TRICUSPID VALVE.Mice, Knockout: Strains of mice in which certain GENES of their GENOMES have been disrupted, or "knocked-out". To produce knockouts, using RECOMBINANT DNA technology, the normal DNA sequence of the gene being studied is altered to prevent synthesis of a normal gene product. Cloned cells in which this DNA alteration is successful are then injected into mouse EMBRYOS to produce chimeric mice. The chimeric mice are then bred to yield a strain in which all the cells of the mouse contain the disrupted gene. Knockout mice are used as EXPERIMENTAL ANIMAL MODELS for diseases (DISEASE MODELS, ANIMAL) and to clarify the functions of the genes.Disease Models, Animal: Naturally occurring or experimentally induced animal diseases with pathological processes sufficiently similar to those of human diseases. They are used as study models for human diseases.Temporal Lobe: Lower lateral part of the cerebral hemisphere responsible for auditory, olfactory, and semantic processing. It is located inferior to the lateral fissure and anterior to the OCCIPITAL LOBE.Catheter Ablation: Removal of tissue with electrical current delivered via electrodes positioned at the distal end of a catheter. Energy sources are commonly direct current (DC-shock) or alternating current at radiofrequencies (usually 750 kHz). The technique is used most often to ablate the AV junction and/or accessory pathways in order to interrupt AV conduction and produce AV block in the treatment of various tachyarrhythmias.Pulmonary Valve Insufficiency: Backflow of blood from the PULMONARY ARTERY into the RIGHT VENTRICLE due to imperfect closure of the PULMONARY VALVE.Cardiac Surgical Procedures: Surgery performed on the heart.Fistula: Abnormal communication most commonly seen between two internal organs, or between an internal organ and the surface of the body.Echocardiography, Doppler: Measurement of intracardiac blood flow using an M-mode and/or two-dimensional (2-D) echocardiogram while simultaneously recording the spectrum of the audible Doppler signal (e.g., velocity, direction, amplitude, intensity, timing) reflected from the moving column of red blood cells.Pulmonary Circulation: The circulation of the BLOOD through the LUNGS.Heart Septal Defects, Atrial: Developmental abnormalities in any portion of the ATRIAL SEPTUM resulting in abnormal communications between the two upper chambers of the heart. Classification of atrial septal defects is based on location of the communication and types of incomplete fusion of atrial septa with the ENDOCARDIAL CUSHIONS in the fetal heart. They include ostium primum, ostium secundum, sinus venosus, and coronary sinus defects.Ventricular Septum: The muscular structure separating the right and the left lower chambers (HEART VENTRICLES) of the heart. The ventricular septum consists of a very small membranous portion just beneath the AORTIC VALVE, and a large thick muscular portion consisting of three sections including the inlet septum, the trabecular septum, and the outlet septum.Electrophysiologic Techniques, Cardiac: Methods to induce and measure electrical activities at specific sites in the heart to diagnose and treat problems with the heart's electrical system.Pulmonary Embolism: Blocking of the PULMONARY ARTERY or one of its branches by an EMBOLUS.Prospective Studies: Observation of a population for a sufficient number of persons over a sufficient number of years to generate incidence or mortality rates subsequent to the selection of the study group.Psychomotor Performance: The coordination of a sensory or ideational (cognitive) process and a motor activity.Stroke Volume: The amount of BLOOD pumped out of the HEART per beat, not to be confused with cardiac output (volume/time). It is calculated as the difference between the end-diastolic volume and the end-systolic volume.Death: Irreversible cessation of all bodily functions, manifested by absence of spontaneous breathing and total loss of cardiovascular and cerebral functions.Myocardial Contraction: Contractile activity of the MYOCARDIUM.Reaction Time: The time from the onset of a stimulus until a response is observed.Ventricular Outflow Obstruction: Occlusion of the outflow tract in either the LEFT VENTRICLE or the RIGHT VENTRICLE of the heart. This may result from CONGENITAL HEART DEFECTS, predisposing heart diseases, complications of surgery, or HEART NEOPLASMS.Pericardium: A conical fibro-serous sac surrounding the HEART and the roots of the great vessels (AORTA; VENAE CAVAE; PULMONARY ARTERY). Pericardium consists of two sacs: the outer fibrous pericardium and the inner serous pericardium. The latter consists of an outer parietal layer facing the fibrous pericardium, and an inner visceral layer (epicardium) resting next to the heart, and a pericardial cavity between these two layers.Blood Pressure: PRESSURE of the BLOOD on the ARTERIES and other BLOOD VESSELS.Infant, Newborn: An infant during the first month after birth.Thoracotomy: Surgical incision into the chest wall.Phenotype: The outward appearance of the individual. It is the product of interactions between genes, and between the GENOTYPE and the environment.Heart Failure: A heterogeneous condition in which the heart is unable to pump out sufficient blood to meet the metabolic need of the body. Heart failure can be caused by structural defects, functional abnormalities (VENTRICULAR DYSFUNCTION), or a sudden overload beyond its capacity. Chronic heart failure is more common than acute heart failure which results from sudden insult to cardiac function, such as MYOCARDIAL INFARCTION.Gene Expression Regulation, Developmental: Any of the processes by which nuclear, cytoplasmic, or intercellular factors influence the differential control of gene action during the developmental stages of an organism.Hepatectomy: Excision of all or part of the liver. (Dorland, 28th ed)Crowns: A prosthetic restoration that reproduces the entire surface anatomy of the visible natural crown of a tooth. It may be partial (covering three or more surfaces of a tooth) or complete (covering all surfaces). It is made of gold or other metal, porcelain, or resin.Terminal Care: Medical and nursing care of patients in the terminal stage of an illness.Moral Obligations: Duties that are based in ETHICS, rather than in law.Mutation: Any detectable and heritable change in the genetic material that causes a change in the GENOTYPE and which is transmitted to daughter cells and to succeeding generations.Cerebral Cortex: The thin layer of GRAY MATTER on the surface of the CEREBRAL HEMISPHERES that develops from the TELENCEPHALON and folds into gyri and sulchi. It reaches its highest development in humans and is responsible for intellectual faculties and higher mental functions.Fetal Heart: The heart of the fetus of any viviparous animal. It refers to the heart in the postembryonic period and is differentiated from the embryonic heart (HEART/embryology) only on the basis of time.Endocardium: The innermost layer of the heart, comprised of endothelial cells.Postoperative Complications: Pathologic processes that affect patients after a surgical procedure. They may or may not be related to the disease for which the surgery was done, and they may or may not be direct results of the surgery.Perceptual Disorders: Cognitive disorders characterized by an impaired ability to perceive the nature of objects or concepts through use of the sense organs. These include spatial neglect syndromes, where an individual does not attend to visual, auditory, or sensory stimuli presented from one side of the body.Pregnancy: The status during which female mammals carry their developing young (EMBRYOS or FETUSES) in utero before birth, beginning from FERTILIZATION to BIRTH.Ventricular Pressure: The pressure within a CARDIAC VENTRICLE. Ventricular pressure waveforms can be measured in the beating heart by catheterization or estimated using imaging techniques (e.g., DOPPLER ECHOCARDIOGRAPHY). The information is useful in evaluating the function of the MYOCARDIUM; CARDIAC VALVES; and PERICARDIUM, particularly with simultaneous measurement of other (e.g., aortic or atrial) pressures.Heart Bypass, Right: Diversion of the flow of blood from the entrance to the right atrium directly to the pulmonary arteries, avoiding the right atrium and right ventricle (Dorland, 28th ed). This a permanent procedure often performed to bypass a congenitally deformed right atrium or right ventricle.Myxoma: A benign neoplasm derived from connective tissue, consisting chiefly of polyhedral and stellate cells that are loosely embedded in a soft mucoid matrix, thereby resembling primitive mesenchymal tissue. It occurs frequently intramuscularly where it may be mistaken for a sarcoma. It appears also in the jaws and the skin. (From Stedman, 25th ed)Arrhythmias, Cardiac: Any disturbances of the normal rhythmic beating of the heart or MYOCARDIAL CONTRACTION. Cardiac arrhythmias can be classified by the abnormalities in HEART RATE, disorders of electrical impulse generation, or impulse conduction.Pacemaker, Artificial: A device designed to stimulate, by electric impulses, contraction of the heart muscles. It may be temporary (external) or permanent (internal or internal-external).Euthanasia, Active, Voluntary: Active euthanasia of a patient at the patient's request and/or with the patient's consent.Reproducibility of Results: The statistical reproducibility of measurements (often in a clinical context), including the testing of instrumentation or techniques to obtain reproducible results. The concept includes reproducibility of physiological measurements, which may be used to develop rules to assess probability or prognosis, or response to a stimulus; reproducibility of occurrence of a condition; and reproducibility of experimental results.Mice, Mutant Strains: Mice bearing mutant genes which are phenotypically expressed in the animals.Mice, Inbred C57BLSuicide, Assisted: Provision (by a physician or other health professional, or by a family member or friend) of support and/or means that gives a patient the power to terminate his or her own life. (from APA, Thesaurus of Psychological Index Terms, 8th ed).Living Donors: Non-cadaveric providers of organs for transplant to related or non-related recipients.Cell Death: The termination of the cell's ability to carry out vital functions such as metabolism, growth, reproduction, responsiveness, and adaptability.Embryo, Mammalian: The entity of a developing mammal (MAMMALS), generally from the cleavage of a ZYGOTE to the end of embryonic differentiation of basic structures. For the human embryo, this represents the first two months of intrauterine development preceding the stages of the FETUS.Lung: Either of the pair of organs occupying the cavity of the thorax that effect the aeration of the blood.Atrial Flutter: Rapid, irregular atrial contractions caused by a block of electrical impulse conduction in the right atrium and a reentrant wave front traveling up the inter-atrial septum and down the right atrial free wall or vice versa. Unlike ATRIAL FIBRILLATION which is caused by abnormal impulse generation, typical atrial flutter is caused by abnormal impulse conduction. As in atrial fibrillation, patients with atrial flutter cannot effectively pump blood into the lower chambers of the heart (HEART VENTRICLES).Photic Stimulation: Investigative technique commonly used during ELECTROENCEPHALOGRAPHY in which a series of bright light flashes or visual patterns are used to elicit brain activity.Heart Diseases: Pathological conditions involving the HEART including its structural and functional abnormalities.Echocardiography, Transesophageal: Ultrasonic recording of the size, motion, and composition of the heart and surrounding tissues using a transducer placed in the esophagus.Tachycardia, Ventricular: An abnormally rapid ventricular rhythm usually in excess of 150 beats per minute. It is generated within the ventricle below the BUNDLE OF HIS, either as autonomic impulse formation or reentrant impulse conduction. Depending on the etiology, onset of ventricular tachycardia can be paroxysmal (sudden) or nonparoxysmal, its wide QRS complexes can be uniform or polymorphic, and the ventricular beating may be independent of the atrial beating (AV dissociation).Embryo Loss: Early pregnancy loss during the EMBRYO, MAMMALIAN stage of development. In the human, this period comprises the second through eighth week after fertilization.Homozygote: An individual in which both alleles at a given locus are identical.Heart Septal Defects: Abnormalities in any part of the HEART SEPTUM resulting in abnormal communication between the left and the right chambers of the heart. The abnormal blood flow inside the heart may be caused by defects in the ATRIAL SEPTUM, the VENTRICULAR SEPTUM, or both.Heart Injuries: General or unspecified injuries to the heart.Reference Values: The range or frequency distribution of a measurement in a population (of organisms, organs or things) that has not been selected for the presence of disease or abnormality.Personal Autonomy: Self-directing freedom and especially moral independence. An ethical principle holds that the autonomy of persons ought to be respected. (Bioethics Thesaurus)Terminally Ill: Persons with an incurable or irreversible illness at the end stage that will result in death within a short time. (From O'Leary et al., Lexikon: Dictionary of Health Care Terms, Organizations, and Acronyms for the Era of Reform, 1994, p780)Occipital Lobe: Posterior portion of the CEREBRAL HEMISPHERES responsible for processing visual sensory information. It is located posterior to the parieto-occipital sulcus and extends to the preoccipital notch.Embryonic and Fetal Development: Morphological and physiological development of EMBRYOS or FETUSES.Bundle of His: Small band of specialized CARDIAC MUSCLE fibers that originates in the ATRIOVENTRICULAR NODE and extends into the membranous part of the interventricular septum. The bundle of His, consisting of the left and the right bundle branches, conducts the electrical impulses to the HEART VENTRICLES in generation of MYOCARDIAL CONTRACTION.Oxygen: An element with atomic symbol O, atomic number 8, and atomic weight [15.99903; 15.99977]. It is the most abundant element on earth and essential for respiration.Cardiomyopathies: A group of diseases in which the dominant feature is the involvement of the CARDIAC MUSCLE itself. Cardiomyopathies are classified according to their predominant pathophysiological features (DILATED CARDIOMYOPATHY; HYPERTROPHIC CARDIOMYOPATHY; RESTRICTIVE CARDIOMYOPATHY) or their etiological/pathological factors (CARDIOMYOPATHY, ALCOHOLIC; ENDOCARDIAL FIBROELASTOSIS).Angiography: Radiography of blood vessels after injection of a contrast medium.Risk Factors: An aspect of personal behavior or lifestyle, environmental exposure, or inborn or inherited characteristic, which, on the basis of epidemiologic evidence, is known to be associated with a health-related condition considered important to prevent.Cardiovascular Abnormalities: Congenital, inherited, or acquired anomalies of the CARDIOVASCULAR SYSTEM, including the HEART and BLOOD VESSELS.Predictive Value of Tests: In screening and diagnostic tests, the probability that a person with a positive test is a true positive (i.e., has the disease), is referred to as the predictive value of a positive test; whereas, the predictive value of a negative test is the probability that the person with a negative test does not have the disease. Predictive value is related to the sensitivity and specificity of the test.Hand: The distal part of the arm beyond the wrist in humans and primates, that includes the palm, fingers, and thumb.Atrial Septum: The thin membrane-like muscular structure separating the right and the left upper chambers (HEART ATRIA) of a heart.Ventricular Function, Left: The hemodynamic and electrophysiological action of the left HEART VENTRICLE. Its measurement is an important aspect of the clinical evaluation of patients with heart disease to determine the effects of the disease on cardiac performance.Value of Life: The intrinsic moral worth ascribed to a living being. (Bioethics Thesaurus)Abnormalities, MultipleMovement: The act, process, or result of passing from one place or position to another. It differs from LOCOMOTION in that locomotion is restricted to the passing of the whole body from one place to another, while movement encompasses both locomotion but also a change of the position of the whole body or any of its parts. Movement may be used with reference to humans, vertebrate and invertebrate animals, and microorganisms. Differentiate also from MOTOR ACTIVITY, movement associated with behavior.Body Surface Potential Mapping: Recording of regional electrophysiological information by analysis of surface potentials to give a complete picture of the effects of the currents from the heart on the body surface. It has been applied to the diagnosis of old inferior myocardial infarction, localization of the bypass pathway in Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome, recognition of ventricular hypertrophy, estimation of the size of a myocardial infarct, and the effects of different interventions designed to reduce infarct size. The limiting factor at present is the complexity of the recording and analysis, which requires 100 or more electrodes, sophisticated instrumentation, and dedicated personnel. (Braunwald, Heart Disease, 4th ed)Imaging, Three-Dimensional: The process of generating three-dimensional images by electronic, photographic, or other methods. For example, three-dimensional images can be generated by assembling multiple tomographic images with the aid of a computer, while photographic 3-D images (HOLOGRAPHY) can be made by exposing film to the interference pattern created when two laser light sources shine on an object.Cardiac Volume: The volume of the HEART, usually relating to the volume of BLOOD contained within it at various periods of the cardiac cycle. The amount of blood ejected from a ventricle at each beat is STROKE VOLUME.Age Factors: Age as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or the effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from AGING, a physiological process, and TIME FACTORS which refers only to the passage of time.Jugular Veins: Veins in the neck which drain the brain, face, and neck into the brachiocephalic or subclavian veins.Withholding Treatment: Withholding or withdrawal of a particular treatment or treatments, often (but not necessarily) life-prolonging treatment, from a patient or from a research subject as part of a research protocol. The concept is differentiated from REFUSAL TO TREAT, where the emphasis is on the health professional's or health facility's refusal to treat a patient or group of patients when the patient or the patient's representative requests treatment. Withholding of life-prolonging treatment is usually indexed only with EUTHANASIA, PASSIVE, unless the distinction between withholding and withdrawing treatment, or the issue of withholding palliative rather than curative treatment, is discussed.Prognosis: A prediction of the probable outcome of a disease based on a individual's condition and the usual course of the disease as seen in similar situations.Gene Targeting: The integration of exogenous DNA into the genome of an organism at sites where its expression can be suitably controlled. This integration occurs as a result of homologous recombination.Syndrome: A characteristic symptom complex.Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation: A technique that involves the use of electrical coils on the head to generate a brief magnetic field which reaches the CEREBRAL CORTEX. It is coupled with ELECTROMYOGRAPHY response detection to assess cortical excitability by the threshold required to induce MOTOR EVOKED POTENTIALS. This method is also used for BRAIN MAPPING, to study NEUROPHYSIOLOGY, and as a substitute for ELECTROCONVULSIVE THERAPY for treating DEPRESSION. Induction of SEIZURES limits its clinical usage.Heart Block: Impaired conduction of cardiac impulse that can occur anywhere along the conduction pathway, such as between the SINOATRIAL NODE and the right atrium (SA block) or between atria and ventricles (AV block). Heart blocks can be classified by the duration, frequency, or completeness of conduction block. Reversibility depends on the degree of structural or functional defects.Immunohistochemistry: Histochemical localization of immunoreactive substances using labeled antibodies as reagents.Ebstein Anomaly: A congenital heart defect characterized by downward or apical displacement of the TRICUSPID VALVE, usually with the septal and posterior leaflets being attached to the wall of the RIGHT VENTRICLE. It is characterized by a huge RIGHT ATRIUM and a small and less effective right ventricle.Coronary Angiography: Radiography of the vascular system of the heart muscle after injection of a contrast medium.Prefrontal Cortex: The rostral part of the frontal lobe, bounded by the inferior precentral fissure in humans, which receives projection fibers from the MEDIODORSAL NUCLEUS OF THE THALAMUS. The prefrontal cortex receives afferent fibers from numerous structures of the DIENCEPHALON; MESENCEPHALON; and LIMBIC SYSTEM as well as cortical afferents of visual, auditory, and somatic origin.Visual Perception: The selecting and organizing of visual stimuli based on the individual's past experience.Severity of Illness Index: Levels within a diagnostic group which are established by various measurement criteria applied to the seriousness of a patient's disorder.Attention: Focusing on certain aspects of current experience to the exclusion of others. It is the act of heeding or taking notice or concentrating.Chronic Disease: Diseases which have one or more of the following characteristics: they are permanent, leave residual disability, are caused by nonreversible pathological alteration, require special training of the patient for rehabilitation, or may be expected to require a long period of supervision, observation, or care. (Dictionary of Health Services Management, 2d ed)Animals, Newborn: Refers to animals in the period of time just after birth.Fetal Death: Death of the developing young in utero. BIRTH of a dead FETUS is STILLBIRTH.Dental Casting Technique: The process of producing a form or impression made of metal or plaster using a mold.Echocardiography, Doppler, Color: Echocardiography applying the Doppler effect, with the superposition of flow information as colors on a gray scale in a real-time image.Anoxia: Relatively complete absence of oxygen in one or more tissues.Heterozygote: An individual having different alleles at one or more loci regarding a specific character.Fingers: Four or five slender jointed digits in humans and primates, attached to each HAND.Space Perception: The awareness of the spatial properties of objects; includes physical space.Pneumonectomy: The excision of lung tissue including partial or total lung lobectomy.Anastomosis, Surgical: Surgical union or shunt between ducts, tubes or vessels. It may be end-to-end, end-to-side, side-to-end, or side-to-side.Cell Survival: The span of viability of a cell characterized by the capacity to perform certain functions such as metabolism, growth, reproduction, some form of responsiveness, and adaptability.Mice, Transgenic: Laboratory mice that have been produced from a genetically manipulated EGG or EMBRYO, MAMMALIAN.Vascular Malformations: A spectrum of congenital, inherited, or acquired abnormalities in BLOOD VESSELS that can adversely affect the normal blood flow in ARTERIES or VEINS. Most are congenital defects such as abnormal communications between blood vessels (fistula), shunting of arterial blood directly into veins bypassing the CAPILLARIES (arteriovenous malformations), formation of large dilated blood blood-filled vessels (cavernous angioma), and swollen capillaries (capillary telangiectases). In rare cases, vascular malformations can result from trauma or diseases.Rats, Sprague-Dawley: A strain of albino rat used widely for experimental purposes because of its calmness and ease of handling. It was developed by the Sprague-Dawley Animal Company.Rats, Wistar: A strain of albino rat developed at the Wistar Institute that has spread widely at other institutions. This has markedly diluted the original strain.Situs Inversus: A congenital abnormality in which organs in the THORAX and the ABDOMEN are opposite to their normal positions (situs solitus) due to lateral transposition. Normally the STOMACH and SPLEEN are on the left, LIVER on the right, the three-lobed right lung is on the right, and the two-lobed left lung on the left. Situs inversus has a familial pattern and has been associated with a number of genes related to microtubule-associated proteins.Gyrus Cinguli: One of the convolutions on the medial surface of the CEREBRAL HEMISPHERES. It surrounds the rostral part of the brain and CORPUS CALLOSUM and forms part of the LIMBIC SYSTEM.Case-Control Studies: Studies which start with the identification of persons with a disease of interest and a control (comparison, referent) group without the disease. The relationship of an attribute to the disease is examined by comparing diseased and non-diseased persons with regard to the frequency or levels of the attribute in each group.Sensitivity and Specificity: Binary classification measures to assess test results. Sensitivity or recall rate is the proportion of true positives. Specificity is the probability of correctly determining the absence of a condition. (From Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 2d ed)Dental Prosthesis Design: The plan and delineation of dental prostheses in general or a specific dental prosthesis. It does not include DENTURE DESIGN. The framework usually consists of metal.Morals: Standards of conduct that distinguish right from wrong.Diastole: Post-systolic relaxation of the HEART, especially the HEART VENTRICLES.Electroencephalography: Recording of electric currents developed in the brain by means of electrodes applied to the scalp, to the surface of the brain, or placed within the substance of the brain.Language: A verbal or nonverbal means of communicating ideas or feelings.Base Sequence: The sequence of PURINES and PYRIMIDINES in nucleic acids and polynucleotides. It is also called nucleotide sequence.Aphasia: A cognitive disorder marked by an impaired ability to comprehend or express language in its written or spoken form. This condition is caused by diseases which affect the language areas of the dominant hemisphere. Clinical features are used to classify the various subtypes of this condition. General categories include receptive, expressive, and mixed forms of aphasia.Liver Transplantation: The transference of a part of or an entire liver from one human or animal to another.Neurons: The basic cellular units of nervous tissue. Each neuron consists of a body, an axon, and dendrites. Their purpose is to receive, conduct, and transmit impulses in the NERVOUS SYSTEM.Dextrocardia: A congenital defect in which the heart is located on the right side of the THORAX instead of on the left side (levocardia, the normal position). When dextrocardia is accompanied with inverted HEART ATRIA, a right-sided STOMACH, and a left-sided LIVER, the combination is called dextrocardia with SITUS INVERSUS. Dextrocardia may adversely affect other thoracic organs.Systole: Period of contraction of the HEART, especially of the HEART VENTRICLES.Feasibility Studies: Studies to determine the advantages or disadvantages, practicability, or capability of accomplishing a projected plan, study, or project.Tooth Preparation, Prosthodontic: The selected form given to a natural tooth when it is reduced by instrumentation to receive a prosthesis (e.g., artificial crown or a retainer for a fixed or removable prosthesis). The selection of the form is guided by clinical circumstances and physical properties of the materials that make up the prosthesis. (Boucher's Clinical Dental Terminology, 4th ed, p239)Plakophilins: Members of the armadillo family of proteins that are found in DESMOSOMES and interact with various proteins including desmocadherins; DESMOPLAKIN; ACTIN FILAMENTS; and KERATINS.Foreign-Body Migration: Migration of a foreign body from its original location to some other location in the body.Constriction, Pathologic: The condition of an anatomical structure's being constricted beyond normal dimensions.Dilatation, Pathologic: The condition of an anatomical structure's being dilated beyond normal dimensions.Cause of Death: Factors which produce cessation of all vital bodily functions. They can be analyzed from an epidemiologic viewpoint.Neural Pathways: Neural tracts connecting one part of the nervous system with another.Palliative Care: Care alleviating symptoms without curing the underlying disease. (Stedman, 25th ed)Autopsy: Postmortem examination of the body.Catheterization: Use or insertion of a tubular device into a duct, blood vessel, hollow organ, or body cavity for injecting or withdrawing fluids for diagnostic or therapeutic purposes. It differs from INTUBATION in that the tube here is used to restore or maintain patency in obstructions.Calcium Sulfate: A calcium salt that is used for a variety of purposes including: building materials, as a desiccant, in dentistry as an impression material, cast, or die, and in medicine for immobilizing casts and as a tablet excipient. It exists in various forms and states of hydration. Plaster of Paris is a mixture of powdered and heat-treated gypsum.Angiocardiography: Radiography of the heart and great vessels after injection of a contrast medium.

The milk and the honey: ethics of artificial nutrition and hydration of the elderly on the other side of Europe. (1/117)

Many health problems that elderly people face today relate not only to the nature of their affliction but also to the kind of treatment required. Such treatment often includes artificial nutrition and hydration, (ANH) a procedure which, despite its technical and invasive character, is still considered to be vested with symbolic meanings. It is precisely during the efforts to reach a legal consensus that the discrepancies between various cultural contexts become obvious. The following case explores the Greek clinical territory in comparison with the international situation, and the reasons why, in Greece, the right to refuse treatment is not necessarily interpreted as including the right to refuse artificial nutrition and hydration as well.  (+info)

Autonomy, rationality and the wish to die. (2/117)

Although suicide has traditionally carried a negative sanction in Western societies, this is now being challenged, and while there remains substantial public concern surrounding youth and elder suicide, there is a paradoxical push to relax the prohibition under certain circumstances. Central to the arguments behind this are the principles of respect for autonomy and the importance of rationality. It is argued here that the concepts of rationality and autonomy, while valuable, are not strong enough to substantiate a categorical "right to suicide" and that the concepts of "understandability" and "respect" are more useful and able to provide the foundation for responding to a person expressing a wish to die. Roman suicide, sometimes held as an example of "rational suicide", illustrates the effects of culture, tradition and values on the attitudes to, and the practice of, suicide.  (+info)

Opinions and reactions of physicians in New Jersey regarding the Oregon Death with Dignity Act. (3/117)

Physician-assisted suicide (PAS) was legalized in Oregon in 1997. In the study reported here, the authors surveyed a sample of New Jersey physicians with regard to Oregon's Death with Dignity Act and to whether similar legislation should be enacted in New Jersey. A 49-item questionnaire was sent to 563 physicians in New Jersey who were licensed in the specialties of family practice, internal medicine, surgery, psychiatry, and obstetrics/gynecology. The questionnaire contained sections pertaining to demographics, physicians' attitudes regarding PAS, and physicians' opinions on Oregon's Death with Dignity Act. A brief summary of the legislation was included in the mailing, which participants were asked to read before completing the questionnaire. Of the 191 physicians who responded to the survey, 55% agreed with legislation that would legalize PAS, and 59% said that a law similar to that enacted in Oregon should exist in New Jersey. However, only 47% of respondents indicated that they believed PAS to be consistent with the role of a physician to relieve pain and suffering. Slightly more than half of respondents indicated that they would refuse to participate in PAS and were concerned about issues such as professional and personal liability and the potential for abuse. Physicians in New Jersey will require additional information, education, and discussion of the ethical and legal implications of PAS before a law similar to that in Oregon could be proposed or considered.  (+info)

Euthanasia--a dialogue. (4/117)

A terminally ill man requests that his life be brought to a peaceful end by the doctor overseeing his care. The doctor, an atheist, regretfully declines. The patient, unsatisfied by the answer and increasingly desperate for relief, presses the doctor for an explanation. During the ensuing dialogue the philosophical, ethical and emotional arguments brought to bear by both the doctor and the patient are dissected.  (+info)

Physician-assisted suicide: the legal slippery slope. (5/117)

BACKGROUND: In Oregon, physicians can prescribe lethal amounts of medication only if requested by competent, terminally ill patients. However, the possibility of extending the practice to patients who lack decisional capacity exists. This paper examines why the legal extension of physician-assisted suicide (PAS) to incapacitated patients is possible, and perhaps likely. METHODS: The author reviews several pivotal court cases that have served to define the distinctions and legalities among "right-to-die" cases and the various forms of euthanasia and PAS. RESULTS: Significant public support exists for legalizing PAS and voluntary euthanasia in the United States. The only defenses against sliding from PAS to voluntary euthanasia are adhering to traditional physician morality that stands against it and keeping the issue of voluntary euthanasia legally framed as homicide. However, if voluntary euthanasia evolves euphemistically as a medical choice issue, then the possibility of its legalization exists. CONCLUSIONS: If courts allow PAS to be framed as a basic personal right akin to the right to refuse treatment, and if they rely on right-to-die case precedents, then they will likely extend PAS to voluntary euthanasia and nonvoluntary euthanasia. This would be done by extending the right to PAS to incapacitated patients, who may or may not have expressed a choice for PAS prior to incapacity.  (+info)

Collusion in doctor-patient communication about imminent death: an ethnographic study. (6/117)

OBJECTIVE: To discover and explore the factors that result in the "false optimism about recovery" observed in patients with small cell lung cancer. DESIGN: A qualitative observational (ethnographic) study in 2 stages over 4 years. SETTING: Lung diseases ward and outpatient clinic in a university hospital in the Netherlands. PARTICIPANTS: 35 patients with small cell lung cancer. RESULTS: False optimism about recovery usually developed during the first course of chemotherapy and was most prevalent when the cancer could no longer be seen on x-ray films. This optimism tended to vanish when the tumor recurred, but it could develop again, though to a lesser extent, during further courses of chemotherapy. Patients gradually found out the facts about their poor prognosis, partly by their physical deterioration and partly through contact with fellow patients in a more advanced stage of the illness who were dying. False optimism about recovery was the result of an association between physicians' activism and patients' adherence to the treatment calendar and to the "recovery plot," which allowed them to avoid acknowledging explicitly what they should and could know. The physician did and did not want to pronounce a "death sentence," and the patient did and did not want to hear it. CONCLUSION: Solutions to the problem of collusion between physician and patient require an active, patient-oriented approach by the physician. Perhaps solutions have to be found outside the physician-patient relationship itself--for example, by involving "treatment brokers."  (+info)

Assisted suicide as conducted by a "Right-to-Die"-society in Switzerland: a descriptive analysis of 43 consecutive cases. (7/117)

BACKGROUND AND METHODS: The Swiss "Right-to-Die"-society EXIT enables assisted suicide by providing terminally ill members with a lethal dosage of barbiturates on request. This practice is tolerated by Swiss legislation. EXIT insists on its assumption that people with serious illness and suffering have the competency to take such a decision. The case of two patients who committed suicide a short time after their release from a psychiatric clinic raised some doubts about the practice of EXIT. The files of all 43 cases of suicide assisted by EXIT between 1992 and 1997 in the region of Basle kept in the Institute of Forensic Medicine were examined for accuracy of the medical data. This sample was compared for age, gender-ratio and prior psychiatric treatment with 425 ordinary suicides in the same region. An attempt was made to assess whether only terminally ill and people with intolerable suffering had been assisted with suicide and what efforts EXIT had made to rule out psychiatric illnesses or poor social conditions as the reason for the wish to die. RESULTS: A medical report of the treating doctor(s) was in the files in only five cases. The "EXIT" cases where older than the "ordinary"-sample. Among those over 65 years old there were almost twice as many women as men. 16 of the 24 women older than 65 years were widowed. There were 20 cases of cancer; but in eleven cases medical files revealed no apparent medical condition to explain a death-wish. Five of the patients declared a social loss or fear of such loss as the reason for their wish to die. Six persons had formerly been in psychiatric care, though this was not mentioned in the files. CONCLUSIONS: Due to the scarcity of information in the files as regards previous palliative care, the high proportion of old women and the high percentage of people not suffering from a terminal illness compared to the literature we conclude that psychiatric or social factors are not an obstacle for EXIT to assist with suicide.  (+info)

The right to die.(8/117)

 (+info)

  • This page offers advice to anyone who uses permanent or semi-permanent hair dye, especially darker-coloured dyes. (www.nhs.uk)
  • Coupling aniline to H-acid gave the azo dye used in the first Procion Red (C.I. Reactive Red 1), and anthraquinone dyes were used to obtain bright blue shades. (britannica.com)
  • Dichlorotriazinyl dyes are produced by more than 30 dye manufacturers, since the early patents on these dyes have expired. (britannica.com)
  • C.I. Reactive Red 1) with a noncoloured group results in dye series (Procion H and Procion P) that can be applied at 80 °C (176 °F). These are analogous to the direct dyes Ciba produced in the 1920s and reintroduced in the late 1950s as Cibacron reactive dyes. (britannica.com)
  • Dies wird möglich durch neue Formen von Interaktionen und Mensch-Maschine-Schnittstellen, die dem natürlichen Körperverhalten entsprechen und alle Sinne integrieren. (idw-online.de)
  • Die cast01 Teilnehmer und Beobachter waren sich einig: Die Konferenz bot ein einzigartiges Umfeld zur Kommunikation von Kunst, Wissenschaft und Technologie und schaffte Raum für neue Synergien. (idw-online.de)
  • In 1997, the longest-lived human ever recorded - a 122-year-old Frenchwoman named Jeanne Calment - died, reportedly with her mental faculties still intact. (latimes.com)
  • Nkosi's mother died of AIDS-related diseases in 1997. (go.com)
  • So far only one person, Frenchwoman Jeanne Calment, has passed that milestone, reaching the age of 122 before she died in 1997. (smh.com.au)
  • The Die-Attach Materials market in the U.S. is estimated at US$204.3 Million in the year 2020. (yahoo.com)
  • If you ignore the safety instructions that come with the dye, you could put yourself at risk of a serious reaction. (www.nhs.uk)
  • So, you could develop a life-threatening allergic reaction when you next use PPD hair dye. (www.nhs.uk)
  • If you develop a reaction to hair dye, even just a mild one, you should stop using products containing PPD altogether, as there's a risk you could develop a more severe reaction in the future. (www.nhs.uk)
  • Reaction with water ( hydrolysis ) in the dyebath competes with the dyeing reaction to reduce the level of fixation (transfer of the dye to the fabric), which can vary from 30-90 percent. (britannica.com)
  • Die Analyse der WHI nach 18 Jahren zeigt bei den heute nun im Mittel 81-jährigen Frauen, dass sich das Risiko für die globale, die karzinombedingte und die kardiovaskuläre Mortalität unter MHT nicht erhöht. (springer.com)
  • Die gültigen Empfehlungen zur MHT stimmen darin überein, dass die Dauer der MHT nicht willkürlich begrenzt werden soll. (springer.com)
  • Das Handlung ist spannend und die Welt so gut ausgearbeitet, dass ich das Buch nur sehr ungern aus der Hand gab um endlich zu schlafen. (bookcrossing.com)
  • Ich hoffe, dass vielleicht noch weitere Bücher aus der Reihe folgen, denn die Welt, die Brigitte Melzer hier geschaffen hat, hat mir sehr gut gefallen. (bookcrossing.com)
  • Mir ist bekannt, dass ich meine Einwilligung jederzeit widerrufen kann, indem ich die Abmeldefunktion in den E-Mails nutze. (sas.com)
  • F r die meisten klinischen Erscheinungen der L hmung gibt es heute funktionsverbessernde Eingriffe im Rahmen eines interdisziplin ren Behandlungskonzepts. (aerzteblatt.de)
  • Disulfonation of the copper complex gave a direct dye for cotton, Chlorantine Fast Turquoise Blue Gll (C.I. Direct Blue 86), the first commercial phthalocyanine dye. (britannica.com)
  • Bei den zu Beginn 50- bis 59-jährigen Frauen war die Gesamtmortalität unter konjugierten equinen Östrogenen signifikant erniedrigt, ebenso die Mortalität bedingt durch Demenz und Morbus Alzheimer. (springer.com)
  • Erfolgversprechender hingegen ist ein strategisch-analytischer Ansatz, der die Entscheidungsfindung, die Steuerungsqualität und die operative Effizienz signifikant verbessert und maßgeblich zur Rentabilität von Öl-und Gasunternehmen beitragen kann. (sas.com)
  • In diesem Umfeld wird es für die Öl- und Gasindustrie zunehmend anspruchsvoller, nachhaltige Wettbewerbsvorteile in Exploration und Produktion, in Transport und Speicherung sowie in Veredelung, Verarbeitung und Verteilung zu erzielen. (sas.com)
  • Für eine Akzeptanz der neuen Medien rückt zunehmend die Optimierung von Design und Qualität ihrer Anwendung in den Vordergrund. (idw-online.de)
  • And research suggests that the real SIDS rate may in fact be significantly higher than the official numbers indicate: Although fewer than 2,500 infant deaths this year will be classified as SIDS, an additional 2,000 seemingly healthy babies under 12 months will also die mysteriously in their sleep, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. (cnn.com)
  • Metabo Corporation, a leading international manufacturer of professional grade portable electric power tools and abrasives for industrial, construction and welding applications, now offers the GE950 G Plus high torque die grinder with spindle lock and wide speed range. (prweb.com)
  • This new die grinder is equipped with a hardened and ground 1/4" collet to ensure accurate balance and minimized run out of the accessory. (prweb.com)
  • This new die grinder is covered by Metabo's XXL warranty. (prweb.com)
  • She became publisher of Die Zeit from 1972 until her death in 2002, together from 1983 onwards with former German chancellor Helmut Schmidt , later joined by Josef Joffe and former German federal secretary of culture Michael Naumann . (wikipedia.org)
  • Der Herausgeber leitet das Institut für Laser- und Anlagensystemtechnik an der Technischen Universität Hamburg sowie die Fraunhofer-Einrichtung für Additive Produktionstechnologien IAPT. (springer.com)
  • Sie st tzen sich dabei auf eine selektive aktuelle Literatur bersicht, den Austausch mit Neurochirurgen ( 3 , 4 ) sowie die Erkenntnisse aus internationalen Arbeitstreffen zu diesem Thema. (aerzteblatt.de)
  • Risikofaktoren sind neben der Schulterdystokie ( 7 ) die Makrosomie (Geburtsgewicht ber 4 kg), eine foeto-maternelle Disproportion mit engem Geburtskanal und/oder bergewicht der Mutter (insbesondere bei Diabetes mellitus oder Schwangerschaftsdiabetes) sowie die Stei geburt. (aerzteblatt.de)
  • Zudem könnten VMS ein Risikofaktor für chronische Krankheiten sein, die von Östrogenen günstig beeinflusst werden. (springer.com)
  • Wenn zudem die Wurzel C7 betroffen ist, kommt die Schw chung des Musculus triceps und der Handgelenksstrecker hinzu. (aerzteblatt.de)
  • Die cast Mg-Al alloys in the AM, AS, AZ and AE series have been corrosion tested by salt spray and immersion in 5% NaCl solution. (sae.org)
  • Amid the COVID-19 crisis, the global market for Die-Attach Materials estimated at US$753. (yahoo.com)
  • Dieser Buchtitel ist Teil des Digitalisierungsprojekts Springer Book Archives mit Publikationen, die seit den Anfängen des Verlags von 1842 erschienen sind. (springer.com)
  • After his young wife, Virginia, got tuberculosis in 1842 and died five years later, the already hard-drinking Poe apparently dove deeper into the bottle. (history.com)
  • Je nach Zugkraft zwischen Kopf und Schulter kommt es zu einer Nervendehnung (Neurapraxie), die innerhalb von drei Wochen defektfrei abheilt, bis hin zu den schwersten Verletzungsformen mit Wurzelausrissen oder proximalen Abrissen und ausbleibender Spontanheilung. (aerzteblatt.de)
  • Drei tage vor Ende des Kickstarter-Projekts ist die anvisierte Finanzierung von lediglich 10.000 US-Dollar bei weitem übertroffen. (engadget.com)
  • King Ananda was 20 when he died of a gunshot wound under mysterious circumstances. (cnn.com)
  • A second Harvard University study found that uninsured patients with traumatic injuries, such as car crashes, falls and gunshot words were almost twice as likely to die in the hospital as similarly injured patients with health insurance. (aol.com)
  • Nearly half of seniors die owning less than $10,000 in financial assets, according to a 2012 study for the National Bureau of Economic Research. (nasdaq.com)
  • Reporters attempted to contact the families of everyone who died at home there. (medscape.com)
  • In accordance with one embodiment of the present invention, a multiple die semiconductor assembly is provided comprising a substrate, first and second semiconductor dies, and at least one decoupling capacitor. (google.de)
  • Webs produced in accordance with the method and die of the present invention display highly desirable properties such as uniformity, softness, opacity, cover and the like. (google.ca)
  • In a particularly preferred embodiment, the die is provided with insulation between the attenuating fluid and the polymer chamber to avoid or reduce the tendency of the molten polymer to cool and cause plugging of the die. (google.ca)
  • If oncologists could see what was happening to tumor cells immediately after a treatment - whether they were flourishing or dying - the physician could quickly switch patients' drugs, if needed. (technologyreview.com)
  • Although physician-assisted dying (PAD) remains a highly contentious and controversial topic, it is going on. (medscape.com)
  • WASHINGTON--Patients with COVID-19 and vertebral fractures are twice as likely to die from the disease, according to a study published in the Endocrine Society's Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism . (sciencecodex.com)
  • The interviews revealed a striking pattern: Before they died, about two dozen patients first sought care at a hospital, which then discharged them, in many cases sending them home to die with hospice care. (medscape.com)
  • During a career that lasted more than three decades, he had watched all too many of his patients struggle with their final months, and this experience had persuaded him that he would take his own life if he found himself dying of an agonizing and clearly terminal illness. (motherjones.com)
  • Nevertheless, three quarters of those physicians believe that dying patients should determine the best dosage regimen to control their pain. (thirteen.org)
  • To investigate bereavement as a risk factor for cardiovascular problems, the team assessed the rate of stroke or heart attack in patients over the age of 60 whose partner died. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • More importantly, by 2015, secobarbital had become the only viable option for patients seeking to end their lives, and doubling the price suddenly put a heavy financial burden on the price of dying. (medscape.com)
  • State senators voted 23-14 to let doctors prescribe life-ending medications to patients expected to die within six months, the Associated Press reported. (medicinenet.com)
  • After taking the severity of injuries and patient's race, gender and age into account, the researchers found something even more troubling -- the uninsured were 80% more likely to die than those with insurance, even low-income patients insured by the government's Medicaid program. (aol.com)
  • Atul Gawande's articles on healthcare for the New Yorker are all top-shelf, but his most recent piece on modern medicine's difficulty in dealing with patients who are likely to die is a doozy and a must-read. (kottke.org)
  • Three of the patients suffered head injuries and died at the scene while a fourth died later in hospital, the reports said. (com.pk)
  • With over 10 million copies sold, 7 Days to Die has defined the survival genre, with unrivaled crafting and world-building content. (steampowered.com)
  • Die Brandwag was the first Afrikaans illustrated family magazine in the Transvaal and was published monthly between 1910 and 1922 under the joint editorship of Dr W M R Malherbe and Gustav Preller. (wikipedia.org)
  • The right to live must be accompanied by the right to die when one chooses. (newscientist.com)
  • We must die eventually, he suggests, because humans have a body design that evolved to hang in there long enough for us to live long enough to reproduce, ensuring the survival of the species. (latimes.com)
  • Another hypothesized route to immortality is the idea of having your personality " uploaded " to a computer before you die, so that the essence of you will live on for centuries or for eons. (ieet.org)
  • So make sure you are not bullied by doctors and you have a chaperone, but you will not die. (yahoo.com)
  • A series of X-ray images taken as the dye flows into the uterus and through the fallopian tubes helps doctors evaluate the size and shape of the uterine cavity and determine whether the fallopian tubes are open, and sometimes even if there are adhesions near the tubes. (netmums.com)
  • He estimates that about 1,000 lions died over a relatively short period of time. (voanews.com)
  • By analyzing the lions' blood, Packer and his colleagues found that the two die-offs seemed to be triggered by outbreaks of canine distemper virus, a disease that usually affects domestic dogs. (voanews.com)
  • Kurzweil's grandfather and father suffered from heart disease, his father dying when Kurzweil was 22. (wired.com)
  • J O H A N N E S B U R G, South Africa, June 1, 2001 -- Nkosi Johnson, a boy born with HIV who became an outspoken champion of others infected with the AIDS virus, died today of the disease he battled for all 12 of his years. (go.com)
  • Die zahlreichen Präsentationen namhafter Künstler und Wissenschaftler aus aller Welt wie auch junger vielversprechender Talente überraschten und beeindruckten durch ihre Fantasie, kreative Umsetzung und Ästhetik. (idw-online.de)
  • Dieser Aufsatz beschreibt zum ersten Mal die Datenflussarchitektur des Prozessors der Z1, der ersten von Konrad Zuse gebauten Rechenmaschine (1936-1938). (springer.com)
  • In den ersten zehn Tagen nach der Geburt wird die verletzte Halsregion durch Anlagern des Armes mit gebeugtem Ellenbogen am Oberk rper entlastet. (aerzteblatt.de)