Resuscitation: The restoration to life or consciousness of one apparently dead. (Dorland, 27th ed)Death, Sudden, Cardiac: Unexpected rapid natural death due to cardiovascular collapse within one hour of initial symptoms. It is usually caused by the worsening of existing heart diseases. The sudden onset of symptoms, such as CHEST PAIN and CARDIAC ARRHYTHMIAS, particularly VENTRICULAR TACHYCARDIA, can lead to the loss of consciousness and cardiac arrest followed by biological death. (from Braunwald's Heart Disease: A Textbook of Cardiovascular Medicine, 7th ed., 2005)Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation: The artificial substitution of heart and lung action as indicated for HEART ARREST resulting from electric shock, DROWNING, respiratory arrest, or other causes. The two major components of cardiopulmonary resuscitation are artificial ventilation (RESPIRATION, ARTIFICIAL) and closed-chest CARDIAC MASSAGE.Death, Sudden: The abrupt cessation of all vital bodily functions, manifested by the permanent loss of total cerebral, respiratory, and cardiovascular functions.Heart Arrest: Cessation of heart beat or MYOCARDIAL CONTRACTION. If it is treated within a few minutes, heart arrest can be reversed in most cases to normal cardiac rhythm and effective circulation.Arrhythmias, Cardiac: Any disturbances of the normal rhythmic beating of the heart or MYOCARDIAL CONTRACTION. Cardiac arrhythmias can be classified by the abnormalities in HEART RATE, disorders of electrical impulse generation, or impulse conduction.Ventricular Fibrillation: A potentially lethal cardiac arrhythmia that is characterized by uncoordinated extremely rapid firing of electrical impulses (400-600/min) in HEART VENTRICLES. Such asynchronous ventricular quivering or fibrillation prevents any effective cardiac output and results in unconsciousness (SYNCOPE). It is one of the major electrocardiographic patterns seen with CARDIAC ARREST.Shock, Hemorrhagic: Acute hemorrhage or excessive fluid loss resulting in HYPOVOLEMIA.Cause of Death: Factors which produce cessation of all vital bodily functions. They can be analyzed from an epidemiologic viewpoint.Resuscitation Orders: Instructions issued by a physician pertaining to the institution, continuation, or withdrawal of life support measures. The concept includes policies, laws, statutes, decisions, guidelines, and discussions that may affect the issuance of such orders.Defibrillators: Cardiac electrical stimulators that apply brief high-voltage electroshocks to the HEART. These stimulators are used to restore normal rhythm and contractile function in hearts of patients who are experiencing VENTRICULAR FIBRILLATION or ventricular tachycardia (TACHYCARDIA, VENTRICULAR) that is not accompanied by a palpable PULSE. Some defibrillators may also be used to correct certain noncritical dysrhythmias (called synchronized defibrillation or CARDIOVERSION), using relatively low-level discharges synchronized to the patient's ECG waveform. (UMDNS, 2003)Defibrillators, Implantable: Implantable devices which continuously monitor the electrical activity of the heart and automatically detect and terminate ventricular tachycardia (TACHYCARDIA, VENTRICULAR) and VENTRICULAR FIBRILLATION. They consist of an impulse generator, batteries, and electrodes.Myocytes, Cardiac: Striated muscle cells found in the heart. They are derived from cardiac myoblasts (MYOBLASTS, CARDIAC).Electrocardiography: Recording of the moment-to-moment electromotive forces of the HEART as projected onto various sites on the body's surface, delineated as a scalar function of time. The recording is monitored by a tracing on slow moving chart paper or by observing it on a cardioscope, which is a CATHODE RAY TUBE DISPLAY.Tachycardia, Ventricular: An abnormally rapid ventricular rhythm usually in excess of 150 beats per minute. It is generated within the ventricle below the BUNDLE OF HIS, either as autonomic impulse formation or reentrant impulse conduction. Depending on the etiology, onset of ventricular tachycardia can be paroxysmal (sudden) or nonparoxysmal, its wide QRS complexes can be uniform or polymorphic, and the ventricular beating may be independent of the atrial beating (AV dissociation).Cell Death: The termination of the cell's ability to carry out vital functions such as metabolism, growth, reproduction, responsiveness, and adaptability.Sudden Infant Death: The abrupt and unexplained death of an apparently healthy infant under one year of age, remaining unexplained after a thorough case investigation, including performance of a complete autopsy, examination of the death scene, and review of the clinical history. (Pediatr Pathol 1991 Sep-Oct;11(5):677-84)Fluid Therapy: Therapy whose basic objective is to restore the volume and composition of the body fluids to normal with respect to WATER-ELECTROLYTE BALANCE. Fluids may be administered intravenously, orally, by intermittent gavage, or by HYPODERMOCLYSIS.Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest: Occurrence of heart arrest in an individual when there is no immediate access to medical personnel or equipment.Electric Countershock: An electrical current applied to the HEART to terminate a disturbance of its rhythm, ARRHYTHMIAS, CARDIAC. (Stedman, 25th ed)Long QT Syndrome: A condition that is characterized by episodes of fainting (SYNCOPE) and varying degree of ventricular arrhythmia as indicated by the prolonged QT interval. The inherited forms are caused by mutation of genes encoding cardiac ion channel proteins. The two major forms are ROMANO-WARD SYNDROME and JERVELL-LANGE NIELSEN SYNDROME.Heart: The hollow, muscular organ that maintains the circulation of the blood.Heart Massage: Rhythmic compression of the heart by pressure applied manually over the sternum (closed heart massage) or directly to the heart through an opening in the chest wall (open heart massage). It is done to reinstate and maintain circulation. (Dorland, 28th ed)Cardiac Output: The volume of BLOOD passing through the HEART per unit of time. It is usually expressed as liters (volume) per minute so as not to be confused with STROKE VOLUME (volume per beat).Emergency Medical Services: Services specifically designed, staffed, and equipped for the emergency care of patients.Risk Factors: An aspect of personal behavior or lifestyle, environmental exposure, or inborn or inherited characteristic, which, on the basis of epidemiologic evidence, is known to be associated with a health-related condition considered important to prevent.Cardiomyopathy, Hypertrophic: A form of CARDIAC MUSCLE disease, characterized by left and/or right ventricular hypertrophy (HYPERTROPHY, LEFT VENTRICULAR; HYPERTROPHY, RIGHT VENTRICULAR), frequent asymmetrical involvement of the HEART SEPTUM, and normal or reduced left ventricular volume. Risk factors include HYPERTENSION; AORTIC STENOSIS; and gene MUTATION; (FAMILIAL HYPERTROPHIC CARDIOMYOPATHY).Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Brugada Syndrome: An autosomal dominant defect of cardiac conduction that is characterized by an abnormal ST-segment in leads V1-V3 on the ELECTROCARDIOGRAM resembling a right BUNDLE-BRANCH BLOCK; high risk of VENTRICULAR TACHYCARDIA; or VENTRICULAR FIBRILLATION; SYNCOPAL EPISODE; and possible sudden death. This syndrome is linked to mutations of gene encoding the cardiac SODIUM CHANNEL alpha subunit.Heart Diseases: Pathological conditions involving the HEART including its structural and functional abnormalities.Death: Irreversible cessation of all bodily functions, manifested by absence of spontaneous breathing and total loss of cardiovascular and cerebral functions.Anti-Arrhythmia Agents: Agents used for the treatment or prevention of cardiac arrhythmias. They may affect the polarization-repolarization phase of the action potential, its excitability or refractoriness, or impulse conduction or membrane responsiveness within cardiac fibers. Anti-arrhythmia agents are often classed into four main groups according to their mechanism of action: sodium channel blockade, beta-adrenergic blockade, repolarization prolongation, or calcium channel blockade.Prospective Studies: Observation of a population for a sufficient number of persons over a sufficient number of years to generate incidence or mortality rates subsequent to the selection of the study group.Myocardial Infarction: NECROSIS of the MYOCARDIUM caused by an obstruction of the blood supply to the heart (CORONARY CIRCULATION).Cardiomyopathies: A group of diseases in which the dominant feature is the involvement of the CARDIAC MUSCLE itself. Cardiomyopathies are classified according to their predominant pathophysiological features (DILATED CARDIOMYOPATHY; HYPERTROPHIC CARDIOMYOPATHY; RESTRICTIVE CARDIOMYOPATHY) or their etiological/pathological factors (CARDIOMYOPATHY, ALCOHOLIC; ENDOCARDIAL FIBROELASTOSIS).Heart Conduction System: An impulse-conducting system composed of modified cardiac muscle, having the power of spontaneous rhythmicity and conduction more highly developed than the rest of the heart.Treatment Outcome: Evaluation undertaken to assess the results or consequences of management and procedures used in combating disease in order to determine the efficacy, effectiveness, safety, and practicability of these interventions in individual cases or series.Cardiac Surgical Procedures: Surgery performed on the heart.Myocardium: The muscle tissue of the HEART. It is composed of striated, involuntary muscle cells (MYOCYTES, CARDIAC) connected to form the contractile pump to generate blood flow.Isotonic Solutions: Solutions having the same osmotic pressure as blood serum, or another solution with which they are compared. (From Grant & Hackh's Chemical Dictionary, 5th ed & Dorland, 28th ed)Risk Assessment: The qualitative or quantitative estimation of the likelihood of adverse effects that may result from exposure to specified health hazards or from the absence of beneficial influences. (Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 1988)Heart Rate: The number of times the HEART VENTRICLES contract per unit of time, usually per minute.Follow-Up Studies: Studies in which individuals or populations are followed to assess the outcome of exposures, procedures, or effects of a characteristic, e.g., occurrence of disease.Cardiac Pacing, Artificial: Regulation of the rate of contraction of the heart muscles by an artificial pacemaker.ManikinsHeart Failure: A heterogeneous condition in which the heart is unable to pump out sufficient blood to meet the metabolic need of the body. Heart failure can be caused by structural defects, functional abnormalities (VENTRICULAR DYSFUNCTION), or a sudden overload beyond its capacity. Chronic heart failure is more common than acute heart failure which results from sudden insult to cardiac function, such as MYOCARDIAL INFARCTION.Autopsy: Postmortem examination of the body.Electrocardiography, Ambulatory: Method in which prolonged electrocardiographic recordings are made on a portable tape recorder (Holter-type system) or solid-state device ("real-time" system), while the patient undergoes normal daily activities. It is useful in the diagnosis and management of intermittent cardiac arrhythmias and transient myocardial ischemia.Retrospective Studies: Studies used to test etiologic hypotheses in which inferences about an exposure to putative causal factors are derived from data relating to characteristics of persons under study or to events or experiences in their past. The essential feature is that some of the persons under study have the disease or outcome of interest and their characteristics are compared with those of unaffected persons.Heart Ventricles: The lower right and left chambers of the heart. The right ventricle pumps venous BLOOD into the LUNGS and the left ventricle pumps oxygenated blood into the systemic arterial circulation.NAV1.5 Voltage-Gated Sodium Channel: A voltage-gated sodium channel subtype that mediates the sodium ion PERMEABILITY of CARDIOMYOCYTES. Defects in the SCN5A gene, which codes for the alpha subunit of this sodium channel, are associated with a variety of CARDIAC DISEASES that result from loss of sodium channel function.Syncope: A transient loss of consciousness and postural tone caused by diminished blood flow to the brain (i.e., BRAIN ISCHEMIA). Presyncope refers to the sensation of lightheadedness and loss of strength that precedes a syncopal event or accompanies an incomplete syncope. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, pp367-9)Arrhythmogenic Right Ventricular Dysplasia: A congenital cardiomyopathy that is characterized by infiltration of adipose and fibrous tissue into the RIGHT VENTRICLE wall and loss of myocardial cells. Primary injuries usually are at the free wall of right ventricular and right atria resulting in ventricular and supraventricular arrhythmias.Medical Futility: The absence of a useful purpose or useful result in a diagnostic procedure or therapeutic intervention. The situation of a patient whose condition will not be improved by treatment or instances in which treatment preserves permanent unconsciousness or cannot end dependence on intensive medical care. (From Ann Intern Med 1990 Jun 15;112(12):949)Echocardiography: Ultrasonic recording of the size, motion, and composition of the heart and surrounding tissues. The standard approach is transthoracic.Advanced Cardiac Life Support: The use of sophisticated methods and equipment to treat cardiopulmonary arrest. Advanced Cardiac Life Support (ACLS) includes the use of specialized equipment to maintain the airway, early defibrillation and pharmacological therapy.Asphyxia: A pathological condition caused by lack of oxygen, manifested in impending or actual cessation of life.Infant, Newborn: An infant during the first month after birth.Predictive Value of Tests: In screening and diagnostic tests, the probability that a person with a positive test is a true positive (i.e., has the disease), is referred to as the predictive value of a positive test; whereas, the predictive value of a negative test is the probability that the person with a negative test does not have the disease. Predictive value is related to the sensitivity and specificity of the test.Hemodynamics: The movement and the forces involved in the movement of the blood through the CARDIOVASCULAR SYSTEM.Disease Models, Animal: Naturally occurring or experimentally induced animal diseases with pathological processes sufficiently similar to those of human diseases. They are used as study models for human diseases.Survival Rate: The proportion of survivors in a group, e.g., of patients, studied and followed over a period, or the proportion of persons in a specified group alive at the beginning of a time interval who survive to the end of the interval. It is often studied using life table methods.Stroke Volume: The amount of BLOOD pumped out of the HEART per beat, not to be confused with cardiac output (volume/time). It is calculated as the difference between the end-diastolic volume and the end-systolic volume.Saline Solution, Hypertonic: Hypertonic sodium chloride solution. A solution having an osmotic pressure greater than that of physiologic salt solution (0.9 g NaCl in 100 ml purified water).Cardiac Electrophysiology: The study of the electrical activity and characteristics of the HEART; MYOCARDIUM; and CARDIOMYOCYTES.Neonatology: A subspecialty of Pediatrics concerned with the newborn infant.Myocardial Ischemia: A disorder of cardiac function caused by insufficient blood flow to the muscle tissue of the heart. The decreased blood flow may be due to narrowing of the coronary arteries (CORONARY ARTERY DISEASE), to obstruction by a thrombus (CORONARY THROMBOSIS), or less commonly, to diffuse narrowing of arterioles and other small vessels within the heart. Severe interruption of the blood supply to the myocardial tissue may result in necrosis of cardiac muscle (MYOCARDIAL INFARCTION).Cardiomegaly: Enlargement of the HEART, usually indicated by a cardiothoracic ratio above 0.50. Heart enlargement may involve the right, the left, or both HEART VENTRICLES or HEART ATRIA. Cardiomegaly is a nonspecific symptom seen in patients with chronic systolic heart failure (HEART FAILURE) or several forms of CARDIOMYOPATHIES.Prognosis: A prediction of the probable outcome of a disease based on a individual's condition and the usual course of the disease as seen in similar situations.Shock: A pathological condition manifested by failure to perfuse or oxygenate vital organs.Romano-Ward Syndrome: A form of long QT syndrome that is without congenital deafness. It is caused by mutation of the KCNQ1 gene which encodes a protein in the VOLTAGE-GATED POTASSIUM CHANNEL.Asphyxia Neonatorum: Respiratory failure in the newborn. (Dorland, 27th ed)Ventricular Dysfunction, Left: A condition in which the LEFT VENTRICLE of the heart was functionally impaired. This condition usually leads to HEART FAILURE; MYOCARDIAL INFARCTION; and other cardiovascular complications. Diagnosis is made by measuring the diminished ejection fraction and a depressed level of motility of the left ventricular wall.Amiodarone: An antianginal and class III antiarrhythmic drug. It increases the duration of ventricular and atrial muscle action by inhibiting POTASSIUM CHANNELS and VOLTAGE-GATED SODIUM CHANNELS. There is a resulting decrease in heart rate and in vascular resistance.KCNQ1 Potassium Channel: A voltage-gated potassium channel that is expressed primarily in the HEART.Survival Analysis: A class of statistical procedures for estimating the survival function (function of time, starting with a population 100% well at a given time and providing the percentage of the population still well at later times). The survival analysis is then used for making inferences about the effects of treatments, prognostic factors, exposures, and other covariates on the function.Incidence: The number of new cases of a given disease during a given period in a specified population. It also is used for the rate at which new events occur in a defined population. It is differentiated from PREVALENCE, which refers to all cases, new or old, in the population at a given time.Dogs: The domestic dog, Canis familiaris, comprising about 400 breeds, of the carnivore family CANIDAE. They are worldwide in distribution and live in association with people. (Walker's Mammals of the World, 5th ed, p1065)Myocardial Contraction: Contractile activity of the MYOCARDIUM.Electrophysiologic Techniques, Cardiac: Methods to induce and measure electrical activities at specific sites in the heart to diagnose and treat problems with the heart's electrical system.Cardiac Tamponade: Compression of the heart by accumulated fluid (PERICARDIAL EFFUSION) or blood (HEMOPERICARDIUM) in the PERICARDIUM surrounding the heart. The affected cardiac functions and CARDIAC OUTPUT can range from minimal to total hemodynamic collapse.Cardiomyopathy, Dilated: A form of CARDIAC MUSCLE disease that is characterized by ventricular dilation, VENTRICULAR DYSFUNCTION, and HEART FAILURE. Risk factors include SMOKING; ALCOHOL DRINKING; HYPERTENSION; INFECTION; PREGNANCY; and mutations in the LMNA gene encoding LAMIN TYPE A, a NUCLEAR LAMINA protein.Life Support Care: Care provided patients requiring extraordinary therapeutic measures in order to sustain and prolong life.Delivery Rooms: Hospital units equipped for childbirth.Coronary Vessel Anomalies: Malformations of CORONARY VESSELS, either arteries or veins. Included are anomalous origins of coronary arteries; ARTERIOVENOUS FISTULA; CORONARY ANEURYSM; MYOCARDIAL BRIDGING; and others.Ether-A-Go-Go Potassium Channels: A family of voltage-gated potassium channels that are characterized by long N-terminal and C-terminal intracellular tails. They are named from the Drosophila protein whose mutation causes abnormal leg shaking under ether anesthesia. Their activation kinetics are dependent on extracellular MAGNESIUM and PROTON concentration.Blood Pressure: PRESSURE of the BLOOD on the ARTERIES and other BLOOD VESSELS.Brain Death: A state of prolonged irreversible cessation of all brain activity, including lower brain stem function with the complete absence of voluntary movements, responses to stimuli, brain stem reflexes, and spontaneous respirations. Reversible conditions which mimic this clinical state (e.g., sedative overdose, hypothermia, etc.) are excluded prior to making the determination of brain death. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, pp348-9)Forensic Pathology: The application of pathology to questions of law.Adrenergic beta-Antagonists: Drugs that bind to but do not activate beta-adrenergic receptors thereby blocking the actions of beta-adrenergic agonists. Adrenergic beta-antagonists are used for treatment of hypertension, cardiac arrhythmias, angina pectoris, glaucoma, migraine headaches, and anxiety.Cardiomyopathy, Hypertrophic, Familial: An autosomal dominant inherited form of HYPERTROPHIC CARDIOMYOPATHY. It results from any of more than 50 mutations involving genes encoding contractile proteins such as VENTRICULAR MYOSINS; cardiac TROPONIN T; ALPHA-TROPOMYOSIN.Ventricular Function, Left: The hemodynamic and electrophysiological action of the left HEART VENTRICLE. Its measurement is an important aspect of the clinical evaluation of patients with heart disease to determine the effects of the disease on cardiac performance.Plasma Substitutes: Any liquid used to replace blood plasma, usually a saline solution, often with serum albumins, dextrans or other preparations. These substances do not enhance the oxygen- carrying capacity of blood, but merely replace the volume. They are also used to treat dehydration.Visitors to Patients: Patients' guests and rules for visiting.Thoracic Injuries: General or unspecified injuries to the chest area.Hypothermia, Induced: Abnormally low BODY TEMPERATURE that is intentionally induced in warm-blooded animals by artificial means. In humans, mild or moderate hypothermia has been used to reduce tissue damages, particularly after cardiac or spinal cord injuries and during subsequent surgeries.Polygeline: A 3.5 per cent colloidal solution containing urea-cross-linked polymerized peptides. It has a molecular weight of approximately 35,000 and is prepared from gelatin and electrolytes. The polymeric solution is used as a plasma expander.Hydroxyethyl Starch Derivatives: Starches that have been chemically modified so that a percentage of OH groups are substituted with 2-hydroxyethyl ether groups.Emergency Medical Technicians: Paramedical personnel trained to provide basic emergency care and life support under the supervision of physicians and/or nurses. These services may be carried out at the site of the emergency, in the ambulance, or in a health care institution.Coronary Disease: An imbalance between myocardial functional requirements and the capacity of the CORONARY VESSELS to supply sufficient blood flow. It is a form of MYOCARDIAL ISCHEMIA (insufficient blood supply to the heart muscle) caused by a decreased capacity of the coronary vessels.First Aid: Emergency care or treatment given to a person who suddenly becomes ill or injured before full medical services become available.Cohort Studies: Studies in which subsets of a defined population are identified. These groups may or may not be exposed to factors hypothesized to influence the probability of the occurrence of a particular disease or other outcome. Cohorts are defined populations which, as a whole, are followed in an attempt to determine distinguishing subgroup characteristics.Cardiac Catheterization: Procedures in which placement of CARDIAC CATHETERS is performed for therapeutic or diagnostic procedures.Autonomic Nervous System: The ENTERIC NERVOUS SYSTEM; PARASYMPATHETIC NERVOUS SYSTEM; and SYMPATHETIC NERVOUS SYSTEM taken together. Generally speaking, the autonomic nervous system regulates the internal environment during both peaceful activity and physical or emotional stress. Autonomic activity is controlled and integrated by the CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM, especially the HYPOTHALAMUS and the SOLITARY NUCLEUS, which receive information relayed from VISCERAL AFFERENTS.United StatesShock, Traumatic: Shock produced as a result of trauma.Sports: Activities or games, usually involving physical effort or skill. Reasons for engagement in sports include pleasure, competition, and/or financial reward.Swine: Any of various animals that constitute the family Suidae and comprise stout-bodied, short-legged omnivorous mammals with thick skin, usually covered with coarse bristles, a rather long mobile snout, and small tail. Included are the genera Babyrousa, Phacochoerus (wart hogs), and Sus, the latter containing the domestic pig (see SUS SCROFA).Coronary Artery Disease: Pathological processes of CORONARY ARTERIES that may derive from a congenital abnormality, atherosclerotic, or non-atherosclerotic cause.Ajmaline: An alkaloid found in the root of RAUWOLFIA SERPENTINA, among other plant sources. It is a class Ia antiarrhythmic agent that apparently acts by changing the shape and threshold of cardiac action potentials.Wounds and Injuries: Damage inflicted on the body as the direct or indirect result of an external force, with or without disruption of structural continuity.Hypovolemia: An abnormally low volume of blood circulating through the body. It may result in hypovolemic shock (see SHOCK).Rats, Sprague-Dawley: A strain of albino rat used widely for experimental purposes because of its calmness and ease of handling. It was developed by the Sprague-Dawley Animal Company.Athletes: Individuals who have developed skills, physical stamina and strength or participants in SPORTS or other physical activities.Models, Cardiovascular: Theoretical representations that simulate the behavior or activity of the cardiovascular system, processes, or phenomena; includes the use of mathematical equations, computers and other electronic equipment.Tachycardia: Abnormally rapid heartbeat, usually with a HEART RATE above 100 beats per minute for adults. Tachycardia accompanied by disturbance in the cardiac depolarization (cardiac arrhythmia) is called tachyarrhythmia.Risk: The probability that an event will occur. It encompasses a variety of measures of the probability of a generally unfavorable outcome.Fatal Outcome: Death resulting from the presence of a disease in an individual, as shown by a single case report or a limited number of patients. This should be differentiated from DEATH, the physiological cessation of life and from MORTALITY, an epidemiological or statistical concept.Troponin T: One of the three polypeptide chains that make up the TROPONIN complex. It is a cardiac-specific protein that binds to TROPOMYOSIN. It is released from damaged or injured heart muscle cells (MYOCYTES, CARDIAC). Defects in the gene encoding troponin T result in FAMILIAL HYPERTROPHIC CARDIOMYOPATHY.Hemorrhage: Bleeding or escape of blood from a vessel.Kaplan-Meier Estimate: A nonparametric method of compiling LIFE TABLES or survival tables. It combines calculated probabilities of survival and estimates to allow for observations occurring beyond a measurement threshold, which are assumed to occur randomly. Time intervals are defined as ending each time an event occurs and are therefore unequal. (From Last, A Dictionary of Epidemiology, 1995)Syndrome: A characteristic symptom complex.Hypertrophy, Left Ventricular: Enlargement of the LEFT VENTRICLE of the heart. This increase in ventricular mass is attributed to sustained abnormal pressure or volume loads and is a contributor to cardiovascular morbidity and mortality.Bundle-Branch Block: A form of heart block in which the electrical stimulation of HEART VENTRICLES is interrupted at either one of the branches of BUNDLE OF HIS thus preventing the simultaneous depolarization of the two ventricles.Attitude to Death: Conceptual response of the person to the various aspects of death, which are based on individual psychosocial and cultural experience.Ventricular Remodeling: The geometric and structural changes that the HEART VENTRICLES undergo, usually following MYOCARDIAL INFARCTION. It comprises expansion of the infarct and dilatation of the healthy ventricle segments. While most prevalent in the left ventricle, it can also occur in the right ventricle.Heart Function Tests: Examinations used to diagnose and treat heart conditions.Biological Markers: Measurable and quantifiable biological parameters (e.g., specific enzyme concentration, specific hormone concentration, specific gene phenotype distribution in a population, presence of biological substances) which serve as indices for health- and physiology-related assessments, such as disease risk, psychiatric disorders, environmental exposure and its effects, disease diagnosis, metabolic processes, substance abuse, pregnancy, cell line development, epidemiologic studies, etc.Mutation: Any detectable and heritable change in the genetic material that causes a change in the GENOTYPE and which is transmitted to daughter cells and to succeeding generations.Age Factors: Age as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or the effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from AGING, a physiological process, and TIME FACTORS which refers only to the passage of time.Proportional Hazards Models: Statistical models used in survival analysis that assert that the effect of the study factors on the hazard rate in the study population is multiplicative and does not change over time.Emergencies: Situations or conditions requiring immediate intervention to avoid serious adverse results.Multivariate Analysis: A set of techniques used when variation in several variables has to be studied simultaneously. In statistics, multivariate analysis is interpreted as any analytic method that allows simultaneous study of two or more dependent variables.Cardiotonic Agents: Agents that have a strengthening effect on the heart or that can increase cardiac output. They may be CARDIAC GLYCOSIDES; SYMPATHOMIMETICS; or other drugs. They are used after MYOCARDIAL INFARCT; CARDIAC SURGICAL PROCEDURES; in SHOCK; or in congestive heart failure (HEART FAILURE).Heart Transplantation: The transference of a heart from one human or animal to another.Registries: The systems and processes involved in the establishment, support, management, and operation of registers, e.g., disease registers.Fibrosis: Any pathological condition where fibrous connective tissue invades any organ, usually as a consequence of inflammation or other injury.Cardiac Output, Low: A state of subnormal or depressed cardiac output at rest or during stress. It is a characteristic of CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASES, including congenital, valvular, rheumatic, hypertensive, coronary, and cardiomyopathic. The serious form of low cardiac output is characterized by marked reduction in STROKE VOLUME, and systemic vasoconstriction resulting in cold, pale, and sometimes cyanotic extremities.Hospitals, State: Hospitals controlled by agencies and departments of the state government.Case-Control Studies: Studies which start with the identification of persons with a disease of interest and a control (comparison, referent) group without the disease. The relationship of an attribute to the disease is examined by comparing diseased and non-diseased persons with regard to the frequency or levels of the attribute in each group.Practice Guidelines as Topic: Directions or principles presenting current or future rules of policy for assisting health care practitioners in patient care decisions regarding diagnosis, therapy, or related clinical circumstances. The guidelines may be developed by government agencies at any level, institutions, professional societies, governing boards, or by the convening of expert panels. The guidelines form a basis for the evaluation of all aspects of health care and delivery.Jervell-Lange Nielsen Syndrome: A form of long QT syndrome that is associated with congenital deafness. It is characterized by abnormal cardioelectrophysiology involving the VOLTAGE-GATED POTASSIUM CHANNEL. It results from mutation of KCNQ1 gene (Subtype 1 or JLN1) or the KCNE1 gene (Subtype 2 or JLN2).Channelopathies: A variety of neuromuscular conditions resulting from MUTATIONS in ION CHANNELS manifesting as episodes of EPILEPSY; HEADACHE DISORDERS; and DYSKINESIAS.Ventricular Dysfunction: A condition in which HEART VENTRICLES exhibit impaired function.Pacemaker, Artificial: A device designed to stimulate, by electric impulses, contraction of the heart muscles. It may be temporary (external) or permanent (internal or internal-external).Withholding Treatment: Withholding or withdrawal of a particular treatment or treatments, often (but not necessarily) life-prolonging treatment, from a patient or from a research subject as part of a research protocol. The concept is differentiated from REFUSAL TO TREAT, where the emphasis is on the health professional's or health facility's refusal to treat a patient or group of patients when the patient or the patient's representative requests treatment. Withholding of life-prolonging treatment is usually indexed only with EUTHANASIA, PASSIVE, unless the distinction between withholding and withdrawing treatment, or the issue of withholding palliative rather than curative treatment, is discussed.Ryanodine Receptor Calcium Release Channel: A tetrameric calcium release channel in the SARCOPLASMIC RETICULUM membrane of SMOOTH MUSCLE CELLS, acting oppositely to SARCOPLASMIC RETICULUM CALCIUM-TRANSPORTING ATPASES. It is important in skeletal and cardiac excitation-contraction coupling and studied by using RYANODINE. Abnormalities are implicated in CARDIAC ARRHYTHMIAS and MUSCULAR DISEASES.Exercise Test: Controlled physical activity which is performed in order to allow assessment of physiological functions, particularly cardiovascular and pulmonary, but also aerobic capacity. Maximal (most intense) exercise is usually required but submaximal exercise is also used.Blood Circulation: The movement of the BLOOD as it is pumped through the CARDIOVASCULAR SYSTEM.Heart Defects, Congenital: Developmental abnormalities involving structures of the heart. These defects are present at birth but may be discovered later in life.Calcium: A basic element found in nearly all organized tissues. It is a member of the alkaline earth family of metals with the atomic symbol Ca, atomic number 20, and atomic weight 40. Calcium is the most abundant mineral in the body and combines with phosphorus to form calcium phosphate in the bones and teeth. It is essential for the normal functioning of nerves and muscles and plays a role in blood coagulation (as factor IV) and in many enzymatic processes.Myoblasts, Cardiac: Precursor cells destined to differentiate into cardiac myocytes (MYOCYTES, CARDIAC).Myocarditis: Inflammatory processes of the muscular walls of the heart (MYOCARDIUM) which result in injury to the cardiac muscle cells (MYOCYTES, CARDIAC). Manifestations range from subclinical to sudden death (DEATH, SUDDEN). Myocarditis in association with cardiac dysfunction is classified as inflammatory CARDIOMYOPATHY usually caused by INFECTION, autoimmune diseases, or responses to toxic substances. Myocarditis is also a common cause of DILATED CARDIOMYOPATHY and other cardiomyopathies.Ventricular Premature Complexes: A type of cardiac arrhythmia with premature contractions of the HEART VENTRICLES. It is characterized by the premature QRS complex on ECG that is of abnormal shape and great duration (generally >129 msec). It is the most common form of all cardiac arrhythmias. Premature ventricular complexes have no clinical significance except in concurrence with heart diseases.Chi-Square Distribution: A distribution in which a variable is distributed like the sum of the squares of any given independent random variable, each of which has a normal distribution with mean of zero and variance of one. The chi-square test is a statistical test based on comparison of a test statistic to a chi-square distribution. The oldest of these tests are used to detect whether two or more population distributions differ from one another.Myocardial Bridging: A malformation that is characterized by a muscle bridge over a segment of the CORONARY ARTERIES. Systolic contractions of the muscle bridge can lead to narrowing of coronary artery; coronary compression; MYOCARDIAL ISCHEMIA; MYOCARDIAL INFARCTION; and SUDDEN CARDIAC DEATH.Cardiac Myosins: Myosin type II isoforms found in cardiac muscle.OregonAmbulances: A vehicle equipped for transporting patients in need of emergency care.Shock, Septic: Sepsis associated with HYPOTENSION or hypoperfusion despite adequate fluid resuscitation. Perfusion abnormalities may include, but are not limited to LACTIC ACIDOSIS; OLIGURIA; or acute alteration in mental status.Heart Block: Impaired conduction of cardiac impulse that can occur anywhere along the conduction pathway, such as between the SINOATRIAL NODE and the right atrium (SA block) or between atria and ventricles (AV block). Heart blocks can be classified by the duration, frequency, or completeness of conduction block. Reversibility depends on the degree of structural or functional defects.Fetal Death: Death of the developing young in utero. BIRTH of a dead FETUS is STILLBIRTH.Precipitating Factors: Factors associated with the definitive onset of a disease, illness, accident, behavioral response, or course of action. Usually one factor is more important or more obviously recognizable than others, if several are involved, and one may often be regarded as "necessary". Examples include exposure to specific disease; amount or level of an infectious organism, drug, or noxious agent, etc.Bradycardia: Cardiac arrhythmias that are characterized by excessively slow HEART RATE, usually below 50 beats per minute in human adults. They can be classified broadly into SINOATRIAL NODE dysfunction and ATRIOVENTRICULAR BLOCK.Phenotype: The outward appearance of the individual. It is the product of interactions between genes, and between the GENOTYPE and the environment.Action Potentials: Abrupt changes in the membrane potential that sweep along the CELL MEMBRANE of excitable cells in response to excitation stimuli.Cardiac Imaging Techniques: Visualization of the heart structure and cardiac blood flow for diagnostic evaluation or to guide cardiac procedures via techniques including ENDOSCOPY (cardiac endoscopy, sometimes refered to as cardioscopy), RADIONUCLIDE IMAGING; MAGNETIC RESONANCE IMAGING; TOMOGRAPHY; or ULTRASONOGRAPHY.Blood Substitutes: Substances that are used in place of blood, for example, as an alternative to BLOOD TRANSFUSIONS after blood loss to restore BLOOD VOLUME and oxygen-carrying capacity to the blood circulation, or to perfuse isolated organs.Oxygen: An element with atomic symbol O, atomic number 8, and atomic weight [15.99903; 15.99977]. It is the most abundant element on earth and essential for respiration.Intubation, Intratracheal: A procedure involving placement of a tube into the trachea through the mouth or nose in order to provide a patient with oxygen and anesthesia.Logistic Models: Statistical models which describe the relationship between a qualitative dependent variable (that is, one which can take only certain discrete values, such as the presence or absence of a disease) and an independent variable. A common application is in epidemiology for estimating an individual's risk (probability of a disease) as a function of a given risk factor.Sodium Channels: Ion channels that specifically allow the passage of SODIUM ions. A variety of specific sodium channel subtypes are involved in serving specialized functions such as neuronal signaling, CARDIAC MUSCLE contraction, and KIDNEY function.Cardiovascular Diseases: Pathological conditions involving the CARDIOVASCULAR SYSTEM including the HEART; the BLOOD VESSELS; or the PERICARDIUM.Severity of Illness Index: Levels within a diagnostic group which are established by various measurement criteria applied to the seriousness of a patient's disorder.Cardiac Resynchronization Therapy: The restoration of the sequential order of contraction and relaxation of the HEART ATRIA and HEART VENTRICLES by atrio-biventricular pacing.Cells, Cultured: Cells propagated in vitro in special media conducive to their growth. Cultured cells are used to study developmental, morphologic, metabolic, physiologic, and genetic processes, among others.Epinephrine: The active sympathomimetic hormone from the ADRENAL MEDULLA. It stimulates both the alpha- and beta- adrenergic systems, causes systemic VASOCONSTRICTION and gastrointestinal relaxation, stimulates the HEART, and dilates BRONCHI and cerebral vessels. It is used in ASTHMA and CARDIAC FAILURE and to delay absorption of local ANESTHETICS.Emergency Treatment: First aid or other immediate intervention for accidents or medical conditions requiring immediate care and treatment before definitive medical and surgical management can be procured.Cardiac Glycosides: Cyclopentanophenanthrenes with a 5- or 6-membered lactone ring attached at the 17-position and SUGARS attached at the 3-position. Plants they come from have long been used in congestive heart failure. They increase the force of cardiac contraction without significantly affecting other parameters, but are very toxic at larger doses. Their mechanism of action usually involves inhibition of the NA(+)-K(+)-EXCHANGING ATPASE and they are often used in cell biological studies for that purpose.Coronary Vessels: The veins and arteries of the HEART.Intensive Care, Neonatal: Continuous care and monitoring of newborn infants with life-threatening conditions, in any setting.Dextropropoxyphene: A narcotic analgesic structurally related to METHADONE. Only the dextro-isomer has an analgesic effect; the levo-isomer appears to exert an antitussive effect.Primary Prevention: Specific practices for the prevention of disease or mental disorders in susceptible individuals or populations. These include HEALTH PROMOTION, including mental health; protective procedures, such as COMMUNICABLE DISEASE CONTROL; and monitoring and regulation of ENVIRONMENTAL POLLUTANTS. Primary prevention is to be distinguished from SECONDARY PREVENTION and TERTIARY PREVENTION.Potassium Channels, Voltage-Gated: Potassium channel whose permeability to ions is extremely sensitive to the transmembrane potential difference. The opening of these channels is induced by the membrane depolarization of the ACTION POTENTIAL.Coronary Angiography: Radiography of the vascular system of the heart muscle after injection of a contrast medium.Colloids: Two-phase systems in which one is uniformly dispersed in another as particles small enough so they cannot be filtered or will not settle out. The dispersing or continuous phase or medium envelops the particles of the discontinuous phase. All three states of matter can form colloids among each other.Hypotension: Abnormally low BLOOD PRESSURE that can result in inadequate blood flow to the brain and other vital organs. Common symptom is DIZZINESS but greater negative impacts on the body occur when there is prolonged depravation of oxygen and nutrients.Genetic Testing: Detection of a MUTATION; GENOTYPE; KARYOTYPE; or specific ALLELES associated with genetic traits, heritable diseases, or predisposition to a disease, or that may lead to the disease in descendants. It includes prenatal genetic testing.Analysis of Variance: A statistical technique that isolates and assesses the contributions of categorical independent variables to variation in the mean of a continuous dependent variable.Emergency Service, Hospital: Hospital department responsible for the administration and provision of immediate medical or surgical care to the emergency patient.Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Cine: A type of imaging technique used primarily in the field of cardiology. By coordinating the fast gradient-echo MRI sequence with retrospective ECG-gating, numerous short time frames evenly spaced in the cardiac cycle are produced. These images are laced together in a cinematic display so that wall motion of the ventricles, valve motion, and blood flow patterns in the heart and great vessels can be visualized.Sensitivity and Specificity: Binary classification measures to assess test results. Sensitivity or recall rate is the proportion of true positives. Specificity is the probability of correctly determining the absence of a condition. (From Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 2d ed)Mice, Transgenic: Laboratory mice that have been produced from a genetically manipulated EGG or EMBRYO, MAMMALIAN.Troponin I: One of the three polypeptide chains that make up the TROPONIN complex. It inhibits F-actin-myosin interactions.Pedigree: The record of descent or ancestry, particularly of a particular condition or trait, indicating individual family members, their relationships, and their status with respect to the trait or condition.Mutation, Missense: A mutation in which a codon is mutated to one directing the incorporation of a different amino acid. This substitution may result in an inactive or unstable product. (From A Dictionary of Genetics, King & Stansfield, 5th ed)Postoperative Complications: Pathologic processes that affect patients after a surgical procedure. They may or may not be related to the disease for which the surgery was done, and they may or may not be direct results of the surgery.Burns: Injuries to tissues caused by contact with heat, steam, chemicals (BURNS, CHEMICAL), electricity (BURNS, ELECTRIC), or the like.Genetic Predisposition to Disease: A latent susceptibility to disease at the genetic level, which may be activated under certain conditions.Respiration, Artificial: Any method of artificial breathing that employs mechanical or non-mechanical means to force the air into and out of the lungs. Artificial respiration or ventilation is used in individuals who have stopped breathing or have RESPIRATORY INSUFFICIENCY to increase their intake of oxygen (O2) and excretion of carbon dioxide (CO2).Electrophysiology: The study of the generation and behavior of electrical charges in living organisms particularly the nervous system and the effects of electricity on living organisms.
... which in turn produce sudden cardiac death. Lown describes the heart as the target, and the brain is called the trigger. Sudden ... 1999 (54) 107-120 Levine RL (May 2007). "Neurocardiology". Resuscitation. 73 (2): 186-8. doi:10.1016/j.resuscitation.2007.01. ... The present understanding about how sudden cardiac death can result from epilepsy is that the brain is stimulating an ... Lown, B; Verrier RL; Rabinowitz SH (May 1977). "Neural and Psychologic Mechanisms and the Problem of Sudden Cardiac Death". ...
75 Cardiac Arrest: The Science and Practice of Resuscitation Medicine, pg. 20 Davis, Robert (2005-05-20). "Seattle: ... Eisenberg, Mickey (July 17, 1997). Life in the Balance: Emergency Medicine and the Quest to Reverse Sudden Death. Oxford ... "Manual chest compression vs use of an automated chest compression device during resuscitation following out-of-hospital cardiac ... Cardiac Arrest Blood Study (CABS) AutoPulse Assisted Prehospital International Resuscitation (ASPIRE) Trial Transthoracic ...
In 1956 American cardiologist Paul Zoll described resuscitations during open-heart surgery and later after sudden cardiac death ... This would, he hoped, lead to discovering how to treat and prevent heart attack and sudden cardiac death. A discussion with a ... Throughout his medical career, Lown focused on two major medical challenges: the problem of sudden cardiac death and the role ... Lown helped raise international medical awareness of sudden cardiac death as a leading cause of mortality in the developed ...
He exited the airport parking lot in his own vehicle, and suffered sudden cardiac death after driving just a few yards. His ... Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) was administered, and paramedics attempted to defibrillate him with electric shocks. These ... Nearly $50,000 was raised for the endowment in the first week after his death. Dr. Billy G. Smith was named the first Malone ... At the time of his death, Michael Malone had written nine books and 20 articles. Among these were Montana: A History of Two ...
... is a cause of cardiac arrest and sudden cardiac death. The ventricular muscle twitches randomly rather ... it is classified as a cardiac arrest rhythm, and patients in V-fib should be treated with cardiopulmonary resuscitation and ... It exacts a significant mortality with approximately 70,000 to 90,000 sudden cardiac deaths each year in the United Kingdom, ... Brugada P, Brugada J (1992). "Right bundle branch block, persistent ST segment elevation and sudden cardiac death: a distinct ...
Anaphylactic shock and subsequent cardiac arrest and sudden death are very rare, but because they occur within minutes, a ... health care provider who uses fluorescein should be prepared to perform emergency resuscitation. Intravenous use has the most ... causing cardiac arrest and sudden death due to anaphylactic shock. The most common adverse reaction is nausea, due to a ... including sudden death, but this may reflect greater use rather than greater risk. Both oral and topical uses have been ...
Sudden cardiac death should not be used to describe events that are not fatal". In some medical facilities, the resuscitation ... "sudden cardiac death" is sudden death from cardiac causes. However, sometimes physicians call cardiac arrest "sudden cardiac ... of people who survived cardiac arrest. Sudden cardiac arrest (SCA) and sudden cardiac death (SCD) occur when the heart abruptly ... Based on death certificates, sudden cardiac death accounts for about 15% of all deaths in Western countries. In the United ...
Myerburg RJ, penyunting (2015). "Cardiac Arrest and Sudden Cardiac Death". Braunwald's heart disease : a textbook of ... "Near death experiences, cognitive function and psychological outcomes of surviving cardiac arrest". Resuscitation. 74 (2): 215- ... "How Can Death Due to Sudden Cardiac Arrest Be Prevented?". NHLBI. June 22, 2016. Diarkib daripada yang asal pada 27 August 2016 ... Resuscitation. (23 July 2013). "Cardiopulmonary resuscitation quality: [corrected] improving cardiac resuscitation outcomes ...
Cardiac failure and sudden death Br Med J, 1 (1889), pp. 6-8 J.A. MacWilliam: Some applications of physiology to medicine, ... He also described the basic elements of cardiopulmonary resuscitation - commonly abbreviated as CPR - (ventilation and cardiac ... "Evolutionary biology and sudden cardiac death". Journal of the American College of Cardiology. 4 (7): 1843-1849. doi:10.1016/ ... foundations for modern cardiac research and that provided the first comprehensive approach to successful cardiac resuscitation ...
... and the Risk of Sudden Cardiac Death. Doctors Lounge Website. Available at: "Archived copy". ... 2005;7(4):262-5. Wald DA (2009). "Resuscitation". In Lex J. Emergency Medicine Q&A (3rd ed.). McGraw-Hill. p. 4. ISBN 0-7216- ... since the incidence of sudden cardiac death is so low (less than 0.6% in some reports). People with WPW who are experiencing ... a leading cause of sudden cardiac death. WPW may be associated with PRKAG2, a protein kinase enzyme encoded by the PRKAG2 gene ...
Resuscitation.heartandstroke.ca. Retrieved 2015-11-14. "Tripling Survival From Sudden Cardiac Arrest Via Early Defibrillation ... The Braidwood Inquiry was a public inquiry which examined the safety of Tasers or CEWs after the death of Robert Dziekański. ... Every year sudden cardiac arrest (SCA) kills between 35,000 and 45,000 people in Canada and approximately 350,000 people in the ... "Rochester, MN, Achieves 58% Survival Rate Thanks to Police AED Program , Sudden Cardiac Arrest Foundation". Sca-aware.org. 2013 ...
Sudden cardiac death is the cause of about half of deaths due to cardiovascular disease or about 15% of all deaths globally. ... Treatment for cardiac arrest is immediate cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) and, if a shockable rhythm is present, ... "What Causes Sudden Cardiac Arrest?". NHLBI. June 22, 2016. Retrieved 16 August 2016. "How Can Death Due to Sudden Cardiac ... These include the great cardiac vein, the middle cardiac vein, the small cardiac vein and the anterior cardiac veins. As the ...
Throughout his medical career, Lown focused on two major medical challenges: the problem of sudden cardiac death and the role ... Lown developed the direct current defibrillator for cardiac resuscitation and the cardioverter for correcting rapid disordered ... His work made possible and safe much of modern cardiac surgery, as well as a host of other innovations. ...
Brugada syndrome Cardiac arrhythmia Long QT syndrome Sick sinus syndrome Sudden cardiac death Wehrens XH, Marks AR (November ... causing sudden death unless immediate cardiopulmonary resuscitation is applied. The most common symptom is dizziness or syncope ... 2004). "Abnormal Calcium Signaling and Sudden Cardiac Death Associated With Mutation of Calsequestrin". Circ. Res. 94 (4): 471- ... Implantable cardioverter-defibrillators are used to prevent sudden death. In recent reports, left cardiac sympathetic ...
Kohl P, Nesbitt AD, Cooper PJ, Lei M (May 2001). "Sudden cardiac death by Commotio cordis: role of mechano-electric feedback". ... American Heart Association guidelines on resuscitation Resuscitation Council (UK) guidelines on resuscitation. ... Commotio cordis is a very rare event, but nonetheless is often considered when an athlete presents with sudden cardiac death. ... Geddes LA, Roeder RA (January 2005). "Evolution of our knowledge of sudden death due to commotio cordis". The American Journal ...
Lewis suffered sudden cardiac death on the basketball court at an off-season practice on July 27, 1993, at Brandeis University ... and another Brandeis University police officer attempted to revive Lewis by using mouth-to-mouth resuscitation, but they were ... Following Lewis' death, it was alleged that Lewis had used cocaine, and that drug use may have been a contributing factor in ... Inc." After Lewis' death, the Reggie Lewis Track and Athletic Center was opened in Roxbury, Boston. The center was funded ...
An implantable ICD is more effective than drug therapy for prevention of sudden cardiac death due to VT and VF, but may be ... In those in cardiac arrest due to ventricular tachycardia cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) and defibrillation is recommended ... "Ventricular arrhythmias and sudden cardiac death". Lancet. 380 (9852): 1520-9. doi:10.1016/S0140-6736(12)61413-5. PMID 23101719 ... ventricular tachycardia and in the monomorphic form coincides with little or no increased risk of sudden cardiac death. In ...
... with citizens and empower them to help reduce the estimated 1 million worldwide annual deaths from sudden cardiac arrest." ... The goal is to increase the possibility that a victim in cardiac arrest will receive cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) ... "CPR & Sudden Cardiac Arrest (SCA) Fact Sheet". American Heart Association. Retrieved 15 January 2015. Creaven, Patrick. "San ... It turned out that someone next door had collapsed and gone into cardiac arrest. Since Price was the department chief, he was ...
The sudden and unexpected death of a swimmer, with no involuntary drowning sequence, can be difficult to ascribe to a specific ... The possibilities may include pre-existing organic cardiac disease, pre-existing cardiac electrical abnormalities, epilepsy, ... with a significantly increased risk of death, as aspiration of stomach contents is a common complication of resuscitation ... 3. Also used in diving but not in free diving, loss of consciousness while ascending on a rebreather due to sudden drop of ...
An automated external defibrillator is used in cases of life-threatening cardiac arrhythmias which lead to sudden cardiac ... rapidly lead to irreversible brain damage and death, once cardiac arrest takes place. After approximately three to five minutes ... "Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (CPR) Statistics". American Red Cross. Archived from the original on 19 November 2008. Retrieved ... Children as well as adults may fall victim to sudden cardiac arrest (SCA). In many areas, emergency vehicles are likely to ...
Rewarming shock (or rewarming collapse) is a sudden drop in blood pressure in combination with a low cardiac output which may ... resuscitation may be discontinued. Hypothermia is the cause of at least 1,500 deaths a year in the United States. It is more ... Some cases of hypothermia death, as well as other preventable deaths, happen because poor people cannot easily afford to keep ... Major organs fail and clinical death occurs. Twenty to fifty percent of hypothermia deaths are associated with paradoxical ...
Abnormal Stress Test New-onset unexplained heart failure Survival of sudden cardiac death or dangerous cardiac arrhythmia ... Resuscitation. 85 (11): 1533-1540. doi:10.1016/j.resuscitation.2014.08.025. ISSN 1873-1570. PMID 25195073. Malouf JF, Edwards ... and catheterization of cardiac chambers and valves of the cardiac system. "Cardiac catheterization" is a general term for a ... Interventional cardiologists can also use cardiac catheterization to estimate the cardiac output, the amount of blood pumped by ...
"ACC/AHA/ESC 2006 Guidelines for Management of Patients With Ventricular Arrhythmias and the Prevention of Sudden Cardiac Death ... Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). References[edit]. *^ Marino, Paul L. (2014). Marino's the ICU book (Fourth edition. ed.). ... Cardiac stress test Bruce protocol. Electrophysiology study. Cardiac imaging. Angiocardiography. Echocardiography TTE. TEE. ... to develop Guidelines for Management of Patients With Ventricular Arrhythmias and the Prevention of Sudden Cardiac Death): ...
... and cardiac hypertrophy, another illness may be present). Athlete's heart is not the cause of sudden cardiac death during or ... Cardiopulmonary resuscitation, defibrillation to restore normal sinus rhythm, and if initial defibrillation fails, ... If sudden cardiac death occurs, it is usually because of pathological hypertrophic enlargement of the heart that went ... This genetic disorder is found in one of 500 Americans and is a leading cause of sudden cardiac death in young athletes ( ...
Systematic review of the incidence of sudden death in the United States. JACC 2011; 57: 792-93 Zoll PM. Resuscitation of the ... Ann Surg 1961; 154:338 Zoll RH, Zoll PM, Belgard AH: Noninvasive cardiac stimulation. In Feruglio GA, editor: Cardiac Pacing: ... With this in mind, Paul Zoll embarked on a mission to develop electrical methods to prevent sudden arrhythmic death. After ... Clin Cardiol 1986; 9: 131-35 Stafford Cohen M.D. Paul Zoll MD; The Pioneer Whose Discoveries Prevent Sudden Death. ISBN 978-0- ...
... s are caused by trauma to the joint or when an individual falls on a specific joint.[4] Great and sudden force ... Resuscitation. *Trauma triad of death. Assessment. Clinical prediction rules. *Revised Trauma Score ... Dislocations are often caused by sudden trauma on the joint like an impact or fall. A joint dislocation can cause damage to the ...
Prevention of sudden death. Cardiac arrest in ARVC/D is the consequence of a combination of various factors (substrate, trigger ... ICD aims to convert ventricular flutter/fibrillation into sinus rhythm for resuscitation from cardiac arrest. The device may be ... Trends of sudden cardiac death incidence in athletes vs non-athletes, Veneto Region of Italy, 1979-2002: note the sharp ... ARVC/D has been reported as the second cause of sudden death in the young [3] (Figs. 1, 2, 3) and the main cause of sudden ...
Resuscitation of sudden cardiac death. A mandate for neurology and emergency medicine. Sandra M. Schneider, Michael N. Diringer ... Sudden cardiac death ends more than 400,000 lives each year in the United States. The development of paramedic staffed ... medical services that provide care to our communities was largely based on the hope that resuscitation of sudden cardiac death ... Furthermore, it is known that neurologic recovery is often incomplete following a successful cardiac resuscitation. ...
Death. Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest. Death, Sudden, Cardiac. Heart Diseases. Cardiovascular Diseases. Pathologic Processes. ... Out of hospital cardiac arrest Out of hospital cardiac arrest of non-traumatic cause ... Unexpected in-hospital cardiac arrest Unexpected cardiac arrest during emergency department stay ... The Effect of Chest Compression and Ventilation Coordination During Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation.. The safety and scientific ...
Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest. Death, Sudden, Cardiac. Heart Diseases. Cardiovascular Diseases. Death, Sudden. Death. ... Out-of-hospital cardiac arrests (OHCA) account for over 60% of deaths from coronary artery disease. The annual incidence of ... patients who suffer Out of hospital, non-traumatic cardiac arrest. *patients who do not respond to the initial resuscitation ... Does the Early Use of Sodium Bicarbonate Improve Results of Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Following Out-of-Hospital Cardiac ...
Out-of-Hospital Resuscitation. The majority of sudden cardiac death victims have no symptoms and are not identified as being at ... sudden cardiac death is very rare, despite the publicity, with only 20 to 25 sports-related sudden cardiac deaths from cardiac ... total death rates are higher, but the fraction of sudden deaths is lower; thus, the impact of reducing sudden cardiac death in ... of sudden cardiac deaths occurred at home. Emotional stress can be an important trigger for sudden cardiac death, as shown by ...
sudden death. View Full Text. Footnotes. *. Funding GDP is supported by a Department of Health National Institute of Research ... Out-of-hospital cardiac arrest: recent advances in resuscitation and effects on outcome ... Out-of-hospital cardiac arrest: recent advances in resuscitation and effects on outcome ... Key elements of treatment comprise early recognition of cardiac arrest, prompt and effective cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR ...
In the London marathon, over 19 years there have been five deaths and five cardiac resuscitations in over 440 000 runs, with a ... of cases of sudden cardiac death in young sports people. Sudden cardiac death is uncommon in sports women, making Annas death ... Sudden cardiac death in sport. Sudden cardiac death in sport can be divided into three categories: commotio cordis in which a ... This syndrome is a rare familial cause of repeated syncope and sudden death (about 10% of cases of sudden adult cardiac death ...
Temporal trends in sudden cardiac death in Ontario, Canada.. Shuvy M, Qiu F, Lau G, Koh M, Dorian P, Geri G, Lin S, Ko DT. ... Resuscitation. 2019 Apr 27. pii: S0300-9572(19)30149-2. doi: 10.1016/j.resuscitation.2019.04.033. [Epub ahead of print] ... Resuscitation. 2019 Mar;136:1-7. doi: 10.1016/j.resuscitation.2019.01.010. Epub 2019 Jan 14. ... Association of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol with non-fatal cardiac and non-cardiac events: a CANHEART substudy. ...
Cardiac Arrest leading to Sudden Death were found in 477 cases (45.3%), but only 199 (42%) of these had been submitted to ... The authors reported the features of a series of sudden death (SD) cases where cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) was ... Despite the improvement of out-of-hospital and in-hospital resuscitation manoeuvres, unexpected sudden fatal events occur. ... Both non-cardiac and cardiac CA/SD causes were present, despite the higher coronary artery disease incidence. Both out-of- ...
Hypomagnesemia: characterization of a model of sudden cardiac death. J Am Coll Cardiol. 1996;27:1771-1776. ... Voelckel W, Kroesen G. Unexpected return of cardiac action after termination of cardiopulmonary resuscitation. Resuscitation. ... Hyperkalemia and ionized hypocalcemia during cardiac arrest and resuscitation: possible culprits for postcountershock ... Hyperkalaemic cardiac arrest successfully treated with peritoneal dialysis [see comments]. BMJ. 1996;312:1289-1290. ...
... along with sudden cardiac death (SCD) education and screening tools, in booth #1427 at the 2015 American College of Cardiology ... announced today that that it will display its portfolio of clinical resuscitation products, including the LifeVest® Wearable ... Sudden Death after Myocardial Infarction. JAMA. 2008;300:2022-2029.. 5 Solomon SD, Zelenkofske S, McMurray JV, et al. Sudden ... along with sudden cardiac death (SCD) education and screening tools, in booth #1427 at the 2015 American College of Cardiology ...
Lightning, sudden cardiac death, simulation and an automated external defibrillator: the perfect storm. Resuscitation. 2007 Sep ... "Novel and highly lethal NKX2.5 missense mutation in a family with sudden death and ventricular arrhythmia." Pediatr Cardiol. ... Family History of Sudden Death, Inherited Arrhythmia Disorders, Long QT Syndrome, Pacemakers, Pediatric Cardiology, Pediatric ... Infantile restrictive cardiomyopathy resulting from a mutation in the cardiac troponin T gene. Pediatrics 117(5):11830-3, 2006 ...
... is an unexpected death due to cardiac causes occurring in a short time period (generally within 1 h of symptom onset) in a ... Most cases of SCD are related to cardiac arrhythmias. ... Myerburg RJ, Estes D, Zaman L. Outcome of resuscitation from ... encoded search term (Sudden Cardiac Death) and Sudden Cardiac Death What to Read Next on Medscape ... Sudden cardiac death (SCD) is an unexpected death due to cardiac causes that occurs in a short time period (generally within 1 ...
Sudden cardiac death and substance abuse. Resuscitation 29:219-21.. *Al-Rasheed NM, Al-Rasheed NM, Faddah LM, Mohamed AM, ... Resuscitation 37(1):43-5.. *Wong FWY, Chan WY, Lee SST. 1998. Resistance to carbon tetrachloride-induced hepatotoxicity in mice ... Report on phase IV-A: public drinking water contamination and birth weight, fetal deaths, and birth defects. A cross-sectional ... Report on phase IV-B: public drinking water contamination and birth weight, fetal deaths, and birth defects. A case-control ...
WebMD tells you how to handle heart disease emergencies like sudden cardiac arrest. ... Sudden cardiac death causes the majority of natural deaths in the U.S. each year. ... Sudden cardiac death (SCD) is a sudden, unexpected death caused by a lethal heart rhythm (sudden cardiac arrest). It is a ... Early Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (CPR). Learning CPR is the greatest gift you can give your family and friends. If performed ...
Sudden Cardiac Death Compendium. Cardiac Arrest. Resuscitation and Reperfusion. Kaustubha D. Patil, Henry R. Halperin, Lance B ... Sudden cardiac death: directing the scope of resuscitation towards the heart and brain. Resuscitation. 2006;70:44-51. doi: ... Roles in Sudden Cardiac Death. Finding the Rhythm of Sudden Cardiac Death: New Opportunities Using Induced Pluripotent Stem ... This article aims to review the cardiac rhythms associated with sudden death, the pathophysiology involved in cardiac ...
An Issue of Cardiac Electrophysiology Clinics, Volume 9-4 - 1st Edition. Print Book & E-Book. ISBN 9780323552684, 9780323552691 ... Public Access Defibrillation: Is This Making Any Difference? Controversial Issues in Resuscitation from Cardiac Arrest ... Sudden cardiac death in children adolescence; Sudden cardiac death in specific cardiomyopathies; Ventricular arrhythmias and ... Contemporary Challenges in Sudden Cardiac Death, An Issue of Cardiac Electrophysiology Clinics, Volume 9-4 1st Edition. ...
Sudden cardiac arrest is a leading cause of death worldwide. Despite significant advances in resuscitation science since the ... The American Heart Association (AHA) and European Resuscitation Council emphasise the importance of high-quality chest ... there continues to be wide variability in rates of successful resuscitation across communities. ... quality and clinical outcomes and the scientific basis for the AHAs key metrics for high-quality cardiopulmonary resuscitation ...
Sudden cardiac death can be viewed as a continuum of electromechanical states of the heart: ventricular tachycardia (VT), ... Refibrillation, resuscitation and survival in out-of-hospital sudden cardiac arrest victims treated with biphasic automated ... is diagnosed in up to half of sudden-death survivors. The incidence of sudden death is also relatively high in the ... The incidence of sudden cardiac death in the United States is approximately 300,000 cases per year. The distribution of rhythms ...
Thrombus composition in sudden cardiac death from acute myocardial infarction. Resuscitation 113: 108-114, Apr 2017.. Tutwiler ...
... which in turn produce sudden cardiac death. Lown describes the heart as the target, and the brain is called the trigger. Sudden ... 1999 (54) 107-120 Levine RL (May 2007). "Neurocardiology". Resuscitation. 73 (2): 186-8. doi:10.1016/j.resuscitation.2007.01. ... The present understanding about how sudden cardiac death can result from epilepsy is that the brain is stimulating an ... Lown, B; Verrier RL; Rabinowitz SH (May 1977). "Neural and Psychologic Mechanisms and the Problem of Sudden Cardiac Death". ...
Cardiac output (±S.E.) averaged 24.2 ±5.7 ml/min/kg during IAC-CPR vs. 13.8 ±2.6 ml/min/kg during standard CPR. IAC-CPR ... and either IAC-CPR or standard CPR was initiated while arterial and venous blood pressures and cardiac output were monitored. ... requires no extra mechanical equipment, and, if proven effective in human trials, may improve resuscitation success in the ... This study was conducted to evaluate the hemodynamic effectiveness of a new modification of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR ...
Most heart attacks dont lead to sudden cardiac death right away and dont need CPR. If needed, give CPR if you are trained, or ... If both stop, then sudden death occurs. Some of the causes of sudden death include poisoning, drowning, choking, suffocation, ... Because less than one-third of sudden cardiac arrest victims get CPR before they get to the hospital, the AHA is promoting ... Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (CPR). What is CPR?. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is given when someones breathing or ...
  • Preparticipation screening for sport eligibility has been proven to be effective in detecting asymptomatic patients and sport disqualification has been life-saving, substantially declining sudden death in young athletes. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Every effort must be made to restore the heartbeat to someone who has experienced sudden cardiac arrest or to restore breathing to someone who cannot breathe. (britannica.com)
  • A suite of resuscitation quality improvement programs for pre-hospital and public safety responders is now available from RQI Partners LLC, the joint venture partnership between the American Heart Association and Laerdal Medical, to help improve cardiac arrest survival rates in communities nationwide. (sca-aware.org)
  • METHODS A retrospective Web-based survey was sent out to all US marathon medical directors (n = 400) to gather details of SCA including demographics, resuscitation efforts, mortality, and autopsy results, if available. (semanticscholar.org)
  • Therefore, non-autopsy based death profile reviews provide a framework for the presentation and discussion of reliable mortality data. (academicjournals.org)
  • The incidence of v fib has steadily dropped over the past 20 years, so all EMS systems need to recognize and rethink their strategy for treating cardiac arrest patients in the field. (jems.com)
  • The ACCESS Trial is the first randomized clinical trial of its kind to study VT/VF cardiac arrest patients to provide reliable data on which clinical practice can be based and consistently provided. (iu.edu)
  • Jonathan Drezner, a family medicine physician and professor in the family medicine department at the University of Washington, said in the past year alone he's seen 22 cases of sudden cardiac arrest in high school football players, 13 of which died. (sportingnews.com)
  • 21 cases of sudden cardiac death were identified over 15 years of follow up. (bmj.com)