Dust: Earth or other matter in fine, dry particles. (Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed)Cosmic Dust: Finely divided solid matter with particle sizes smaller than a micrometeorite, thus with diameters much smaller than a millimeter, moving in interplanetary space. (NASA Thesaurus, 1994)Air Pollutants, Occupational: Air pollutants found in the work area. They are usually produced by the specific nature of the occupation.Pyroglyphidae: Family of house dust mites, in the superfamily Analgoidea, order Astigmata. They include the genera Dermatophagoides and Euroglyphus.Mites: Any arthropod of the subclass ACARI except the TICKS. They are minute animals related to the spiders, usually having transparent or semitransparent bodies. They may be parasitic on humans and domestic animals, producing various irritations of the skin (MITE INFESTATIONS). Many mite species are important to human and veterinary medicine as both parasite and vector. Mites also infest plants.Occupational Exposure: The exposure to potentially harmful chemical, physical, or biological agents that occurs as a result of one's occupation.Quartz: Quartz (SiO2). A glassy or crystalline form of silicon dioxide. Many colored varieties are semiprecious stones. (From Grant & Hackh's Chemical Dictionary, 5th ed)Pneumoconiosis: A diffuse parenchymal lung disease caused by inhalation of dust and by tissue reaction to their presence. These inorganic, organic, particulate, or vaporized matters usually are inhaled by workers in their occupational environment, leading to the various forms (ASBESTOSIS; BYSSINOSIS; and others). Similar air pollution can also have deleterious effects on the general population.Wood: A product of hard secondary xylem composed of CELLULOSE, hemicellulose, and LIGNANS, that is under the bark of trees and shrubs. It is used in construction and as a source of CHARCOAL and many other products.Inhalation Exposure: The exposure to potentially harmful chemical, physical, or biological agents by inhaling them.Byssinosis: A condition of BRONCHOCONSTRICTION resulting from hypersensitive reaction to inhaled dust during the initial processing of cotton, flax, or hemp in the textile industry. Symptoms include wheezing and tightness in the chest.Silicon Dioxide: Transparent, tasteless crystals found in nature as agate, amethyst, chalcedony, cristobalite, flint, sand, QUARTZ, and tridymite. The compound is insoluble in water or acids except hydrofluoric acid.Environmental Monitoring: The monitoring of the level of toxins, chemical pollutants, microbial contaminants, or other harmful substances in the environment (soil, air, and water), workplace, or in the bodies of people and animals present in that environment.Air Pollution, Indoor: The contamination of indoor air.Construction Materials: Supplies used in building.Allergens: Antigen-type substances that produce immediate hypersensitivity (HYPERSENSITIVITY, IMMEDIATE).Floors and Floorcoverings: The surface of a structure upon which one stands or walks.Textile Industry: The aggregate business enterprise of manufacturing textiles. (From Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed)MiningCoal: A natural fuel formed by partial decomposition of vegetable matter under certain environmental conditions.Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus: Species of European house dust mite, in the family PYROGLYPHIDAE. It is the most commonly found house dust mite.Arthropod Proteins: Proteins synthesized by organisms belonging to the phylum ARTHROPODA. Included in this heading are proteins from the subdivisions ARACHNIDA; CRUSTACEA; and HORSESHOE CRABS. Note that a separate heading for INSECT PROTEINS is listed under this heading.Air Microbiology: The presence of bacteria, viruses, and fungi in the air. This term is not restricted to pathogenic organisms.Housing: Living facilities for humans.Silicosis: A form of pneumoconiosis resulting from inhalation of dust containing crystalline form of SILICON DIOXIDE, usually in the form of quartz. Amorphous silica is relatively nontoxic.Agricultural Workers' Diseases: Diseases in persons engaged in cultivating and tilling soil, growing plants, harvesting crops, raising livestock, or otherwise engaged in husbandry and farming. The diseases are not restricted to farmers in the sense of those who perform conventional farm chores: the heading applies also to those engaged in the individual activities named above, as in those only gathering harvest or in those only dusting crops.Dermatophagoides farinae: Species of American house dust mite, in the family PYROGLYPHIDAE.Flour: Ground up seed of WHEAT.Environmental Exposure: The exposure to potentially harmful chemical, physical, or biological agents in the environment or to environmental factors that may include ionizing radiation, pathogenic organisms, or toxic chemicals.Industry: Any enterprise centered on the processing, assembly, production, or marketing of a line of products, services, commodities, or merchandise, in a particular field often named after its principal product. Examples include the automobile, fishing, music, publishing, insurance, and textile industries.Interior Design and Furnishings: The planning of the furnishings and decorations of an architectural interior.Gossypium: A plant genus of the family MALVACEAE. It is the source of COTTON FIBER; COTTONSEED OIL, which is used for cooking, and GOSSYPOL. The economically important cotton crop is a major user of agricultural PESTICIDES.Threshold Limit Values: Standards for limiting worker exposure to airborne contaminants. They are the maximum concentration in air at which it is believed that a particular substance will not produce adverse health effects with repeated daily exposure. It can be a time-weighted average (TLV-TWA), a short-term value (TLV-STEL), or an instantaneous value (TLV-Ceiling). They are expressed either as parts per million (ppm) or milligram per cubic meter (mg/m3).Maximum Allowable Concentration: The maximum exposure to a biologically active physical or chemical agent that is allowed during an 8-hour period (a workday) in a population of workers, or during a 24-hour period in the general population, which does not appear to cause appreciable harm, whether immediate or delayed for any period, in the target population. (From Lewis Dictionary of Toxicology, 1st ed)Endotoxins: Toxins closely associated with the living cytoplasm or cell wall of certain microorganisms, which do not readily diffuse into the culture medium, but are released upon lysis of the cells.Respiration Disorders: Diseases of the respiratory system in general or unspecified or for a specific respiratory disease not available.Ventilation: Supplying a building or house, their rooms and corridors, with fresh air. The controlling of the environment thus may be in public or domestic sites and in medical or non-medical locales. (From Dorland, 28th ed)TextilesParticle Size: Relating to the size of solids.Respiratory Tract DiseasesHousekeeping: The care and management of property.Air Pollutants: Any substance in the air which could, if present in high enough concentration, harm humans, animals, vegetation or material. Substances include GASES; PARTICULATE MATTER; and volatile ORGANIC CHEMICALS.Meteoroids: Any solid objects moving in interplanetary space that are smaller than a planet or asteroid but larger than a molecule. Meteorites are any meteoroid that has fallen to a planetary surface. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)Asbestos: Asbestos. Fibrous incombustible mineral composed of magnesium and calcium silicates with or without other elements. It is relatively inert chemically and used in thermal insulation and fireproofing. Inhalation of dust causes asbestosis and later lung and gastrointestinal neoplasms.Metallurgy: The science, art, or technology dealing with processes involved in the separation of metals from their ores, the technique of making or compounding the alloys, the techniques of working or heat-treating metals, and the mining of metals. It includes industrial metallurgy as well as metallurgical techniques employed in the preparation and working of metals used in dentistry, with special reference to orthodontic and prosthodontic appliances. (From Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992, p494)Asthma: A form of bronchial disorder with three distinct components: airway hyper-responsiveness (RESPIRATORY HYPERSENSITIVITY), airway INFLAMMATION, and intermittent AIRWAY OBSTRUCTION. It is characterized by spasmodic contraction of airway smooth muscle, WHEEZING, and dyspnea (DYSPNEA, PAROXYSMAL).Asbestos, Serpentine: A type of asbestos that occurs in nature as the dihydrate of magnesium silicate. It exists in two forms: antigorite, a plated variety, and chrysotile, a fibrous variety. The latter makes up 95% of all asbestos products. (From Merck Index, 11th ed, p.893)Respiratory Protective Devices: Respirators to protect individuals from breathing air contaminated with harmful dusts, fogs, fumes, mists, gases, smokes, sprays, or vapors.Hypersensitivity: Altered reactivity to an antigen, which can result in pathologic reactions upon subsequent exposure to that particular antigen.Mesothelioma: A tumor derived from mesothelial tissue (peritoneum, pleura, pericardium). It appears as broad sheets of cells, with some regions containing spindle-shaped, sarcoma-like cells and other regions showing adenomatous patterns. Pleural mesotheliomas have been linked to exposure to asbestos. (Dorland, 27th ed)Asbestos, Crocidolite: A lavender, acid-resistant asbestos.Asbestosis: A form of pneumoconiosis caused by inhalation of asbestos fibers which elicit potent inflammatory responses in the parenchyma of the lung. The disease is characterized by interstitial fibrosis of the lung, varying from scattered sites to extensive scarring of the alveolar interstitium.Pleural DiseasesAsbestos, Amphibole: A class of asbestos that includes silicates of magnesium, iron, calcium, and sodium. The fibers are generally brittle and cannot be spun, but are more resistant to chemicals and heat than ASBESTOS, SERPENTINE. (From Hawley's Condensed Chemical Dictionary, 11th ed)
  • An OSHA investigation found the Furst-McNess Corp. failed to implement a housekeeping program to control and remove combustible dust accumulations that occur during storage of grain materials and manufacturing of animal feed. (dol.gov)
  • The first step to ensure safe operations involving combustible dust is to conduct a dust hazard analysis. (ohsonline.com)
  • This webinar will provide viewers with a guide to identifying combustible dust hazards in manufacturing facilities. (ohsonline.com)
  • To ensure the safe operation of facilities handling combustible dust, a balanced mix of engineering and administrative controls are required. (ohsonline.com)
  • This webinar will provide information on the safeguards used to mitigate the hazards associated with combustible dust and how to determine what is appropriate for your facility. (ohsonline.com)
  • As a member of the National Fire Protection Association, he is a Principal member on the committee for NFPA 61, the standard for dust fire and explosion prevention in the agricultural and food processing industries, and he has worked with the Fundamentals of Combustible Dust technical committee on NFPA 652 and the Wood and Cellulosic Materials Processing technical committee on NFPA 664. (ohsonline.com)
  • It's easy to underestimate combustible dust risks and the precautions needed to avoid them. (ohsonline.com)
  • The impact of dust deposition on ice in Greenland, such as darkening ice and formation of algae on ice or cryoconite, as well as the link between Saharan dust transport and the Arctic heat dome must be investigated further in collaboration with scientists in UK and Germany' Francis emphasized. (eurekalert.org)
  • Deposition of dust may have a significant effect on the composition and nature of soils in arid regions and beyond. (nps.gov)
  • They also collected pieces of carpet from three homes in Ohio, and took samples of dust from vacuum cleaner bags from those same homes. (eurekalert.org)
  • Road dust may be suppressed by mechanical methods like street sweeper vehicles equipped with vacuum cleaners , vegetable oil sprays, or with water sprayers. (wikipedia.org)
  • Vacuum or dust your smoke alarms according to manufacturer's directions to keep them working properly. (pwcgov.org)
  • Construction workers may be (µg/m3) as a time weighted aver- pelled or boom mounted, and may exposed to hazardous dust con- age for up to a 10 hour workday dur- ride on the slab or on the subbase. (cdc.gov)
  • He is responsible for the Indiana and Ohio regions and provides thorough support from recommending cleaning equipment to providing insight to topics link hazardous dust, to offering training and field support. (ohsonline.com)
  • LONE PINE, CALIF. - Los Angeles and the Owens Valley are at war over water again, with the city trying to rework a historic agreement aimed at stopping massive dust storms that have besieged the eastern Sierra Nevada since L.A. opened an aqueduct 99 years ago that drained Owens Lake. (latimes.com)
  • The L.A. Department of Water and Power has spent $1.2 billion in accordance with a 1997 agreement to combat the powder-fine dust from a 40-square-mile area of the dry Owens Lake bed. (latimes.com)
  • We have no intention of walking away from our responsibility for the dust at the dry Owens Lake bed," Nichols said. (latimes.com)
  • Now, Los Angeles is back in court over its obligations to control dust pollution at Owens Lake. (kcur.org)
  • That earned Owens Lake the dubious mark of being the largest single source of dust pollution in the nation. (kcur.org)
  • For example, the DWP has had to spread more water than anticipated -- yearly costs have grown to about $45 million -- over portions of the lake bed where dust pollution exceeds federal standards. (latimes.com)
  • Dust kicked up by vehicles traveling on roads may make up 33% of air pollution . (wikipedia.org)
  • The city of L.A. is in court over obligations to control dust pollution at the lake. (kcur.org)
  • The introduction couldn't come at a better time, with the summer's hot, dry weather, and the recent release of a PSU study concerning the hazards of spraying drilling and fracking wastewater for dust control.¹ Resinator has been approved by the Penn State Center for Dirt and Gravel Road Studies, making it one of only six products that meet their stringent environmental requirements for high performance under heavy traffic conditions. (benzinga.com)
  • When I came home the house was neat and clean with no dust or dirt anywhere. (thumbtack.com)
  • On Black Sunday, a dust storm deposited dirt and debris swept from the Plains States onto Washington. (reference.com)
  • Once the adjacent new slab is poured and cured, the dowels evaluate the effectiveness of dust con- cancer, kidney disease, reduced lung distribute loads between adjacent con- trols for dowel drilling machines, to function, and other disorders [NIOSH crete pavement slabs [Park et al. (cdc.gov)
  • Pneumoconiosis is a restrictive and occupational lung disease caused by inhalation of dust. (medgadget.com)
  • The aim of this systematic review was to reveal the impact of organic dust exposure on long-term change in lung function. (bmj.com)
  • Overall, 14 studies found some type of association between exposure to organic dust and long-term change in lung function. (bmj.com)
  • 12 studies revealed a significant exposure-response relation between organic dust and change in lung function. (bmj.com)
  • We therefore conclude that there is limited evidence of a causal association between general exposure to organic dust and long-term excess decline in lung function. (bmj.com)
  • 7 μm) of cinnamon dust and cellulose dust had evidence of damaged lung elasticity and alveobronchiolitis at days 1 and 7 and evidence of fibrotic changes at 1 month. (aappublications.org)
  • When it's time to dust, use a damp cloth or rag. (naturalnews.com)
  • They are great for dusting if used slightly damp, I even used them to wash windows, although better not to use the patterned side for this application as it will leave a sticky mess on the window. (biome.com.au)
  • Atmospheric or wind-borne fugitive dust , also known as aeolian dust , comes from arid and dry regions where high velocity winds are able to remove mostly silt-sized material, deflating susceptible surfaces. (wikipedia.org)
  • Aeolian processes are responsible for the emission and/or mobilization of dust and the formation of areas of sand dunes. (nps.gov)
  • Many highway construction tasks pro- el diameter and whether cement-based found that exposures were re- duce dusts that can contain respirable grout or an epoxy compound is used to duced using tool-mounted local crystalline silica. (cdc.gov)
  • Breathing dust that contains respira- formed during new concrete airport ment repair and up to eight times the ble crystalline silica can lead to silico- runway and highway construction (e.g. (cdc.gov)
  • Crystalline silica is found in sev- dust controls if necessary, and to pro- eral construction materials, such as Typical dowel drilling machines have mote the use of tools with dust con- brick, block, mortar and concrete. (cdc.gov)
  • Goudie and Middleton (2006) provide an excellent review of desert dust processes, while Goudie et al. (nps.gov)
  • The webinar will then cover how to analyze processes and buildings to determine where dust fire and explosion hazards exists by evaluating normal and abnormal operating conditions, potential ignition sources, and existing safeguards in place. (ohsonline.com)
  • COLUMBUS, Ohio--The dust that settles throughout our homes and offices almost always contains bits of chemicals that can cause problems for the human endocrine system, scientists say. (eurekalert.org)
  • When chemicals are released by these everyday items they get into the air and end up in the dust that settles on our floors and household items. (naturalnews.com)
  • A meandering polar jet was discovered as responsible for both the emission and transport of dust from Northwest Africa to the Arctic. (eurekalert.org)
  • There is a need for a more generalised road dust emission model since the majority of already developed road dust emission models contain empirical constants or functions related to local air quality measurements. (uio.no)
  • This thesis is concerned with the evaluation and development of models related to the emissions and dispersion of traffic induced road dust. (uio.no)
  • The second study is concerned with the development of a more generalised model framework to describe road dust emissions, i.e. emissions of particulate matter (PM) from the road surface due to road surface wear as well as resuspension of deposited material on the road surface and road shoulders. (uio.no)
  • As such, the applicability of these models on other road environments is limited and they cannot be used for analysis of mitigation measures related to road dust emissions. (uio.no)
  • As such, refinements of the parameterisations of road surface conditions are needed and measurement campaigns with the aim of understanding the effect of road surface conditions on road dust emissions should be conducted. (uio.no)
  • A generalised model for traffic induced road dust emissions. (uio.no)
  • Road dust is a significant source contributing to the generation and release of particulate matter into the atmosphere. (wikipedia.org)
  • Control of road dust is a significant challenge in urban areas, and also in other locations with high levels of vehicular traffic upon unsealed roads, such as mines and landfill dumps. (wikipedia.org)
  • In the first phase of the project, a pilot study was conduct- ed that measured respirable dust emissions from a five-drill dowel drilling machine that was operated in a tent, isolat- ed from the effects of wind, weather, and other particulates. (cdc.gov)
  • But it's mostly just giant, shallow pools of water that are still the weapons of choice to fight dust. (kcur.org)
  • LODI, WI - The U.S. Department of Labor's Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) has cited Furst-McNess Corp. - based in Lodi, Wisconsin - for exposing employees to potential grain dust explosions and other hazards at the feed mill facility. (dol.gov)
  • Half of the dust extracts examined were found to promote the proliferation of fat cells at only 100 micrograms - 1,000 times less than the 60 to 100 milligram average daily dust consumption of most children. (naturalnews.com)
  • Everything around us is inhaling it because it's a real fine powdery dust and we're breathing it just as much as them sheep are. (loe.org)
  • Their hand-to-mouth behavior makes them vulnerable to lead poisoning from contaminated soil or dust. (medindia.net)
  • Far-traveled dust from distant sources may have a significant effect on soil chemistry and nutrient status (e.g. (nps.gov)
  • During the 1930s wind erosion lifted soil from farmland, resulting in the Dust Bowl and affecting 75 percent of the United States. (reference.com)
  • One-third of the global land area is covered by dust-producing surfaces, made up of hyper-arid regions like the Sahara which covers 0.9 billion hectares, and drylands which occupy 5.2 billion hectares. (wikipedia.org)
  • OSHA standards require that grain dust and ignition sources be controlled to protect workers from potentially catastrophic explosions," said OSHA Madison Area Office Director Chad Greenwood. (dol.gov)
  • The topics will include developing a dust sampling plan, principles of dust clouds and ignitable atmospheres, and mechanics of dust flash fires and explosions. (ohsonline.com)
  • project demonstrate that LEV dust control systems on dowel drilling machines can be very effective. (cdc.gov)
  • While the experiments so far have involved the peripheral nervous system and muscles, the neural dust motes could work equally well in the central nervous system and brain to control prosthetics, the researchers say. (dailygalaxy.com)
  • The DWP says that if it prevails, the amount of water used for dust control could be cut in half, saving the average ratepayer about $20 a year. (latimes.com)
  • To date, the city has spent more than a billion dollars doing that, giving it another distinction: It's one of the largest dust-control projects in U.S. history. (kcur.org)
  • And it's really trying to control dust in a desert that's naturally dusty," Adams says. (kcur.org)
  • Those dust-control measures are easier to see once the chopper ascends higher. (kcur.org)
  • Instead, the researchers found, those microbes are eating away at potentially harmful chemicals in dust--chemicals that are part of everyday, modern life. (eurekalert.org)
  • A short walk across the grass, and I notice that my shoes and pants have collected black dust halfway up to my knees. (loe.org)