A procedure consisting of a sequence of algebraic formulas and/or logical steps to calculate or determine a given task.
An analytical technique for resolution of a chemical mixture into its component compounds. Compounds are separated on an adsorbent paper (stationary phase) by their varied degree of solubility/mobility in the eluting solvent (mobile phase).
A publication issued at stated, more or less regular, intervals.
Theoretical representations that simulate the behavior or activity of systems, processes, or phenomena. They include the use of mathematical equations, computers, and other electronic equipment.
Computer-based representation of physical systems and phenomena such as chemical processes.
Electrophoresis in which paper is used as the diffusion medium. This technique is confined almost entirely to separations of small molecules such as amino acids, peptides, and nucleotides, and relatively high voltages are nearly always used.
Time period from 1901 through 2000 of the common era.
The statistical reproducibility of measurements (often in a clinical context), including the testing of instrumentation or techniques to obtain reproducible results. The concept includes reproducibility of physiological measurements, which may be used to develop rules to assess probability or prognosis, or response to a stimulus; reproducibility of occurrence of a condition; and reproducibility of experimental results.
Statistical formulations or analyses which, when applied to data and found to fit the data, are then used to verify the assumptions and parameters used in the analysis. Examples of statistical models are the linear model, binomial model, polynomial model, two-parameter model, etc.
Theoretical representations that simulate the behavior or activity of biological processes or diseases. For disease models in living animals, DISEASE MODELS, ANIMAL is available. Biological models include the use of mathematical equations, computers, and other electronic equipment.
"The business or profession of the commercial production and issuance of literature" (Webster's 3d). It includes the publisher, publication processes, editing and editors. Production may be by conventional printing methods or by electronic publishing.
Sequential operating programs and data which instruct the functioning of a digital computer.
In INFORMATION RETRIEVAL, machine-sensing or identification of visible patterns (shapes, forms, and configurations). (Harrod's Librarians' Glossary, 7th ed)
An approach of practicing medicine with the goal to improve and evaluate patient care. It requires the judicious integration of best research evidence with the patient's values to make decisions about medical care. This method is to help physicians make proper diagnosis, devise best testing plan, choose best treatment and methods of disease prevention, as well as develop guidelines for large groups of patients with the same disease. (from JAMA 296 (9), 2006)
Critical and exhaustive investigation or experimentation, having for its aim the discovery of new facts and their correct interpretation, the revision of accepted conclusions, theories, or laws in the light of newly discovered facts, or the practical application of such new or revised conclusions, theories, or laws. (Webster, 3d ed)
Techniques using energy such as radio frequency, infrared light, laser light, visible light, or acoustic energy to transfer information without the use of wires, over both short and long distances.
Method of measuring performance against established standards of best practice.
Theory and development of COMPUTER SYSTEMS which perform tasks that normally require human intelligence. Such tasks may include speech recognition, LEARNING; VISUAL PERCEPTION; MATHEMATICAL COMPUTING; reasoning, PROBLEM SOLVING, DECISION-MAKING, and translation of language.
Methods of creating machines and devices.
Organized activities related to the storage, location, search, and retrieval of information.
A plan for collecting and utilizing data so that desired information can be obtained with sufficient precision or so that an hypothesis can be tested properly.
A system containing any combination of computers, computer terminals, printers, audio or visual display devices, or telephones interconnected by telecommunications equipment or cables: used to transmit or receive information. (Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed)
Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.
The profession of writing. Also the identity of the writer as the creator of a literary production.
Descriptions of specific amino acid, carbohydrate, or nucleotide sequences which have appeared in the published literature and/or are deposited in and maintained by databanks such as GENBANK, European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), National Biomedical Research Foundation (NBRF), or other sequence repositories.
The evaluation by experts of the quality and pertinence of research or research proposals of other experts in the same field. Peer review is used by editors in deciding which submissions warrant publication, by granting agencies to determine which proposals should be funded, and by academic institutions in tenure decisions.
Research that involves the application of the natural sciences, especially biology and physiology, to medicine.
The use of statistical methods in the analysis of a body of literature to reveal the historical development of subject fields and patterns of authorship, publication, and use. Formerly called statistical bibliography. (from The ALA Glossary of Library and Information Science, 1983)
The portion of an interactive computer program that issues messages to and receives commands from a user.
A quantitative measure of the frequency on average with which articles in a journal have been cited in a given period of time.
Application of statistical procedures to analyze specific observed or assumed facts from a particular study.
Time period from 1801 through 1900 of the common era.
The terms, expressions, designations, or symbols used in a particular science, discipline, or specialized subject area.
A field of biology concerned with the development of techniques for the collection and manipulation of biological data, and the use of such data to make biological discoveries or predictions. This field encompasses all computational methods and theories for solving biological problems including manipulation of models and datasets.
Extensive collections, reputedly complete, of facts and data garnered from material of a specialized subject area and made available for analysis and application. The collection can be automated by various contemporary methods for retrieval. The concept should be differentiated from DATABASES, BIBLIOGRAPHIC which is restricted to collections of bibliographic references.
A loose confederation of computer communication networks around the world. The networks that make up the Internet are connected through several backbone networks. The Internet grew out of the US Government ARPAnet project and was designed to facilitate information exchange.
A process of separating particulate matter from a fluid, such as air or a liquid, by passing the fluid carrier through a medium that will not pass the particulates. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)
Any device or element which converts an input signal into an output signal of a different form. Examples include the microphone, phonographic pickup, loudspeaker, barometer, photoelectric cell, automobile horn, doorbell, and underwater sound transducer. (McGraw Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)
Decisions, usually developed by government policymakers, for determining present and future objectives pertaining to the health care system.
Computer-based systems for input, storage, display, retrieval, and printing of information contained in a patient's medical record.
Copies of a work or document distributed to the public by sale, rental, lease, or lending. (From ALA Glossary of Library and Information Science, 1983, p181)
The order of amino acids as they occur in a polypeptide chain. This is referred to as the primary structure of proteins. It is of fundamental importance in determining PROTEIN CONFORMATION.
Duties that are based in ETHICS, rather than in law.
Computer-assisted processing of electric, ultrasonic, or electronic signals to interpret function and activity.
Theoretical representations that simulate the behavior or activity of genetic processes or phenomena. They include the use of mathematical equations, computers, and other electronic equipment.
Methods developed to aid in the interpretation of ultrasound, radiographic images, etc., for diagnosis of disease.
Systematic gathering of data for a particular purpose from various sources, including questionnaires, interviews, observation, existing records, and electronic devices. The process is usually preliminary to statistical analysis of the data.
The principles of professional conduct concerning the rights and duties of the physician, relations with patients and fellow practitioners, as well as actions of the physician in patient care and interpersonal relations with patient families.
The study of natural phenomena by observation, measurement, and experimentation.
Activities performed to identify concepts and aspects of published information and research reports.
The sequence of PURINES and PYRIMIDINES in nucleic acids and polynucleotides. It is also called nucleotide sequence.
Branch of medicine concerned with the prevention and control of disease and disability, and the promotion of physical and mental health of the population on the international, national, state, or municipal level.
Standards of conduct that distinguish right from wrong.
Time period from 2001 through 2100 of the common era.
The monitoring of the level of toxins, chemical pollutants, microbial contaminants, or other harmful substances in the environment (soil, air, and water), workplace, or in the bodies of people and animals present in that environment.
Systems composed of a computer or computers, peripheral equipment, such as disks, printers, and terminals, and telecommunications capabilities.
A philosophically coherent set of propositions (for example, utilitarianism) which attempts to provide general norms for the guidance and evaluation of moral conduct. (from Beauchamp and Childress, Principles of Biomedical Ethics, 4th ed)
Countries in the process of change with economic growth, that is, an increase in production, per capita consumption, and income. The process of economic growth involves better utilization of natural and human resources, which results in a change in the social, political, and economic structures.
The rate dynamics in chemical or physical systems.
The taking of a blood sample to determine its character as a whole, to identify levels of its component cells, chemicals, gases, or other constituents, to perform pathological examination, etc.
Extensive collections, reputedly complete, of references and citations to books, articles, publications, etc., generally on a single subject or specialized subject area. Databases can operate through automated files, libraries, or computer disks. The concept should be differentiated from DATABASES, FACTUAL which is used for collections of data and facts apart from bibliographic references to them.
A systematic statement of policy rules or principles. Guidelines may be developed by government agencies at any level, institutions, professional societies, governing boards, or by convening expert panels. The text may be cursive or in outline form but is generally a comprehensive guide to problems and approaches in any field of activity. For guidelines in the field of health care and clinical medicine, PRACTICE GUIDELINES AS TOPIC is available.
The interaction of persons or groups of persons representing various nations in the pursuit of a common goal or interest.
A technique of inputting two-dimensional images into a computer and then enhancing or analyzing the imagery into a form that is more useful to the human observer.
The obligations and accountability assumed in carrying out actions or ideas on behalf of others.
Observation and acquisition of physical data from a distance by viewing and making measurements from a distance or receiving transmitted data from observations made at distant location.
Computer processing of a language with rules that reflect and describe current usage rather than prescribed usage.
Activities concerned with governmental policies, functions, etc.
The decision process by which individuals, groups or institutions establish policies pertaining to plans, programs or procedures.
Any enterprise centered on the processing, assembly, production, or marketing of a line of products, services, commodities, or merchandise, in a particular field often named after its principal product. Examples include the automobile, fishing, music, publishing, insurance, and textile industries.
Encouraging consumer behaviors most likely to optimize health potentials (physical and psychosocial) through health information, preventive programs, and access to medical care.
The concept concerned with all aspects of providing and distributing health services to a patient population.
The process of generating three-dimensional images by electronic, photographic, or other methods. For example, three-dimensional images can be generated by assembling multiple tomographic images with the aid of a computer, while photographic 3-D images (HOLOGRAPHY) can be made by exposing film to the interference pattern created when two laser light sources shine on an object.
A love or pursuit of wisdom. A search for the underlying causes and principles of reality. (Webster, 3d ed)
Self-directing freedom and especially moral independence. An ethical principle holds that the autonomy of persons ought to be respected. (Bioethics Thesaurus)
Improvement of the quality of a picture by various techniques, including computer processing, digital filtering, echocardiographic techniques, light and ultrastructural MICROSCOPY, fluorescence spectrometry and microscopy, scintigraphy, and in vitro image processing at the molecular level.
Predetermined sets of questions used to collect data - clinical data, social status, occupational group, etc. The term is often applied to a self-completed survey instrument.
The qualitative or quantitative estimation of the likelihood of adverse effects that may result from exposure to specified health hazards or from the absence of beneficial influences. (Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 1988)
Evaluation undertaken to assess the results or consequences of management and procedures used in combating disease in order to determine the efficacy, effectiveness, safety, and practicability of these interventions in individual cases or series.
The deductive study of shape, quantity, and dependence. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)
Application of computer programs designed to assist the physician in solving a diagnostic problem.
An interactive process whereby members of a community are concerned for the equality and rights of all.
Integrated set of files, procedures, and equipment for the storage, manipulation, and retrieval of information.
New abnormal growth of tissue. Malignant neoplasms show a greater degree of anaplasia and have the properties of invasion and metastasis, compared to benign neoplasms.
The interaction of two or more persons or organizations directed toward a common goal which is mutually beneficial. An act or instance of working or acting together for a common purpose or benefit, i.e., joint action. (From Random House Dictionary Unabridged, 2d ed)
Protective measures against unauthorized access to or interference with computer operating systems, telecommunications, or data structures, especially the modification, deletion, destruction, or release of data in computers. It includes methods of forestalling interference by computer viruses or so-called computer hackers aiming to compromise stored data.
Data processing largely performed by automatic means.
The philosophy or code pertaining to what is ideal in human character and conduct. Also, the field of study dealing with the principles of morality.
The procedures involved in combining separately developed modules, components, or subsystems so that they work together as a complete system. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)
Linear POLYPEPTIDES that are synthesized on RIBOSOMES and may be further modified, crosslinked, cleaved, or assembled into complex proteins with several subunits. The specific sequence of AMINO ACIDS determines the shape the polypeptide will take, during PROTEIN FOLDING, and the function of the protein.
Works about clinical trials that involve at least one test treatment and one control treatment, concurrent enrollment and follow-up of the test- and control-treated groups, and in which the treatments to be administered are selected by a random process, such as the use of a random-numbers table.
The intrinsic moral worth ascribed to a living being. (Bioethics Thesaurus)
Studies designed to assess the efficacy of programs. They may include the evaluation of cost-effectiveness, the extent to which objectives are met, or impact.
The premier bibliographic database of the NATIONAL LIBRARY OF MEDICINE. MEDLINE® (MEDLARS Online) is the primary subset of PUBMED and can be searched on NLM's Web site in PubMed or the NLM Gateway. MEDLINE references are indexed with MEDICAL SUBJECT HEADINGS (MeSH).
The integration of epidemiologic, sociological, economic, and other analytic sciences in the study of health services. Health services research is usually concerned with relationships between need, demand, supply, use, and outcome of health services. The aim of the research is evaluation, particularly in terms of structure, process, output, and outcome. (From Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 2d ed)
The prediction or projection of the nature of future problems or existing conditions based upon the extrapolation or interpretation of existing scientific data or by the application of scientific methodology.
A theorem in probability theory named for Thomas Bayes (1702-1761). In epidemiology, it is used to obtain the probability of disease in a group of people with some characteristic on the basis of the overall rate of that disease and of the likelihood of that characteristic in healthy and diseased individuals. The most familiar application is in clinical decision analysis where it is used for estimating the probability of a particular diagnosis given the appearance of some symptoms or test result.
An aspect of personal behavior or lifestyle, environmental exposure, or inborn or inherited characteristic, which, on the basis of epidemiologic evidence, is known to be associated with a health-related condition considered important to prevent.
Computer-assisted study of methods for obtaining useful quantitative solutions to problems that have been expressed mathematically.
Software designed to store, manipulate, manage, and control data for specific uses.
Procedures for collecting, preserving, and transporting of specimens sufficiently stable to provide accurate and precise results suitable for clinical interpretation.
Approximate, quantitative reasoning that is concerned with the linguistic ambiguity which exists in natural or synthetic language. At its core are variables such as good, bad, and young as well as modifiers such as more, less, and very. These ordinary terms represent fuzzy sets in a particular problem. Fuzzy logic plays a key role in many medical expert systems.
A series of steps taken in order to conduct research.
The field of information science concerned with the analysis and dissemination of medical data through the application of computers to various aspects of health care and medicine.
Innovation and improvement of the health care system by reappraisal, amendment of services, and removal of faults and abuses in providing and distributing health services to patients. It includes a re-alignment of health services and health insurance to maximum demographic elements (the unemployed, indigent, uninsured, elderly, inner cities, rural areas) with reference to coverage, hospitalization, pricing and cost containment, insurers' and employers' costs, pre-existing medical conditions, prescribed drugs, equipment, and services.
The use of systematic methods of ethical examination, such as CASUISTRY or ETHICAL THEORY, in reasoning about moral problems.
Specifications and instructions applied to the software.
The circulation or wide dispersal of information.
The property of objects that determines the direction of heat flow when they are placed in direct thermal contact. The temperature is the energy of microscopic motions (vibrational and translational) of the particles of atoms.
The process of formulating, improving, and expanding educational, managerial, or service-oriented work plans (excluding computer program development).
A set of statistical methods used to group variables or observations into strongly inter-related subgroups. In epidemiology, it may be used to analyze a closely grouped series of events or cases of disease or other health-related phenomenon with well-defined distribution patterns in relation to time or place or both.
A course or method of action selected, usually by a government, from among alternatives to guide and determine present and future decisions.
A specified list of terms with a fixed and unalterable meaning, and from which a selection is made when CATALOGING; ABSTRACTING AND INDEXING; or searching BOOKS; JOURNALS AS TOPIC; and other documents. The control is intended to avoid the scattering of related subjects under different headings (SUBJECT HEADINGS). The list may be altered or extended only by the publisher or issuing agency. (From Harrod's Librarians' Glossary, 7th ed, p163)
Any detectable and heritable change in the genetic material that causes a change in the GENOTYPE and which is transmitted to daughter cells and to succeeding generations.
Studies determining the effectiveness or value of processes, personnel, and equipment, or the material on conducting such studies. For drugs and devices, CLINICAL TRIALS AS TOPIC; DRUG EVALUATION; and DRUG EVALUATION, PRECLINICAL are available.
The application of electronic, computerized control systems to mechanical devices designed to perform human functions. Formerly restricted to industry, but nowadays applied to artificial organs controlled by bionic (bioelectronic) devices, like automated insulin pumps and other prostheses.
A system for verifying and maintaining a desired level of quality in a product or process by careful planning, use of proper equipment, continued inspection, and corrective action as required. (Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed)
The concept pertaining to the health status of inhabitants of the world.
The process of making a selective intellectual judgment when presented with several complex alternatives consisting of several variables, and usually defining a course of action or an idea.
Theoretical representations and constructs that describe or explain the structure and hierarchy of relationships and interactions within or between formal organizational entities or informal social groups.
A computer architecture, implementable in either hardware or software, modeled after biological neural networks. Like the biological system in which the processing capability is a result of the interconnection strengths between arrays of nonlinear processing nodes, computerized neural networks, often called perceptrons or multilayer connectionist models, consist of neuron-like units. A homogeneous group of units makes up a layer. These networks are good at pattern recognition. They are adaptive, performing tasks by example, and thus are better for decision-making than are linear learning machines or cluster analysis. They do not require explicit programming.
Systems where the input data enter the computer directly from the point of origin (usually a terminal or workstation) and/or in which output data are transmitted directly to that terminal point of origin. (Sippl, Computer Dictionary, 4th ed)
An infant during the first month after birth.
The science and art of collecting, summarizing, and analyzing data that are subject to random variation. The term is also applied to the data themselves and to the summarization of the data.
The part of CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM that is contained within the skull (CRANIUM). Arising from the NEURAL TUBE, the embryonic brain is comprised of three major parts including PROSENCEPHALON (the forebrain); MESENCEPHALON (the midbrain); and RHOMBENCEPHALON (the hindbrain). The developed brain consists of CEREBRUM; CEREBELLUM; and other structures in the BRAIN STEM.
Time period from 1701 through 1800 of the common era.
The status during which female mammals carry their developing young (EMBRYOS or FETUSES) in utero before birth, beginning from FERTILIZATION to BIRTH.
The arrangement of two or more amino acid or base sequences from an organism or organisms in such a way as to align areas of the sequences sharing common properties. The degree of relatedness or homology between the sequences is predicted computationally or statistically based on weights assigned to the elements aligned between the sequences. This in turn can serve as a potential indicator of the genetic relatedness between the organisms.
A medical specialty concerned with the use of physical agents, mechanical apparatus, and manipulation in rehabilitating physically diseased or injured patients.
Written or other literary works whose subject matter is medical or about the profession of medicine and related areas.
Conferences, conventions or formal meetings usually attended by delegates representing a special field of interest.
The study of chance processes or the relative frequency characterizing a chance process.
Introduction of changes which are new to the organization and are created by management.
A species of gram-negative, facultatively anaerobic, rod-shaped bacteria (GRAM-NEGATIVE FACULTATIVELY ANAEROBIC RODS) commonly found in the lower part of the intestine of warm-blooded animals. It is usually nonpathogenic, but some strains are known to produce DIARRHEA and pyogenic infections. Pathogenic strains (virotypes) are classified by their specific pathogenic mechanisms such as toxins (ENTEROTOXIGENIC ESCHERICHIA COLI), etc.
Any deviation of results or inferences from the truth, or processes leading to such deviation. Bias can result from several sources: one-sided or systematic variations in measurement from the true value (systematic error); flaws in study design; deviation of inferences, interpretations, or analyses based on flawed data or data collection; etc. There is no sense of prejudice or subjectivity implied in the assessment of bias under these conditions.
The restriction of a characteristic behavior, anatomical structure or physical system, such as immune response; metabolic response, or gene or gene variant to the members of one species. It refers to that property which differentiates one species from another but it is also used for phylogenetic levels higher or lower than the species.
A multistage process that includes cloning, physical mapping, subcloning, determination of the DNA SEQUENCE, and information analysis.
A method of comparing the cost of a program with its expected benefits in dollars (or other currency). The benefit-to-cost ratio is a measure of total return expected per unit of money spent. This analysis generally excludes consideration of factors that are not measured ultimately in economic terms. Cost effectiveness compares alternative ways to achieve a specific set of results.
The quality or state of relating to or affecting two or more nations. (After Merriam-Webster Collegiate Dictionary, 10th ed)
The privacy of information and its protection against unauthorized disclosure.
Systematic organization, storage, retrieval, and dissemination of specialized information, especially of a scientific or technical nature (From ALA Glossary of Library and Information Science, 1983). It often involves authenticating or validating information.
Integrated, computer-assisted systems designed to store, manipulate, and retrieve information concerned with the administrative and clinical aspects of providing medical services within the hospital.
The state or condition of being a human individual accorded moral and/or legal rights. Criteria to be used to determine this status are subject to debate, and range from the requirement of simply being a human organism to such requirements as that the individual be self-aware and capable of rational thought and moral agency.
The process of cumulative change over successive generations through which organisms acquire their distinguishing morphological and physiological characteristics.
The external elements and conditions which surround, influence, and affect the life and development of an organism or population.
Compositions written by hand, as one written before the invention or adoption of printing. A manuscript may also refer to a handwritten copy of an ancient author. A manuscript may be handwritten or typewritten as distinguished from a printed copy, especially the copy of a writer's work from which printed copies are made. (Webster, 3d ed)
The study, control, and application of the conduction of ELECTRICITY through gases or vacuum, or through semiconducting or conducting materials. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)
Works about pre-planned studies of the safety, efficacy, or optimum dosage schedule (if appropriate) of one or more diagnostic, therapeutic, or prophylactic drugs, devices, or techniques selected according to predetermined criteria of eligibility and observed for predefined evidence of favorable and unfavorable effects. This concept includes clinical trials conducted both in the U.S. and in other countries.
Devices that control the supply of electric current for running electrical equipment.
The relationships of groups of organisms as reflected by their genetic makeup.
The educational process of instructing.
Small computers using LSI (large-scale integration) microprocessor chips as the CPU (central processing unit) and semiconductor memories for compact, inexpensive storage of program instructions and data. They are smaller and less expensive than minicomputers and are usually built into a dedicated system where they are optimized for a particular application. "Microprocessor" may refer to just the CPU or the entire microcomputer.
A type of MICROCOMPUTER, sometimes called a personal digital assistant, that is very small and portable and fitting in a hand. They are convenient to use in clinical and other field situations for quick data management. They usually require docking with MICROCOMPUTERS for updates.
Published materials which provide an examination of recent or current literature. Review articles can cover a wide range of subject matter at various levels of completeness and comprehensiveness based on analyses of literature that may include research findings. The review may reflect the state of the art. It also includes reviews as a literary form.
Descriptions and evaluations of specific health care organizations.
The process of pictorial communication, between human and computers, in which the computer input and output have the form of charts, drawings, or other appropriate pictorial representation.
Theoretical representations that simulate the behavior or activity of chemical processes or phenomena; includes the use of mathematical equations, computers, and other electronic equipment.
Community or individual involvement in the decision-making process.
The smallest continent and an independent country, comprising six states and two territories. Its capital is Canberra.
Time period from 1601 through 1700 of the common era.
Devices or objects in various imaging techniques used to visualize or enhance visualization by simulating conditions encountered in the procedure. Phantoms are used very often in procedures employing or measuring x-irradiation or radioactive material to evaluate performance. Phantoms often have properties similar to human tissue. Water demonstrates absorbing properties similar to normal tissue, hence water-filled phantoms are used to map radiation levels. Phantoms are used also as teaching aids to simulate real conditions with x-ray or ultrasonic machines. (From Iturralde, Dictionary and Handbook of Nuclear Medicine and Clinical Imaging, 1990)
Models used experimentally or theoretically to study molecular shape, electronic properties, or interactions; includes analogous molecules, computer-generated graphics, and mechanical structures.
Social process whereby the values, attitudes, or institutions of society, such as education, family, religion, and industry become modified. It includes both the natural process and action programs initiated by members of the community.
The relationships between symbols and their meanings.
Clusters of topics that fall within the domain of BIOETHICS, the field of study concerned with value questions that arise in biomedicine and health care delivery.
Three-dimensional representation to show anatomic structures. Models may be used in place of intact animals or organisms for teaching, practice, and study.
Exercise of governmental authority to control conduct.
Computer systems capable of assembling, storing, manipulating, and displaying geographically referenced information, i.e. data identified according to their locations.
Directions or principles presenting current or future rules of policy for assisting health care practitioners in patient care decisions regarding diagnosis, therapy, or related clinical circumstances. The guidelines may be developed by government agencies at any level, institutions, professional societies, governing boards, or by the convening of expert panels. The guidelines form a basis for the evaluation of all aspects of health care and delivery.
Use of sophisticated analysis tools to sort through, organize, examine, and combine large sets of information.
Organized collections of computer records, standardized in format and content, that are stored in any of a variety of computer-readable modes. They are the basic sets of data from which computer-readable files are created. (from ALA Glossary of Library and Information Science, 1983)
The protection, preservation, restoration, and rational use of all resources in the total environment.
Criteria and standards used for the determination of the appropriateness of the inclusion of patients with specific conditions in proposed treatment plans and the criteria used for the inclusion of subjects in various clinical trials and other research protocols.
Theoretical representations that simulate the behavior or activity of the neurological system, processes or phenomena; includes the use of mathematical equations, computers, and other electronic equipment.
Combination or superimposition of two images for demonstrating differences between them (e.g., radiograph with contrast vs. one without, radionuclide images using different radionuclides, radiograph vs. radionuclide image) and in the preparation of audiovisual materials (e.g., offsetting identical images, coloring of vessels in angiograms).
The art and science of designing buildings and structures. More generally, it is the design of the total built environment, including town planning, urban design, and landscape architecture.
A bibliographic database that includes MEDLINE as its primary subset. It is produced by the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI), part of the NATIONAL LIBRARY OF MEDICINE. PubMed, which is searchable through NLM's Web site, also includes access to additional citations to selected life sciences journals not in MEDLINE, and links to other resources such as the full-text of articles at participating publishers' Web sites, NCBI's molecular biology databases, and PubMed Central.
The collective designation of three organizations with common membership: the European Economic Community (Common Market), the European Coal and Steel Community, and the European Atomic Energy Community (Euratom). It was known as the European Community until 1994. It is primarily an economic union with the principal objectives of free movement of goods, capital, and labor. Professional services, social, medical and paramedical, are subsumed under labor. The constituent countries are Austria, Belgium, Denmark, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Ireland, Italy, Luxembourg, Netherlands, Portugal, Spain, Sweden, and the United Kingdom. (The World Almanac and Book of Facts 1997, p842)
It is the study of social phenomena which characterize the learned, shared, and transmitted social activities of particular ethnic groups with focus on the causes, consequences, and complexities of human social and cultural variability.
Processes that incorporate some element of randomness, used particularly to refer to a time series of random variables.
The collection, writing, and editing of current interest material on topics related to biomedicine for presentation through the mass media, including newspapers, magazines, radio, or television, usually for a public audience such as health care consumers.
The largest country in North America, comprising 10 provinces and three territories. Its capital is Ottawa.
Signal and data processing method that uses decomposition of wavelets to approximate, estimate, or compress signals with finite time and frequency domains. It represents a signal or data in terms of a fast decaying wavelet series from the original prototype wavelet, called the mother wavelet. This mathematical algorithm has been adopted widely in biomedical disciplines for data and signal processing in noise removal and audio/image compression (e.g., EEG and MRI).
Specific languages used to prepare computer programs.
Non-invasive method of demonstrating internal anatomy based on the principle that atomic nuclei in a strong magnetic field absorb pulses of radiofrequency energy and emit them as radiowaves which can be reconstructed into computerized images. The concept includes proton spin tomographic techniques.
A course of study offered by an educational institution.
The application of scientific knowledge to practical purposes in any field. It includes methods, techniques, and instrumentation.
Social and economic factors that characterize the individual or group within the social structure.
The interchange of goods or commodities, especially on a large scale, between different countries or between populations within the same country. It includes trade (the buying, selling, or exchanging of commodities, whether wholesale or retail) and business (the purchase and sale of goods to make a profit). (From Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed, p411, p2005 & p283)
Conversations with an individual or individuals held in order to obtain information about their background and other personal biographical data, their attitudes and opinions, etc. It includes school admission or job interviews.
The purposes, missions, and goals of an individual organization or its units, established through administrative processes. It includes an organization's long-range plans and administrative philosophy.
The capacity of an organization, institution, or business to produce desired results with a minimum expenditure of energy, time, money, personnel, materiel, etc.
The study of systems which respond disproportionately (nonlinearly) to initial conditions or perturbing stimuli. Nonlinear systems may exhibit "chaos" which is classically characterized as sensitive dependence on initial conditions. Chaotic systems, while distinguished from more ordered periodic systems, are not random. When their behavior over time is appropriately displayed (in "phase space"), constraints are evident which are described by "strange attractors". Phase space representations of chaotic systems, or strange attractors, usually reveal fractal (FRACTALS) self-similarity across time scales. Natural, including biological, systems often display nonlinear dynamics and chaos.
Voluntary authorization, by a patient or research subject, with full comprehension of the risks involved, for diagnostic or investigative procedures, and for medical and surgical treatment.
BMJ retracts 26-year-old paper (October 2015 retraction of 1989 paper about breastfeeding and infant formula). ... In 2005 the paper was retracted. In 2002, "Amrit L. Jain", allegedly a pseudonym of Chandra's, published a study in Nutrition ... "Nutrition retracts 2001 paper". The Scientist. The Scientist. Retrieved 2019-06-27. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link) ... Attempts to verify Jain's identity or existence have been unsuccessful, and in 2016 the Jain paper was retracted. Although ...
Deng asked Mazák to retract the paper. Mazák finally conceded by stating (on 20 August 2012 in PNAS) that: "after further ... Ivanoransky (20 August 2012). "Author retracts PNAS paper about alleged Pliocene cheetah fossil that critics said was a fake". ... Even at the time of pre-publication of the research paper in 2008, there were already strong doubts about the veracity of the ... Retracted, see doi:10.1073/pnas.1211510109) Randerson, James (December 29, 2008). "Fossilised skull suggests cheetahs evolved ...
The Lancet paper was partially retracted in 2004 and fully retracted in 2010, when Lancet's editor-in-chief Richard Horton ... Dyer, Clare (2010-02-02). "Lancet retracts Wakefield's MMR paper". BMJ. 340: c696. doi:10.1136/bmj.c696. ISSN 0959-8138. PMID ... The Lancet paper was partially retracted in 2004 and fully retracted in 2010, when Lancet's editor-in-chief Richard Horton ... Rose D (3 February 2010). "Lancet journal retracts Andrew Wakefield MMR scare paper". The Times. Retrieved 13 January 2011. ...
El-Remessy has had six research papers retracted, three papers corrected, and two papers attached to an expression of concern. ... S. Shafer (2012). "Statement of Concern" (PDF). "What took more than five years? Elsevier retracts 20 papers by world's most ... all of which UAB has called to be retracted. Katiyar has had 12 of his research papers retracted, and three others have ... fabricated data and recycled text in 20 papers". As of 2020 Ozeki has had 19 research papers retracted. David Panka (US), a ...
The paper was retracted in 2010 but is still cited by anti-vaccinationists. The claims in the paper were widely reported, ... Dyer, Clare (2 February 2010). "Lancet retracts Wakefield's MMR paper". BMJ. 340: c696. doi:10.1136/bmj.c696. ISSN 0959-8138. ... The Lancet paper was partially retracted in 2004 and fully retracted in 2010, when The Lancet's editor-in-chief Richard Horton ... The Lancet paper was partially retracted in 2004 and fully retracted in 2010, when Lancet's editor-in-chief Richard Horton ...
"Cancer biologist retracts five papers". Retraction Watch. 14 March 2018. "OSU Professor Falsified Data on Eight Papers, Resigns ... Carlo M. Croce, chair of the department of cancer biology and genetics, had 8 papers retracted and 15 more had corrections ... Samson T. Jacob, a professor of cancer biology and genetics, has had five papers retracted after an investigation. Ching-Shih ...
... the paper will usually be corrected; it will not usually be retracted. Paper retractions, notifications to superiors, and ... CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link) Stern, Author Victoria (2018-01-17). "Journal retracts letter for missing disclosure ... The publisher may charge authors substantial fees for retracting papers, even in cases of honest error, giving them a financial ... Journals may find it difficult to correct and retract erroneous papers after publication because of legal threats. Many ...
Fourteen of his papers were retracted in 2020, and journals issued 64 statements of concern about publications by him. Rod ... Oransky, Ivan (21 January 2020). "Journal retracts 30-year-old paper by controversial psychologist Hans Eysenck". Retraction ... Later, 13 additional papers were retracted. There are five portraits of Eysenck in the permanent collection of the National ... Following the King's College London enquiry the International Journal of Sport Psychology retracted a paper that was coauthored ...
... identified Wakefield's 1998 paper as the most cited retracted scientific paper, with 758 citations, and gave the "reason for ... Rose, David (3 February 2010). "Lancet journal retracts Andrew Wakefield MMR scare paper". The Times. London. Archived from the ... The Lancet formally retracted Wakefield's 1998 paper. The retraction states: "The claims in the original paper that children ... In May 2010, The American Journal of Gastroenterology retracted a paper of Wakefield's that used data from the 12 patients of ...
In 2004, the MMR-and-autism interpretation of the paper was formally retracted by ten of Wakefield's twelve coauthors, and in ... Boseley S (February 2, 2010). "Lancet retracts 'utterly false' MMR paper". The Guardian. Retrieved February 2, 2010. Taylor LE ... In the UK, the MMR vaccine was the subject of controversy after the publication in The Lancet of a 1998 paper by Andrew ... "Scientist: autism paper had catastrophic effects". NPR. February 7, 2010. Goldacre B (August 30, 2008). "The MMR hoax". The ...
Boseley S (February 2, 2010). "Lancet retracts 'utterly false' MMR paper". The Guardian. Retrieved February 2, 2010. "Vaccines ... "Two (now retracted) studies purporting to show that vaccinated children are sicker than unvaccinated children show nothing of ... The studies have been rejected by the World Health Organization and some have been retracted. A claimed "vaccinated vs. ...
Boseley S (February 2, 2010). "Lancet retracts 'utterly false' MMR paper". The Guardian. Retrieved February 2, 2010. Taylor LE ... A later-retracted article from The Lancet making false claims provoked concern about vaccines among parents. Its author was ...
Rose, David (3 February 2010). "Lancet journal retracts Andrew Wakefield MMR scare paper". The Times. Archived from the ... Wakefield's now-retracted and fraudulent report used inadequate controls and suppressed negative findings and multiple attempts ... ISBN 978-0-393-32238-5. Boseley, Sarah (2 February 2010). "Lancet retracts 'utterly false' MMR paper". The Guardian. Retrieved ... "NCAHF Position Paper on Over the Counter Herbal Remedies (1995)". National Council Against Health Fraud. 1995. Retrieved 17 ...
Springer subsequently retracted all papers from these proceedings. IEEE had removed more than 100 fake papers from its ... "Major publisher retracts 64 scientific papers in fake peer review outbreak". Washington Post. Retrieved 24 August 2015.. ... In 2015, Springer retracted 64 papers from 10 of its journals it had published after a fraudulent peer review process could be ... In 2014, it was revealed that sixteen papers in conference proceedings published by Springer had been computer-generated using ...
"Oops: Elsevier journal retracts the wrong paper". Retraction Watch. 2018-03-08. Retrieved 2018-03-13.. ... In 2018, the journal accidentally retracted an article from the journal because of "human error". The article has since been ...
If this is an intentional citation to a retracted paper, please replace {{Retracted}}. with {{Retracted,intentional=yes}}. .) ... The hyoglossus, arises from the hyoid bone and retracts and depresses the tongue. The chondroglossus is often included with ...
"Lancet journal retracts Andrew Wakefield MMR scare paper". The Times. London. Arkiveret fra originalen 3. februar 2010.. ... RETRACTED: Ileal-lymphoid-nodular hyperplasia, non-specific colitis, and pervasive developmental disorder in children ... "Lancet retracts 'utterly false' MMR paper". The Guardian. London. Hentet 14. januar 2015 ... "Controversial MMR and autism study retracted". New Scientist. Arkiveret fra originalen 13. august 2007. Hentet 21. oktober ...
British Paper Retracts Story Claiming Prince Philip Has Prostate Cancer, Fox News, 8 August 2008. ... The newspaper retracted the report and admitted it was untrue.[89][90] ... "Paper apologises for Prince Philip story", The Sydney Morning Herald, 8 August 2008. ...
"Elsevier journal to retract 2012 paper widely derided as racist". 17 June 2020. Retrieved 19 June 2020. McKiernan, Erin C.; ... Ivan Oransky (23 August 2018). "UPDATED: Elsevier retracts a paper on solar cells that appears to plagiarize a Nature journal. ... Kim Jung-hyun (December 29, 2017). "70여개 대학 도서관, 새해 첫 날부터 일부 논문 못 봐 - 한국대학신문" [70 University Libraries Can't See Some Papers ... The journal had published 322 papers with El Naschie as author since 1993. The last issue of December 2008 featured five of his ...
... a central pillar for the idea that vaccination could increase childrens risk of developing autism has been formally retracted ... Therefore we fully retract this paper from the published record.". "The Lancet is an enormously prestigious journal with ... Lancet Retracts Controversial Autism Paper. The retraction of the 1998 study may not change public perception of vaccines. ... 3, 2010 -- It was the scientific paper that served as a central pillar for the idea that vaccination could increase childrens ...
Science has retracted a study that suggested a link between chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS)/myalgic encephalomyelitis (ME) and a ... Mr Alberts added that the journal was retracting the paper without the full agreement of its authors, as although the majority ... The paper, which was published in Science journal in 2009, suggested a link between a virus called XMRV and CFS, which affects ... A leading journal has retracted a controversial study that claimed to have found a possible link between chronic fatigue ...
"Definitely embarrassing:" Nobel Laureate retracts non-reproducible paper in Nature journal. Posted on RetractionWatch.com ... Thus, the famous-now infamous-paper had to be retracted. The authors-one of them a Nobel Laureate-later confessed, "In ... In fact, a secular scientist published a 2012 paper expressing this great frustration titled, "The RNA world hypothesis: the ...
... to omit key details in a paper describing how researchers had managed to create an aerosolized form of the deadly H5N1 bir... ... On Thursday, the journal decided to retract the paper completely, saying [PDF] that "Science has lost confidence in the report ... It was a long time coming: a journal retracts a controversial 2009 paper linking a virus to chronic fatigue. The good news? ... Then, on Thursday came the difficult decision to retract a 2009 paper describing how a virus could be responsible for chronic ...
The Lancet today finally retracted the paper that sparked a crisis in MMR vaccination across the UK, following the General ... had to be retracted. "It was utterly clear, without any ambiguity at all, that the statements in the paper were utterly false ... Many in the scientific and medical community have been pressing for the paper, linking the MMR (measles, mumps and rubella) jab ... "We are entirely satisfied that the investigations performed on children reported in the Lancet paper had been subjected to ...
A high-profile paper has finally been retracted by the journal Science after 10 months of investigation. The work has been ... Even though it took 10 months, Science finally retracted the paper on May 3rd. ... The paper was high profile, in large part because of its subject - the effect of plastic microbeads on fish. The authors ... Late last year, a story emerged questioning the validity of a paper that had made a big splash when it was published in Science ...
No word yet on what type of papers, or if any climate papers are involved. From press release: Retraction of… ... has announced on its website that 64 articles published in 10 of its journals are being retracted. Editorial staff found ... hotair.com/archives/2015/08/19/leading-science-publisher-retracts-dozens-of-papers-for-fake-peer-reviews/ ... They had already retracted 43 earlier this year for faked reviews. Theyve retracted about 1,500 papers since 2012, about 15% ...
"We therefore retract these two papers and advise the scientific community that the results reported in them are deemed to be ... Thursdays retraction covered the Science paper on patient-specific stem cells, published in May 2005, as well as a 2004 paper ... The journal said it had received agreement to the retraction from six of the 15 authors listed for the 2004 paper, and from all ... Science also said it regretted "the time that the peer reviewers and others spent evaluating these papers as well as the time ...
... we are retracting two papers by Paolo Macchiarini and co-authors after receiving requests to do so from the new President of ... In its final decision, the KI finds that the research reported in the 2011 Lancet paper and elements of a Review published in ... Lancet retracts papers about therapeutic cloning - posted in Science & Technology of the Future: In this issue, ... Lancet retracts papers about therapeutic cloning Started by funkervogt , Jul 09 2018 05:55 PM ...
But retraction of 434 research papers by the same journal at one go is a rare occurence. ... However, the JFASs sudden retraction of 434 research papers in one go set a record for the largest number of papers retracted ... Journal Retracts a Record-Setting 434 Research Papers Last updated Mar 6, 2019. ... The journal retracted 434 research papers. What happened, and what does it mean for science? ...
... has retracted a scientific paper that described neural pathways in the sense of smell, after the scientists were unable to ... Nobel laureates research team retracts paper. Dr. Keith J. Kaplan , March 10, 2008 ... has retracted a scientific paper that described neural pathways in the sense of smell, after the scientists were unable to ... The paper reported details of how the nervous system of the mouse carries odor signals from the nose to a particular region of ...
Journal of Translational Medicine retracts a paper touting an unapproved stem cell treatment ... Seminal paper boosting stem cell treatment is retracted. DCTCRS May 4, 2021 5 min read ... The retracted paper was co-written by Kristen Comella, who was then the chief scientific officer of U.S. Stem Cell. The FDAs ... A seminal research paper in the saga of questionable stem cell medical treatments has just been retracted, largely due to ...
... and Szostak quickly retracted his original paper in response. On December 5th, 2017, Victoria Stern published a popular article ... 4 thoughts on "Nobel Prize Winner "Blinded by Belief": Retracts 2016 Paper on RNA Self-Replication" * wesley kime. says: ... Nobel Prize Winner "Blinded by Belief": Retracts 2016 Paper on RNA Self-Replication. Sean Pitman / January 3, 2018 ... In a 2016 paper published in Nature Chemistry, Nobel Laureate Jack W. Szostak (professor of chemistry and chemical biology at ...
The scientific journal Nature has retracted two landmark research studies that offered a surprisingly easy way to make master ... Science Journal Nature Retracts Stem-Cell Research Studies Journal is Reviewing Internal Prodecures for Vetting Papers. ... The scientific journal Nature has retracted two landmark research studies that offered a surprisingly easy way to make master ...
A Chinese scientific journal has retracted a paper about the authors ... A Chinese scientific journal has retracted a paper about the authors "noble" mentor and the mentors wifes beauty after being ... Scientific journal retracts paper over fawning content on authors mentors nobility By Global Times Published: Jan 12, 2020 11 ... As a student of Chengs, the author Xu Zhongmin was found to have published other papers that netizens claimed are not ...
... tweeted for a boycott until Philosophical Psychology retracts the paper and spells out "a plan to more competently referee ... A rather misleading summary of the paper. Nearly two years ago, a feminist philosophy journal faced demands to retract a paper ... "papers shouldnt be retracted and people should feel freedom to advance their views about published papers without fear of ... It calls on editors Cees van Leeuwen and Mitchell Herschbach to retract the paper, apologize, resign or "some combination" of ...
"A month after Surgisphere paper retraction, Lancet retracts, replaces hydroxychloroquine editorial" at Retraction Watch. The ... "A Nobel Laureate has retracted a 2016 paper in Nature Chemistry that explored the origins of life on earth, after discovering ... The journals ethical review committee then contacted Funck-Brentano, letting him know that the paper would be retracted and ... "A month after Surgisphere paper retraction, Lancet retracts, replaces hydroxychloroquine editorial" at Retraction Watch ...
It is not difficult to find fault with the paper. The only recourse is to get it retracted. ... sure Bin Laden is where she says she is and then retracts that statement and says it makes the analyst cringe? Consider the ... According to my search of academic citations (using Web of Science) about 12,000 academic papers have cited papers that ... write a paper that promotes the evils of climate change and you will be rewarded. write a paper that disputes the evils of ...
The Lancet retracts paper linking MMR vaccines and autism (Arstechnica). *In Your Eye, Jenny McCarthy (Slate) ... catalog and litany of some the most terrible behavior in any research and is therefore very clear that it has to be retracted." ...
This week Politifact retracted a fact-check it did last year about the lab leak theory of the origin of the coronavirus. The ... Experts have publicly rebuked Yans paper, and its unclear whether it was peer reviewed. ...
Major publisher retracts 64 scientific papers in fake peer review outbreak. 2015-08-18, Washington Post ... The announcement comes nine months after 43 studies were retracted by BioMed Central (one of Springers imprints) for the same ... has retracted 64 articles from 10 of its journals after discovering that their reviews were linked to fake e-mail addresses. ... wrote a controversial paper in 2008 proposing that the US government employ teams of covert agents and pseudo-"independent" ...
Bonus: Free print head replacements when exclusively using Boca paper. Warranty. Printer: 1 year, parts and labor. Print head: ... Presenter: automatically retracts ticket/receipt if not taken by customer. Configuration: the printer is shipped with parts to ... The Lemur-Z kiosk printer includes a looping presenter, which can retract the media if not taken within a prescribed period. ... An adjustable width paper guide to support fanfolded media is shipped with the ticket configuration.. Roll: inner diameter - ...
In other embodiments, the heat source 160h may be static and/or the anvil 160k2 advance and retract independently thereof (not ... In operation, the product pusher assembly 20 linearly retracts and advances to push a product through the product chute 30 so ... the apparatus can be oriented to run left to right or in a direction that is in or out of the paper. FIG. 2 also illustrates a ... The cutting anvil 160k2 is heated by the heat source 160h and, in operation, automatically extended and retracted using the PLC ...
Due to this unfortunate development, the authors request that the paper be retracted," The Lancet said in a statement. ... Let me know if youd like some help reading and understanding the paper. I have a doctor friend who can help you with that and ... June 4, 2020 - The online medical journal The Lancet has apologized to readers after retracting a study that said the anti- ... The Lancet paper on this topic was withdrawn because it was unverifiable. ...
OPMC RETRACTS STATEMENT ON AXIOM KB & SMMs APPEAL DECISION. Sibc News- March 28, 2016. Office of the Prime Minister and ... Photo credit: SICR The Prime Ministers Office has decided to retract a media statement regarding the Court of ... Read More ... PANGA WANTS APOLOGY FROM LOCAL PAPER SOLOMON STAR. Sibc NewsApril 13, 2014 10:19 am 0. ...
Claims on radio that the budget broke EU rules retracted by fiscal advisory council chairman ... The ePaper An exact digital replica of the printed paper * Breaking news app Our Apple and Android apps to read on the go ... Budget 2016: Head of advisory group retracts criticisms John McHale had claimed budget had echoes of mistakes we have made in ...
Until the journal retracts the Study 329 Paxil paper then this manifesto is just hand waving - worthy of the Trump White House. ... Study 329 became the poster child for the insanely widespread practice of "outcome switching". The journal have never retracted ...
Sounds like a settlement was paid for him to retract it???. Hmmmm. Im not sure many people are going to be overly impressed ... The former employee who made the accusations has now retracted the statement made about the Tiny Metal team using money from ... Former Tiny Metal Staffer Retracts Accusation Of Kickstarter Embezzlement. "Please allow me to apologize again for my actions" ...
That sounds bad because it doesnt really feel like a success if a paper gets retracted, theres a sad story behind that paper ... But if a journal retracts a paper that I flagged, it does feel like something good has been done for science. Its obviously ... Recently I have seen, for example, that Nobel Laureate Francis Arnold has gone public on Twitter about retracting a paper, ... And the punishments can be light, people dont have to go to prison in my opinion, but their papers should be retracted and ...
Major publisher retracts 43 scientific papers amid wider fake peer-review scandal. ... A major publisher of scholarly medical and science articles has retracted 43 papers because of "fabricated" peer reviews amid ... The paper was accepted by journals hosted by industry titans Sage and Elsevier. The paper was accepted by journals published by ... www.washingtonpost.com/news/morning-mix/wp/2015/03/27/fabricated-peer-reviews-prompt-scientific-journal-to-retract-43-papers- ...
... about 1,500 papers in multiple journals have been retracted for various reasons since 2012, as the editors of Retraction Watch ... research has retracted 64 articles from 10 journals after discovering that the peer-review reports-summaries of how the papers ... Last November, BioMed Central, a Springer company, retracted 43 studies for similar reasons, and in the past three years alone ... The process for getting a paper published is highly competitive, and retractions appear to be on the rise- ...
OBSERVATIONS ON HOMOSEXUALITY AMONG UNIVERSITY STUDENTS [RETRACTED}* * A Case of Self-Cannibalism: An Extremely Rare Type of ... The editor of The Journal of Nervous and Mental Disease retracts the article "Observations on Homosexuality Among University ... published papers in the past reflecting many other beliefs we find abhorrent today, such as those on eugenics, the disabled, ... Revisiting the Journals Past: A 1951 Article About Homosexuality That Deserves to Be Retracted ...
Today’s news that is main PayPal to offer $6B in customer loans.Cleveland Fed retracts research on P2P lending.China Citic, ... Why the Cleveland Fed should retract its lending that is online research. AT: “The Fed did in reality just just just take its ... Inside our view, this paper вЂ" “The Taste of Peer-to-Peer Loans” вЂ" and its own accompanying materials reveal that too ... Today’s thought-provoking articles: Why the Cleveland Fed should retract lending that is online.Deep plunge into Marcus.Are ...
Covid-19: Lancet retracts paper that halted hydroxychloroquine trials The Lancet paper that halted global trials of ... hydroxychloroquine for Covid-19 because of fears of increased deaths has been retracted after a Guardian investigation found ...
The New York Put up reported that the story was retracted after Scientific American obtained a letter from three Nobel Prize ... The letter went on to say that, "Whereas purporting to be a scientific assertion about public well being, the paper addressed ... Scientific American Retracts Story Accusing Israel of "Vaccine Apartheid" - Jewish Enterprise Information June 28, 2021. jenny ... Scientific American Retracts Story Accusing Israel of "Vaccine Apartheid". Scientific American ought to have identified higher ...
Papers will also be retracted in case of research misconduct, in accord with COPE guidelines. Corrections to errors that do not ... Journal retracts paper claiming COVID-19 vaccines kill * Ecology. Something is killing U.S. birds. Its not cicadas ... Related Papers. Copies of any papers by any subset of the authors that are related to the submitted manuscript and are under ... While your paper is under consideration at a Science Journal, please contact your editor if a related paper is submitted ...
Papers will also be retracted in case of research misconduct, in accord with COPE guidelines. Corrections to errors that do not ... Journal retracts paper claiming COVID-19 vaccines kill * Ecology. Something is killing U.S. birds. Its not cicadas ... Related Papers. Copies of any papers by any subset of the authors that are related to the submitted manuscript and are under ... While your paper is under consideration at a Science Journal, please contact your editor if a related paper is submitted ...
Papers will also be retracted in case of research misconduct, in accord with COPE guidelines. Corrections to errors that do not ... Journal retracts paper claiming COVID-19 vaccines kill * Ecology. Something is killing U.S. birds. Its not cicadas ... Related Papers. Copies of any papers by any subset of the authors that are related to the submitted manuscript and are under ... While your paper is under consideration at a Science Journal, please contact your editor if a related paper is submitted ...
The Guardian - Medical Journal to Retract Paper Over Concerns Organs Came from Executed Prisoners Science Magazine - Study ... Journal Retracts Chinese Paper Because Transplanted Livers Couldnt Be Traced China says it has stopped harvesting organs, but ... WORLD FIRST - LIVER INTERNATIONAL RETRACTS CHINESE ARTICLE AND PLACES LIFETIME BAN ON AUTHORS. ...
107 cancer papers retracted due to peer review fraud. https://arstechnica.com/science/2017/04/107-cancer-papers-retracted-due- ... Major publisher retracts 43 scientific papers amid wider fake peer-review scandal. https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/morning- ... Below you will find nearly 100 studies that support and as well replicate the findings in that 1998 now retracted Lancet paper ... mix/wp/2015/03/27/fabricated-peer-reviews-prompt-scientific-journal-to-retract-43-papers-systematic-scheme-may-affect-other- ...
... a retracted paper cannot be cited or referenced anymore. There is no such thing as a partial retraction, though EMBO Press did ... retractionwatch.com/2017/05/25/journal-retracts-nine-papers-one-day-author-investigation-weizmann-institute/ ["Kaoru Sakabe, ... Instead of "retract and replace" as currently practiced by some publishers, we would recommend "retract and republish" with a ... for those papers with problems (90% of papers commented @PubPeer ) versioning will simply allow data manipulation to become ...
Update 25.02.2018. The paper Roy et al 2017 was retracted by ACS Biomaterials. Will there be more retractions for Sharma, ... "The Editor retracts this article based on concerns with the microscopy data presented in this published article. In response to ... Also within papers, and even within adjacent panels of the same Figure, or in the same panel. In four papers, for instance, a ... The S&M papers have been cited 393 times by 297 articles, with 260 not being self-citing.. If each paper had 3 reviewers, then ...
Indeed, one journal retracts the criticised paper, another issues a correction describing the affected… ... PLOS One issued the following correction on the same day the Dibue et al paper in Epilepsia was retracted:. "The article ... Indeed, one journal retracts the criticised paper, another issues a correction describing the affected results as "not reliable ... I just came along this: the retracted paper in Epilepsia was published with the same data in another Journal (see below).. So ...
Paper inlet ducting. All wood and sheeting to make the Attacker 21 sheets of balsa sheeting. and spruce and balsa stringers. ... 6 Channel , Ailerons,elevator,Throttle,Retracts, flaps,nosewheel steering,rudder. Kit Includes:. Photos and Instructions ... Retract sets/ wheels etc. *Wood for builders. *Finishing and Glue. *Diverse Small Parts ...
  • The Lancet today finally retracted the paper that sparked a crisis in MMR vaccination across the UK, following the General Medical Council's decision that its lead author, Andrew Wakefield, had been dishonest. (disinfo.com)
  • We are entirely satisfied that the investigations performed on children reported in the Lancet paper had been subjected to appropriate and rigorous ethical scrutiny," he said at that time. (disinfo.com)
  • He documented his procedures and results in medical papers submitted to The Lancet. (futuretimeline.net)
  • (CNN) -- The medical journal The Lancet on Tuesday retracted a controversial 1998 paper that linked the measles, mumps and rubella (MMR) vaccine to autism. (cnn.com)
  • The General Medical Council, which oversees doctors in Britain, said that 'there was a biased selection of patients in The Lancet paper' and that his 'conduct in this regard was dishonest and irresponsible. (cnn.com)
  • After the council's findings last week, The Lancet retracted the study and released this statement. (cnn.com)
  • In fact, the Lancet paper does not claim to confirm a link between the MMR vaccine and autism. (cnn.com)
  • Science Magazine quotes researchers and online investigators expressing shock that the retracted Lancet paper includes "astonishing number of patients and details about patient demographics and dosing that seemed implausible. (newsd.in)
  • The Lancet is not alone in retracting a COVID19 paper that has attracted widespread attention. (newsd.in)
  • The 2017 paper touted the safety of injecting stem cells derived from patients' fat cells into their arthritic knees. (dctcrs.org)
  • The 2017 paper was "important for stem cell clinics," Knoepfler wrote. (dctcrs.org)
  • The journal told Retraction Watch that it revisited the 2017 paper after nearly four years in print that "concerns were raised regarding the article so an investigation was initiated," but that it would keep the complainant's identity confidential. (dctcrs.org)
  • On December 5th, 2017, Victoria Stern published a popular article about the retraction of Szostak's original paper as a result of Olsen failing to reproduce it's claims. (educatetruth.com)
  • It has become clear that several elements of the 1998 paper by Wakefield et al. (cnn.com)
  • In this issue, we are retracting two papers by Paolo Macchiarini and co-authors after receiving requests to do so from the new President of the Karolinska Institute (KI), Ole Petter Ottersen. (futuretimeline.net)
  • Earlier this year, the president of the Karolinska Institute, Ole Petter Ottersen , contacted the journal Respiration, saying KI had conducted an investigation and determined that a 2015 paper co-authored by once-lauded surgeon Paolo Macchiarini had been tainted by misconduct . (journalgazett.com)
  • What is more important is that an investigator, on the basis of false pretenses, published a paper and propelled a controversial hypothesis forward that led to decisions among individuals and groups to reject vaccination, with resultant outbreaks of these diseases," he said. (go.com)
  • A leading journal has retracted a controversial study that claimed to have found a possible link between chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS), also known as myalgic encephalomyelitis (ME), and a mouse virus. (netdoctor.co.uk)
  • It was a long time coming: a journal retracts a controversial 2009 paper linking a virus to chronic fatigue. (time.com)
  • The story was perplexing, though because, even though the paper seemed like a hot mess all around, a preliminary investigation conducted by Uppsala University (the home institution of the research team) not only found no evidence for scientific dishonesty and misconduct, they also did not recommend a full investigation. (acsh.org)
  • When scientific misconduct comes to light, it often results in retractions of published papers. (enago.com)
  • A finding of misconduct spurs the retraction of a Science paper claiming to have identified a protein in mice that boosted immunity to both viruses and cancer. (the-scientist.com)
  • Many in the scientific and medical community have been pressing for the paper, linking the MMR (measles, mumps and rubella) jab to bowel disease and autism, to be quashed. (disinfo.com)
  • The retraction wasn't a complete surprise, however, since the authors of the paper had already partially retracted some of its results, and many other follow-up studies had cast serious doubt on its findings. (time.com)
  • In May, two new papers confirmed that the original findings were due to laboratory contamination of the blood samples. (time.com)
  • The medical journal's editor, Richard Horton, told the Guardian today that he realised as soon as he read the GMC findings that the paper, published in February 1998, had to be retracted. (disinfo.com)
  • After being dogged by critics for his unethical clinical methods and the very high mortality rate of his patients, the publication finally retracted his findings. (futuretimeline.net)
  • It turns out, however, that after subsequent experiments, Tivoli Olsen, a member of Szostak's lab, could not reproduce Szostak's 2016 findings - and Szostak quickly retracted his original paper in response. (educatetruth.com)
  • Late last year, a story emerged questioning the validity of a paper that had made a big splash when it was published in Science earlier in 2016. (acsh.org)
  • In a 2016 paper published in Nature Chemistry , Nobel Laureate Jack W. Szostak (professor of chemistry and chemical biology at Harvard University in Cambridge) claimed to show how RNA could self-replicate under conditions that may have been present during the early Earth environment - leading to the evolution of the first forms of life. (educatetruth.com)
  • For example, Tumor Biology retracted 107 research papers after a fake peer review scandal, while the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences retracted 106 such papers. (enago.com)
  • According to NPR , some of the study's authors retracted the paper after the company that provided the data, Surgisphere, refused to release its data, citing confidentiality concerns. (biospace.com)
  • A seminal research paper in the saga of questionable stem cell medical treatments has just been retracted, largely due to ethical concerns . (dctcrs.org)
  • The retracted paper was co-written by Kristen Comella, who was then the chief scientific officer of U.S. Stem Cell. (dctcrs.org)
  • In his retraction statement, Science editor-in-chief Bruce Alberts confirmed that the journal was 'fully retracting' the original report by scientists at the Whittemore Peterson Institute in Reno, Nevada, the Cleveland Clinic and the US National Cancer Institute. (netdoctor.co.uk)
  • Other scientists said the paper was chock full of mistakes, negligence and even potential fraud. (acsh.org)
  • After the journal was delisted, scientists from the Universal Society for Applied Research (USAR) asked to retract their papers. (enago.com)
  • The request from the scientists to have their articles retracted following the delisting comes as no surprise. (enago.com)
  • The New York Times (3/7, Chang) reported that a 'team of scientists, including Linda B. Buck, who shared the 2004 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine, has retracted a scientific paper that described neural pathways in the sense of smell, after the scientists were unable to reproduce the results. (tissuepathology.com)
  • The paper, which was published in Science journal in 2009, suggested a link between a virus called XMRV and CFS, which affects about 250,000 people in the UK and is poorly understood. (netdoctor.co.uk)
  • On Thursday, the journal decided to retract the paper completely, saying [PDF] that " Science has lost confidence in the report and the validity of its conclusions" and that the journal "regret[s] the time and resources that the scientific community has devoted to unsuccessful attempts to replicate these results. (time.com)
  • Because the final report of the SNU investigation indicated that a significant amount of the data presented in both papers is fabricated, the editors of Science feel that an immediate and unconditional retraction of both papers is needed," the journal said in a statement attributed to editor-in-chief Donald Kennedy and published on its Web site (PDF file) . (nbcnews.com)
  • The journal said it had received agreement to the retraction from six of the 15 authors listed for the 2004 paper, and from all 25 authors of the 2005 paper. (nbcnews.com)
  • The journal retracted 434 research papers . (enago.com)
  • The scientific journal Nature has retracted two landmark research studies that offered a surprisingly easy way to make master stem cells for treating disease. (wsj.com)
  • The New England Journal of Medicine today put out a thick paragraph retracting their article called "Cardiovascular Disease, Drug Therapy, and Mortality in Covid-19. (newsd.in)
  • The Journal of Vibration and Control retracted 60 articles at once after the discovery of a "peer-review and citation ring. (medicaldaily.com)
  • The Journal of Vibration and Control has retracted 60 scientific articles after the discovery of a "peer-review and citation ring," helping academics facing the existential crisis: publish or perish. (medicaldaily.com)
  • RW: KI's argument is that it has already conducted an investigation of the paper, which included hearing from the authors, so the journal doesn't need to do its own. (journalgazett.com)
  • In 2006, Science was forced to retract the results of South Korean scientist Woo Suk Hwang, who claimed to have perfected the cloning process in human cells. (time.com)
  • Even though it took 10 months, Science finally retracted the paper on May 3rd . (acsh.org)
  • Thursday's retraction covered the Science paper on patient-specific stem cells, published in May 2005 , as well as a 2004 paper reporting that stem cells had been isolated from one cloned human embryo. (nbcnews.com)
  • Science also said it regretted "the time that the peer reviewers and others spent evaluating these papers as well as the time and resources that the scientific community may have spent trying to replicate these results. (nbcnews.com)
  • Science publishing giant Springer, with over 2900 journals, has announced on its website that 64 articles published in 10 of its journals are being retracted. (wattsupwiththat.com)
  • Springer confirms that 64 articles are being retracted from 10 Springer subscription journals, after editorial checks spotted fake email addresses, and subsequent internal investigations uncovered fabricated peer review reports. (wattsupwiththat.com)
  • That is certainly reflected in the scope of this update, which includes links to many new papers, books and articles that appeared in recent months, along with reports on two very important Shroud presentations I made this year. (shroud.com)
  • It was, however, 'not immediately clear how important the retracted research, done in mice, was to the body of work that led to her Nobel. (tissuepathology.com)
  • Forbes Retracts Monsanto Article - But Why? (mercola.com)
  • An article raising concern about the safety of using hydroxychloroquine as a treatment of COVID-19 that forced the World Health Organization to temporarily suspend a clinical study involving the drug has been retracted. (biospace.com)
  • This kind of publicity does not and for very obvious reasons cannot play a role in the decision whether we retract an article or not. (journalgazett.com)
  • The authors claim that the data that were included in the paper were stored in only one place - a laptop computer. (acsh.org)
  • The research was carried out without sufficient support by preclinical data, and the paper presents its data in a way that is unduly positive and uncritical. (futuretimeline.net)
  • The embattled thoracic surgeon blames his former employer, the Karolinska Institute, for losing data related to the retracted research. (the-scientist.com)
  • A September 2008 study replicated key parts of Wakefield's original paper and found no evidence that the vaccine had a connection to either autism or GI disorders. (cnn.com)
  • Today, three of the authors of the paper, "Hydroxychloroquine or chloroquine with or without a macrolide for treatment of COVID-19: a multinational registry analysis", have retracted their study. (newsd.in)
  • Mehra, Ruschitzka, and Patel are three of the four authors who have retracted this study that has existed for exactly 13 days. (newsd.in)
  • Nonetheless, a 'spokesman for Harvard Medical School said the school has formed an internal committee to review the 2001 paper. (tissuepathology.com)
  • A research paper is the result of funding investment, institutional commitment and months of work by the authors, and publishing outputs affect careers, funding applications and institutional reputations. (wattsupwiththat.com)
  • Well, the results are in , the verdict is guilty, and the paper will be no more. (acsh.org)
  • The paper reported results from 10 patients apparently treated at a clinic in New Delhi. (dctcrs.org)
  • First came the controversy surrounding their decision, at the request of government security officials, to omit key details in a paper describing how researchers had managed to create an aerosolized form of the deadly H5N1 bird flu virus. (time.com)
  • Should delisted journals be allowed to retract the work of published authors? (enago.com)
  • In fact, a secular scientist published a 2012 paper expressing this great frustration titled, "The RNA world hypothesis: the worst theory of the early evolution of life (except for all the others). (icr.org)
  • It was utterly clear, without any ambiguity at all, that the statements in the paper were utterly false," he said. (disinfo.com)
  • However, the JFAS's sudden retraction of 434 research papers in one go set a record for the largest number of papers retracted at one time. (enago.com)
  • in particular, the claims in the original paper that children were 'consecutively referred' and that investigations were 'approved' by the local ethics committee have been proven to be false. (go.com)
  • Feb. 3, 2010 -- It was the scientific paper that served as a central pillar for the idea that vaccination could increase children's risk of developing autism . (go.com)
  • In the original 2009 paper, the 13 co-authors described how a mouse virus known as xenotropic murine leukemia (XMRV) had consistently shown up in the blood of 67% of patients with chronic fatigue syndrome, but in only 4% of those without the condition. (time.com)
  • Then, on Thursday came the difficult decision to retract a 2009 paper describing how a virus could be responsible for chronic fatigue syndrome. (time.com)
  • RW: Has the publication of your correspondence influenced your decision of whether or not to retract the paper? (journalgazett.com)
  • Actually, you don't even need Pals - just a few email addresses and you can write the paper and review it all by your self. (wattsupwiththat.com)
  • Indeed, shortly after Hwang's 2005 paper was published, a British team said they had succeeded in producing a cloned human embryo , although no stem cells were extracted in that case. (nbcnews.com)
  • The 'paper reported details of how the nervous system of the mouse carries odor signals from the nose to a particular region of the brain,' added the AP (3/7, Ritter). (tissuepathology.com)
  • No word yet on what type of papers, or if any climate papers are involved. (wattsupwiththat.com)
  • The paper was high profile, in large part because of its subject - the effect of plastic microbeads on fish. (acsh.org)