The restoration to life or consciousness of one apparently dead. (Dorland, 27th ed)
The artificial substitution of heart and lung action as indicated for HEART ARREST resulting from electric shock, DROWNING, respiratory arrest, or other causes. The two major components of cardiopulmonary resuscitation are artificial ventilation (RESPIRATION, ARTIFICIAL) and closed-chest CARDIAC MASSAGE.
Cessation of heart beat or MYOCARDIAL CONTRACTION. If it is treated within a few minutes, heart arrest can be reversed in most cases to normal cardiac rhythm and effective circulation.
Acute hemorrhage or excessive fluid loss resulting in HYPOVOLEMIA.
Instructions issued by a physician pertaining to the institution, continuation, or withdrawal of life support measures. The concept includes policies, laws, statutes, decisions, guidelines, and discussions that may affect the issuance of such orders.
Therapy whose basic objective is to restore the volume and composition of the body fluids to normal with respect to WATER-ELECTROLYTE BALANCE. Fluids may be administered intravenously, orally, by intermittent gavage, or by HYPODERMOCLYSIS.
Rhythmic compression of the heart by pressure applied manually over the sternum (closed heart massage) or directly to the heart through an opening in the chest wall (open heart massage). It is done to reinstate and maintain circulation. (Dorland, 28th ed)
Occurrence of heart arrest in an individual when there is no immediate access to medical personnel or equipment.
Services specifically designed, staffed, and equipped for the emergency care of patients.
Solutions having the same osmotic pressure as blood serum, or another solution with which they are compared. (From Grant & Hackh's Chemical Dictionary, 5th ed & Dorland, 28th ed)
In the medical field, manikins are realistic, full-size models of human bodies used for teaching and practicing medical skills, such as CPR, intubation, or surgical procedures, as they provide a realistic and safe training environment without the use of actual patients.
Cardiac electrical stimulators that apply brief high-voltage electroshocks to the HEART. These stimulators are used to restore normal rhythm and contractile function in hearts of patients who are experiencing VENTRICULAR FIBRILLATION or ventricular tachycardia (TACHYCARDIA, VENTRICULAR) that is not accompanied by a palpable PULSE. Some defibrillators may also be used to correct certain noncritical dysrhythmias (called synchronized defibrillation or CARDIOVERSION), using relatively low-level discharges synchronized to the patient's ECG waveform. (UMDNS, 2003)
A potentially lethal cardiac arrhythmia that is characterized by uncoordinated extremely rapid firing of electrical impulses (400-600/min) in HEART VENTRICLES. Such asynchronous ventricular quivering or fibrillation prevents any effective cardiac output and results in unconsciousness (SYNCOPE). It is one of the major electrocardiographic patterns seen with CARDIAC ARREST.
The absence of a useful purpose or useful result in a diagnostic procedure or therapeutic intervention. The situation of a patient whose condition will not be improved by treatment or instances in which treatment preserves permanent unconsciousness or cannot end dependence on intensive medical care. (From Ann Intern Med 1990 Jun 15;112(12):949)
Hypertonic sodium chloride solution. A solution having an osmotic pressure greater than that of physiologic salt solution (0.9 g NaCl in 100 ml purified water).
A subspecialty of Pediatrics concerned with the newborn infant.
Respiratory failure in the newborn. (Dorland, 27th ed)
Hospital units equipped for childbirth.
The use of sophisticated methods and equipment to treat cardiopulmonary arrest. Advanced Cardiac Life Support (ACLS) includes the use of specialized equipment to maintain the airway, early defibrillation and pharmacological therapy.
A pathological condition manifested by failure to perfuse or oxygenate vital organs.
Care provided patients requiring extraordinary therapeutic measures in order to sustain and prolong life.
Patients' guests and rules for visiting.
A 3.5 per cent colloidal solution containing urea-cross-linked polymerized peptides. It has a molecular weight of approximately 35,000 and is prepared from gelatin and electrolytes. The polymeric solution is used as a plasma expander.
An electrical current applied to the HEART to terminate a disturbance of its rhythm, ARRHYTHMIAS, CARDIAC. (Stedman, 25th ed)
Starches that have been chemically modified so that a percentage of OH groups are substituted with 2-hydroxyethyl ether groups.
Any liquid used to replace blood plasma, usually a saline solution, often with serum albumins, dextrans or other preparations. These substances do not enhance the oxygen- carrying capacity of blood, but merely replace the volume. They are also used to treat dehydration.
Shock produced as a result of trauma.
Paramedical personnel trained to provide basic emergency care and life support under the supervision of physicians and/or nurses. These services may be carried out at the site of the emergency, in the ambulance, or in a health care institution.
A pathological condition caused by lack of oxygen, manifested in impending or actual cessation of life.
Emergency care or treatment given to a person who suddenly becomes ill or injured before full medical services become available.
An abnormally low volume of blood circulating through the body. It may result in hypovolemic shock (see SHOCK).
Abnormally low BODY TEMPERATURE that is intentionally induced in warm-blooded animals by artificial means. In humans, mild or moderate hypothermia has been used to reduce tissue damages, particularly after cardiac or spinal cord injuries and during subsequent surgeries.
Damage inflicted on the body as the direct or indirect result of an external force, with or without disruption of structural continuity.
Bleeding or escape of blood from a vessel.
An infant during the first month after birth.
Withholding or withdrawal of a particular treatment or treatments, often (but not necessarily) life-prolonging treatment, from a patient or from a research subject as part of a research protocol. The concept is differentiated from REFUSAL TO TREAT, where the emphasis is on the health professional's or health facility's refusal to treat a patient or group of patients when the patient or the patient's representative requests treatment. Withholding of life-prolonging treatment is usually indexed only with EUTHANASIA, PASSIVE, unless the distinction between withholding and withdrawing treatment, or the issue of withholding palliative rather than curative treatment, is discussed.
Substances that are used in place of blood, for example, as an alternative to BLOOD TRANSFUSIONS after blood loss to restore BLOOD VOLUME and oxygen-carrying capacity to the blood circulation, or to perfuse isolated organs.
Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.
Situations or conditions requiring immediate intervention to avoid serious adverse results.
A vehicle equipped for transporting patients in need of emergency care.
Sepsis associated with HYPOTENSION or hypoperfusion despite adequate fluid resuscitation. Perfusion abnormalities may include, but are not limited to LACTIC ACIDOSIS; OLIGURIA; or acute alteration in mental status.
Continuous care and monitoring of newborn infants with life-threatening conditions, in any setting.
Two-phase systems in which one is uniformly dispersed in another as particles small enough so they cannot be filtered or will not settle out. The dispersing or continuous phase or medium envelops the particles of the discontinuous phase. All three states of matter can form colloids among each other.
A procedure involving placement of a tube into the trachea through the mouth or nose in order to provide a patient with oxygen and anesthesia.
Evaluation undertaken to assess the results or consequences of management and procedures used in combating disease in order to determine the efficacy, effectiveness, safety, and practicability of these interventions in individual cases or series.
Any of various animals that constitute the family Suidae and comprise stout-bodied, short-legged omnivorous mammals with thick skin, usually covered with coarse bristles, a rather long mobile snout, and small tail. Included are the genera Babyrousa, Phacochoerus (wart hogs), and Sus, the latter containing the domestic pig (see SUS SCROFA).
Fluids restored to the body in order to maintain normal water-electrolyte balance.
Injuries to tissues caused by contact with heat, steam, chemicals (BURNS, CHEMICAL), electricity (BURNS, ELECTRIC), or the like.
First aid or other immediate intervention for accidents or medical conditions requiring immediate care and treatment before definitive medical and surgical management can be procured.
The movement and the forces involved in the movement of the blood through the CARDIOVASCULAR SYSTEM.
Inhalation of oxygen aimed at restoring toward normal any pathophysiologic alterations of gas exchange in the cardiopulmonary system, as by the use of a respirator, nasal catheter, tent, chamber, or mask. (From Dorland, 27th ed & Stedman, 25th ed)
The movement of the BLOOD as it is pumped through the CARDIOVASCULAR SYSTEM.
Any materials used in providing care specifically in the hospital.
The capability to perform acceptably those duties directly related to patient care.
Observation of a population for a sufficient number of persons over a sufficient number of years to generate incidence or mortality rates subsequent to the selection of the study group.
Health care provided to a critically ill patient during a medical emergency or crisis.
Hospital department responsible for the administration and provision of immediate medical or surgical care to the emergency patient.
The branch of medicine concerned with the evaluation and initial treatment of urgent and emergent medical problems, such as those caused by accidents, trauma, sudden illness, poisoning, or disasters. Emergency medical care can be provided at the hospital or at sites outside the medical facility.
Naturally occurring or experimentally induced animal diseases with pathological processes sufficiently similar to those of human diseases. They are used as study models for human diseases.
Multiple physical insults or injuries occurring simultaneously.
The active sympathomimetic hormone from the ADRENAL MEDULLA. It stimulates both the alpha- and beta- adrenergic systems, causes systemic VASOCONSTRICTION and gastrointestinal relaxation, stimulates the HEART, and dilates BRONCHI and cerebral vessels. It is used in ASTHMA and CARDIAC FAILURE and to delay absorption of local ANESTHETICS.
The care of women and a fetus or newborn given before, during, and after delivery from the 28th week of gestation through the 7th day after delivery.
The administration of medication or fluid through a needle directly into the bone marrow. The technique is especially useful in the management of pediatric emergencies when intravenous access to the systemic circulation is difficult.
The practice of medicine as applied to special circumstances associated with military operations.
Declarations by patients, made in advance of a situation in which they may be incompetent to decide about their own care, stating their treatment preferences or authorizing a third party to make decisions for them. (Bioethics Thesaurus)
Any method of artificial breathing that employs mechanical or non-mechanical means to force the air into and out of the lungs. Artificial respiration or ventilation is used in individuals who have stopped breathing or have RESPIRATORY INSUFFICIENCY to increase their intake of oxygen (O2) and excretion of carbon dioxide (CO2).
The proportion of survivors in a group, e.g., of patients, studied and followed over a period, or the proportion of persons in a specified group alive at the beginning of a time interval who survive to the end of the interval. It is often studied using life table methods.
Abnormally low BLOOD PRESSURE that can result in inadequate blood flow to the brain and other vital organs. Common symptom is DIZZINESS but greater negative impacts on the body occur when there is prolonged depravation of oxygen and nutrients.
An anatomic severity scale based on the Abbreviated Injury Scale (AIS) and developed specifically to score multiple traumatic injuries. It has been used as a predictor of mortality.
An element with atomic symbol O, atomic number 8, and atomic weight [15.99903; 15.99977]. It is the most abundant element on earth and essential for respiration.
Devices that cover the nose and mouth to maintain aseptic conditions or to administer inhaled anesthetics or other gases. (UMDNS, 1999)
The transfer of blood components such as erythrocytes, leukocytes, platelets, and plasma from a donor to a recipient or back to the donor. This process differs from the procedures undertaken in PLASMAPHERESIS and types of CYTAPHERESIS; (PLATELETPHERESIS and LEUKAPHERESIS) where, following the removal of plasma or the specific cell components, the remainder is transfused back to the donor.
A voluntary organization concerned with the prevention and treatment of heart and vascular diseases.
Measurement of oxygen and carbon dioxide in the blood.
The specialty or practice of nursing in the care of patients admitted to the emergency department.
Systemic inflammatory response syndrome with a proven or suspected infectious etiology. When sepsis is associated with organ dysfunction distant from the site of infection, it is called severe sepsis. When sepsis is accompanied by HYPOTENSION despite adequate fluid infusion, it is called SEPTIC SHOCK.
Health care workers specially trained and licensed to assist and support the work of health professionals. Often used synonymously with paramedical personnel, the term generally refers to all health care workers who perform tasks which must otherwise be performed by a physician or other health professional.
Directions or principles presenting current or future rules of policy for assisting health care practitioners in patient care decisions regarding diagnosis, therapy, or related clinical circumstances. The guidelines may be developed by government agencies at any level, institutions, professional societies, governing boards, or by the convening of expert panels. The guidelines form a basis for the evaluation of all aspects of health care and delivery.
A process involving chance used in therapeutic trials or other research endeavor for allocating experimental subjects, human or animal, between treatment and control groups, or among treatment groups. It may also apply to experiments on inanimate objects.
Rapid and extreme blood loss leading to HEMORRHAGIC SHOCK.
A progressive condition usually characterized by combined failure of several organs such as the lungs, liver, kidney, along with some clotting mechanisms, usually postinjury or postoperative.
A method, developed by Dr. Virginia Apgar, to evaluate a newborn's adjustment to extrauterine life. Five items - heart rate, respiratory effort, muscle tone, reflex irritability, and color - are evaluated 60 seconds after birth and again five minutes later on a scale from 0-2, 0 being the lowest, 2 being normal. The five numbers are added for the Apgar score. A score of 0-3 represents severe distress, 4-7 indicates moderate distress, and a score of 7-10 predicts an absence of difficulty in adjusting to extrauterine life.
Application of a life support system that circulates the blood through an oxygenating system, which may consist of a pump, a membrane oxygenator, and a heat exchanger. Examples of its use are to assist victims of smoke inhalation injury, respiratory failure, and cardiac failure.
A profound state of unconsciousness associated with depressed cerebral activity from which the individual cannot be aroused. Coma generally occurs when there is dysfunction or injury involving both cerebral hemispheres or the brain stem RETICULAR FORMATION.
The introduction of whole blood or blood component directly into the blood stream. (Dorland, 27th ed)
Water-soluble proteins found in egg whites, blood, lymph, and other tissues and fluids. They coagulate upon heating.
General or unspecified injuries involving organs in the abdominal cavity.
Drugs that bind to and activate adrenergic receptors.
A composition in prose or verse presenting in dialogue or pantomime a story involving various characters, usually intended to be acted on a stage and to be regarded as a form of entertainment. (From Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed)
PRESSURE of the BLOOD on the ARTERIES and other BLOOD VESSELS.
A strain of albino rat used widely for experimental purposes because of its calmness and ease of handling. It was developed by the Sprague-Dawley Animal Company.
Specialized hospital facilities which provide diagnostic and therapeutic services for trauma patients.
Computer disks storing data with a maximum reduction of space and bandwidth. The compact size reduces cost of transmission and storage.
A human infant born before 37 weeks of GESTATION.
A vital statistic measuring or recording the rate of death from any cause in hospitalized populations.
Failing to prevent death from natural causes, for reasons of mercy by the withdrawal or withholding of life-prolonging treatment.
The use of communication systems, such as telecommunication, to transmit emergency information to appropriate providers of health services.
Professional medical personnel approved to provide care to patients in a hospital.
General or unspecified injuries to the chest area.
The volume of air inspired or expired during each normal, quiet respiratory cycle. Common abbreviations are TV or V with subscript T.
Continuance of life or existence especially under adverse conditions; includes methods and philosophy of survival.
Studies used to test etiologic hypotheses in which inferences about an exposure to putative causal factors are derived from data relating to characteristics of persons under study or to events or experiences in their past. The essential feature is that some of the persons under study have the disease or outcome of interest and their characteristics are compared with those of unaffected persons.
Application of heat to correct hypothermia, accidental or induced.
Advanced and highly specialized care provided to medical or surgical patients whose conditions are life-threatening and require comprehensive care and constant monitoring. It is usually administered in specially equipped units of a health care facility.
Hemorrhagic and thrombotic disorders that occur as a consequence of abnormalities in blood coagulation due to a variety of factors such as COAGULATION PROTEIN DISORDERS; BLOOD PLATELET DISORDERS; BLOOD PROTEIN DISORDERS or nutritional conditions.
The use of persons coached to feign symptoms or conditions of real diseases in a life-like manner in order to teach or evaluate medical personnel.
Injuries caused by impact with a blunt object where there is no penetration of the skin.
A medical specialty concerned with maintaining health and providing medical care to children from birth to adolescence.
Techniques for controlling bleeding.
Hospital units providing continuous surveillance and care to acutely ill patients.
The volume of BLOOD passing through the HEART per unit of time. It is usually expressed as liters (volume) per minute so as not to be confused with STROKE VOLUME (volume per beat).
The continuous measurement of physiological processes, blood pressure, heart rate, renal output, reflexes, respiration, etc., in a patient or experimental animal; includes pharmacologic monitoring, the measurement of administered drugs or their metabolites in the blood, tissues, or urine.
The circulation of blood through the BLOOD VESSELS supplying the abdominal VISCERA.
A class of statistical procedures for estimating the survival function (function of time, starting with a population 100% well at a given time and providing the percentage of the population still well at later times). The survival analysis is then used for making inferences about the effects of treatments, prognostic factors, exposures, and other covariates on the function.
A pathologic condition of acid accumulation or depletion of base in the body. The two main types are RESPIRATORY ACIDOSIS and metabolic acidosis, due to metabolic acid build up.
The principles of professional conduct concerning the rights and duties of the physician, relations with patients and fellow practitioners, as well as actions of the physician in patient care and interpersonal relations with patient families.
Wounds caused by objects penetrating the skin.
On the job training programs for personnel carried out within an institution or agency. It includes orientation programs.
A disorder characterized by a reduction of oxygen in the blood combined with reduced blood flow (ISCHEMIA) to the brain from a localized obstruction of a cerebral artery or from systemic hypoperfusion. Prolonged hypoxia-ischemia is associated with ISCHEMIC ATTACK, TRANSIENT; BRAIN INFARCTION; BRAIN EDEMA; COMA; and other conditions.
A nursing specialty involving nursing care given to the pregnant patient before, after, or during childbirth.
The process of making a selective intellectual judgment when presented with several complex alternatives consisting of several variables, and usually defining a course of action or an idea.
Lower than normal body temperature, especially in warm-blooded animals.
A systemic inflammatory response to a variety of clinical insults, characterized by two or more of the following conditions: (1) fever >38 degrees C or HYPOTHERMIA 90 beat/minute; (3) tachypnea >24 breaths/minute; (4) LEUKOCYTOSIS >12,000 cells/cubic mm or 10% immature forms. While usually related to infection, SIRS can also be associated with noninfectious insults such as TRAUMA; BURNS; or PANCREATITIS. If infection is involved, a patient with SIRS is said to have SEPSIS.
The pressure that would be exerted by one component of a mixture of gases if it were present alone in a container. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)
Care of patients by a multidisciplinary team usually organized under the leadership of a physician; each member of the team has specific responsibilities and the whole team contributes to the care of the patient.
A ubiquitous sodium salt that is commonly used to season food.
Antidiuretic hormones released by the NEUROHYPOPHYSIS of all vertebrates (structure varies with species) to regulate water balance and OSMOLARITY. In general, vasopressin is a nonapeptide consisting of a six-amino-acid ring with a cysteine 1 to cysteine 6 disulfide bridge or an octapeptide containing a CYSTINE. All mammals have arginine vasopressin except the pig with a lysine at position 8. Vasopressin, a vasoconstrictor, acts on the KIDNEY COLLECTING DUCTS to increase water reabsorption, increase blood volume and blood pressure.
Hospital units providing continuous surveillance and care to acutely ill infants and children. Neonates are excluded since INTENSIVE CARE UNITS, NEONATAL is available.

A resuscitated case from asphyxia by large bronchial cast. (1/1070)

A 62-year-old woman with bronchiectasis suffered from asphyxia due to a large bronchial cast that obstructed the bronchial tree. Immediate bronchoscopic suction of a bronchial cast of 17 cm in length through the intubated tube relieved the patients without any complications. Large bronchial casts appear to be rare in this century but it should be considered in patients with acute exacerbation of excessive sputa not only in patients with asthma or allergy but also in patients with respiratory tract infection.  (+info)

Intraosseous lines in preterm and full term neonates. (2/1070)

AIM: To evaluate the use of intraosseous lines for rapid vascular access in primary resuscitation of preterm and full term neonates. METHODS: Thirty intraosseous lines were placed in 27 newborns, in whom conventional venous access had failed. RESULTS: All the neonates survived the resuscitation procedure, with no long term side effects. CONCLUSION: Intraosseous infusion is quick, safe, and effective in compromised neonates.  (+info)

Should doctors practise resuscitation skills on newly deceased patients? A survey of public opinion. (3/1070)

Trainee doctors must acquire skills in resuscitation, but opportunities for learning on real patients are limited. One option is to practise these skills in newly deceased patients. We sought opinions from 400 multiethnic guests at an open-access dinner dance for members of a local community. The questionnaire could elicit the responses strongly agree, agree, unsure, disagree or strongly disagree. 332 (83%) guests responded. For non-invasive techniques, 32% of responders supported practice without consent, 74% with consent. Support diminished with increasing invasiveness of procedure. 91% of the sample were uncomfortable about the procedures, the commonest reason being 'respect for the body' (264/302). 86% of responders felt that practice should last for no more than 5 minutes. The most popular solutions were for people to carry a personal card giving consent (89%) and establishment of a central register of individuals consenting to be practised upon after death (79%).  (+info)

Survival after cardiac arrest or sustained ventricular tachycardia in patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. (4/1070)

OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to evaluate the survival of patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) after resuscitated ventricular fibrillation or syncopal sustained ventricular tachycardia (VT/VF) when treated with low dose amiodarone or implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICDs). BACKGROUND: Prospective data on clinical outcome in patients with HCM who survive a cardiac arrest are limited, but studies conducted before the widespread use of amiodarone and/or ICD therapy suggest that over a third die within seven years from sudden cardiac death or progressive heart failure. METHODS: Sixteen HCM patients with a history of VT/VF (nine male, age at VT/VF 19 +/- 8 years [range 10 to 36]) were studied. Syncopal sustained ventricular tachycardia/ventricular fibrillation occurred during or immediately after exertion in eight patients and was the initial presentation in eight. One patient had disabling neurologic deficit after VT/VF. Before VT/VF, two patients had angina, four had syncope and six had a family history of premature sudden cardiac death. After VT/VF all patients were in New York Heart Association class I or II, three had nonsustained VT during ambulatory electrocardiography and 11 had an abnormal exercise blood pressure response. After VT/VF eight patients were treated with low dose amiodarone and six received an ICD. Prophylactic therapy was declined by two patients. RESULTS: Mean follow-up was 6.1 +/- 4.0 years (range 0.5 to 14.5). Cumulative survival (death or ICD discharge) for the entire cohort was 59% at five years (95% confidence interval: 33% to 84%). Thirteen (81%) patients were alive at last follow-up. Two patients died suddenly while taking low dose amiodarone, and one died due to neurologic complications of his initial cardiac arrest. Three patients had one or more appropriate ICD discharges during follow-up; the times to first shock after ICD implantation were 23, 197 and 1,124 days. CONCLUSIONS: This study shows that patients with HCM who survive an episode of VT/VF remain at risk for a recurrent event. Implantable cardioverter defibrillator therapy appears to offer the best potential benefit regarding outcome.  (+info)

Outcome of very severe birth asphyxia. (5/1070)

The aim of this study was to establish the outcome of very severe birth asphyxia in a group of babies intensively resuscitated at birth. 48 infants, born between 1966 and 1971 inclusive, were selected; 15 were apparently stillborn and 33 had not established spontaneous respirations by 20 minutes after birth. One-half of them died, but 3 to 7 years later three-quarters of the survivors are apparently normal. Later handicap was associated with factors leading to prolonged partial intrapartum asphyxia, while acute periods of more complete asphyxia were not necessarily harmful.  (+info)

Boerhaave's syndrome presenting as tension pneumothorax. (6/1070)

Boerhaave's syndrome can present initially as a case of tension pneumothorax. Mortality rate with delayed treatment is very high, therefore diagnosis should be made rapidly in the emergency department. Multidisciplinary cooperation, immediate radiological confirmation, prompt aggressive resuscitation, and surgical intervention offer the best chance of survival.  (+info)

Systemic and microcirculatory effects of autologous whole blood resuscitation in severe hemorrhagic shock. (7/1070)

Systemic and microcirculatory effects of autologous whole blood resuscitation after 4-h hemorrhagic shock with a mean arterial pressure (MAP) level of 40 mmHg were investigated in 63 conscious Syrian golden hamsters. Microcirculation of skeletal skin muscle and subcutaneous connective tissue was visualized in a dorsal skinfold. Shed blood was retransfused within 30 min after 4 h. Animals were grouped into survivors in good (SG) and poor condition (SP) and nonsurvivors (NS) according to 24-h outcome after resuscitation and studied before shock, during shock (60, 120, and 240 min), and 30 min and 24 h after resuscitation. Microvascular and interstitial PO2 values were determined by phosphorescence decay. Shock caused a significant increase of arterial PO2 and decrease of PCO2, pH, and base excess. In the microcirculation, there was a significant decrease in blood flow (QB), functional capillary density (FCD; capillaries with red blood cell flow), and interstitial PO2 [1.8 +/- 0.8 mmHg (SG), 1.3 +/- 1.3 mmHg (SP), and 0.9 +/- 1.1 mmHg (NS) vs. 23.0 +/- 6.1 mmHg at control]. Blood resuscitation caused immediate MAP recompensation in all animals, whereas metabolic acidosis, hyperventilation, and a significant interstitial PO2 decrease (40-60% of control) persisted. In NS (44.4% of the animals), systemic and microcirculatory alterations were significantly more severe both in shock and after resuscitation than in survivors. Whereas in SG (31.8% of the animals) there was only a slight (15-30%) but still significant impairment of microscopic tissue perfusion (QB, FCD) and oxygenation at 24 h, SP (23.8% of the animals) showed severe metabolic acidosis and substantial decreases (>/=50%) of FCD and interstitial PO2. FCD, interstitial PO2, and metabolic state were the main determinants of shock outcome.  (+info)

Early experience with simulated trauma resuscitation. (8/1070)

Although trauma resuscitation is best taught through direct exposure with hands-on experience, the opportunities for this type of teaching in Canada are limited by the relatively low incidence of serious injury and the consolidation of trauma care to a small number of centres. Simulators have been used extensively outside the health care environment and more recently have been used by anesthetists to simulate intraoperative crises. In this paper early experience using a realistic mannequin, controlled by a remote computer, that simulates a variety of physiologic and injury specific variables is presented. The resource implications of simulated resuscitation are reviewed, including one-time and operating costs. Simulated trauma resuscitation may be an educational alternative to "real-life" trauma resuscitation, but careful evaluation of the benefits and resource implications of this type of teaching through well-designed research studies will be important.  (+info)

Resuscitation is a medical term that refers to the process of reversing cardiopulmonary arrest or preventing further deterioration of someone in cardiac or respiratory arrest. It involves a series of interventions aimed at restoring spontaneous blood circulation and breathing, thereby preventing or minimizing tissue damage due to lack of oxygen.

The most common form of resuscitation is cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR), which combines chest compressions to manually pump blood through the body with rescue breaths to provide oxygen to the lungs. In a hospital setting, more advanced techniques such as defibrillation, medication administration, and intubation may also be used as part of the resuscitation process.

The goal of resuscitation is to stabilize the patient's condition and prevent further harm while treating the underlying cause of the arrest. Successful resuscitation can lead to a full recovery or, in some cases, result in varying degrees of neurological impairment depending on the severity and duration of the cardiac or respiratory arrest.

Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is a lifesaving procedure that is performed when someone's breathing or heartbeat has stopped. It involves a series of steps that are designed to manually pump blood through the body and maintain the flow of oxygen to the brain until advanced medical treatment can be provided.

CPR typically involves a combination of chest compressions and rescue breaths, which are delivered in a specific rhythm and frequency. The goal is to maintain circulation and oxygenation of vital organs, particularly the brain, until advanced life support measures such as defibrillation or medication can be administered.

Chest compressions are used to manually pump blood through the heart and into the rest of the body. This is typically done by placing both hands on the lower half of the chest and pressing down with enough force to compress the chest by about 2 inches. The compressions should be delivered at a rate of at least 100-120 compressions per minute.

Rescue breaths are used to provide oxygen to the lungs and maintain oxygenation of the body's tissues. This is typically done by pinching the nose shut, creating a seal around the person's mouth with your own, and blowing in enough air to make the chest rise. The breath should be delivered over about one second, and this process should be repeated until the person begins to breathe on their own or advanced medical help arrives.

CPR can be performed by trained laypeople as well as healthcare professionals. It is an important skill that can help save lives in emergency situations where a person's breathing or heartbeat has stopped.

Cardiac arrest, also known as heart arrest, is a medical condition where the heart suddenly stops beating or functioning properly. This results in the cessation of blood flow to the rest of the body, including the brain, leading to loss of consciousness and pulse. Cardiac arrest is often caused by electrical disturbances in the heart that disrupt its normal rhythm, known as arrhythmias. If not treated immediately with cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) and defibrillation, it can lead to death or permanent brain damage due to lack of oxygen supply. It's important to note that a heart attack is different from cardiac arrest; a heart attack occurs when blood flow to a part of the heart is blocked, often by a clot, causing damage to the heart muscle, but the heart continues to beat. However, a heart attack can sometimes trigger a cardiac arrest.

Hemorrhagic shock is a type of shock that occurs when there is significant blood loss leading to inadequate perfusion of tissues and organs. It is characterized by hypovolemia (low blood volume), hypotension (low blood pressure), tachycardia (rapid heart rate), and decreased urine output. Hemorrhagic shock can be classified into four stages based on the amount of blood loss and hemodynamic changes. In severe cases, it can lead to multi-organ dysfunction and death if not treated promptly and effectively.

Resuscitation orders, also known as do-not-resuscitate (DNR) orders or no-code orders, are medical instructions written by a physician in the chart of a patient who has a serious illness or chronic health condition and for whom cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) would be medically inappropriate.

The order specifies that if the patient's heart stops or they stop breathing, healthcare providers should not attempt to restart it using CPR or other advanced life support measures. Instead, comfort care measures are provided to keep the patient as comfortable and pain-free as possible.

Resuscitation orders are typically discussed with the patient, their family members, and their healthcare team, taking into account the patient's values, goals, and treatment preferences. The decision to implement a resuscitation order is based on an assessment of the patient's overall prognosis, likelihood of survival, and quality of life.

Fluid therapy, in a medical context, refers to the administration of fluids into a patient's circulatory system for various therapeutic purposes. This can be done intravenously (through a vein), intraosseously (through a bone), or subcutaneously (under the skin). The goal of fluid therapy is to correct or prevent imbalances in the body's fluids and electrolytes, maintain or restore blood volume, and support organ function.

The types of fluids used in fluid therapy can include crystalloids (which contain electrolytes and water) and colloids (which contain larger molecules like proteins). The choice of fluid depends on the patient's specific needs and condition. Fluid therapy is commonly used in the treatment of dehydration, shock, sepsis, trauma, surgery, and other medical conditions that can affect the body's fluid balance.

Proper administration of fluid therapy requires careful monitoring of the patient's vital signs, urine output, electrolyte levels, and overall clinical status to ensure that the therapy is effective and safe.

Heart massage, also known as cardiac massage or chest compression, is a medical procedure that involves applying pressure to the chest in order to manually pump blood through the heart and maintain circulation when the heart has stopped or is not functioning effectively. This is a critical component of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) and is typically performed during a cardiac arrest to help restore proper blood flow to vital organs and tissues.

During heart massage, the rescuer places their hands on the lower half of the victim's chest, typically at the center, and presses down with the heel of one or both hands. The recommended compression depth for adults is at least 2 inches (5 cm) and should be performed at a rate of 100-120 compressions per minute. It is essential to minimize interruptions in chest compressions and ensure that they are deep and fast enough to maintain adequate blood flow.

Heart massage can also be performed surgically during specific medical procedures, such as open-heart surgery or extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO). In these cases, the surgeon directly compresses the heart using their hands or specialized instruments. This technique is called a "surgical heart massage" or "direct cardiac compression."

It's important to note that heart massage should only be performed by trained individuals, as improper techniques can cause harm and potentially worsen the patient's condition.

Out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) is a medical condition where the heart suddenly and unexpectedly stops functioning outside of a hospital setting, leading to the cessation of blood circulation and breathing. This results in immediate unconsciousness and can be caused by various factors such as electrical disturbances in the heart, severe trauma, or suffocation. It is a serious emergency that requires immediate cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) and advanced life support measures to restore spontaneous circulation and improve survival outcomes.

Emergency Medical Services (EMS) is a system that provides immediate and urgent medical care, transportation, and treatment to patients who are experiencing an acute illness or injury that poses an immediate threat to their health, safety, or life. EMS is typically composed of trained professionals, such as emergency medical technicians (EMTs), paramedics, and first responders, who work together to assess a patient's condition, administer appropriate medical interventions, and transport the patient to a hospital or other medical facility for further treatment.

The goal of EMS is to quickly and effectively stabilize patients in emergency situations, prevent further injury or illness, and ensure that they receive timely and appropriate medical care. This may involve providing basic life support (BLS) measures such as cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR), controlling bleeding, and managing airway obstructions, as well as more advanced interventions such as administering medications, establishing intravenous lines, and performing emergency procedures like intubation or defibrillation.

EMS systems are typically organized and managed at the local or regional level, with coordination and oversight provided by public health agencies, hospitals, and other healthcare organizations. EMS providers may work for private companies, non-profit organizations, or government agencies, and they may be dispatched to emergencies via 911 or other emergency response systems.

In summary, Emergency Medical Services (EMS) is a critical component of the healthcare system that provides urgent medical care and transportation to patients who are experiencing acute illnesses or injuries. EMS professionals work together to quickly assess, stabilize, and transport patients to appropriate medical facilities for further treatment.

Isotonic solutions are defined in the context of medical and physiological sciences as solutions that contain the same concentration of solutes (dissolved particles) as another solution, usually the bodily fluids like blood. This means that if you compare the concentration of solute particles in two isotonic solutions, they will be equal.

A common example is a 0.9% sodium chloride (NaCl) solution, also known as normal saline. The concentration of NaCl in this solution is approximately equal to the concentration found in the fluid portion of human blood, making it isotonic with blood.

Isotonic solutions are crucial in medical settings for various purposes, such as intravenous (IV) fluids replacement, wound care, and irrigation solutions. They help maintain fluid balance, prevent excessive water movement across cell membranes, and reduce the risk of damaging cells due to osmotic pressure differences between the solution and bodily fluids.

A manikin is commonly referred to as a full-size model of the human body used for training in various medical and healthcare fields. Medical manikins are often made from materials that simulate human skin and tissues, allowing for realistic practice in procedures such as physical examinations, resuscitation, and surgical techniques.

These manikins can be highly advanced, with built-in mechanisms to simulate physiological responses, such as breathing, heartbeats, and pupil dilation. They may also have interchangeable parts, allowing for the simulation of various medical conditions and scenarios. Medical manikins are essential tools in healthcare education, enabling learners to develop their skills and confidence in a controlled, safe environment before working with real patients.

A defibrillator is a medical device that delivers a therapeutic dose of electrical energy to the heart. The aim of the treatment is to restore the normal rhythm of the heart in cases where it has started to beat irregularly, or in a chaotic and unsynchronized manner, which can be life-threatening.

There are two main types of defibrillators: external and implantable. External defibrillators are typically used in emergency situations and are often found in public places such as airports, casinos, and sports arenas. These devices have pads that are placed on the chest of the patient, and they deliver an electrical shock to the heart through the chest wall.

Implantable cardioverter-defibrillators (ICDs) are small devices that are implanted in the chest of patients who are at risk of sudden cardiac death due to life-threatening arrhythmias. ICDs constantly monitor the heart's rhythm and deliver an electrical shock if they detect a dangerous arrhythmia, such as ventricular fibrillation or ventricular tachycardia.

Defibrillators are important medical devices that can save lives in emergency situations. They are often used in conjunction with other treatments, such as medications and cardiac procedures, to manage heart conditions and prevent sudden cardiac death.

Ventricular Fibrillation (VF) is a type of cardiac arrhythmia, which is an abnormal heart rhythm. In VF, the ventricles, which are the lower chambers of the heart, beat in a rapid and unorganized manner. This results in the heart being unable to pump blood effectively to the rest of the body, leading to immediate circulatory collapse and cardiac arrest if not treated promptly. It is often caused by underlying heart conditions such as coronary artery disease, structural heart problems, or electrolyte imbalances. VF is a medical emergency that requires immediate defibrillation to restore a normal heart rhythm.

Medical futility is a controversial and complex concept that refers to medical treatments or interventions that are highly unlikely to result in achieving a meaningful clinical benefit for the patient. The determination of medical futility often involves a consideration of various factors, including the patient's current medical condition, prognosis, values, and goals of care.

There is no universally accepted definition of medical futility, and its interpretation can vary widely among healthcare providers, patients, and families. In general, medical treatments are considered futile when they have a very low probability of success or when they only prolong the process of dying without improving the patient's quality of life.

The concept of medical futility is important in end-of-life care discussions and decision-making, as it can help healthcare providers and patients make informed decisions about whether to pursue certain treatments or interventions. However, determining medical futility can be challenging, and it requires careful consideration of the patient's individual circumstances and values. Ultimately, the goal of medical futility is to ensure that patients receive care that is both medically appropriate and aligned with their goals and values.

A hypertonic saline solution is a type of medical fluid that contains a higher concentration of salt (sodium chloride) than is found in the average person's blood. This solution is used to treat various medical conditions, such as dehydration, brain swelling, and increased intracranial pressure.

The osmolarity of a hypertonic saline solution typically ranges from 1500 to 23,400 mOsm/L, with the most commonly used solutions having an osmolarity of around 3000 mOsm/L. The high sodium concentration in these solutions creates an osmotic gradient that draws water out of cells and into the bloodstream, helping to reduce swelling and increase fluid volume in the body.

It is important to note that hypertonic saline solutions should be administered with caution, as they can cause serious side effects such as electrolyte imbalances, heart rhythm abnormalities, and kidney damage if not used properly. Healthcare professionals must carefully monitor patients receiving these solutions to ensure safe and effective treatment.

Neonatology is a subspecialty of pediatrics that focuses on the medical care of newborn infants, particularly those who are born prematurely or with critical illnesses. Neonatologists are physicians who have additional training and expertise in managing complex neonatal conditions such as respiratory distress syndrome, birth defects, infection, and other issues that can affect newborns. They typically work in neonatal intensive care units (NICUs) and collaborate with a multidisciplinary team of healthcare professionals to provide comprehensive care for these vulnerable patients.

Asphyxia neonatorum is a medical condition that refers to a newborn baby's lack of oxygen or difficulty breathing, which can lead to suffocation and serious complications. It is often caused by problems during the birthing process, such as umbilical cord compression or prolapse, placental abruption, or prolonged labor.

Symptoms of asphyxia neonatorum may include bluish skin color (cyanosis), weak or absent breathing, poor muscle tone, meconium-stained amniotic fluid, and a slow heart rate. In severe cases, it can lead to organ damage, developmental delays, or even death.

Prompt medical attention is necessary to diagnose and treat asphyxia neonatorum. Treatment may include oxygen therapy, mechanical ventilation, and medications to support the baby's heart function and blood pressure. In some cases, therapeutic hypothermia (cooling the body) may be used to reduce the risk of brain damage. Preventive measures such as proper prenatal care, timely delivery, and careful monitoring during labor and delivery can also help reduce the risk of asphyxia neonatorum.

A delivery room is a specialized unit in a hospital where childbirth takes place. It is staffed with healthcare professionals, such as obstetricians, nurses, and midwives, who are trained to assist women during labor, delivery, and the immediate postpartum period. Delivery rooms are equipped with medical equipment and supplies to monitor the mother's and baby's vital signs, administer medications, and perform emergency procedures if necessary.

Delivery rooms may also be referred to as labor and delivery units or wards. In some hospitals, there may be different types of delivery rooms, such as birthing suites that provide a more home-like atmosphere for women who prefer a natural childbirth experience. Overall, the goal of a delivery room is to ensure a safe and healthy outcome for both the mother and the baby during childbirth.

Advanced Cardiac Life Support (ACLS) is a set of clinical guidelines and protocols used by healthcare providers to manage and treat cardiopulmonary emergencies, such as cardiac arrest, stroke, and other life-threatening conditions. It is an advanced level of care that builds upon Basic Life Support (BLS) skills and includes the use of medications, electrical therapies, and specialized monitoring techniques.

ACLS certification courses typically cover topics such as airway management, electrocardiogram (ECG) interpretation, pharmacology, rhythm recognition, and team dynamics. The goal of ACLS is to provide a systematic approach to assessing, diagnosing, and treating patients in critical situations, with the ultimate aim of improving outcomes and increasing survival rates.

ACLS protocols are regularly updated by professional organizations such as the American Heart Association (AHA) and the European Resuscitation Council (ERC), based on the latest scientific research and evidence-based practices. Healthcare providers who work in critical care settings, such as emergency departments, intensive care units, and cardiac catheterization labs, are often required to maintain ACLS certification through regular training and recertification.

In medical terms, shock is a life-threatening condition that occurs when the body is not getting enough blood flow or when the circulatory system is not functioning properly to distribute oxygen and nutrients to the tissues and organs. This results in a state of hypoxia (lack of oxygen) and cellular dysfunction, which can lead to multiple organ failure and death if left untreated.

Shock can be caused by various factors such as severe blood loss, infection, trauma, heart failure, allergic reactions, and severe burns. The symptoms of shock include low blood pressure, rapid pulse, cool and clammy skin, rapid and shallow breathing, confusion, weakness, and a bluish color to the lips and nails. Immediate medical attention is required for proper diagnosis and treatment of shock.

Life support care, also known as artificial life support or mechanical ventilation, refers to medical interventions that are used to maintain and sustain the essential body functions of a patient who is unable to do so independently. These interventions can include mechanical ventilation to assist with breathing, hemodialysis to filter waste from the blood, intravenous (IV) fluids and medications to maintain circulation, and various other treatments to support organ function.

The goal of life support care is to keep a patient alive while treating their underlying medical condition, allowing time for the body to heal or providing comfort at the end of life. The use of life support can be temporary or long-term, depending on the patient's prognosis and the severity of their illness or injury.

It is important to note that decisions regarding the initiation, continuation, or withdrawal of life support care are complex and multifaceted, often requiring input from medical professionals, patients, and their families. Ethical considerations and advance directives, such as living wills and healthcare proxies, may also play a role in these decisions.

I'm happy to help, but it seems there might be a misunderstanding. "Visitors to patients" is not a medical term or concept in and of itself. However, the practice of visiting patients in a healthcare setting is an important aspect of patient-centered care that can contribute to positive health outcomes.

In this context, we could define "visitors to patients" as individuals who come to see or accompany a patient during their hospitalization or visit to a medical facility. Visitors may include family members, friends, or other support persons who provide emotional and social support to the patient, which can contribute to improved mental health, reduced anxiety, and better coping mechanisms during treatment and recovery.

It's important to note that healthcare facilities often have specific policies regarding visitation hours and guidelines to ensure the safety and well-being of both patients and visitors. These policies may include restrictions on visiting hours, the number of visitors allowed at a time, and requirements for personal protective equipment (PPE) during infectious disease outbreaks.

Polygeline is a colloidal plasma expander, which is a type of intravenous fluid used to increase blood volume in hypovolemia or shock. It is made up of polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) molecules that are cross-linked with divinyl sulfone and then suspended in an electrolyte solution. Polygeline works by drawing water into the circulation, thereby increasing the volume of the plasma.

It is important to note that polygeline has been associated with anaphylactic reactions and therefore should be used with caution. It is also not recommended for use in patients with renal impairment or those who are allergic to PVP. As with any medical treatment, it should only be administered under the direction of a qualified healthcare professional.

Electric countershock, also known as defibrillation, is a medical procedure that uses an electric current to restore normal heart rhythm in certain types of cardiac arrhythmias, such as ventricular fibrillation or pulseless ventricular tachycardia. The procedure involves delivering a therapeutic dose of electrical energy to the heart through electrodes placed on the chest wall or directly on the heart. This electric current helps to depolarize a large number of cardiac cells simultaneously, which can help to interrupt the abnormal electrical activity in the heart and allow the normal conduction system to regain control and restore a normal rhythm. Electric countershock is typically delivered using an automated external defibrillator (AED) or a manual defibrillator, and it is a critical component of advanced cardiac life support (ACLS).

Hydroxyethyl starch derivatives are modified starches that are used as plasma expanders in medicine. They are created by chemically treating corn, potato, or wheat starch with hydroxylethyl groups, which makes the starch more soluble and less likely to be broken down by enzymes in the body. This results in a large molecule that can remain in the bloodstream for an extended period, increasing intravascular volume and improving circulation.

These derivatives are available in different molecular weights and substitution patterns, which affect their pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics. They are used to treat or prevent hypovolemia (low blood volume) due to various causes such as bleeding, burns, or dehydration. Common brand names include Hetastarch, Pentastarch, and Voluven.

It's important to note that the use of hydroxyethyl starch derivatives has been associated with adverse effects, including kidney injury, coagulopathy, and pruritus (severe itching). Therefore, their use should be carefully monitored and restricted to specific clinical situations.

Plasma substitutes are fluids that are used to replace the plasma volume in conditions such as hypovolemia (low blood volume) or plasma loss, for example due to severe burns, trauma, or major surgery. They do not contain cells or clotting factors, but they help to maintain intravascular volume and tissue perfusion. Plasma substitutes can be divided into two main categories: crystalloids and colloids.

Crystalloid solutions contain small molecules that can easily move between intracellular and extracellular spaces. Examples include normal saline (0.9% sodium chloride) and lactated Ringer's solution. They are less expensive and have a lower risk of allergic reactions compared to colloids, but they may require larger volumes to achieve the same effect due to their rapid distribution in the body.

Colloid solutions contain larger molecules that tend to stay within the intravascular space for longer periods, thus increasing the oncotic pressure and helping to maintain fluid balance. Examples include albumin, fresh frozen plasma, and synthetic colloids such as hydroxyethyl starch (HES) and gelatin. Colloids may be more effective in restoring intravascular volume, but they carry a higher risk of allergic reactions and anaphylaxis, and some types have been associated with adverse effects such as kidney injury and coagulopathy.

The choice of plasma substitute depends on various factors, including the patient's clinical condition, the underlying cause of plasma loss, and any contraindications or potential side effects of the available products. It is important to monitor the patient's hemodynamic status, electrolyte balance, and coagulation profile during and after the administration of plasma substitutes to ensure appropriate resuscitation and avoid complications.

Traumatic shock is a type of physiological response that occurs when an individual experiences a severe physical trauma, such as severe injury, burns, or bleeding. This condition is characterized by inadequate tissue perfusion and oxygenation, which can lead to cellular damage and organ dysfunction. The primary cause of traumatic shock is a significant decrease in blood volume due to hemorrhage, which reduces the amount of oxygen and nutrients delivered to tissues and organs.

The symptoms of traumatic shock include:

1. Hypotension (low blood pressure)
2. Tachycardia (rapid heart rate)
3. Altered mental status (confusion, agitation, or lethargy)
4. Cool, clammy skin
5. Weak or absent peripheral pulses
6. Rapid, shallow breathing
7. Decreased urine output
8. Lactic acidosis (elevated levels of lactic acid in the blood)
9. Metabolic disturbances

Traumatic shock is a medical emergency that requires immediate treatment to prevent further tissue damage and organ dysfunction. Treatment typically involves fluid resuscitation, blood transfusion, and surgery to control bleeding. In some cases, medications such as vasopressors may be necessary to maintain blood pressure and perfusion to vital organs.

Emergency Medical Technicians (EMTs) are healthcare professionals who provide emergency medical services to critically ill or injured individuals. They are trained to assess a patient's condition, manage respiratory, cardiac, and trauma emergencies, and administer basic life support care. EMTs may also perform emergency procedures such as spinal immobilization, automated external defibrillation, and administer medications under certain circumstances.

EMTs typically work in ambulances, fire departments, hospitals, and other emergency medical settings. They must be able to work in high-stress situations, make quick decisions, and communicate effectively with other healthcare providers. EMTs are required to obtain certification and maintain continuing education to ensure they are up-to-date on the latest practices and protocols in emergency medicine.

Asphyxia is a medical condition that occurs when there is insufficient oxygen supply or excessive carbon dioxide buildup in the body, leading to impaired respiration and oxygenation of organs. This can result in unconsciousness, damage to internal organs, and potentially death if not treated promptly.

Asphyxia can be caused by various factors such as strangulation, choking, smoke inhalation, chemical exposure, or drowning. Symptoms of asphyxia may include shortness of breath, coughing, wheezing, cyanosis (bluish discoloration of the skin and mucous membranes), rapid heartbeat, confusion, and eventually loss of consciousness.

Immediate medical attention is required for individuals experiencing symptoms of asphyxia. Treatment may involve providing supplemental oxygen, removing the source of obstruction or exposure to harmful substances, and supporting respiratory function with mechanical ventilation if necessary. Prevention measures include avoiding hazardous environments, using proper safety equipment, and seeking prompt medical attention in case of suspected asphyxiation.

First Aid is the immediate and temporary treatment or care given to a sick, injured, or wounded person until full medical services become available. It can include simple procedures like cleaning and dressing wounds, administering CPR (Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation), preventing shock, or placing a splint on a broken bone. The goal of first aid is to preserve life, prevent further harm, and promote recovery.

Hypovolemia is a medical condition characterized by a decreased volume of circulating blood in the body, leading to inadequate tissue perfusion and oxygenation. This can occur due to various reasons such as bleeding, dehydration, vomiting, diarrhea, or excessive sweating, which result in a reduced amount of fluid in the intravascular space.

The severity of hypovolemia depends on the extent of fluid loss and can range from mild to severe. Symptoms may include thirst, dry mouth, weakness, dizziness, lightheadedness, confusion, rapid heartbeat, low blood pressure, and decreased urine output. Severe hypovolemia can lead to shock, organ failure, and even death if not treated promptly and effectively.

Induced hypothermia is a medically controlled lowering of the core body temperature to around 89.6-93.2°F (32-34°C) for therapeutic purposes. It is intentionally induced to reduce the metabolic rate and oxygen demand of organs, thereby offering protection during periods of low blood flow or inadequate oxygenation, such as during cardiac bypass surgery, severe trauma, or after a cardiac arrest. The deliberate induction and maintenance of hypothermia can help minimize tissue damage and improve outcomes in specific clinical scenarios. Once the risk has passed, the body temperature is gradually rewarmed to normal levels under controlled conditions.

A wound is a type of injury that occurs when the skin or other tissues are cut, pierced, torn, or otherwise broken. Wounds can be caused by a variety of factors, including accidents, violence, surgery, or certain medical conditions. There are several different types of wounds, including:

* Incisions: These are cuts that are made deliberately, often during surgery. They are usually straight and clean.
* Lacerations: These are tears in the skin or other tissues. They can be irregular and jagged.
* Abrasions: These occur when the top layer of skin is scraped off. They may look like a bruise or a scab.
* Punctures: These are wounds that are caused by sharp objects, such as needles or knives. They are usually small and deep.
* Avulsions: These occur when tissue is forcibly torn away from the body. They can be very serious and require immediate medical attention.

Injuries refer to any harm or damage to the body, including wounds. Injuries can range from minor scrapes and bruises to more severe injuries such as fractures, dislocations, and head trauma. It is important to seek medical attention for any injury that is causing significant pain, swelling, or bleeding, or if there is a suspected bone fracture or head injury.

In general, wounds and injuries should be cleaned and covered with a sterile bandage to prevent infection. Depending on the severity of the wound or injury, additional medical treatment may be necessary. This may include stitches for deep cuts, immobilization for broken bones, or surgery for more serious injuries. It is important to follow your healthcare provider's instructions carefully to ensure proper healing and to prevent complications.

Hemorrhage is defined in the medical context as an excessive loss of blood from the circulatory system, which can occur due to various reasons such as injury, surgery, or underlying health conditions that affect blood clotting or the integrity of blood vessels. The bleeding may be internal, external, visible, or concealed, and it can vary in severity from minor to life-threatening, depending on the location and extent of the bleeding. Hemorrhage is a serious medical emergency that requires immediate attention and treatment to prevent further blood loss, organ damage, and potential death.

A newborn infant is a baby who is within the first 28 days of life. This period is also referred to as the neonatal period. Newborns require specialized care and attention due to their immature bodily systems and increased vulnerability to various health issues. They are closely monitored for signs of well-being, growth, and development during this critical time.

"Withholding treatment" in a medical context refers to the deliberate decision not to provide or initiate certain medical treatments, interventions, or procedures for a patient. This decision is typically made after considering various factors such as the patient's wishes, their overall prognosis, the potential benefits and burdens of the treatment, and the patient's quality of life.

The reasons for withholding treatment can vary widely, but some common reasons include:

* The treatment is unlikely to be effective in improving the patient's condition or extending their life.
* The treatment may cause unnecessary discomfort, pain, or suffering for the patient.
* The patient has expressed a desire not to receive certain treatments, particularly if they are deemed to be burdensome or of little benefit.
* The cost of the treatment is prohibitive and not covered by insurance, and the patient cannot afford to pay out-of-pocket.

It's important to note that withholding treatment does not mean abandoning the patient or providing substandard care. Rather, it involves making thoughtful and informed decisions about the most appropriate course of action for a given situation, taking into account the patient's individual needs and preferences.

Blood substitutes, also known as artificial blood or blood surrogates, are fluids that are designed to mimic some of the properties and functions of human blood. They are used as a replacement for blood transfusions in situations where blood is not available or when it is not safe to use. Blood substitutes can be divided into two main categories: oxygen-carrying and non-oxygen-carrying.

Oxygen-carrying blood substitutes contain artificial molecules called hemoglobin-based oxygen carriers (HBOCs) that are designed to carry oxygen from the lungs to the body's tissues. These HBOCs can be derived from human or animal hemoglobin, or they can be synthetically produced.

Non-oxygen-carrying blood substitutes, on the other hand, do not contain hemoglobin and are used primarily to restore intravascular volume and maintain blood pressure in cases of hypovolemia (low blood volume) caused by bleeding or dehydration. These products include crystalloids, such as saline solution and lactated Ringer's solution, and colloids, such as albumin and hydroxyethyl starch solutions.

It is important to note that while blood substitutes can be useful in certain situations, they are not a perfect substitute for human blood. They do not provide all of the functions of blood, such as immune defense and clotting, and their use is associated with some risks, including allergic reactions, kidney damage, and increased oxygen free radical production. Therefore, they should only be used when there is no suitable alternative available.

In the field of medicine, "time factors" refer to the duration of symptoms or time elapsed since the onset of a medical condition, which can have significant implications for diagnosis and treatment. Understanding time factors is crucial in determining the progression of a disease, evaluating the effectiveness of treatments, and making critical decisions regarding patient care.

For example, in stroke management, "time is brain," meaning that rapid intervention within a specific time frame (usually within 4.5 hours) is essential to administering tissue plasminogen activator (tPA), a clot-busting drug that can minimize brain damage and improve patient outcomes. Similarly, in trauma care, the "golden hour" concept emphasizes the importance of providing definitive care within the first 60 minutes after injury to increase survival rates and reduce morbidity.

Time factors also play a role in monitoring the progression of chronic conditions like diabetes or heart disease, where regular follow-ups and assessments help determine appropriate treatment adjustments and prevent complications. In infectious diseases, time factors are crucial for initiating antibiotic therapy and identifying potential outbreaks to control their spread.

Overall, "time factors" encompass the significance of recognizing and acting promptly in various medical scenarios to optimize patient outcomes and provide effective care.

An emergency is a sudden, unexpected situation that requires immediate medical attention to prevent serious harm, permanent disability, or death. Emergencies can include severe injuries, trauma, cardiac arrest, stroke, difficulty breathing, severe allergic reactions, and other life-threatening conditions. In such situations, prompt medical intervention is necessary to stabilize the patient's condition, diagnose the underlying problem, and provide appropriate treatment.

Emergency medical services (EMS) are responsible for providing emergency care to patients outside of a hospital setting, such as in the home, workplace, or public place. EMS personnel include emergency medical technicians (EMTs), paramedics, and other first responders who are trained to assess a patient's condition, provide basic life support, and transport the patient to a hospital for further treatment.

In a hospital setting, an emergency department (ED) is a specialized unit that provides immediate care to patients with acute illnesses or injuries. ED staff includes physicians, nurses, and other healthcare professionals who are trained to handle a wide range of medical emergencies. The ED is equipped with advanced medical technology and resources to provide prompt diagnosis and treatment for critically ill or injured patients.

Overall, the goal of emergency medical care is to stabilize the patient's condition, prevent further harm, and provide timely and effective treatment to improve outcomes and save lives.

An ambulance is a vehicle specifically equipped to provide emergency medical care and transportation to sick or injured individuals. The term "ambulance" generally refers to the vehicle itself, as well as the medical services provided within it.

The primary function of an ambulance is to quickly transport patients to a hospital or other medical facility where they can receive further treatment. However, many ambulances are also staffed with trained medical professionals, such as paramedics and emergency medical technicians (EMTs), who can provide basic life support and advanced life support during transportation.

Ambulances may be equipped with a variety of medical equipment, including stretchers, oxygen tanks, heart monitors, defibrillators, and medication to treat various medical emergencies. Some ambulances may also have specialized equipment for transporting patients with specific needs, such as bariatric patients or those requiring critical care.

There are several types of ambulances, including:

1. Ground Ambulance: These are the most common type of ambulance and are designed to travel on roads and highways. They can range from basic transport vans to advanced mobile intensive care units (MICUs).
2. Air Ambulance: These are helicopters or fixed-wing aircraft that are used to transport patients over long distances or in remote areas where ground transportation is not feasible.
3. Water Ambulance: These are specialized boats or ships that are used to transport patients in coastal or aquatic environments, such as offshore oil rigs or cruise ships.
4. Bariatric Ambulance: These are specially designed ambulances that can accommodate patients who weigh over 300 pounds (136 kg). They typically have reinforced floors and walls, wider doors, and specialized lifting equipment to safely move the patient.
5. Critical Care Ambulance: These are advanced mobile intensive care units that are staffed with critical care nurses and paramedics. They are equipped with sophisticated medical equipment, such as ventilators and monitoring devices, to provide critical care during transportation.

Septic shock is a serious condition that occurs as a complication of an infection that has spread throughout the body. It's characterized by a severe drop in blood pressure and abnormalities in cellular metabolism, which can lead to organ failure and death if not promptly treated.

In septic shock, the immune system overreacts to an infection, releasing an overwhelming amount of inflammatory chemicals into the bloodstream. This leads to widespread inflammation, blood vessel dilation, and leaky blood vessels, which can cause fluid to leak out of the blood vessels and into surrounding tissues. As a result, the heart may not be able to pump enough blood to vital organs, leading to organ failure.

Septic shock is often caused by bacterial infections, but it can also be caused by fungal or viral infections. It's most commonly seen in people with weakened immune systems, such as those who have recently undergone surgery, have chronic medical conditions, or are taking medications that suppress the immune system.

Prompt diagnosis and treatment of septic shock is critical to prevent long-term complications and improve outcomes. Treatment typically involves aggressive antibiotic therapy, intravenous fluids, vasopressors to maintain blood pressure, and supportive care in an intensive care unit (ICU).

Neonatal Intensive Care (NIC) is a specialized medical care for newborn babies who are born prematurely, have low birth weight, or have medical conditions that require advanced medical intervention. This can include monitoring and support for breathing, heart function, temperature regulation, and nutrition. NICUs are staffed with healthcare professionals trained in neonatology, nursing, respiratory therapy, and other specialized areas to provide the highest level of care for these vulnerable infants.

The goal of NICU is to stabilize the newborn's condition, treat medical problems, promote growth and development, and support the family throughout the hospitalization and transition to home. The level of care provided in a NICU can vary depending on the severity of the infant's condition, ranging from basic monitoring and support to complex treatments such as mechanical ventilation, surgery, and medication therapy.

In general, NICUs are classified into different levels based on the complexity of care they can provide. Level I NICUs provide basic care for infants born at or near term who require minimal medical intervention. Level II NICUs provide more advanced care for premature or sick newborns who require specialized monitoring and treatment but do not need surgery or complex therapies. Level III NICUs provide the highest level of care, including advanced respiratory support, surgical services, and critical care for critically ill infants with complex medical conditions.

Colloids are a type of mixture that contains particles that are intermediate in size between those found in solutions and suspensions. These particles range in size from about 1 to 1000 nanometers in diameter, which is smaller than what can be seen with the naked eye, but larger than the molecules in a solution.

Colloids are created when one substance, called the dispersed phase, is dispersed in another substance, called the continuous phase. The dispersed phase can consist of particles such as proteins, emulsified fats, or finely divided solids, while the continuous phase is usually a liquid, but can also be a gas or a solid.

Colloids are important in many areas of medicine and biology, including drug delivery, diagnostic imaging, and tissue engineering. They are also found in nature, such as in milk, blood, and fog. The properties of colloids can be affected by factors such as pH, temperature, and the presence of other substances, which can influence their stability and behavior.

Intubation, intratracheal is a medical procedure in which a flexible plastic or rubber tube called an endotracheal tube (ETT) is inserted through the mouth or nose, passing through the vocal cords and into the trachea (windpipe). This procedure is performed to establish and maintain a patent airway, allowing for the delivery of oxygen and the removal of carbon dioxide during mechanical ventilation in various clinical scenarios, such as:

1. Respiratory failure or arrest
2. Procedural sedation
3. Surgery under general anesthesia
4. Neuromuscular disorders
5. Ingestion of toxic substances
6. Head and neck trauma
7. Critical illness or injury affecting the airway

The process of intubation is typically performed by trained medical professionals, such as anesthesiologists, emergency medicine physicians, or critical care specialists, using direct laryngoscopy or video laryngoscopy to visualize the vocal cords and guide the ETT into the correct position. Once placed, the ETT is secured to prevent dislodgement, and the patient's respiratory status is continuously monitored to ensure proper ventilation and oxygenation.

Treatment outcome is a term used to describe the result or effect of medical treatment on a patient's health status. It can be measured in various ways, such as through symptoms improvement, disease remission, reduced disability, improved quality of life, or survival rates. The treatment outcome helps healthcare providers evaluate the effectiveness of a particular treatment plan and make informed decisions about future care. It is also used in clinical research to compare the efficacy of different treatments and improve patient care.

"Swine" is a common term used to refer to even-toed ungulates of the family Suidae, including domestic pigs and wild boars. However, in a medical context, "swine" often appears in the phrase "swine flu," which is a strain of influenza virus that typically infects pigs but can also cause illness in humans. The 2009 H1N1 pandemic was caused by a new strain of swine-origin influenza A virus, which was commonly referred to as "swine flu." It's important to note that this virus is not transmitted through eating cooked pork products; it spreads from person to person, mainly through respiratory droplets produced when an infected person coughs or sneezes.

Rehydration solutions are medically formulated drinks designed to restore fluid and electrolyte balance in the body, particularly when someone is dehydrated due to vomiting, diarrhea, or excessive sweating. These solutions typically contain water, glucose (or sucrose), and essential electrolytes such as sodium, potassium, chloride, and bicarbonate in specific concentrations to match the body's needs. Common examples of rehydration solutions include oral rehydration salts (ORS) and sports drinks, which help replenish the body's water and electrolyte levels, promoting rapid and effective rehydration.

Burns are injuries to tissues caused by heat, electricity, chemicals, friction, or radiation. They are classified based on their severity:

1. First-degree burns (superficial burns) affect only the outer layer of skin (epidermis), causing redness, pain, and swelling.
2. Second-degree burns (partial-thickness burns) damage both the epidermis and the underlying layer of skin (dermis). They result in redness, pain, swelling, and blistering.
3. Third-degree burns (full-thickness burns) destroy the entire depth of the skin and can also damage underlying muscles, tendons, and bones. These burns appear white or blackened and charred, and they may be painless due to destroyed nerve endings.

Immediate medical attention is required for second-degree and third-degree burns, as well as for large area first-degree burns, to prevent infection, manage pain, and ensure proper healing. Treatment options include wound care, antibiotics, pain management, and possibly skin grafting or surgery in severe cases.

Emergency treatment refers to the urgent medical interventions and care provided to individuals who are experiencing a severe injury, illness, or life-threatening condition. The primary aim of emergency treatment is to stabilize the patient's condition, prevent further harm, and provide immediate medical attention to save the patient's life or limb.

Emergency treatment may include various medical procedures, such as cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR), airway management, administering medications, controlling bleeding, treating burns, immobilizing fractures, and providing pain relief. The specific emergency treatment provided will depend on the nature and severity of the patient's condition.

Emergency treatment is typically delivered in an emergency department (ED) or a similar setting, such as an urgent care center, ambulance, or helicopter transport. Healthcare professionals who provide emergency treatment include emergency physicians, nurses, paramedics, and other specialists trained in emergency medicine.

It's important to note that emergency treatment is different from routine medical care, which is usually provided on a scheduled basis and focuses on preventing, diagnosing, and managing chronic or ongoing health conditions. Emergency treatment, on the other hand, is provided in response to an acute event or crisis that requires immediate attention and action.

Hemodynamics is the study of how blood flows through the cardiovascular system, including the heart and the vascular network. It examines various factors that affect blood flow, such as blood volume, viscosity, vessel length and diameter, and pressure differences between different parts of the circulatory system. Hemodynamics also considers the impact of various physiological and pathological conditions on these variables, and how they in turn influence the function of vital organs and systems in the body. It is a critical area of study in fields such as cardiology, anesthesiology, and critical care medicine.

Oxygen inhalation therapy is a medical treatment that involves the administration of oxygen to a patient through a nasal tube or mask, with the purpose of increasing oxygen concentration in the body. This therapy is used to treat various medical conditions such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), pneumonia, heart failure, and other conditions that cause low levels of oxygen in the blood. The additional oxygen helps to improve tissue oxygenation, reduce work of breathing, and promote overall patient comfort and well-being. Oxygen therapy may be delivered continuously or intermittently, depending on the patient's needs and medical condition.

Blood circulation, also known as cardiovascular circulation, refers to the process by which blood is pumped by the heart and circulated throughout the body through a network of blood vessels, including arteries, veins, and capillaries. This process ensures that oxygen and nutrients are delivered to cells and tissues, while waste products and carbon dioxide are removed.

The circulation of blood can be divided into two main parts: the pulmonary circulation and the systemic circulation. The pulmonary circulation involves the movement of blood between the heart and the lungs, where it picks up oxygen and releases carbon dioxide. The systemic circulation refers to the movement of blood between the heart and the rest of the body, delivering oxygen and nutrients to cells and tissues while picking up waste products for removal.

The heart plays a central role in blood circulation, acting as a pump that contracts and relaxes to move blood through the body. The contraction of the heart's left ventricle pushes oxygenated blood into the aorta, which then branches off into smaller arteries that carry blood throughout the body. The blood then flows through capillaries, where it exchanges oxygen and nutrients for waste products and carbon dioxide with surrounding cells and tissues. The deoxygenated blood is then collected in veins, which merge together to form larger vessels that eventually return the blood back to the heart's right atrium. From there, the blood is pumped into the lungs to pick up oxygen and release carbon dioxide, completing the cycle of blood circulation.

Hospital equipment and supplies refer to the physical resources used in a hospital setting to provide patient care and treatment. This includes both reusable and disposable medical devices and items used for diagnostic, therapeutic, monitoring, or supportive purposes. Examples of hospital equipment include but are not limited to:

1. Medical beds and mattresses
2. Wheelchairs and stretchers
3. Infusion pumps and syringe drivers
4. Defibrillators and ECG machines
5. Anesthesia machines and ventilators
6. Operating room tables and lights
7. X-ray machines, CT scanners, and MRI machines
8. Ultrasound machines and other imaging devices
9. Laboratory equipment for testing and analysis

Hospital supplies include items used in the delivery of patient care, such as:

1. Syringes, needles, and IV catheters
2. Bandages, dressings, and wound care products
3. Gloves, gowns, and other personal protective equipment (PPE)
4. Sterile surgical instruments and sutures
5. Incontinence pads and briefs
6. Nutritional supplements and feeding tubes
7. Medications and medication administration supplies
8. Disinfectants, cleaning agents, and sterilization equipment.

Proper management of hospital equipment and supplies is essential for ensuring patient safety, providing high-quality care, and controlling healthcare costs.

Clinical competence is the ability of a healthcare professional to provide safe and effective patient care, demonstrating the knowledge, skills, and attitudes required for the job. It involves the integration of theoretical knowledge with practical skills, judgment, and decision-making abilities in real-world clinical situations. Clinical competence is typically evaluated through various methods such as direct observation, case studies, simulations, and feedback from peers and supervisors.

A clinically competent healthcare professional should be able to:

1. Demonstrate a solid understanding of the relevant medical knowledge and its application in clinical practice.
2. Perform essential clinical skills proficiently and safely.
3. Communicate effectively with patients, families, and other healthcare professionals.
4. Make informed decisions based on critical thinking and problem-solving abilities.
5. Exhibit professionalism, ethical behavior, and cultural sensitivity in patient care.
6. Continuously evaluate and improve their performance through self-reflection and ongoing learning.

Maintaining clinical competence is essential for healthcare professionals to ensure the best possible outcomes for their patients and stay current with advances in medical science and technology.

Prospective studies, also known as longitudinal studies, are a type of cohort study in which data is collected forward in time, following a group of individuals who share a common characteristic or exposure over a period of time. The researchers clearly define the study population and exposure of interest at the beginning of the study and follow up with the participants to determine the outcomes that develop over time. This type of study design allows for the investigation of causal relationships between exposures and outcomes, as well as the identification of risk factors and the estimation of disease incidence rates. Prospective studies are particularly useful in epidemiology and medical research when studying diseases with long latency periods or rare outcomes.

Critical care, also known as intensive care, is a medical specialty that deals with the diagnosis and management of life-threatening conditions that require close monitoring and organ support. Critical care medicine is practiced in critical care units (ICUs) or intensive care units of hospitals. The goal of critical care is to prevent further deterioration of the patient's condition, to support failing organs, and to treat any underlying conditions that may have caused the patient to become critically ill.

Critical care involves a multidisciplinary team approach, including intensivists (specialist doctors trained in critical care), nurses, respiratory therapists, pharmacists, and other healthcare professionals. The care provided in the ICU is highly specialized and often involves advanced medical technology such as mechanical ventilation, dialysis, and continuous renal replacement therapy.

Patients who require critical care may have a wide range of conditions, including severe infections, respiratory failure, cardiovascular instability, neurological emergencies, and multi-organ dysfunction syndrome (MODS). Critical care is an essential component of modern healthcare and has significantly improved the outcomes of critically ill patients.

An emergency service in a hospital is a department that provides immediate medical or surgical care for individuals who are experiencing an acute illness, injury, or severe symptoms that require immediate attention. The goal of an emergency service is to quickly assess, stabilize, and treat patients who require urgent medical intervention, with the aim of preventing further harm or death.

Emergency services in hospitals typically operate 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, and are staffed by teams of healthcare professionals including physicians, nurses, physician assistants, nurse practitioners, and other allied health professionals. These teams are trained to provide rapid evaluation and treatment for a wide range of medical conditions, from minor injuries to life-threatening emergencies such as heart attacks, strokes, and severe infections.

In addition to providing emergency care, hospital emergency services also serve as a key point of entry for patients who require further hospitalization or specialized care. They work closely with other departments within the hospital, such as radiology, laboratory, and critical care units, to ensure that patients receive timely and appropriate treatment. Overall, the emergency service in a hospital plays a crucial role in ensuring that patients receive prompt and effective medical care during times of crisis.

Emergency medicine is a medical specialty that focuses on the diagnosis and treatment of acute illnesses or injuries that require immediate medical attention. This can include conditions such as severe trauma, cardiac arrest, stroke, respiratory distress, and other life-threatening situations. Emergency medicine physicians, also known as emergency doctors or ER doctors, are trained to provide rapid assessment, diagnosis, and treatment in a fast-paced and often unpredictable environment. They work closely with other healthcare professionals, such as nurses, paramedics, and specialists, to ensure that patients receive the best possible care in a timely manner. Emergency medicine is a critical component of the healthcare system, providing essential services for patients who require immediate medical attention, 24 hours a day, 7 days a week.

Animal disease models are specialized animals, typically rodents such as mice or rats, that have been genetically engineered or exposed to certain conditions to develop symptoms and physiological changes similar to those seen in human diseases. These models are used in medical research to study the pathophysiology of diseases, identify potential therapeutic targets, test drug efficacy and safety, and understand disease mechanisms.

The genetic modifications can include knockout or knock-in mutations, transgenic expression of specific genes, or RNA interference techniques. The animals may also be exposed to environmental factors such as chemicals, radiation, or infectious agents to induce the disease state.

Examples of animal disease models include:

1. Mouse models of cancer: Genetically engineered mice that develop various types of tumors, allowing researchers to study cancer initiation, progression, and metastasis.
2. Alzheimer's disease models: Transgenic mice expressing mutant human genes associated with Alzheimer's disease, which exhibit amyloid plaque formation and cognitive decline.
3. Diabetes models: Obese and diabetic mouse strains like the NOD (non-obese diabetic) or db/db mice, used to study the development of type 1 and type 2 diabetes, respectively.
4. Cardiovascular disease models: Atherosclerosis-prone mice, such as ApoE-deficient or LDLR-deficient mice, that develop plaque buildup in their arteries when fed a high-fat diet.
5. Inflammatory bowel disease models: Mice with genetic mutations affecting intestinal barrier function and immune response, such as IL-10 knockout or SAMP1/YitFc mice, which develop colitis.

Animal disease models are essential tools in preclinical research, but it is important to recognize their limitations. Differences between species can affect the translatability of results from animal studies to human patients. Therefore, researchers must carefully consider the choice of model and interpret findings cautiously when applying them to human diseases.

Multiple trauma, also known as polytrauma, is a medical term used to describe severe injuries to the body that are sustained in more than one place or region. It often involves damage to multiple organ systems and can be caused by various incidents such as traffic accidents, falls from significant heights, high-energy collisions, or violent acts.

The injuries sustained in multiple trauma may include fractures, head injuries, internal bleeding, chest and abdominal injuries, and soft tissue injuries. These injuries can lead to a complex medical situation requiring immediate and ongoing care from a multidisciplinary team of healthcare professionals, including emergency physicians, trauma surgeons, critical care specialists, nurses, rehabilitation therapists, and mental health providers.

Multiple trauma is a serious condition that can result in long-term disability or even death if not treated promptly and effectively.

Epinephrine, also known as adrenaline, is a hormone and a neurotransmitter that is produced in the body. It is released by the adrenal glands in response to stress or excitement, and it prepares the body for the "fight or flight" response. Epinephrine works by binding to specific receptors in the body, which causes a variety of physiological effects, including increased heart rate and blood pressure, improved muscle strength and alertness, and narrowing of the blood vessels in the skin and intestines. It is also used as a medication to treat various medical conditions, such as anaphylaxis (a severe allergic reaction), cardiac arrest, and low blood pressure.

Perinatal care refers to the health care provided to pregnant individuals, fetuses, and newborn infants during the time immediately before and after birth. This period is defined as beginning at approximately 20 weeks of gestation and ending 4 weeks after birth. Perinatal care includes preventative measures, medical and supportive services, and treatment for complications during pregnancy, childbirth, and in the newborn period. It encompasses a wide range of services including prenatal care, labor and delivery management, postpartum care, and neonatal care. The goal of perinatal care is to ensure the best possible outcomes for both the mother and the baby by preventing, diagnosing, and treating any potential health issues that may arise during this critical period.

Intraosseous infusion is a medical procedure that involves the injection of fluid or medication directly into the bone marrow, specifically through the tibia or humerus bones. This route is used when intravenous access is difficult or impossible to obtain in emergency situations, such as cardiac arrest, severe trauma, or shock. The goal is to deliver essential fluids and medications rapidly into the systemic circulation, bypassing the need for traditional venous access. Intraosseous infusions are considered a temporary measure until intravenous access can be established.

"Military medicine" is a specific branch of medical practice that deals with the diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of diseases and injuries in military populations. It encompasses the provision of healthcare services to military personnel, both in peacetime and during times of conflict or emergency situations. This may include providing care in combat zones, managing mass casualties, delivering preventive medicine programs, conducting medical research, and providing medical support during peacekeeping missions and humanitarian assistance efforts. Military medicine also places a strong emphasis on the development and use of specialized equipment, techniques, and protocols to ensure the best possible medical care for military personnel in challenging environments.

Advance directives are legal documents that allow individuals to express their wishes and preferences regarding medical treatment in the event that they become unable to make decisions for themselves due to serious illness or injury. These documents typically include a living will, which outlines the types of treatments an individual wants or doesn't want to receive in specific circumstances, and a healthcare power of attorney, which designates a trusted person to make medical decisions on their behalf.

Advance directives are an important tool for ensuring that individuals receive the medical care they desire, even when they cannot communicate their wishes themselves. They can also help to prevent family members from having to make difficult decisions about medical treatment without knowing what their loved one would have wanted. It is important for individuals to discuss their advance directives with their healthcare providers and loved ones to ensure that everyone understands their wishes and can carry them out if necessary.

Artificial respiration is an emergency procedure that can be used to provide oxygen to a person who is not breathing or is breathing inadequately. It involves manually forcing air into the lungs, either by compressing the chest or using a device to deliver breaths. The goal of artificial respiration is to maintain adequate oxygenation of the body's tissues and organs until the person can breathe on their own or until advanced medical care arrives. Artificial respiration may be used in conjunction with cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) in cases of cardiac arrest.

Medical survival rate is a statistical measure used to determine the percentage of patients who are still alive for a specific period of time after their diagnosis or treatment for a certain condition or disease. It is often expressed as a five-year survival rate, which refers to the proportion of people who are alive five years after their diagnosis. Survival rates can be affected by many factors, including the stage of the disease at diagnosis, the patient's age and overall health, the effectiveness of treatment, and other health conditions that the patient may have. It is important to note that survival rates are statistical estimates and do not necessarily predict an individual patient's prognosis.

Hypotension is a medical term that refers to abnormally low blood pressure, usually defined as a systolic blood pressure less than 90 millimeters of mercury (mm Hg) or a diastolic blood pressure less than 60 mm Hg. Blood pressure is the force exerted by the blood against the walls of the blood vessels as the heart pumps blood.

Hypotension can cause symptoms such as dizziness, lightheadedness, weakness, and fainting, especially when standing up suddenly. In severe cases, hypotension can lead to shock, which is a life-threatening condition characterized by multiple organ failure due to inadequate blood flow.

Hypotension can be caused by various factors, including certain medications, medical conditions such as heart disease, endocrine disorders, and dehydration. It is important to seek medical attention if you experience symptoms of hypotension, as it can indicate an underlying health issue that requires treatment.

The Injury Severity Score (ISS) is a medical scoring system used to assess the severity of trauma in patients with multiple injuries. It's based on the Abbreviated Injury Scale (AIS), which classifies each injury by body region on a scale from 1 (minor) to 6 (maximum severity).

The ISS is calculated by summing the squares of the highest AIS score in each of the three most severely injured body regions. The possible ISS ranges from 0 to 75, with higher scores indicating more severe injuries. An ISS over 15 is generally considered a significant injury, and an ISS over 25 is associated with a high risk of mortality. It's important to note that the ISS has limitations, as it doesn't consider the number or type of injuries within each body region, only the most severe one.

Oxygen is a colorless, odorless, tasteless gas that constitutes about 21% of the earth's atmosphere. It is a crucial element for human and most living organisms as it is vital for respiration. Inhaled oxygen enters the lungs and binds to hemoglobin in red blood cells, which carries it to tissues throughout the body where it is used to convert nutrients into energy and carbon dioxide, a waste product that is exhaled.

Medically, supplemental oxygen therapy may be provided to patients with conditions such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), pneumonia, heart failure, or other medical conditions that impair the body's ability to extract sufficient oxygen from the air. Oxygen can be administered through various devices, including nasal cannulas, face masks, and ventilators.

In a medical context, masks are typically used as personal protective equipment (PPE) to protect the wearer from inhaling airborne particles and contaminants. They can also help prevent the spread of respiratory droplets from the wearer to others, which is particularly important in clinical settings where patients may have infectious diseases.

There are several types of masks used in medical settings, including:

1. Medical Masks: These are loose-fitting, disposable masks that create a physical barrier between the mouth and nose of the wearer and potential contaminants in the immediate environment. They are commonly used by healthcare professionals during medical procedures to protect themselves and patients from respiratory droplets and aerosols.
2. N95 Respirators: These are tight-fitting masks that can filter out both large droplets and small aerosol particles, including those containing viruses. They offer a higher level of protection than medical masks and are recommended for use in healthcare settings where there is a risk of exposure to airborne contaminants, such as during certain medical procedures or when caring for patients with infectious diseases like tuberculosis or COVID-19.
3. Surgical N95 Respirators: These are a specialized type of N95 respirator designed for use in surgical settings. They have a clear plastic window that allows the wearer's mouth and nose to be visible, which is useful during surgery where clear communication and identification of the wearer's facial features are important.
4. Powered Air-Purifying Respirators (PAPRs): These are motorized masks that use a fan to draw air through a filter, providing a continuous supply of clean air to the wearer. They offer a high level of protection and are often used in healthcare settings where there is a risk of exposure to highly infectious diseases or hazardous substances.

It's important to note that masks should be used in conjunction with other infection prevention measures, such as hand hygiene and social distancing, to provide the best possible protection against respiratory illnesses.

A blood component transfusion is the process of transferring a specific component of donated blood into a recipient's bloodstream. Blood components include red blood cells, plasma, platelets, and cryoprecipitate (a fraction of plasma that contains clotting factors). These components can be separated from whole blood and stored separately to allow for targeted transfusions based on the individual needs of the patient.

For example, a patient who is anemic may only require a red blood cell transfusion, while a patient with severe bleeding may need both red blood cells and plasma to replace lost volume and clotting factors. Platelet transfusions are often used for patients with low platelet counts or platelet dysfunction, and cryoprecipitate is used for patients with factor VIII or fibrinogen deficiencies.

Blood component transfusions must be performed under strict medical supervision to ensure compatibility between the donor and recipient blood types and to monitor for any adverse reactions. Proper handling, storage, and administration of blood components are also critical to ensure their safety and efficacy.

The American Heart Association (AHA) is a non-profit organization in the United States that aims to reduce disability and death from cardiovascular diseases and stroke, including heart disease and stroke. The AHA was founded in 1924 and is one of the oldest and largest voluntary organizations dedicated to fighting cardiovascular disease.

The AHA provides a range of services, including:

* Funding research into the causes, prevention, and treatment of heart disease and stroke
* Providing educational resources for healthcare professionals, patients, and the general public
* Advocating for policies that promote heart health and prevent heart disease and stroke
* Developing guidelines and standards for the diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of cardiovascular diseases

The AHA is funded through donations from individuals, corporations, and foundations. It operates with a volunteer board of directors and a professional staff. The organization has more than 3,400 volunteers and 70 local offices across the United States.

Blood gas analysis is a medical test that measures the levels of oxygen and carbon dioxide in the blood, as well as the pH level, which indicates the acidity or alkalinity of the blood. This test is often used to evaluate lung function, respiratory disorders, and acid-base balance in the body. It can also be used to monitor the effectiveness of treatments for conditions such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), asthma, and other respiratory illnesses. The analysis is typically performed on a sample of arterial blood, although venous blood may also be used in some cases.

Emergency nursing is a specialized field of nursing that involves providing care to patients who are experiencing acute illnesses or injuries that require immediate attention. Emergency nurses work in emergency departments, trauma centers, and urgent care settings, where they quickly assess a patient's condition, provide life-saving interventions, and coordinate care with other members of the healthcare team.

Emergency nurses must be highly skilled in a wide range of procedures, including cardiac monitoring, airway management, IV insertion, and medication administration. They must also be able to communicate effectively with patients and their families, as well as other healthcare providers, to ensure that each patient receives the best possible care.

In addition to their technical skills, emergency nurses must be able to work in a fast-paced, high-stress environment and make quick decisions under pressure. They must also be compassionate and empathetic, as they often provide care to patients who are experiencing some of the most difficult moments of their lives. Overall, emergency nursing is a rewarding and challenging field that requires a unique combination of technical expertise, critical thinking skills, and interpersonal abilities.

Sepsis is a life-threatening condition that arises when the body's response to an infection injures its own tissues and organs. It is characterized by a whole-body inflammatory state (systemic inflammation) that can lead to blood clotting issues, tissue damage, and multiple organ failure.

Sepsis happens when an infection you already have triggers a chain reaction throughout your body. Infections that lead to sepsis most often start in the lungs, urinary tract, skin, or gastrointestinal tract.

Sepsis is a medical emergency. If you suspect sepsis, seek immediate medical attention. Early recognition and treatment of sepsis are crucial to improve outcomes. Treatment usually involves antibiotics, intravenous fluids, and may require oxygen, medication to raise blood pressure, and corticosteroids. In severe cases, surgery may be required to clear the infection.

Allied health personnel refers to a group of healthcare professionals who are licensed or regulated to provide specific services within the healthcare system. They work in collaboration with physicians and other healthcare providers to deliver comprehensive medical care. Allied health personnel include various disciplines such as:

1. Occupational therapists
2. Physical therapists
3. Speech-language pathologists
4. Audiologists
5. Respiratory therapists
6. Dietitians and nutritionists
7. Social workers
8. Diagnostic medical sonographers
9. Radiologic technologists
10. Clinical laboratory scientists
11. Genetic counselors
12. Rehabilitation counselors
13. Therapeutic recreation specialists

These professionals play a crucial role in the prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of various medical conditions and are essential members of the healthcare team.

Practice guidelines, also known as clinical practice guidelines, are systematically developed statements that aim to assist healthcare professionals and patients in making informed decisions about appropriate health care for specific clinical circumstances. They are based on a thorough evaluation of the available scientific evidence, consensus of expert opinion, and consideration of patient preferences. Practice guidelines can cover a wide range of topics, including diagnosis, management, prevention, and treatment options for various medical conditions. They are intended to improve the quality and consistency of care, reduce unnecessary variations in practice, and promote evidence-based medicine. However, they should not replace clinical judgment or individualized patient care.

"Random allocation," also known as "random assignment" or "randomization," is a process used in clinical trials and other research studies to distribute participants into different intervention groups (such as experimental group vs. control group) in a way that minimizes selection bias and ensures the groups are comparable at the start of the study.

In random allocation, each participant has an equal chance of being assigned to any group, and the assignment is typically made using a computer-generated randomization schedule or other objective methods. This process helps to ensure that any differences between the groups are due to the intervention being tested rather than pre-existing differences in the participants' characteristics.

Exsanguination is a medical term that refers to the state of complete loss of blood from the circulatory system. It can be caused by severe bleeding due to trauma, surgery, or medical conditions such as ruptured aneurysms or hemorrhagic shock. Exsanguination can lead to hypovolemia, which is a critical decrease in blood volume that can result in organ failure and death if not promptly treated with fluid replacement and blood transfusions.

Multiple Organ Failure (MOF) is a severe condition characterized by the dysfunction or failure of more than one organ system in the body. It often occurs as a result of serious illness, trauma, or infection, such as sepsis. The organs that commonly fail include the lungs, kidneys, liver, and heart. This condition can lead to significant morbidity and mortality if not promptly diagnosed and treated.

The definition of MOF has evolved over time, but a widely accepted one is the "Sequential Organ Failure Assessment" (SOFA) score, which evaluates six organ systems: respiratory, coagulation, liver, cardiovascular, renal, and neurologic. A SOFA score of 10 or more indicates MOF, and a higher score is associated with worse outcomes.

MOF can be classified as primary or secondary. Primary MOF occurs when the initial insult directly causes organ dysfunction, such as in severe trauma or septic shock. Secondary MOF occurs when the initial injury or illness has been controlled, but organ dysfunction develops later due to ongoing inflammation and other factors.

Early recognition and aggressive management of MOF are crucial for improving outcomes. Treatment typically involves supportive care, such as mechanical ventilation, dialysis, and medication to support cardiovascular function. In some cases, surgery or other interventions may be necessary to address the underlying cause of organ dysfunction.

The Apgar score is a quick assessment of the physical condition of a newborn infant, assessed by measuring heart rate, respiratory effort, muscle tone, reflex irritability, and skin color. It is named after Virginia Apgar, an American anesthesiologist who developed it in 1952. The score is usually given at one minute and five minutes after birth, with a possible range of 0 to 10. Scores of 7 and above are considered normal, while scores of 4-6 indicate moderate distress, and scores below 4 indicate severe distress. The Apgar score can provide important information for making decisions about the need for resuscitation or other medical interventions after birth.

Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation (ECMO) is a medical procedure that uses a machine to take over the function of the lungs and sometimes also the heart, by pumping and oxygenating the patient's blood outside of their body. This technique is used when a patient's lungs or heart are unable to provide adequate gas exchange or circulation, despite other forms of treatment.

During ECMO, blood is removed from the body through a large catheter or cannula, passed through a membrane oxygenator that adds oxygen and removes carbon dioxide, and then returned to the body through another catheter. This process helps to rest and heal the lungs and/or heart while maintaining adequate oxygenation and circulation to the rest of the body.

ECMO is typically used as a last resort in patients with severe respiratory or cardiac failure who have not responded to other treatments, such as mechanical ventilation or medication. It can be a life-saving procedure, but it also carries risks, including bleeding, infection, and damage to blood vessels or organs.

A coma is a deep state of unconsciousness in which an individual cannot be awakened, cannot respond to stimuli, and does not exhibit any sleep-wake cycles. It is typically caused by severe brain injury, illness, or toxic exposure that impairs the function of the brainstem and cerebral cortex.

In a coma, the person may appear to be asleep, but they are not aware of their surroundings or able to communicate or respond to stimuli. Comas can last for varying lengths of time, from days to weeks or even months, and some people may emerge from a coma with varying degrees of brain function and disability.

Medical professionals use various diagnostic tools and assessments to evaluate the level of consciousness and brain function in individuals who are in a coma, including the Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS), which measures eye opening, verbal response, and motor response. Treatment for coma typically involves supportive care to maintain vital functions, manage any underlying medical conditions, and prevent further complications.

A blood transfusion is a medical procedure in which blood or its components are transferred from one individual (donor) to another (recipient) through a vein. The donated blood can be fresh whole blood, packed red blood cells, platelets, plasma, or cryoprecipitate, depending on the recipient's needs. Blood transfusions are performed to replace lost blood due to severe bleeding, treat anemia, support patients undergoing major surgeries, or manage various medical conditions such as hemophilia, thalassemia, and leukemia. The donated blood must be carefully cross-matched with the recipient's blood type to minimize the risk of transfusion reactions.

Albumins are a type of protein found in various biological fluids, including blood plasma. The most well-known albumin is serum albumin, which is produced by the liver and is the most abundant protein in blood plasma. Serum albumin plays several important roles in the body, such as maintaining oncotic pressure (which helps to regulate fluid balance in the body), transporting various substances (such as hormones, fatty acids, and drugs), and acting as an antioxidant.

Albumins are soluble in water and have a molecular weight ranging from 65,000 to 69,000 daltons. They are composed of a single polypeptide chain that contains approximately 585 amino acid residues. The structure of albumin is characterized by a high proportion of alpha-helices and beta-sheets, which give it a stable, folded conformation.

In addition to their role in human physiology, albumins are also used as diagnostic markers in medicine. For example, low serum albumin levels may indicate liver disease, malnutrition, or inflammation, while high levels may be seen in dehydration or certain types of kidney disease. Albumins may also be used as a replacement therapy in patients with severe protein loss, such as those with nephrotic syndrome or burn injuries.

Abdominal injuries refer to damages or traumas that occur in the abdomen, an area of the body that is located between the chest and the pelvis. This region contains several vital organs such as the stomach, liver, spleen, pancreas, small intestine, large intestine, kidneys, and reproductive organs. Abdominal injuries can range from minor bruises and cuts to severe internal bleeding and organ damage, depending on the cause and severity of the trauma.

Common causes of abdominal injuries include:

* Blunt force trauma, such as that caused by car accidents, falls, or physical assaults
* Penetrating trauma, such as that caused by gunshot wounds or stabbing
* Deceleration injuries, which occur when the body is moving at a high speed and suddenly stops, causing internal organs to continue moving and collide with each other or the abdominal wall

Symptoms of abdominal injuries may include:

* Pain or tenderness in the abdomen
* Swelling or bruising in the abdomen
* Nausea or vomiting
* Dizziness or lightheadedness
* Blood in the urine or stool
* Difficulty breathing or shortness of breath
* Rapid heartbeat or low blood pressure

Abdominal injuries can be life-threatening if left untreated, and immediate medical attention is necessary to prevent complications such as infection, internal bleeding, organ failure, or even death. Treatment may include surgery, medication, or other interventions depending on the severity and location of the injury.

Adrenergic agonists are medications or substances that bind to and activate adrenergic receptors, which are a type of receptor in the body that respond to neurotransmitters such as norepinephrine and epinephrine (also known as adrenaline).

There are two main types of adrenergic receptors: alpha and beta receptors. Alpha-adrenergic agonists activate alpha receptors, while beta-adrenergic agonists activate beta receptors. These medications can have a variety of effects on the body, depending on which type of receptor they act on.

Alpha-adrenergic agonists are often used to treat conditions such as nasal congestion, glaucoma, and low blood pressure. Examples include phenylephrine, oxymetazoline, and clonidine.

Beta-adrenergic agonists are commonly used to treat respiratory conditions such as asthma and COPD (chronic obstructive pulmonary disease). They work by relaxing the smooth muscle in the airways, which makes it easier to breathe. Examples include albuterol, salmeterol, and formoterol.

It's important to note that adrenergic agonists can have both desired and undesired effects on the body. They should be used under the guidance of a healthcare professional, who can monitor their effectiveness and potential side effects.

'Drama' is a term that is more commonly associated with the humanities, particularly literature, theater, and film, rather than medicine. It refers to a type of narrative that explores human emotions, conflicts, and experiences through characters and plot. Drama can be presented in various forms such as plays, movies, or television shows.

There is no medical definition for 'drama' as it is not a term used in the field of medicine. However, in some contexts, drama may refer to emotional distress or turmoil that a person experiences, which could be relevant to mental health and psychology. In such cases, healthcare professionals might use related terms like "psychological distress," "emotional disturbance," or "crisis intervention" to describe the situation more accurately.

Blood pressure is the force exerted by circulating blood on the walls of the blood vessels. It is measured in millimeters of mercury (mmHg) and is given as two figures:

1. Systolic pressure: This is the pressure when the heart pushes blood out into the arteries.
2. Diastolic pressure: This is the pressure when the heart rests between beats, allowing it to fill with blood.

Normal blood pressure for adults is typically around 120/80 mmHg, although this can vary slightly depending on age, sex, and other factors. High blood pressure (hypertension) is generally considered to be a reading of 130/80 mmHg or higher, while low blood pressure (hypotension) is usually defined as a reading below 90/60 mmHg. It's important to note that blood pressure can fluctuate throughout the day and may be affected by factors such as stress, physical activity, and medication use.

Sprague-Dawley rats are a strain of albino laboratory rats that are widely used in scientific research. They were first developed by researchers H.H. Sprague and R.C. Dawley in the early 20th century, and have since become one of the most commonly used rat strains in biomedical research due to their relatively large size, ease of handling, and consistent genetic background.

Sprague-Dawley rats are outbred, which means that they are genetically diverse and do not suffer from the same limitations as inbred strains, which can have reduced fertility and increased susceptibility to certain diseases. They are also characterized by their docile nature and low levels of aggression, making them easier to handle and study than some other rat strains.

These rats are used in a wide variety of research areas, including toxicology, pharmacology, nutrition, cancer, and behavioral studies. Because they are genetically diverse, Sprague-Dawley rats can be used to model a range of human diseases and conditions, making them an important tool in the development of new drugs and therapies.

A Trauma Center is a hospital that has specialized resources and capabilities to provide comprehensive care for severely injured patients. It is a designated facility that has met strict criteria established by the American College of Surgeons (ACS) and/or state or regional trauma systems. These criteria include having a dedicated trauma team, available 24/7, with specially trained healthcare professionals who can promptly assess, resuscitate, operate, and provide critical care to patients suffering from traumatic injuries.

Trauma centers are categorized into levels (I-V), based on the resources and capabilities they offer. Level I trauma centers have the highest level of resources and are capable of providing comprehensive care for all types of traumatic injuries, including conducting research and offering education in trauma care. In contrast, lower-level trauma centers may not have the same extent of resources but still provide essential trauma care services to their communities.

The primary goal of a trauma center is to ensure that severely injured patients receive prompt, high-quality care to minimize the risk of complications, reduce long-term disability, and improve overall outcomes.

A Compact Disc (CD) is not a medical term, but rather a term used in technology and electronics. It is a small, flat, circular piece of optical storage media that can hold digital data such as music, video, or computer files. The medical field does not use compact discs for storing patient records or other medical information, as there are more secure and efficient methods available for electronic health records (EHRs).

A premature infant is a baby born before 37 weeks of gestation. They may face various health challenges because their organs are not fully developed. The earlier a baby is born, the higher the risk of complications. Prematurity can lead to short-term and long-term health issues, such as respiratory distress syndrome, jaundice, anemia, infections, hearing problems, vision problems, developmental delays, and cerebral palsy. Intensive medical care and support are often necessary for premature infants to ensure their survival and optimal growth and development.

Hospital mortality is a term used to describe the number or rate of deaths that occur in a hospital setting during a specific period. It is often used as a measure of the quality of healthcare provided by a hospital, as a higher hospital mortality rate may indicate poorer care or more complex cases being treated. However, it's important to note that hospital mortality rates can be influenced by many factors, including the severity of illness of the patients being treated, patient demographics, and the availability of resources and specialized care. Therefore, hospital mortality rates should be interpreted with caution and in the context of other quality metrics.

Passive euthanasia is the act of withholding or withdrawing medical treatments that are necessary to maintain life, allowing the natural dying process to occur. This can include stopping artificial nutrition and hydration, mechanical ventilation, or other forms of life-sustaining treatment. The goal of passive euthanasia is to allow a person who is suffering from a terminal illness or irreversible condition to die with dignity and in comfort, sparing them from unnecessary pain and suffering. It is important to note that the decision to engage in passive euthanasia should be made carefully, with the full involvement of the patient, their family, and medical team, and in accordance with applicable laws and ethical guidelines.

Emergency Medical Service (EMS) communication systems are networks and technologies used to facilitate the communication and coordination of emergency medical services. These systems typically include dispatch centers, radio and telephone communications, computer-aided dispatch (CAD) systems, and other technologies that enable EMS personnel to quickly and effectively respond to medical emergencies.

The primary goal of an EMS communication system is to ensure that the right resources are dispatched to the right location in a timely manner, and that EMS providers have the information they need to provide appropriate care. This may include transmitting patient information, such as medical history and symptoms, from the dispatch center to the responding EMS personnel, as well as coordinating the response of multiple agencies, such as fire departments and law enforcement, to a single incident.

EMS communication systems are an essential component of emergency medical services, as they help ensure that patients receive the care they need as quickly and efficiently as possible.

'Medical Staff, Hospital' is a general term that refers to the group of licensed physicians and other healthcare professionals who are responsible for providing medical care to patients in a hospital setting. The medical staff may include attending physicians, residents, interns, fellows, nurse practitioners, physician assistants, and other advanced practice providers.

The medical staff is typically governed by a set of bylaws that outline the structure, authority, and responsibilities of the group. They are responsible for establishing policies and procedures related to patient care, quality improvement, and safety. The medical staff also plays a key role in the hospital's credentialing and privileging process, which ensures that healthcare professionals meet certain standards and qualifications before they are allowed to practice in the hospital.

The medical staff may work in various departments or divisions within the hospital, such as internal medicine, surgery, pediatrics, obstetrics and gynecology, psychiatry, and radiology. They may also participate in teaching and research activities, as well as hospital committees and leadership roles.

Thoracic injuries refer to damages or traumas that occur in the thorax, which is the part of the body that contains the chest cavity. The thorax houses vital organs such as the heart, lungs, esophagus, trachea, and major blood vessels. Thoracic injuries can range from blunt trauma, caused by impacts or compressions, to penetrating trauma, resulting from stabbing or gunshot wounds. These injuries may cause various complications, including but not limited to:

1. Hemothorax - bleeding into the chest cavity
2. Pneumothorax - collapsed lung due to air accumulation in the chest cavity
3. Tension pneumothorax - a life-threatening condition where trapped air puts pressure on the heart and lungs, impairing their function
4. Cardiac tamponade - compression of the heart caused by blood or fluid accumulation in the pericardial sac
5. Rib fractures, which can lead to complications like punctured lungs or internal bleeding
6. Tracheobronchial injuries, causing air leaks and difficulty breathing
7. Great vessel injuries, potentially leading to massive hemorrhage and hemodynamic instability

Immediate medical attention is required for thoracic injuries, as they can quickly become life-threatening due to the vital organs involved. Treatment may include surgery, chest tubes, medications, or supportive care, depending on the severity and type of injury.

Tidal volume (Vt) is the amount of air that moves into or out of the lungs during normal, resting breathing. It is the difference between the volume of air in the lungs at the end of a normal expiration and the volume at the end of a normal inspiration. In other words, it's the volume of each breath you take when you are not making any effort to breathe more deeply.

The average tidal volume for an adult human is around 500 milliliters (ml) per breath, but this can vary depending on factors such as age, sex, size, and fitness level. During exercise or other activities that require increased oxygen intake, tidal volume may increase to meet the body's demands for more oxygen.

Tidal volume is an important concept in respiratory physiology and clinical medicine, as it can be used to assess lung function and diagnose respiratory disorders such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) or asthma.

In a medical context, "survival" generally refers to the continuation of life following a serious illness, injury, or dangerous event. It is often used in research and clinical settings to describe the length and quality of life after a specific treatment or diagnosis. For example, survival rate might refer to the percentage of patients who are still alive after a certain period of time following a cancer diagnosis or surgery. Survival can also be used more broadly to describe an individual's ability to adapt and persist in the face of adversity or challenge, whether that's due to medical conditions or other life circumstances.

Retrospective studies, also known as retrospective research or looking back studies, are a type of observational study that examines data from the past to draw conclusions about possible causal relationships between risk factors and outcomes. In these studies, researchers analyze existing records, medical charts, or previously collected data to test a hypothesis or answer a specific research question.

Retrospective studies can be useful for generating hypotheses and identifying trends, but they have limitations compared to prospective studies, which follow participants forward in time from exposure to outcome. Retrospective studies are subject to biases such as recall bias, selection bias, and information bias, which can affect the validity of the results. Therefore, retrospective studies should be interpreted with caution and used primarily to generate hypotheses for further testing in prospective studies.

Rewarming, in a medical context, refers to the process of gradually increasing the body temperature of a person who is experiencing hypothermia. Hypothermia is a condition in which the core body temperature drops below 95°F (35°C), which can be caused by exposure to cold environments or certain medical conditions.

Rewarming can be accomplished through various methods, including:

1. Passive rewarming: This involves removing wet clothing and covering the person with warm blankets to allow their body to naturally increase its temperature.
2. Active external rewarming: This involves using warming devices such as heating pads or warm water bottles to apply heat to the skin surface.
3. Active core rewarming: This involves using more invasive methods, such as warmed intravenous fluids, warm air insufflation, or extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) with a heat exchanger, to directly warm the internal organs and blood.

The choice of rewarming method depends on the severity of hypothermia, the presence of other medical conditions, and the resources available. It is important to monitor the person's vital signs and core temperature during rewarming to avoid complications such as rewarming shock or arrhythmias.

Intensive care is a specialized level of medical care that is provided to critically ill patients. It's usually given in a dedicated unit of a hospital called the Intensive Care Unit (ICU) or Critical Care Unit (CCU). The goal of intensive care is to closely monitor and manage life-threatening conditions, stabilize vital functions, and support organs until they recover or the patient can be moved to a less acute level of care.

Intensive care involves advanced medical equipment and technologies, such as ventilators to assist with breathing, dialysis machines for kidney support, intravenous lines for medication administration, and continuous monitoring devices for heart rate, blood pressure, oxygen levels, and other vital signs.

The ICU team typically includes intensive care specialists (intensivists), critical care nurses, respiratory therapists, and other healthcare professionals who work together to provide comprehensive, round-the-clock care for critically ill patients.

Blood coagulation disorders, also known as bleeding disorders or clotting disorders, refer to a group of medical conditions that affect the body's ability to form blood clots properly. Normally, when a blood vessel is injured, the body's coagulation system works to form a clot to stop the bleeding and promote healing.

In blood coagulation disorders, there can be either an increased tendency to bleed due to problems with the formation of clots (hemorrhagic disorder), or an increased tendency for clots to form inappropriately even without injury, leading to blockages in the blood vessels (thrombotic disorder).

Examples of hemorrhagic disorders include:

1. Hemophilia - a genetic disorder that affects the ability to form clots due to deficiencies in clotting factors VIII or IX.
2. Von Willebrand disease - another genetic disorder caused by a deficiency or abnormality of the von Willebrand factor, which helps platelets stick together to form a clot.
3. Liver diseases - can lead to decreased production of coagulation factors, increasing the risk of bleeding.
4. Disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC) - a serious condition where clotting and bleeding occur simultaneously due to widespread activation of the coagulation system.

Examples of thrombotic disorders include:

1. Factor V Leiden mutation - a genetic disorder that increases the risk of inappropriate blood clot formation.
2. Antithrombin III deficiency - a genetic disorder that impairs the body's ability to break down clots, increasing the risk of thrombosis.
3. Protein C or S deficiencies - genetic disorders that lead to an increased risk of thrombosis due to impaired regulation of the coagulation system.
4. Antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) - an autoimmune disorder where the body produces antibodies against its own clotting factors, increasing the risk of thrombosis.

Treatment for blood coagulation disorders depends on the specific diagnosis and may include medications to manage bleeding or prevent clots, as well as lifestyle changes and monitoring to reduce the risk of complications.

Patient simulation is the creation of a situation or scenario that represents a patient's medical condition or illness, using a mannequin or computer-based program. It allows healthcare professionals and students to practice their skills and decision-making abilities in a controlled and safe environment. The simulated patient can respond to treatments and interventions, providing a realistic representation of the patient's condition. This type of simulation is used for training, assessment, and research purposes in medical education and healthcare fields.

Nonpenetrating wounds are a type of trauma or injury to the body that do not involve a break in the skin or underlying tissues. These wounds can result from blunt force trauma, such as being struck by an object or falling onto a hard surface. They can also result from crushing injuries, where significant force is applied to a body part, causing damage to internal structures without breaking the skin.

Nonpenetrating wounds can cause a range of injuries, including bruising, swelling, and damage to internal organs, muscles, bones, and other tissues. The severity of the injury depends on the force of the trauma, the location of the impact, and the individual's overall health and age.

While nonpenetrating wounds may not involve a break in the skin, they can still be serious and require medical attention. If you have experienced blunt force trauma or suspect a nonpenetrating wound, it is important to seek medical care to assess the extent of the injury and receive appropriate treatment.

Pediatrics is a branch of medicine that deals with the medical care and treatment of infants, children, and adolescents, typically up to the age of 18 or sometimes up to 21 years. It covers a wide range of health services including preventive healthcare, diagnosis and treatment of physical, mental, and emotional illnesses, and promotion of healthy lifestyles and behaviors in children.

Pediatricians are medical doctors who specialize in this field and have extensive training in the unique needs and developmental stages of children. They provide comprehensive care for children from birth to young adulthood, addressing various health issues such as infectious diseases, injuries, genetic disorders, developmental delays, behavioral problems, and chronic conditions like asthma, diabetes, and cancer.

In addition to medical expertise, pediatricians also need excellent communication skills to build trust with their young patients and their families, and to provide education and guidance on various aspects of child health and well-being.

Hemostatic techniques refer to various methods used in medicine to stop bleeding or hemorrhage. The goal of these techniques is to promote the body's natural clotting process and prevent excessive blood loss. Some common hemostatic techniques include:

1. Mechanical compression: Applying pressure directly to the wound to physically compress blood vessels and stop the flow of blood. This can be done manually or with the use of medical devices such as clamps, tourniquets, or compression bandages.
2. Suturing or stapling: Closing a wound with stitches or staples to bring the edges of the wound together and allow the body's natural clotting process to occur.
3. Electrocautery: Using heat generated by an electrical current to seal off blood vessels and stop bleeding.
4. Hemostatic agents: Applying topical substances that promote clotting, such as fibrin glue, collagen, or gelatin sponges, to the wound site.
5. Vascular embolization: Inserting a catheter into a blood vessel and injecting a substance that blocks the flow of blood to a specific area, such as a bleeding tumor or aneurysm.
6. Surgical ligation: Tying off a bleeding blood vessel with suture material during surgery.
7. Arterial or venous repair: Repairing damaged blood vessels through surgical intervention to restore normal blood flow and prevent further bleeding.

An Intensive Care Unit (ICU) is a specialized hospital department that provides continuous monitoring and advanced life support for critically ill patients. The ICU is equipped with sophisticated technology and staffed by highly trained healthcare professionals, including intensivists, nurses, respiratory therapists, and other specialists.

Patients in the ICU may require mechanical ventilation, invasive monitoring, vasoactive medications, and other advanced interventions due to conditions such as severe infections, trauma, cardiac arrest, respiratory failure, or post-surgical complications. The goal of the ICU is to stabilize patients' condition, prevent further complications, and support organ function while the underlying illness is treated.

ICUs may be organized into different units based on the type of care provided, such as medical, surgical, cardiac, neurological, or pediatric ICUs. The length of stay in the ICU can vary widely depending on the patient's condition and response to treatment.

Cardiac output is a measure of the amount of blood that is pumped by the heart in one minute. It is defined as the product of stroke volume (the amount of blood pumped by the left ventricle during each contraction) and heart rate (the number of contractions per minute). Normal cardiac output at rest for an average-sized adult is about 5 to 6 liters per minute. Cardiac output can be increased during exercise or other conditions that require more blood flow, such as during illness or injury. It can be measured noninvasively using techniques such as echocardiography or invasively through a catheter placed in the heart.

Physiological monitoring is the continuous or intermittent observation and measurement of various body functions or parameters in a patient, with the aim of evaluating their health status, identifying any abnormalities or changes, and guiding clinical decision-making and treatment. This may involve the use of specialized medical equipment, such as cardiac monitors, pulse oximeters, blood pressure monitors, and capnographs, among others. The data collected through physiological monitoring can help healthcare professionals assess the effectiveness of treatments, detect complications early, and make timely adjustments to patient care plans.

Splanchnic circulation refers to the blood flow to the visceral organs, including the gastrointestinal tract, pancreas, spleen, and liver. These organs receive a significant portion of the cardiac output, with approximately 25-30% of the total restingly going to the splanchnic circulation. The splanchnic circulation is regulated by a complex interplay of neural and hormonal mechanisms that help maintain adequate blood flow to these vital organs while also allowing for the distribution of blood to other parts of the body as needed.

The splanchnic circulation is unique in its ability to vasodilate and increase blood flow significantly in response to meals or other stimuli, such as stress or hormonal changes. This increased blood flow helps support the digestive process and absorption of nutrients. At the same time, the body must carefully regulate this blood flow to prevent a significant drop in blood pressure or overloading the heart with too much work.

Overall, the splanchnic circulation plays a critical role in maintaining the health and function of the body's vital organs, and dysregulation of this system can contribute to various diseases, including digestive disorders, liver disease, and cardiovascular disease.

Survival analysis is a branch of statistics that deals with the analysis of time to event data. It is used to estimate the time it takes for a certain event of interest to occur, such as death, disease recurrence, or treatment failure. The event of interest is called the "failure" event, and survival analysis estimates the probability of not experiencing the failure event until a certain point in time, also known as the "survival" probability.

Survival analysis can provide important information about the effectiveness of treatments, the prognosis of patients, and the identification of risk factors associated with the event of interest. It can handle censored data, which is common in medical research where some participants may drop out or be lost to follow-up before the event of interest occurs.

Survival analysis typically involves estimating the survival function, which describes the probability of surviving beyond a certain time point, as well as hazard functions, which describe the instantaneous rate of failure at a given time point. Other important concepts in survival analysis include median survival times, restricted mean survival times, and various statistical tests to compare survival curves between groups.

Acidosis is a medical condition that occurs when there is an excess accumulation of acid in the body or when the body loses its ability to effectively regulate the pH level of the blood. The normal pH range of the blood is slightly alkaline, between 7.35 and 7.45. When the pH falls below 7.35, it is called acidosis.

Acidosis can be caused by various factors, including impaired kidney function, respiratory problems, diabetes, severe dehydration, alcoholism, and certain medications or toxins. There are two main types of acidosis: metabolic acidosis and respiratory acidosis.

Metabolic acidosis occurs when the body produces too much acid or is unable to eliminate it effectively. This can be caused by conditions such as diabetic ketoacidosis, lactic acidosis, kidney failure, and ingestion of certain toxins.

Respiratory acidosis, on the other hand, occurs when the lungs are unable to remove enough carbon dioxide from the body, leading to an accumulation of acid. This can be caused by conditions such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), asthma, and sedative overdose.

Symptoms of acidosis may include fatigue, shortness of breath, confusion, headache, rapid heartbeat, and in severe cases, coma or even death. Treatment for acidosis depends on the underlying cause and may include medications, oxygen therapy, fluid replacement, and dialysis.

Medical ethics is a branch of ethics that deals with moral issues in medical care, research, and practice. It provides a framework for addressing questions related to patient autonomy, informed consent, confidentiality, distributive justice, beneficentia (doing good), and non-maleficence (not doing harm). Medical ethics also involves the application of ethical principles such as respect for persons, beneficence, non-maleficence, and justice to specific medical cases and situations. It is a crucial component of medical education and practice, helping healthcare professionals make informed decisions that promote patient well-being while respecting their rights and dignity.

Penetrating wounds are a type of traumatic injury that occurs when an object pierces through the skin and underlying tissues, creating a hole or cavity in the body. These wounds can vary in severity, depending on the size and shape of the object, as well as the location and depth of the wound.

Penetrating wounds are typically caused by sharp objects such as knives, bullets, or glass. They can damage internal organs, blood vessels, nerves, and bones, leading to serious complications such as bleeding, infection, organ failure, and even death if not treated promptly and properly.

The management of penetrating wounds involves a thorough assessment of the wound and surrounding tissues, as well as the identification and treatment of any associated injuries or complications. This may include wound cleaning and closure, antibiotics to prevent infection, pain management, and surgery to repair damaged structures. In some cases, hospitalization and close monitoring may be necessary to ensure proper healing and recovery.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Inservice Training" is not a medical term per se. Instead, it is a general term used in various fields, including healthcare and education, to refer to training or professional development programs provided to staff members who are already employed or working in a particular organization or industry.

In the context of healthcare, Inservice Training might involve workshops, seminars, or other educational activities designed to enhance the knowledge, skills, and abilities of healthcare professionals such as nurses, doctors, allied health professionals, and administrative staff. These training programs can cover a wide range of topics, including new medical technologies, patient care protocols, safety procedures, regulatory requirements, and leadership development.

The primary goal of Inservice Training is to ensure that healthcare professionals remain up-to-date with the latest developments in their field and are equipped with the necessary skills to provide high-quality care to their patients. By promoting ongoing learning and professional development, organizations can improve patient outcomes, increase staff satisfaction, and enhance the overall quality of care delivered in the healthcare setting.

Hypoxia-Ischemia, Brain refers to a condition characterized by a reduced supply of oxygen (hypoxia) and blood flow (ischemia) to the brain. This can lead to serious damage or death of brain cells, depending on the severity and duration of the hypoxic-ischemic event.

Hypoxia occurs when there is insufficient oxygen available to meet the metabolic needs of the brain tissue. Ischemia results from a decrease in blood flow, which can be caused by various factors such as cardiac arrest, stroke, or severe respiratory distress. When both hypoxia and ischemia occur together, they can have a synergistic effect, leading to more severe brain damage.

Brain Hypoxia-Ischemia can result in neurological deficits, cognitive impairment, and physical disabilities, depending on the area of the brain affected. Treatment typically focuses on addressing the underlying cause of the hypoxia-ischemia and providing supportive care to minimize secondary damage. In some cases, therapeutic hypothermia may be used to reduce metabolic demands and protect vulnerable brain tissue.

Obstetric nursing is a specialized field of nursing that focuses on the care of women during pregnancy, childbirth, and the postpartum period. This includes providing prenatal education and support, managing labor and delivery, assisting with newborn care immediately after birth, and supporting the physical and emotional needs of new mothers in the days and weeks following childbirth. Obstetric nurses may also provide care for women experiencing high-risk pregnancies or pregnancy-related complications. They work closely with obstetricians, midwives, and other healthcare professionals to ensure that women receive comprehensive and compassionate care throughout their pregnancy and childbirth journey.

Decision-making is the cognitive process of selecting a course of action from among multiple alternatives. In a medical context, decision-making refers to the process by which healthcare professionals and patients make choices about medical tests, treatments, or management options based on a thorough evaluation of available information, including the patient's preferences, values, and circumstances.

The decision-making process in medicine typically involves several steps:

1. Identifying the problem or issue that requires a decision.
2. Gathering relevant information about the patient's medical history, current condition, diagnostic test results, treatment options, and potential outcomes.
3. Considering the benefits, risks, and uncertainties associated with each option.
4. Evaluating the patient's preferences, values, and goals.
5. Selecting the most appropriate course of action based on a careful weighing of the available evidence and the patient's individual needs and circumstances.
6. Communicating the decision to the patient and ensuring that they understand the rationale behind it, as well as any potential risks or benefits.
7. Monitoring the outcomes of the decision and adjusting the course of action as needed based on ongoing evaluation and feedback.

Effective decision-making in medicine requires a thorough understanding of medical evidence, clinical expertise, and patient preferences. It also involves careful consideration of ethical principles, such as respect for autonomy, non-maleficence, beneficence, and justice. Ultimately, the goal of decision-making in healthcare is to promote the best possible outcomes for patients while minimizing harm and respecting their individual needs and values.

Hypothermia is a medically defined condition where the core body temperature drops below 35°C (95°F). It is often associated with exposure to cold environments, but can also occur in cases of severe illness, injury, or immersion in cold water. Symptoms may include shivering, confusion, slowed heart rate and breathing, and if not treated promptly, can lead to unconsciousness, cardiac arrest, and even death.

Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome (SIRS) is not a specific disease, but rather a systemic response to various insults or injuries within the body. It is defined as a combination of clinical signs that indicate a widespread inflammatory response in the body. According to the American College of Chest Physicians/Society of Critical Care Medicine (ACCP/SCCM) consensus criteria, SIRS is characterized by the presence of at least two of the following conditions:

1. Body temperature >38°C (100.4°F) or 90 beats per minute
3. Respiratory rate >20 breaths per minute or arterial carbon dioxide tension (PaCO2) 12,000 cells/mm3, 10% bands (immature white blood cells)

SIRS can be caused by various factors, including infections (sepsis), trauma, burns, pancreatitis, and immune-mediated reactions. Prolonged SIRS may lead to organ dysfunction and failure, which can progress to severe sepsis or septic shock if not treated promptly and effectively.

In the context of medicine, and specifically in physiology and respiratory therapy, partial pressure (P or p) is a measure of the pressure exerted by an individual gas in a mixture of gases. It's commonly used to describe the concentrations of gases in the body, such as oxygen (PO2), carbon dioxide (PCO2), and nitrogen (PN2).

The partial pressure of a specific gas is calculated as the fraction of that gas in the total mixture multiplied by the total pressure of the mixture. This concept is based on Dalton's law, which states that the total pressure exerted by a mixture of gases is equal to the sum of the pressures exerted by each individual gas.

For example, in room air at sea level, the partial pressure of oxygen (PO2) is approximately 160 mmHg (mm of mercury), which represents about 21% of the total barometric pressure (760 mmHg). This concept is crucial for understanding gas exchange in the lungs and how gases move across membranes, such as from alveoli to blood and vice versa.

A Patient Care Team is a group of healthcare professionals from various disciplines who work together to provide comprehensive, coordinated care to a patient. The team may include doctors, nurses, pharmacists, social workers, physical therapists, dietitians, and other specialists as needed, depending on the patient's medical condition and healthcare needs.

The Patient Care Team works collaboratively to develop an individualized care plan for the patient, taking into account their medical history, current health status, treatment options, and personal preferences. The team members communicate regularly to share information, coordinate care, and make any necessary adjustments to the care plan.

The goal of a Patient Care Team is to ensure that the patient receives high-quality, safe, and effective care that is tailored to their unique needs and preferences. By working together, the team can provide more comprehensive and coordinated care, which can lead to better outcomes for the patient.

Sodium Chloride is defined as the inorganic compound with the chemical formula NaCl, representing a 1:1 ratio of sodium and chloride ions. It is commonly known as table salt or halite, and it is used extensively in food seasoning and preservation due to its ability to enhance flavor and inhibit bacterial growth. In medicine, sodium chloride is used as a balanced electrolyte solution for rehydration and as a topical wound irrigant and antiseptic. It is also an essential component of the human body's fluid balance and nerve impulse transmission.

Vasopressin, also known as antidiuretic hormone (ADH), is a hormone that helps regulate water balance in the body. It is produced by the hypothalamus and stored in the posterior pituitary gland. When the body is dehydrated or experiencing low blood pressure, vasopressin is released into the bloodstream, where it causes the kidneys to decrease the amount of urine they produce and helps to constrict blood vessels, thereby increasing blood pressure. This helps to maintain adequate fluid volume in the body and ensure that vital organs receive an adequate supply of oxygen-rich blood. In addition to its role in water balance and blood pressure regulation, vasopressin also plays a role in social behaviors such as pair bonding and trust.

A Pediatric Intensive Care Unit (PICU) is a specialized hospital unit that provides intensive care to critically ill or injured infants, children, and adolescents. The PICU is equipped with advanced medical technology and staffed by healthcare professionals trained in pediatrics, including pediatric intensivists, pediatric nurses, respiratory therapists, and other specialists as needed.

The primary goal of the PICU is to closely monitor and manage the most critical patients, providing around-the-clock care and interventions to support organ function, treat life-threatening conditions, and prevent complications. The PICU team works together to provide family-centered care, keeping parents informed about their child's condition and involving them in decision-making processes.

Common reasons for admission to the PICU include respiratory failure, shock, sepsis, severe trauma, congenital heart disease, neurological emergencies, and post-operative monitoring after complex surgeries. The length of stay in the PICU can vary widely depending on the severity of the child's illness or injury and their response to treatment.

Well-known examples are cardiopulmonary resuscitation and mouth-to-mouth resuscitation. Look up resuscitation in Wiktionary, ... Resuscitation is the process of correcting physiological disorders (such as lack of breathing or heartbeat) in an acutely ill ... "Resuscitation - an overview , ScienceDirect Topics". www.sciencedirect.com. Retrieved 2023-07-30. (Articles with short ... also known as Fluid resuscitation - medical practice of replenishing bodily fluid lostPages displaying wikidata descriptions as ...
... , also known as newborn resuscitation, is an emergency procedure focused on supporting approximately 10% ... If a newborns score is 0-3, then resuscitation efforts are initiated. Neonatal resuscitation guidelines closely resemble those ... The most widely known training/certification for neonatal resuscitation is the Neonatal Resuscitation Program (NRP). Neonatal ... ILCOR Neonatal Resuscitation Guidelines 2010 Lui, K; Jones, LJ; Foster, JP; Davis, PG; Ching, SK; Oei, JL; Osborn, DA (4 May ...
Resuscitation is an album released by Detroit, Michigan electronic music duo ADULT. in 2001. Before this release, ADULT.'s ... A bulk of the songs are presented on Resuscitation in remixed or re-recorded forms. ADULT.'s members, Adam Lee Miller (music) ... "ADULT.: Resuscitation". Pitchfork. Retrieved 2023-08-07. (Articles needing additional references from August 2023, All articles ...
Resuscitation. 92: 38-44. doi:10.1016/j.resuscitation.2015.04.011. PMID 25917260. "European Resuscitation Council Guidelines ... The Cerebral Resuscitation Study Group". Resuscitation. 17 Suppl (Suppl S55-69): S55-69, discussion S199-206. doi:10.1016/0300- ... European Resuscitation Council (2005). "Part 2: Adult basic life support". Guidelines for resuscitation. Archived from the ... "Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR)". www.betterhealth.vic.gov.au. Retrieved 2022-10-20. "Resuscitation Council UK Paediatric ...
Resuscitation is a monthly peer-reviewed medical journal covering research on cardiac arrest and cardiopulmonary resuscitation ... It is an official journal of the European Resuscitation Council and is published by Elsevier. The editor-in-chief is Jerry ... List of medical journals European Resuscitation Council Editorial introductions. Current Opinion in Critical Care, 2013, ... Wolters Kluwer Health/Lippincott Williams & Wilkins "Resuscitation". 2018 Journal Citation Reports. Web of Science (Science ed ...
"2021 Resuscitation Guidelines". Resuscitation Council UK. Retrieved 21 September 2021. "Quality Standards". Resuscitation ... "National Resuscitation Councils". European Resuscitation Council. Retrieved 2009-01-05. "Who we are". Resuscitation Council UK ... Resuscitation Council UK aims to: establish appropriate guidelines for resuscitation encourage members of the public to respond ... Resuscitation Council UK (RCUK) is a healthcare charity focused on resuscitation education and training for healthcare ...
The European Resuscitation Council (ERC) is the European Interdisciplinary Council for Resuscitation Medicine and Emergency ... The ERC's objective is "To preserve human life by making high quality resuscitation available to all". The ERC is the network ... of National Resuscitation Councils in Europe. Chair of the ERC is Koen Monsieurs. "ERC ,". Official site v t e (Articles ...
... (commonly known as ECPR) is a method of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) that ...
Overview and principles of resuscitation Initial steps in resuscitation Use of resuscitation devices for positive-pressure ... The Neonatal Resuscitation Program is an educational program in neonatal resuscitation that was developed and is maintained by ... This program focuses on basic resuscitation skills for newly born infants. With the rollout of the seventh edition of the ... Providers who take the Neonatal Resuscitation Program are diverse in their scope of practice. The course outline is flexible to ...
Kudenchuck Resuscitation Outcomes Consortium The Alabama Resuscitation Center The Dallas Center for Resuscitation Research The ... Resuscitation Outcomes Consortium OHSU ROC Study Rescu (Toronto RescuNET) ROC (Resuscitation Outcomes Consortium) Studies , UW ... The Resuscitation Outcomes Consortium (ROC) is a network of eleven regional clinical centers and a data coordinating center. ... Prehospital Resuscitation using an IMpedance valve and Early vs Delayed analysis) Seattle/King County did not participate in ...
... (EPR) is an experimental medical procedure where an emergency department patient is ... Kutcher, M. E., Forsythe, R. M., & Tisherman, S. A. (2016). "Emergency preservation and resuscitation for cardiac arrest from ... and fail to respond to ordinary resuscitation efforts. According to Tisherman, "The patient will probably have already lost ... "Induction of Profound Hypothermia for Emergency Preservation and Resuscitation Allows Intact Survival After Cardiac Arrest ...
Significant advances in resuscitation were made in Europe during the Age of Enlightenment. For example, in 1732, Scottish ... The history of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) can be traced as far back as the literary works of ancient Egypt (c. 2686 - ... However, the story of resuscitation does not stop in the early 1970s. Major advances have continued. In 1980 the first program ... The American Heart Association uses a metaphor of four links in a chain to describe the elements of successful resuscitation. ...
... is a part of most protocols for performing cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) making it an ... Mouth-to-mouth resuscitation, a form of artificial ventilation, is the act of assisting or stimulating respiration in which a ... It is used on a patient with a beating heart or as part of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) to achieve the internal ... Wikibooks has a book on the topic of: First Aid Expired Air Resuscitation Archived 2007-03-11 at the Wayback Machine Basic ...
... is a novel by Denis Johnson published in 1991 by Farrar, Straus and Giroux. The story explores ... Critic David L. Ulin argues that the thematic center of The Resuscitation of a Hanged Man-"the key to the entire novel"-resides ... Critic Mona Simpson, testifying to Johnson's "ability to write a gorgeous sentence", registers this critique of Resuscitation ... becomes Resuscitation of a Hanged Man's one real weakness. For when he begins to focus on the conspiracy he thinks he sees ...
Resuscitation. 67 (2-3): 157-161. doi:10.1016/j.resuscitation.2005.05.011. PMID 16221520. "New ILCOR resuscitation guidelines ... the Resuscitation Councils of Southern Africa (RCSA), the Resuscitation Councils of Asia (RCA) and the Inter American Heart ... Foster scientific research in areas of resuscitation where there is a lack of data or where there is controversy. Provide for ... A further update appeared in 2015 The standard revisions cycle for resuscitation is five years. The next is therefore scheduled ...
Sternbach GL, Varon J (2004). "Resuscitation Great. John Mayow and oxygen". Resuscitation. 60 (3): 235-7. doi:10.1016/j. ... Sternbach GL, Varon J (2004). "Resuscitation Great. John Mayow and oxygen". Resuscitation. 60 (3): 235-7. doi:10.1016/j. ... resuscitation.2003.12.013. PMID 15050753. "John Mayow (1641-1679)". JAMA. 197 (5): 364-5. 1966. doi:10.1001/jama.197.5.364b. ... resuscitation.2003.12.013. PMID 15050753. (Wikipedia articles incorporating a citation from the 1911 Encyclopaedia Britannica ...
Resuscitation. 85 (11): 1533-1540. doi:10.1016/j.resuscitation.2014.08.025. ISSN 1873-1570. PMID 25195073. Malouf JF, Edwards ...
Resuscitation. 74 (1): 27-37. doi:10.1016/j.resuscitation.2006.11.010. PMID 17306436. Jonasson B, Jonasson U, Saldeen T ( ...
October 2015). "European Resuscitation Council Guidelines for Resuscitation 2015 Section 9. First aid". Resuscitation. 95: 278- ... doi:10.1016/j.resuscitation.2015.07.031. PMID 26477417. Watson S (21 April 2021). Wheeler T (ed.). "Physical Therapy and Other ... Resuscitation and Emergency Medicine. 27 (1): 77. doi:10.1186/s13049-019-0655-x. PMC 6700785. PMID 31426850. Connell RA, Graham ...
Resuscitation. 50 (2): 189-204. doi:10.1016/s0300-9572(01)00333-1. PMID 11719148. Life extension Mondragon, Carlos (1992). " ...
Resuscitation. 81 (11): 1479-87. doi:10.1016/j.resuscitation.2010.08.006. PMID 20828914. Bougouin, W.; Marijon, E.; Puymirat, E ... Treatment is with cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) and defibrillation. Biphasic defibrillation may be better than monophasic ... of all ventricular fibrillation resuscitations in patients under the age of 40. It follows then that, on the basis of the fact ... and patients in V-fib should be treated with cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) and prompt defibrillation. Left untreated, ...
Resuscitation. 81 (2): 163-7. doi:10.1016/j.resuscitation.2009.10.025. PMID 19962225. EMS Division 2006, pg. 55 Eisenberg 2009 ... The paramedic medical director for the one of six Medic One programs that provided care reviews every resuscitation, intubation ... In King County outcomes of attempted out-of-hospital resuscitations are recorded, following the Utstein uniform reporting ... 2006). "Manual chest compression vs use of an automated chest compression device during resuscitation following out-of-hospital ...
Resuscitation. 85 (1): 104-108. doi:10.1016/j.resuscitation.2013.08.012. PMID 23994803. Beach, MC (2002). "The effect of do-not ... Resuscitation. 148: 98-107. doi:10.1016/j.resuscitation.2020.01.003. PMID 31945422. S2CID 210703171. Cohn, S (2013). "Do Not ... Resuscitation. 162: 343-350. doi:10.1016/j.resuscitation.2021.01.013. PMID 33482270. S2CID 231687872. Huxley, C (2021). " ... Fritz, Z (2017). "Resuscitation policy should focus on the patient, not the decision". BMJ. 356: j813. doi:10.1136/bmj.j813. ...
Resuscitation. 81 (10): 1400-33. doi:10.1016/j.resuscitation.2010.08.015. PMID 20956045. de Baaij JH, Hoenderop JG, Bindels RJ ... Resuscitation. 81 (10): 1400-33. doi:10.1016/j.resuscitation.2010.08.015. PMID 20956045. Soar, J; Perkins, GD; Abbas, G; ... "European Resuscitation Council Guidelines for Resuscitation 2010 Section 8. Cardiac arrest in special circumstances: ... "European Resuscitation Council Guidelines for Resuscitation 2010 Section 8. Cardiac arrest in special circumstances: ...
Resuscitation. 96: 49-50. doi:10.1016/j.resuscitation.2015.09.114. ISSN 0300-9572. Lockey, D.; Crewdson, K.; Weaver, A.; Davies ... Resuscitation and Emergency Medicine. 31 (1): 39. doi:10.1186/s13049-023-01109-6. ISSN 1757-7241. PMC 10463457. PMID 37608349 ...
A bibliography". Resuscitation. 10 (4): 235-251. doi:10.1016/0300-9572(83)90026-6. ISSN 0300-9572. PMID 6316444. Adamenko, N. P ... that documents Soviet research into the resuscitation of clinically dead organisms. The operations in the film, as well as the ... 1969). "[Technic of experimental resuscitation of dogs with a variant of the method of extracorporeal circulation using S. S. ...
All knowledge on anesthesia caused by submergence and on resuscitation available at the time was collected. More recently, the ... Baskett, Peter J. F. (2003). "JD Herholdt and CG Rafn: two unsung heroes from Denmark". Resuscitation. 58 (3): 283-288. doi: ... much of which was visionary and subsequently has been proven to be of key relevance to resuscitation of the submerged victim as ...
"Cardio Pulmonary Resuscitation" (PDF). Centre for Excellence in Teaching and Learning. Morley, J and Sprenger C (2012), First ... Resuscitation Council(UK). ISBN 978-1-903812-12-9. "Recovery Position". Archived from the original on 2009-02-03. Retrieved ... In 1957, Peter Safar wrote the book ABC of Resuscitation, which established the basis for mass training of CPR. This new ... "A systematic approach to the acutely ill patient". Resuscitation Council (UK). June 2005. Archived from the original on 18 July ...
Baskett, Thomas F (Oct 2004). "Arthur Guedel and the oropharyngeal airway". Resuscitation. Ireland. 63 (1): 3-5. doi:10.1016/j. ... resuscitation.2004.07.004. ISSN 0300-9572. PMID 15451579. Keys, T E (1975). "Historical vignettes: Dr. Arthur Ernest Guedel ...
... smartphones to improve cardiopulmonary resuscitation". Resuscitation. 168: 35-43. doi:10.1016/j.resuscitation.2021.08.048. PMID ... Resuscitation. 121: 123-126. doi:10.1016/j.resuscitation.2017.10.020. PMID 29079507. "More people survived a cardiac arrest ... Resuscitation. 105: 52-58. doi:10.1016/j.resuscitation.2016.05.007. ISSN 0300-9572. PMID 27211834. Smith, Christopher M.; ...
Well-known examples are cardiopulmonary resuscitation and mouth-to-mouth resuscitation. Look up resuscitation in Wiktionary, ... Resuscitation is the process of correcting physiological disorders (such as lack of breathing or heartbeat) in an acutely ill ... "Resuscitation - an overview , ScienceDirect Topics". www.sciencedirect.com. Retrieved 2023-07-30. (Articles with short ... also known as Fluid resuscitation - medical practice of replenishing bodily fluid lostPages displaying wikidata descriptions as ...
... cardiopulmonary resuscitation was attempted in 52 elderly patients (mean age 75.6 yr, range 64-91). Of 14 who were resuscitated ... Cardiopulmonary resuscitation of old people Lancet. 1983 Jul 30;2(8344):267-9. doi: 10.1016/s0140-6736(83)90244-1. ... In a prospective study, cardiopulmonary resuscitation was attempted in 52 elderly patients (mean age 75.6 yr, range 64-91). Of ... from the episode of cardiac arrest and resuscitation; 7 had left hospital. The nature of the cardiac dysrhythmia is a strong ...
Considering taking a vitamin or supplement to treat Neonatal+Resuscitation? Below is a list of common natural remedies used to ... treat or reduce the symptoms of Neonatal+Resuscitation. Follow the links to read common uses, side effects, dosage details and ...
... , Neonatal Resuscitation, Neonatal Advanced Life Support, Resuscitation of the Newborn, Advanced Life ... Newborn Resuscitation. Newborn Resuscitation Aka: Newborn Resuscitation, Neonatal Resuscitation, Neonatal Advanced Life Support ... Resuscitation medications (e.g. Epinephrine 1:10,000, Normal Saline, D10W). *Umbilical Vein Catheter equipment (3.5, 5.0 F ... Monitor Resuscitation efforts with Pulse Oximetry (but do not expect O2 Sat ,85% until after 10 min of life) ...
PropDel}},br>,br>{{subpages}} Cardio Pulmonary Resuscitation or CPR is performed when a persons heart has stopped due to ... although this is disputed by new reports which indicate that CPR compressions alone provide the best chance of resuscitation. ...
... cardiopulmonary resuscitation - Sharing our stories on preparing for and responding to public health events ... Tags automated external defibrillator, carbon monoxide, cardiopulmonary resuscitation, choking, drowning, fire extinguisher, ...
The Neonatal Resuscitation Program (NRP) is designed for healthcare professionals involved in hospital-based neonatal ... resuscitation, including physicians, nurses, advanced practice nurses, certified nurse midwives and respiratory care ... The Neonatal Resuscitation Program (NRP) is designed for healthcare professionals involved in hospital-based neonatal ... resuscitation, including physicians, nurses, advanced practice nurses, certified nurse midwives and respiratory care ...
Epinephrine for the resuscitation of apparently stillborn or extremely bradycardic newborn infants. There are no trials ... Epinephrine for the resuscitation of apparently stillborn or extremely bradycardic newborn infants. Cochrane Database of ... Despite formal guidelines for the use of epinephrine in neonatal resuscitation, the evidence for these recommendations has not ...
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Mark Protocolised reduction of non-resuscitation fluids versus usual care in patients with septic shock (REDUSE) : a protocol ...
Luce JM, Ross BK, OQuin RJ, Culver BH, Sivarajan M, Amory DW, Regional blood flow during cardiopulmonary resuscitation in dogs ... Survival after cardiopulmonary resuscitation in the hospital. N Engl J Med. 1983;309:569-76. DOIPubMedGoogle Scholar ... Possible SARS Coronavirus Transmission during Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation On This Page Methods Discussion Conclusion Cite ... In the emergency resuscitation described in this report, the delay in certain rescuers responding was due to the time required ...
Initial Evaluation and Resuscitation. Before management of the burn wound can begin, the patient should be properly and ... Should the resuscitation be delayed, this volume is administered so that infusion is completed by the end of the eighth hour ... Fluid resuscitation. Burn patients demonstrate a graded capillary leak, which increases with injury size, delay in initiation ... Because the changes are different in every patient, fluid resuscitation can only be loosely guided by formulas. [25] The ...
Recommendations for Fluid Resuscitation in Acutely Ill Patients. 26 September, 2013 Guillermo Firman ... Currently Viewing Posts Tagged Resuscitation. The Apgar Score. 27 June, 2018 Guillermo Firman ... In light of recent high quality evidence, a reappraisal of how resuscitation fluids are used in acutely ill patients is now ... Although the use of resuscitation fluids is one of the most common interventions in medicine, no currently available ...
adult and infant resuscitation manikins following ARC guidelines for the purpose of assessment of CPR procedures ... Assess the casualty and recognise the need for cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). 1.4. Seek assistance from emergency ... This unit describes the skills and knowledge required to perform cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) in line with the ... Compression and ventilation skills must be demonstrated on resuscitation manikins following ARC guidelines for the purpose of ...
Hooper, S. B., Kitchen, M. J., Polglase, G. R., Roehr, C. C., & Te Pas, A. B. (2018). The physiology of neonatal resuscitation ... The physiology of neonatal resuscitation. / Hooper, Stuart B.; Kitchen, Marcus J.; Polglase, Graeme R. et al. In: Current ... The physiology of neonatal resuscitation. Stuart B. Hooper, Marcus J. Kitchen, Graeme R. Polglase, Charles C. Roehr, Arjan B. ... Hooper, SB, Kitchen, MJ, Polglase, GR, Roehr, CC & Te Pas, AB 2018, The physiology of neonatal resuscitation, Current Opinion ...
I administer all the requirements for the resuscitation services team. This includes organising all the resuscitation courses ... In addition, I order items for all the resuscitation trolleys and emergency grab-bags across the Trust, ensuring each area has ... applications; enrolling them onto the Resuscitation Council UK (RCUK) website and sending our course information to every ...
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Protocolized resuscitation was initiated when heart rate decreased to 25% of baseline. Respiratory and hemodynamic parameters ... Although ETCO2 ≥14mmHg has been shown to be associated with return of an adequate heart rate in neonatal resuscitation and ... In addition to optimizing resuscitation efforts, capnometry can assist by predicting outcomes of newborns requiring chest ... Conclusion Surviving piglets had significantly better respiratory and hemodynamic parameters during resuscitation compared to ...
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After 6 weeks, a compression-only cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) test assessed ... read more the skills acquired. Setting ... A pilot study of flipped cardiopulmonary resuscitation training: Which items can be self-trained?. DSpace/Manakin Repository. ... The qualitative aspects of basic life-saving actions were evaluated using European Resuscitation Council (ERC) guidelines. ...
Cardiopulmonary resuscitation, Critical care, Europe, Family presence, Family-witnessed, Relatives Persistent URL doi.org/ ... The presence of family members during cardiopulmonary resuscitation: European federation of Critical Care Nursing associations ... The presence of family members during cardiopulmonary resuscitation: European federation of Critical Care Nursing associations ... Nursing and Allied Professions Joint Position Statement on The Presence of Family Members During Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation ...
Neonatal resuscitation 1: a model to measure inspired and expired tidal volumes and assess leakage at the face mask ... Neonatal resuscitation 1: a model to measure inspired and expired tidal volumes and assess leakage at the face mask ... Neonatal resuscitation 1: a model to measure inspired and expired tidal volumes and assess leakage at the face mask ...
Anesthetist students during the debriefing after a critical situation resuscitation exercise at the... - BSI-BSIP-016355-029 ... Stock Photo - Anesthetist students during the debriefing after a critical situation resuscitation exercise at the Nimes Faculty ...
UofL Health - Jewish Hospital receives prestigious ACC chest pain, PCI and resuscitation accreditation. UofL Health - Jewish ... Hospitals that have earned ACC Chest Pain Center with Primary PCI and Resuscitation Accreditation have proven exceptional ... Home » UofL Health - Jewish Hospital receives prestigious ACC chest pain, PCI and resuscitation accreditation ... Jewish Hospital with Chest Pain Center with Primary PCI and Resuscitation Accreditation." ...
Considerations Before Enrolling to a Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Class. October 21, 2019October 21, 2019, 0 Comments, admin ... Choosing Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Classes There are CPR courses are offered across many hospitals, community health ... Cardiopulmonary resuscitation is an effective first aid procedure administered on unresponsive people whove stopped breathing. ... Normally CPR rescue would involve mouth-to-mouth resuscitation but when the mouth has sustained major injuries or cant open, ...
... induced cardiac arrest preceding resuscitation in a swine model. Variables were tested by logistic regression (a= 0.1). Groups ... therefore time wasted during resuscitation for unsuccessful counter-shocks can be reduced if scrutiny is given toward ... purpose of this study was to examine parameters with potential to predict the outcome of counter-shocks during resuscitation. ...
Training in cardiopulmonary resuscitation Cite CITE. Title : Training in cardiopulmonary resuscitation Personal Author(s) : ... Schrogie, J. J. "Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation In Practice" 81, no. 2 (1966). Schrogie, J. J. "Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation In ... Title : Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation In Practice Personal Author(s) : Schrogie, J. J. Published Date : 02/01/1966 Source : ... Schrogie, John J. "Training in cardiopulmonary resuscitation" 80, no. 1 (1965). Schrogie, John J. "Training in cardiopulmonary ...
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  • Well-known examples are cardiopulmonary resuscitation and mouth-to-mouth resuscitation. (wikipedia.org)
  • In a prospective study, cardiopulmonary resuscitation was attempted in 52 elderly patients (mean age 75.6 yr, range 64-91). (nih.gov)
  • Its aim was "to explore if participation in an unsuccessful cardiopulmonary resuscitation attempt created a heightened level of stress, referred to as postcode stress, and if coping behaviors individuals utilized influenced the development of a more chronic psychological distress as evidenced by PTSD symptom severity or stress as a result of a traumatic event," McMeekin says. (healthleadersmedia.com)
  • Five cycles of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) implies five cycles of 30 compressions followed by 2 ventilations. (scielo.org.za)
  • We investigated a possible cluster of SARS-CoV infections in healthcare workers who used contact and droplet precautions during attempted cardiopulmonary resuscitation of a SARS patient. (cdc.gov)
  • We present the results of an investigation of the first reported transmission of SARS-CoV to healthcare workers that occurred during attempted cardiopulmonary resuscitation of a completely unresponsive SARS patient. (cdc.gov)
  • Data were collected through interviews of healthcare workers present during the attempted cardiopulmonary resuscitation where transmission of SARS-CoV was thought to have occurred. (cdc.gov)
  • Laboratory specimens, collected with nasopharyngeal swabs, were obtained from healthcare workers with symptoms that fulfilled the SARS clinical case definition after exposure during the attempted cardiopulmonary resuscitation. (cdc.gov)
  • Extensive subcutaneous bleeding after cardiopulmonary resuscitation and thrombolytic therapy. (bmj.com)
  • Immediate cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) followed by advanced cardiac life support (ACLS) has been shown to save lives. (cdc.gov)
  • Recent incidents that have come to the attention of NIOSH have shown that electrocution victims can be revived if immediate cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) or defibrillation is provided. (cdc.gov)
  • The revised "Standards and Guidelines for Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (CPR) and Emergency Cardiac Care (ECC)" published in June 1986, is a product of the 1985 National Conference on CPR and ECC. (cdc.gov)
  • There are two parts: basic cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) and advanced cardiac life support (ACLS). (cdc.gov)
  • These poor outcomes may be attributable in part to the fact that only one third to one half of these patients receives bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). (medscape.com)
  • It instructs health care providers not to do cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) if a patient's breathing stops or if the patient's heart stops beating. (medlineplus.gov)
  • Despite cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) and advanced life support (ALS) performed at the scene, in the ambulance, and at the hospital emergency department, and additional procedures in the hospital's cardiac catheterization laboratory, the fire fighter died. (cdc.gov)
  • The Neonatal Resuscitation Program (NRP) is designed for healthcare professionals involved in hospital-based neonatal resuscitation, including physicians, nurses, advanced practice nurses, certified nurse midwives and respiratory care practitioners. (seattlechildrens.org)
  • The SAMF states that 'in acute resuscitation, slow IV boluses of 150 mg may be given. (scielo.org.za)
  • This is believed to be attributable to earlier recognition and management of critical conditions, earlier CPR, and the implementation of medical emergency teams with specialists trained in the acute resuscitation of pediatric patients using the PALS and APLS algorisms. (medscape.com)
  • Ensuring an attitude of respect and support is crucial and aids in processing the inevitable stress that accompanies pediatric resuscitation (Figure 1) . (nhcps.com)
  • Since the 1980s, significant advancements have been made in pediatric resuscitation training in the United States. (medscape.com)
  • This course was designed to be more comprehensive and covered a spectrum of pediatric emergencies in addition to basic resuscitation. (medscape.com)
  • In a pediatric resuscitation, understanding the anatomical differences from adults is paramount. (medscape.com)
  • The ILCOR guidelines for PALS highlights the importance of effective team dynamics during resuscitation. (nhcps.com)
  • The ILCOR supports a team structure with each provider assuming a specific role during the resuscitation. (nhcps.com)
  • This statement is not in accord with the International Liaison Committee on Resuscitation (ILCOR) and American Heart Association (AHA) treatment recommendations. (scielo.org.za)
  • Despite formal guidelines for the use of epinephrine in neonatal resuscitation, the evidence for these recommendations has not yet been rigorously scrutinised. (cochrane.org)
  • At least 1 person skilled in the initial steps of neonatal resuscitation, including giving positive pressure ventilation (PPV), should be in attendance at every birth, and additional personnel with the ability to do a complete resuscitation should be rapidly available even in the absence of specific risk factors. (msdmanuals.com)
  • The NRP Steering Committee made the decision to offer 2 course options so that the NRP providers could excel in the course material most relevant to their role and personnel resources during newborn resuscitation. (aap.org)
  • New sections in Lesson 10 (Special Considerations) about resuscitation of the newborn with a myelomeningocele or an abdominal wall defect. (aap.org)
  • [ 19 ] After evaluation of the burn wound, begin fluid resuscitation and make decisions concerning outpatient or inpatient management or transfer to a burn center (see American Burn Association burn center transfer criteria in Evaluation of the Burn Wound). (medscape.com)
  • After successful resuscitation, a hypermetabolic response occurs, with near doubling of cardiac output and resting energy expenditure. (medscape.com)
  • Previous research has found that nurses favored family presence during resuscitation, and the issue is supported by many professional health care organizations," she said. (bsu.edu)
  • Facilitators are usually nurses who take responsibility for supporting and communicating with families as they witness the resuscitation and who build the family's trust in the health care team. (bsu.edu)
  • Critical care nurses who participate in unsuccessful resuscitation attempts report moderate levels of postcode stress and PTSD symptoms, research shows. (healthleadersmedia.com)
  • I was curious to know if there was any published literature on the emotional or psychological consequences on nurses specifically related to resuscitation attempts," says Dawn E. McMeekin, RN, DNP, CNE, advanced clinical education specialist at Baycare Health System in Dunedin, FL. (healthleadersmedia.com)
  • The study found that when asked to recall an unsuccessful resuscitation, critical care nurses showed moderate levels of postcode stress and PTSD symptoms. (healthleadersmedia.com)
  • These results point to the need for further study of the effectiveness of various interventions to support nurses after failed resuscitation, McMeekin says. (healthleadersmedia.com)
  • In the meantime, understanding that nurses face very real after-effects after a failed resuscitation is a step in the right direction. (healthleadersmedia.com)
  • Basic neonatal resuscitation skills of midwives and nurses in Eastern Ethiopia are not well retained: An observational study. (bvsalud.org)
  • Hence, this study aimed to assess neonatal resuscitation skills retention and associated factors among midwives and nurses in Eastern Ethiopia . (bvsalud.org)
  • About 11.2% of nurses and midwives were found to have retention of neonatal resuscitation skills. (bvsalud.org)
  • Basic neonatal resuscitation skills of midwives and nurses in Eastern Ethiopia are not well retained. (bvsalud.org)
  • The most strongly perceived risks were emotional trauma to families and potential disruption of the resuscitation efforts by distraught family members," said Renee Twibell, a Ball State nursing professor who led a research team examining the issue. (bsu.edu)
  • The Basic and Advanced Resuscitation Training Center (TC) provides high-quality American Heart Association (AHA) emergency cardiovascular care courses consistent with current AHA guidelines of science, curriculum, policies and procedures. (umc.edu)
  • Family Presence During Resuscitation - Physicians' Perceptions of Risk, Benefit, and Self-Confidence," a survey of 181 physicians, found that respondents in this study perceived that family presence was a right of patients and should be offered to families. (bsu.edu)
  • The study also found that more than two-thirds of the physicians surveyed agreed or strongly agreed that they felt anxious during resuscitations with families present. (bsu.edu)
  • Contrary to perceptions of physicians in this study and others, there is little evidence that families become overtly panicky and disruptive during resuscitations, researchers found. (bsu.edu)
  • Below is a list of common natural remedies used to treat or reduce the symptoms of Neonatal+Resuscitation. (webmd.com)
  • It is recommended that breathing is applied to the patient at regular intervals, although this is disputed by new reports which indicate that CPR compressions alone provide the best chance of resuscitation. (citizendium.org)
  • Aotearoa New Zealand's doctor shortage needs urgent attention, and a group of University of Otago researchers has a three-step resuscitation strategy. (otago.ac.nz)
  • Resuscitation is the time for implementing acquired skills, not trying new ones. (nhcps.com)
  • Participants in this RACGP accredited activity will have an opportunity to apply resuscitation skills within a simulated clinical environment. (epworth.org.au)
  • For that reason, a person with neonatal resuscitation skills must attend each birth. (msdmanuals.com)
  • Improving providers' neonatal resuscitation skills is critical for delivering quality care and for morbidity and mortality reduction. (bvsalud.org)
  • Data were collected on facility type, availability of essential resuscitation equipment , socio-demographic characteristics of participants, current working unit, years of professional experience, whether a nurse or midwife received refresher training , and skills and knowledge related to neonatal resuscitation . (bvsalud.org)
  • Resuscitation attempts in critical care units are not unusual and, unfortunately, not always successful. (healthleadersmedia.com)
  • Speed has been found to be critical to resuscitation: immediate defibrillation would be ideal. (cdc.gov)
  • Three Supplemental Lessons (Improving Resuscitation Team Performance, Resuscitation Outside the Delivery Room, and Bringing Quality Improvement to Your Resuscitation Team) that all NRP users to enhance their resuscitation knowledge and performance. (aap.org)
  • Resuscitation demands mutual respect, knowledge sharing, and constructive criticism. (nhcps.com)
  • Being a midwife , Bachelor Sciences degree or above educational status , ever performing neonatal resuscitation , and good knowledge were associated with skill retention. (bvsalud.org)
  • A team of 4 or more members may be required for a complex resuscitation, and depending on the risk factors, it may be appropriate for the entire resuscitation team to be present prior to the birth. (msdmanuals.com)
  • South African literature should reflect the latest evidence to guide resuscitation and safe patient care. (scielo.org.za)
  • The score is not a tool to guide resuscitation or subsequent treatment and does not determine the prognosis of an individual patient. (msdmanuals.com)
  • After participants gave informed consent, convalescent-phase serum was collected from all consenting healthcare workers exposed to the attempted resuscitation event as part of a larger seroprevalence study of hospital staff. (cdc.gov)
  • After each resuscitation case, providers should spend time reviewing the process and providing each other with helpful and constructive feedback. (nhcps.com)
  • Dr. Twibell also notes that families often desire proximity to loved ones during life-threatening resuscitations and perceive clear benefits to being present. (bsu.edu)
  • In children that require resuscitation, blood pressure may be normal. (medscape.com)
  • Neonatal resuscitation is a life -saving intervention for birth asphyxia , a leading cause of neonatal mortality . (bvsalud.org)
  • Hospital and provincial policies in place at the time of the resuscitation were reviewed. (cdc.gov)
  • Our regular newsletter contains updates on all things resuscitation, information about campaigns for CPR education and opportunities to purchase event tickets, manuals, and other RCUK merchandise. (resus.org.uk)
  • I am happy for Resuscitation Council UK to send me regular newsletters by email. (resus.org.uk)
  • For that reason, a person with neonatal resuscitation. (msdmanuals.com)

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