A group of viruses in the PNEUMOVIRUS genus causing respiratory infections in various mammals. Humans and cattle are most affected but infections in goats and sheep have also been reported.
Pneumovirus infections caused by the RESPIRATORY SYNCYTIAL VIRUSES. Humans and cattle are most affected but infections in goats and sheep have been reported.
The type species of PNEUMOVIRUS and an important cause of lower respiratory disease in infants and young children. It frequently presents with bronchitis and bronchopneumonia and is further characterized by fever, cough, dyspnea, wheezing, and pallor.
A species of PNEUMOVIRUS causing an important respiratory infection in cattle. Symptoms include fever, conjunctivitis, and respiratory distress.
Vaccines or candidate vaccines used to prevent infection with RESPIRATORY SYNCYTIAL VIRUSES.
Infections with viruses of the genus RESPIROVIRUS, family PARAMYXOVIRIDAE. Host cell infection occurs by adsorption, via HEMAGGLUTININ, to the cell surface.
An acute inflammatory disease of the lower RESPIRATORY TRACT, caused by paramyxoviruses, occurring primarily in infants and young children; the viruses most commonly implicated are PARAINFLUENZA VIRUS TYPE 3; RESPIRATORY SYNCYTIAL VIRUS, HUMAN; and METAPNEUMOVIRUS.
Glycoprotein from Sendai, para-influenza, Newcastle Disease, and other viruses that participates in binding the virus to cell-surface receptors. The HN protein possesses both hemagglutinin and neuraminidase activity.
Proteins, usually glycoproteins, found in the viral envelopes of a variety of viruses. They promote cell membrane fusion and thereby may function in the uptake of the virus by cells.
A subfamily of the family MURIDAE comprised of 69 genera. New World mice and rats are included in this subfamily.
Inflammation of the BRONCHIOLES.
Invasion of the host RESPIRATORY SYSTEM by microorganisms, usually leading to pathological processes or diseases.
The top portion of the pharynx situated posterior to the nose and superior to the SOFT PALATE. The nasopharynx is the posterior extension of the nasal cavities and has a respiratory function.
A genus of the subfamily PNEUMOVIRINAE, containing two members: Turkey rhinotracheitis virus and a human Metapneumovirus. Virions lack HEMAGGLUTININ and NEURAMINIDASE.
Proteins found in any species of virus.
Infections with viruses of the family PARAMYXOVIRIDAE. This includes MORBILLIVIRUS INFECTIONS; RESPIROVIRUS INFECTIONS; PNEUMOVIRUS INFECTIONS; HENIPAVIRUS INFECTIONS; AVULAVIRUS INFECTIONS; and RUBULAVIRUS INFECTIONS.
Immunoglobulins produced in response to VIRAL ANTIGENS.
Substances elaborated by viruses that have antigenic activity.
A general term for diseases produced by viruses.
The process of intracellular viral multiplication, consisting of the synthesis of PROTEINS; NUCLEIC ACIDS; and sometimes LIPIDS, and their assembly into a new infectious particle.
Inflammation of the lung parenchyma that is caused by a viral infection.
Layers of protein which surround the capsid in animal viruses with tubular nucleocapsids. The envelope consists of an inner layer of lipids and virus specified proteins also called membrane or matrix proteins. The outer layer consists of one or more types of morphological subunits called peplomers which project from the viral envelope; this layer always consists of glycoproteins.
A species of RESPIROVIRUS frequently isolated from small children with pharyngitis, bronchitis, and pneumonia.
Process of growing viruses in live animals, plants, or cultured cells.
The type species of ORTHOPOXVIRUS, related to COWPOX VIRUS, but whose true origin is unknown. It has been used as a live vaccine against SMALLPOX. It is also used as a vector for inserting foreign DNA into animals. Rabbitpox virus is a subspecies of VACCINIA VIRUS.
Viruses whose genetic material is RNA.
Either of the pair of organs occupying the cavity of the thorax that effect the aeration of the blood.
The measurement of infection-blocking titer of ANTISERA by testing a series of dilutions for a given virus-antiserum interaction end-point, which is generally the dilution at which tissue cultures inoculated with the serum-virus mixtures demonstrate cytopathology (CPE) or the dilution at which 50% of test animals injected with serum-virus mixtures show infectivity (ID50) or die (LD50).
Ribonucleic acid that makes up the genetic material of viruses.
A species of the genus PNEUMOVIRUS causing pneumonia in mice.
Fluid obtained by THERAPEUTIC IRRIGATION or washout of the nasal cavity and NASAL MUCOSA. The resulting fluid is used in cytologic and immunologic assays of the nasal mucosa such as with the NASAL PROVOCATION TEST in the diagnosis of nasal hypersensitivity.
Established cell cultures that have the potential to propagate indefinitely.
Agents used in the prophylaxis or therapy of VIRUS DISEASES. Some of the ways they may act include preventing viral replication by inhibiting viral DNA polymerase; binding to specific cell-surface receptors and inhibiting viral penetration or uncoating; inhibiting viral protein synthesis; or blocking late stages of virus assembly.
A genus of the family PARAMYXOVIRIDAE (subfamily PARAMYXOVIRINAE) where all the virions have both HEMAGGLUTININ and NEURAMINIDASE activities and encode a non-structural C protein. SENDAI VIRUS is the type species.
A CELL LINE derived from the kidney of the African green (vervet) monkey, (CERCOPITHECUS AETHIOPS) used primarily in virus replication studies and plaque assays.
Diseases of domestic cattle of the genus Bos. It includes diseases of cows, yaks, and zebus.
An infant during the first month after birth.
Divisions of the year according to some regularly recurrent phenomena usually astronomical or climatic. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)
Suspensions of attenuated or killed viruses administered for the prevention or treatment of infectious viral disease.
A species of RESPIROVIRUS, subfamily PARAMYXOVIRINAE, most often seen in conjunction with a secondary infection of MANNHEIMIA HAEMOLYTICA resulting in pneumonic pasteurellosis (PASTEURELLOSIS, PNEUMONIC).
Descriptions of specific amino acid, carbohydrate, or nucleotide sequences which have appeared in the published literature and/or are deposited in and maintained by databanks such as GENBANK, European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), National Biomedical Research Foundation (NBRF), or other sequence repositories.
The expelling of virus particles from the body. Important routes include the respiratory tract, genital tract, and intestinal tract. Virus shedding is an important means of vertical transmission (INFECTIOUS DISEASE TRANSMISSION, VERTICAL).
Infections with viruses of the genus PNEUMOVIRUS, family PARAMYXOVIRIDAE. This includes RESPIRATORY SYNCYTIAL VIRUS INFECTIONS, an important cause of respiratory disease in humans.
A species of CERCOPITHECUS containing three subspecies: C. tantalus, C. pygerythrus, and C. sabeus. They are found in the forests and savannah of Africa. The African green monkey (C. pygerythrus) is the natural host of SIMIAN IMMUNODEFICIENCY VIRUS and is used in AIDS research.
A genus of the family PARAMYXOVIRIDAE (subfamily PNEUMOVIRINAE) where the human and bovine virions have neither hemagglutinin nor neuraminidase activity. RESPIRATORY SYNCYTIAL VIRUS, HUMAN is the type species.
A family of RNA viruses causing INFLUENZA and other diseases. There are five recognized genera: INFLUENZAVIRUS A; INFLUENZAVIRUS B; INFLUENZAVIRUS C; ISAVIRUS; and THOGOTOVIRUS.
The study of the structure, growth, function, genetics, and reproduction of viruses, and VIRUS DISEASES.
Live vaccines prepared from microorganisms which have undergone physical adaptation (e.g., by radiation or temperature conditioning) or serial passage in laboratory animal hosts or infected tissue/cell cultures, in order to produce avirulent mutant strains capable of inducing protective immunity.
Antibodies produced by a single clone of cells.
The assembly of VIRAL STRUCTURAL PROTEINS and nucleic acid (VIRAL DNA or VIRAL RNA) to form a VIRUS PARTICLE.
A family of spherical viruses, of the order MONONEGAVIRALES, somewhat larger than the orthomyxoviruses, and containing single-stranded RNA. Subfamilies include PARAMYXOVIRINAE and PNEUMOVIRINAE.
Minute infectious agents whose genomes are composed of DNA or RNA, but not both. They are characterized by a lack of independent metabolism and the inability to replicate outside living host cells.
The functional hereditary units of VIRUSES.
Visible morphologic changes in cells infected with viruses. It includes shutdown of cellular RNA and protein synthesis, cell fusion, release of lysosomal enzymes, changes in cell membrane permeability, diffuse changes in intracellular structures, presence of viral inclusion bodies, and chromosomal aberrations. It excludes malignant transformation, which is CELL TRANSFORMATION, VIRAL. Viral cytopathogenic effects provide a valuable method for identifying and classifying the infecting viruses.
A form of fluorescent antibody technique utilizing a fluorochrome conjugated to an antibody, which is added directly to a tissue or cell suspension for the detection of a specific antigen. (Bennington, Saunders Dictionary & Encyclopedia of Laboratory Medicine and Technology, 1984)
A condition characterized by infiltration of the lung with EOSINOPHILS due to inflammation or other disease processes. Major eosinophilic lung diseases are the eosinophilic pneumonias caused by infections, allergens, or toxic agents.
Test for tissue antigen using either a direct method, by conjugation of antibody with fluorescent dye (FLUORESCENT ANTIBODY TECHNIQUE, DIRECT) or an indirect method, by formation of antigen-antibody complex which is then labeled with fluorescein-conjugated anti-immunoglobulin antibody (FLUORESCENT ANTIBODY TECHNIQUE, INDIRECT). The tissue is then examined by fluorescence microscopy.
An immunoassay utilizing an antibody labeled with an enzyme marker such as horseradish peroxidase. While either the enzyme or the antibody is bound to an immunosorbent substrate, they both retain their biologic activity; the change in enzyme activity as a result of the enzyme-antibody-antigen reaction is proportional to the concentration of the antigen and can be measured spectrophotometrically or with the naked eye. Many variations of the method have been developed.
A species of RESPIROVIRUS also called hemadsorption virus 2 (HA2), which causes laryngotracheitis in humans, especially children.
Domesticated bovine animals of the genus Bos, usually kept on a farm or ranch and used for the production of meat or dairy products or for heavy labor.
The mucous lining of the NASAL CAVITY, including lining of the nostril (vestibule) and the OLFACTORY MUCOSA. Nasal mucosa consists of ciliated cells, GOBLET CELLS, brush cells, small granule cells, basal cells (STEM CELLS) and glands containing both mucous and serous cells.
Specific molecular components of the cell capable of recognizing and interacting with a virus, and which, after binding it, are capable of generating some signal that initiates the chain of events leading to the biological response.
An acute viral infection in humans involving the respiratory tract. It is marked by inflammation of the NASAL MUCOSA; the PHARYNX; and conjunctiva, and by headache and severe, often generalized, myalgia.
Vaccines in which the infectious microbial nucleic acid components have been destroyed by chemical or physical treatment (e.g., formalin, beta-propiolactone, gamma radiation) without affecting the antigenicity or immunogenicity of the viral coat or bacterial outer membrane proteins.
The order of amino acids as they occur in a polypeptide chain. This is referred to as the primary structure of proteins. It is of fundamental importance in determining PROTEIN CONFORMATION.
Method for measuring viral infectivity and multiplication in CULTURED CELLS. Clear lysed areas or plaques develop as the VIRAL PARTICLES are released from the infected cells during incubation. With some VIRUSES, the cells are killed by a cytopathic effect; with others, the infected cells are not killed but can be detected by their hemadsorptive ability. Sometimes the plaque cells contain VIRAL ANTIGENS which can be measured by IMMUNOFLUORESCENCE.
The type species of MORBILLIVIRUS and the cause of the highly infectious human disease MEASLES, which affects mostly children.
The tubular and cavernous organs and structures, by means of which pulmonary ventilation and gas exchange between ambient air and the blood are brought about.
Small synthetic peptides that mimic surface antigens of pathogens and are immunogenic, or vaccines manufactured with the aid of recombinant DNA techniques. The latter vaccines may also be whole viruses whose nucleic acids have been modified.
A subfamily of MURIDAE found nearly world-wide and consisting of about 20 genera. Voles, lemmings, and muskrats are members.
A species of POLYOMAVIRUS originally isolated from Rhesus monkey kidney tissue. It produces malignancy in human and newborn hamster kidney cell cultures.
A subtype of INFLUENZA A VIRUS with the surface proteins hemagglutinin 1 and neuraminidase 1. The H1N1 subtype was responsible for the Spanish flu pandemic of 1918.
Vaccines or candidate vaccines used to prevent infection with parainfluenza viruses in humans and animals.
Viruses parasitic on plants higher than bacteria.
Viruses whose nucleic acid is DNA.
A subtype of INFLUENZA A VIRUS comprised of the surface proteins hemagglutinin 3 and neuraminidase 2. The H3N2 subtype was responsible for the Hong Kong flu pandemic of 1968.
A variation of the PCR technique in which cDNA is made from RNA via reverse transcription. The resultant cDNA is then amplified using standard PCR protocols.
A species of RUBULAVIRUS associated particularly with acute laryngotracheitis (CROUP) in children aged 6 months to 3 years.
Viruses which lack a complete genome so that they cannot completely replicate or cannot form a protein coat. Some are host-dependent defectives, meaning they can replicate only in cell systems which provide the particular genetic function which they lack. Others, called SATELLITE VIRUSES, are able to replicate only when their genetic defect is complemented by a helper virus.
Delivery of medications through the nasal mucosa.
The confinement of a patient in a hospital.
A part of the upper respiratory tract. It contains the organ of SMELL. The term includes the external nose, the nasal cavity, and the PARANASAL SINUSES.
The relationships of groups of organisms as reflected by their genetic makeup.
Noises, normal and abnormal, heard on auscultation over any part of the RESPIRATORY TRACT.
Sudden increase in the incidence of a disease. The concept includes EPIDEMICS and PANDEMICS.
Multinucleated masses produced by the fusion of many cells; often associated with viral infections. In AIDS, they are induced when the envelope glycoprotein of the HIV virus binds to the CD4 antigen of uninfected neighboring T4 cells. The resulting syncytium leads to cell death and thus may account for the cytopathic effect of the virus.
The type species of ALPHAVIRUS normally transmitted to birds by CULEX mosquitoes in Egypt, South Africa, India, Malaya, the Philippines, and Australia. It may be associated with fever in humans. Serotypes (differing by less than 17% in nucleotide sequence) include Babanki, Kyzylagach, and Ockelbo viruses.
Cells that line the inner and outer surfaces of the body by forming cellular layers (EPITHELIUM) or masses. Epithelial cells lining the SKIN; the MOUTH; the NOSE; and the ANAL CANAL derive from ectoderm; those lining the RESPIRATORY SYSTEM and the DIGESTIVE SYSTEM derive from endoderm; others (CARDIOVASCULAR SYSTEM and LYMPHATIC SYSTEM) derive from mesoderm. Epithelial cells can be classified mainly by cell shape and function into squamous, glandular and transitional epithelial cells.
Species of the genus INFLUENZAVIRUS B that cause HUMAN INFLUENZA and other diseases primarily in humans. Antigenic variation is less extensive than in type A viruses (INFLUENZA A VIRUS) and consequently there is no basis for distinct subtypes or variants. Epidemics are less likely than with INFLUENZA A VIRUS and there have been no pandemics. Previously only found in humans, Influenza B virus has been isolated from seals which may constitute the animal reservoir from which humans are exposed.
Non-antibody proteins secreted by inflammatory leukocytes and some non-leukocytic cells, that act as intercellular mediators. They differ from classical hormones in that they are produced by a number of tissue or cell types rather than by specialized glands. They generally act locally in a paracrine or autocrine rather than endocrine manner.
Any of the processes by which cytoplasmic factors influence the differential control of gene action in viruses.
The infective system of a virus, composed of the viral genome, a protein core, and a protein coat called a capsid, which may be naked or enclosed in a lipoprotein envelope called the peplos.
The type species of RESPIROVIRUS in the subfamily PARAMYXOVIRINAE. It is the murine version of HUMAN PARAINFLUENZA VIRUS 1, distinguished by host range.
Deliberate stimulation of the host's immune response. ACTIVE IMMUNIZATION involves administration of ANTIGENS or IMMUNOLOGIC ADJUVANTS. PASSIVE IMMUNIZATION involves administration of IMMUNE SERA or LYMPHOCYTES or their extracts (e.g., transfer factor, immune RNA) or transplantation of immunocompetent cell producing tissue (thymus or bone marrow).
The type species of LYSSAVIRUS causing rabies in humans and other animals. Transmission is mostly by animal bites through saliva. The virus is neurotropic multiplying in neurons and myotubes of vertebrates.
The major immunoglobulin isotype class in normal human serum. There are several isotype subclasses of IgG, for example, IgG1, IgG2A, and IgG2B.
Sites on an antigen that interact with specific antibodies.
Viral proteins found in either the NUCLEOCAPSID or the viral core (VIRAL CORE PROTEINS).
The quantity of measurable virus in a body fluid. Change in viral load, measured in plasma, is sometimes used as a SURROGATE MARKER in disease progression.
A subtype of INFLUENZA A VIRUS comprised of the surface proteins hemagglutinin 5 and neuraminidase 1. The H5N1 subtype, frequently referred to as the bird flu virus, is endemic in wild birds and very contagious among both domestic (POULTRY) and wild birds. It does not usually infect humans, but some cases have been reported.
Cells propagated in vitro in special media conducive to their growth. Cultured cells are used to study developmental, morphologic, metabolic, physiologic, and genetic processes, among others.
Washing liquid obtained from irrigation of the lung, including the BRONCHI and the PULMONARY ALVEOLI. It is generally used to assess biochemical, inflammatory, or infection status of the lung.
Virus diseases caused by the PICORNAVIRIDAE.
A genus of PICORNAVIRIDAE inhabiting primarily the respiratory tract of mammalian hosts. It includes over 100 human serotypes associated with the COMMON COLD.
In vitro method for producing large amounts of specific DNA or RNA fragments of defined length and sequence from small amounts of short oligonucleotide flanking sequences (primers). The essential steps include thermal denaturation of the double-stranded target molecules, annealing of the primers to their complementary sequences, and extension of the annealed primers by enzymatic synthesis with DNA polymerase. The reaction is efficient, specific, and extremely sensitive. Uses for the reaction include disease diagnosis, detection of difficult-to-isolate pathogens, mutation analysis, genetic testing, DNA sequencing, and analyzing evolutionary relationships.
Deoxyribonucleic acid that makes up the genetic material of viruses.
RNA sequences that serve as templates for protein synthesis. Bacterial mRNAs are generally primary transcripts in that they do not require post-transcriptional processing. Eukaryotic mRNA is synthesized in the nucleus and must be exported to the cytoplasm for translation. Most eukaryotic mRNAs have a sequence of polyadenylic acid at the 3' end, referred to as the poly(A) tail. The function of this tail is not known for certain, but it may play a role in the export of mature mRNA from the nucleus as well as in helping stabilize some mRNA molecules by retarding their degradation in the cytoplasm.
Antibodies that reduce or abolish some biological activity of a soluble antigen or infectious agent, usually a virus.
A protein-nucleic acid complex which forms part or all of a virion. It consists of a CAPSID plus enclosed nucleic acid. Depending on the virus, the nucleocapsid may correspond to a naked core or be surrounded by a membranous envelope.
Conjugated protein-carbohydrate compounds including mucins, mucoid, and amyloid glycoproteins.
The mucous membrane lining the RESPIRATORY TRACT, including the NASAL CAVITY; the LARYNX; the TRACHEA; and the BRONCHI tree. The respiratory mucosa consists of various types of epithelial cells ranging from ciliated columnar to simple squamous, mucous GOBLET CELLS, and glands containing both mucous and serous cells.
An area showing altered staining behavior in the nucleus or cytoplasm of a virus-infected cell. Some inclusion bodies represent "virus factories" in which viral nucleic acid or protein is being synthesized; others are merely artifacts of fixation and staining. One example, Negri bodies, are found in the cytoplasm or processes of nerve cells in animals that have died from rabies.
Disease having a short and relatively severe course.
Inflammation of the lung parenchyma that is associated with BRONCHITIS, usually involving lobular areas from TERMINAL BRONCHIOLES to the PULMONARY ALVEOLI. The affected areas become filled with exudate that forms consolidated patches.
Viral proteins that are components of the mature assembled VIRUS PARTICLES. They may include nucleocapsid core proteins (gag proteins), enzymes packaged within the virus particle (pol proteins), and membrane components (env proteins). These do not include the proteins encoded in the VIRAL GENOME that are produced in infected cells but which are not packaged in the mature virus particle,i.e. the so called non-structural proteins (VIRAL NONSTRUCTURAL PROTEINS).
The type species of VESICULOVIRUS causing a disease symptomatically similar to FOOT-AND-MOUTH DISEASE in cattle, horses, and pigs. It may be transmitted to other species including humans, where it causes influenza-like symptoms.
Binary classification measures to assess test results. Sensitivity or recall rate is the proportion of true positives. Specificity is the probability of correctly determining the absence of a condition. (From Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 2d ed)
The type species of RUBULAVIRUS that causes an acute infectious disease in humans, affecting mainly children. Transmission occurs by droplet infection.
The sequence of PURINES and PYRIMIDINES in nucleic acids and polynucleotides. It is also called nucleotide sequence.
Naturally occurring or experimentally induced animal diseases with pathological processes sufficiently similar to those of human diseases. They are used as study models for human diseases.
A nucleoside antimetabolite antiviral agent that blocks nucleic acid synthesis and is used against both RNA and DNA viruses.
The type species of the genus ORTHOHEPADNAVIRUS which causes human HEPATITIS B and is also apparently a causal agent in human HEPATOCELLULAR CARCINOMA. The Dane particle is an intact hepatitis virion, named after its discoverer. Non-infectious spherical and tubular particles are also seen in the serum.
Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.
The major interferon produced by mitogenically or antigenically stimulated LYMPHOCYTES. It is structurally different from TYPE I INTERFERON and its major activity is immunoregulation. It has been implicated in the expression of CLASS II HISTOCOMPATIBILITY ANTIGENS in cells that do not normally produce them, leading to AUTOIMMUNE DISEASES.
A species of FLAVIVIRUS, one of the Japanese encephalitis virus group (ENCEPHALITIS VIRUSES, JAPANESE). It can infect birds and mammals. In humans, it is seen most frequently in Africa, Asia, and Europe presenting as a silent infection or undifferentiated fever (WEST NILE FEVER). The virus appeared in North America for the first time in 1999. It is transmitted mainly by CULEX spp mosquitoes which feed primarily on birds, but it can also be carried by the Asian Tiger mosquito, AEDES albopictus, which feeds mainly on mammals.
Administration of vaccines to stimulate the host's immune response. This includes any preparation intended for active immunological prophylaxis.
DNA molecules capable of autonomous replication within a host cell and into which other DNA sequences can be inserted and thus amplified. Many are derived from PLASMIDS; BACTERIOPHAGES; or VIRUSES. They are used for transporting foreign genes into recipient cells. Genetic vectors possess a functional replicator site and contain GENETIC MARKERS to facilitate their selective recognition.
Resistance to a disease-causing agent induced by the introduction of maternal immunity into the fetus by transplacental transfer or into the neonate through colostrum and milk.
Immunologic techniques based on the use of: (1) enzyme-antibody conjugates; (2) enzyme-antigen conjugates; (3) antienzyme antibody followed by its homologous enzyme; or (4) enzyme-antienzyme complexes. These are used histologically for visualizing or labeling tissue specimens.
Production of new arrangements of DNA by various mechanisms such as assortment and segregation, CROSSING OVER; GENE CONVERSION; GENETIC TRANSFORMATION; GENETIC CONJUGATION; GENETIC TRANSDUCTION; or mixed infection of viruses.
The biosynthesis of RNA carried out on a template of DNA. The biosynthesis of DNA from an RNA template is called REVERSE TRANSCRIPTION.
The binding of virus particles to receptors on the host cell surface. For enveloped viruses, the virion ligand is usually a surface glycoprotein as is the cellular receptor. For non-enveloped viruses, the virus CAPSID serves as the ligand.
The type species of the genus INFLUENZAVIRUS A that causes influenza and other diseases in humans and animals. Antigenic variation occurs frequently between strains, allowing classification into subtypes and variants. Transmission is usually by aerosol (human and most non-aquatic hosts) or waterborne (ducks). Infected birds shed the virus in their saliva, nasal secretions, and feces.
A multistage process that includes cloning, physical mapping, subcloning, determination of the DNA SEQUENCE, and information analysis.
A species of ALPHAVIRUS isolated in central, eastern, and southern Africa.
Genotypic differences observed among individuals in a population.
The outer protein protective shell of a virus, which protects the viral nucleic acid.
The mechanism by which latent viruses, such as genetically transmitted tumor viruses (PROVIRUSES) or PROPHAGES of lysogenic bacteria, are induced to replicate and then released as infectious viruses. It may be effected by various endogenous and exogenous stimuli, including B-cell LIPOPOLYSACCHARIDES, glucocorticoid hormones, halogenated pyrimidines, IONIZING RADIATION, ultraviolet light, and superinfecting viruses.
Immunoglobulin preparations used in intravenous infusion, containing primarily IMMUNOGLOBULIN G. They are used to treat a variety of diseases associated with decreased or abnormal immunoglobulin levels including pediatric AIDS; primary HYPERGAMMAGLOBULINEMIA; SCID; CYTOMEGALOVIRUS infections in transplant recipients, LYMPHOCYTIC LEUKEMIA, CHRONIC; Kawasaki syndrome, infection in neonates, and IDIOPATHIC THROMBOCYTOPENIC PURPURA.
Serum that contains antibodies. It is obtained from an animal that has been immunized either by ANTIGEN injection or infection with microorganisms containing the antigen.
Immunized T-lymphocytes which can directly destroy appropriate target cells. These cytotoxic lymphocytes may be generated in vitro in mixed lymphocyte cultures (MLC), in vivo during a graft-versus-host (GVH) reaction, or after immunization with an allograft, tumor cell or virally transformed or chemically modified target cell. The lytic phenomenon is sometimes referred to as cell-mediated lympholysis (CML). These CD8-positive cells are distinct from NATURAL KILLER CELLS and NATURAL KILLER T-CELLS. There are two effector phenotypes: TC1 and TC2.
A subfamily in the family MURIDAE, comprising the hamsters. Four of the more common genera are Cricetus, CRICETULUS; MESOCRICETUS; and PHODOPUS.
Virus diseases caused by the ORTHOMYXOVIRIDAE.
Transfer of immunity from immunized to non-immune host by administration of serum antibodies, or transplantation of lymphocytes (ADOPTIVE TRANSFER).
A highly reactive aldehyde gas formed by oxidation or incomplete combustion of hydrocarbons. In solution, it has a wide range of uses: in the manufacture of resins and textiles, as a disinfectant, and as a laboratory fixative or preservative. Formaldehyde solution (formalin) is considered a hazardous compound, and its vapor toxic. (From Reynolds, Martindale The Extra Pharmacopoeia, 30th ed, p717)
The interactions between a host and a pathogen, usually resulting in disease.
Pathological processes involving the NASOPHARYNX.
Fusion of somatic cells in vitro or in vivo, which results in somatic cell hybridization.
Short sequences (generally about 10 base pairs) of DNA that are complementary to sequences of messenger RNA and allow reverse transcriptases to start copying the adjacent sequences of mRNA. Primers are used extensively in genetic and molecular biology techniques.
Group of chemokines with the first two cysteines separated by three amino acids. CX3C chemokines are chemotactic for natural killer cells, monocytes, and activated T-cells.
Serologic tests based on inactivation of complement by the antigen-antibody complex (stage 1). Binding of free complement can be visualized by addition of a second antigen-antibody system such as red cells and appropriate red cell antibody (hemolysin) requiring complement for its completion (stage 2). Failure of the red cells to lyse indicates that a specific antigen-antibody reaction has taken place in stage 1. If red cells lyse, free complement is present indicating no antigen-antibody reaction occurred in stage 1.
The complete genetic complement contained in a DNA or RNA molecule in a virus.
The capacity of a normal organism to remain unaffected by microorganisms and their toxins. It results from the presence of naturally occurring ANTI-INFECTIVE AGENTS, constitutional factors such as BODY TEMPERATURE and immediate acting immune cells such as NATURAL KILLER CELLS.
Antibodies from non-human species whose protein sequences have been modified to make them nearly identical with human antibodies. If the constant region and part of the variable region are replaced, they are called humanized. If only the constant region is modified they are called chimeric. INN names for humanized antibodies end in -zumab.
The ability of a pathogenic virus to lie dormant within a cell (latent infection). In eukaryotes, subsequent activation and viral replication is thought to be caused by extracellular stimulation of cellular transcription factors. Latency in bacteriophage is maintained by the expression of virally encoded repressors.
Membrane glycoproteins from influenza viruses which are involved in hemagglutination, virus attachment, and envelope fusion. Fourteen distinct subtypes of HA glycoproteins and nine of NA glycoproteins have been identified from INFLUENZA A VIRUS; no subtypes have been identified for Influenza B or Influenza C viruses.
Colloids with a gaseous dispersing phase and either liquid (fog) or solid (smoke) dispersed phase; used in fumigation or in inhalation therapy; may contain propellant agents.
Studies determining the effectiveness or value of processes, personnel, and equipment, or the material on conducting such studies. For drugs and devices, CLINICAL TRIALS AS TOPIC; DRUG EVALUATION; and DRUG EVALUATION, PRECLINICAL are available.
Animals or humans raised in the absence of a particular disease-causing virus or other microorganism. Less frequently plants are cultivated pathogen-free.
A critical subpopulation of regulatory T-lymphocytes involved in MHC Class I-restricted interactions. They include both cytotoxic T-lymphocytes (T-LYMPHOCYTES, CYTOTOXIC) and CD8+ suppressor T-lymphocytes.
Proteins found mainly in icosahedral DNA and RNA viruses. They consist of proteins directly associated with the nucleic acid inside the NUCLEOCAPSID.
A funnel-shaped fibromuscular tube that conducts food to the ESOPHAGUS, and air to the LARYNX and LUNGS. It is located posterior to the NASAL CAVITY; ORAL CAVITY; and LARYNX, and extends from the SKULL BASE to the inferior border of the CRICOID CARTILAGE anteriorly and to the inferior border of the C6 vertebra posteriorly. It is divided into the NASOPHARYNX; OROPHARYNX; and HYPOPHARYNX (laryngopharynx).
Subset of helper-inducer T-lymphocytes which synthesize and secrete the interleukins IL-4, IL-5, IL-6, and IL-10. These cytokines influence B-cell development and antibody production as well as augmenting humoral responses.
A group of viruses in the genus PESTIVIRUS, causing diarrhea, fever, oral ulcerations, hemorrhagic syndrome, and various necrotic lesions among cattle and other domestic animals. The two species (genotypes), BVDV-1 and BVDV-2 , exhibit antigenic and pathological differences. The historical designation, BVDV, consisted of both (then unrecognized) genotypes.
The viscous secretion of mucous membranes. It contains mucin, white blood cells, water, inorganic salts, and exfoliated cells.
The property of objects that determines the direction of heat flow when they are placed in direct thermal contact. The temperature is the energy of microscopic motions (vibrational and translational) of the particles of atoms.
Represents 15-20% of the human serum immunoglobulins, mostly as the 4-chain polymer in humans or dimer in other mammals. Secretory IgA (IMMUNOGLOBULIN A, SECRETORY) is the main immunoglobulin in secretions.
Viruses that produce tumors.
One of the type I interferons produced by fibroblasts in response to stimulation by live or inactivated virus or by double-stranded RNA. It is a cytokine with antiviral, antiproliferative, and immunomodulating activity.
Tendency of the smooth muscle of the tracheobronchial tree to contract more intensely in response to a given stimulus than it does in the response seen in normal individuals. This condition is present in virtually all symptomatic patients with asthma. The most prominent manifestation of this smooth muscle contraction is a decrease in airway caliber that can be readily measured in the pulmonary function laboratory.
Respiratory and conjunctival infections caused by 33 identified serotypes of human adenoviruses.
Diseases of domestic and mountain sheep of the genus Ovis.
Species of the genus LENTIVIRUS, subgenus primate immunodeficiency viruses (IMMUNODEFICIENCY VIRUSES, PRIMATE), that induces acquired immunodeficiency syndrome in monkeys and apes (SAIDS). The genetic organization of SIV is virtually identical to HIV.
A cytokine synthesized by T-LYMPHOCYTES that produces proliferation, immunoglobulin isotype switching, and immunoglobulin production by immature B-LYMPHOCYTES. It appears to play a role in regulating inflammatory and immune responses.
Proteins prepared by recombinant DNA technology.
A copper-containing dye used as a gelling agent for lubricants, for staining of bacteria and for the dyeing of histiocytes and fibroblasts in vivo.
Child hospitalized for short term care.
A family of non-enveloped viruses infecting mammals (MASTADENOVIRUS) and birds (AVIADENOVIRUS) or both (ATADENOVIRUS). Infections may be asymptomatic or result in a variety of diseases.
Infection of the lung often accompanied by inflammation.
Class of pro-inflammatory cytokines that have the ability to attract and activate leukocytes. They can be divided into at least three structural branches: C; (CHEMOKINES, C); CC; (CHEMOKINES, CC); and CXC; (CHEMOKINES, CXC); according to variations in a shared cysteine motif.
The first continuously cultured human malignant CELL LINE, derived from the cervical carcinoma of Henrietta Lacks. These cells are used for VIRUS CULTIVATION and antitumor drug screening assays.
Infections with viruses of the genus RUBULAVIRUS, family PARAMYXOVIRIDAE.
A CC-type chemokine that is a chemoattractant for EOSINOPHILS; MONOCYTES; and LYMPHOCYTES. It is a potent and selective eosinophil chemotaxin that is stored in and released from PLATELETS and activated T-LYMPHOCYTES. Chemokine CCL5 is specific for CCR1 RECEPTORS; CCR3 RECEPTORS; and CCR5 RECEPTORS. The acronym RANTES refers to Regulated on Activation, Normal T Expressed and Secreted.
Proteins encoded by a VIRAL GENOME that are produced in the organisms they infect, but not packaged into the VIRUS PARTICLES. Some of these proteins may play roles within the infected cell during VIRUS REPLICATION or act in regulation of virus replication or VIRUS ASSEMBLY.
Viruses which produce a mottled appearance of the leaves of plants.
Washing out of the lungs with saline or mucolytic agents for diagnostic or therapeutic purposes. It is very useful in the diagnosis of diffuse pulmonary infiltrates in immunosuppressed patients.
A species of VARICELLOVIRUS that causes INFECTIOUS BOVINE RHINOTRACHEITIS and other associated syndromes in CATTLE.
Vaccines using VIROSOMES as the antigen delivery system that stimulates the desired immune response.
The restriction of a characteristic behavior, anatomical structure or physical system, such as immune response; metabolic response, or gene or gene variant to the members of one species. It refers to that property which differentiates one species from another but it is also used for phylogenetic levels higher or lower than the species.
Proteins associated with the inner surface of the lipid bilayer of the viral envelope. These proteins have been implicated in control of viral transcription and may possibly serve as the "glue" that binds the nucleocapsid to the appropriate membrane site during viral budding from the host cell.
The degree of pathogenicity within a group or species of microorganisms or viruses as indicated by case fatality rates and/or the ability of the organism to invade the tissues of the host. The pathogenic capacity of an organism is determined by its VIRULENCE FACTORS.
A species in the genus HEPATOVIRUS containing one serotype and two strains: HUMAN HEPATITIS A VIRUS and Simian hepatitis A virus causing hepatitis in humans (HEPATITIS A) and primates, respectively.
A sequence of successive nucleotide triplets that are read as CODONS specifying AMINO ACIDS and begin with an INITIATOR CODON and end with a stop codon (CODON, TERMINATOR).
The application of molecular biology to the answering of epidemiological questions. The examination of patterns of changes in DNA to implicate particular carcinogens and the use of molecular markers to predict which individuals are at highest risk for a disease are common examples.
Methods for using more than one primer set in a polymerase chain reaction to amplify more than one segment of the target DNA sequence in a single reaction.
The genetic constitution of the individual, comprising the ALLELES present at each GENETIC LOCUS.
A herpesvirus infection of CATTLE characterized by INFLAMMATION and NECROSIS of the mucous membranes of the upper RESPIRATORY TRACT.

Detection of antibody to bovine syncytial virus and respiratory syncytial virus in bovine fetal serum. (1/1481)

Batches of commercial fetal bovine serum, described by the suppliers as antibody-free, all contained antibody to bovine syncytial virus (BSV) when tested by indirect immunofluorescence. Antibody to bovine respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) was not detected in these sera. Twenty-four percent of individual fetal bovine sera contained antibody to BSV, and 14% contained antibody to RSV when tested by indirect immunofluorescence. BSV antibody titers in fetal sera from dams with high BSV antibody levels were variable but always higher than RSV antibody titers. Radial immunodiffusion studies with BSV-positive sera revealed the presence of immunoglobulin M (IgM), IgG, and IgA, but the quantity of these immunoglobulins was not directly related to the BSV antibody titers. The evidence suggests that the antibody present in fetal sera arose as the result of infection rather than from maternal transfer across the placenta.  (+info)

Maternal immunization. (2/1481)

Maternal immunization can enhance passive immunity of infants to pathogens that cause life-threatening illnesses. In most instances, immunization during pregnancy will provide important protection for the woman as well as for her offspring. The tetanus toxoid and influenza vaccines are examples of vaccines that provide a double benefit. Other vaccines under evaluation include those for respiratory syncytial virus, pneumococci, group B streptococci, and Haemophilus influenzae type b. Although most IgG antibody crosses the placenta in the third trimester, the process is time-dependent, dictating that immunization should be accomplished ideally at least 6 weeks prior to delivery. IgG1 antibodies are transferred preferentially. Maternal immunization has not interfered with active immunization of the infant. Inactivated vaccines administered in the third trimester of pregnancy pose no known risk to the woman or to her fetus.  (+info)

Human antibody responses to mature and immature forms of viral envelope in respiratory syncytial virus infection: significance for subunit vaccines. (3/1481)

A number of antibodies generated during human respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection have been cloned by the phage library approach. Antibodies reactive with an immunodominant epitope on the F glycoprotein of this virus have a high affinity for affinity-purified F antigen. These antibodies, however, have a much lower affinity for mature F glycoprotein on the surface of infected cells and are nonneutralizing. In contrast, a potent neutralizing antibody has a high affinity for mature F protein but a much lower affinity for purified F protein or F protein in viral lysates. The data indicate that at least two F protein immunogens are produced during natural RSV infection: immature F, found in viral lysates, and mature F, found on infected cells or virions. Binding studies with polyclonal human immunoglobulin G suggest that the antibody responses to the two immunogens are of similar magnitudes. Competitive binding studies suggest that overlap between the responses is relatively limited. A mature envelope with an antigenic configuration different from that of the immature envelope has an evolutionary advantage in that the infecting virus is less subject to neutralization by the humoral response to the immature envelope that inevitably arises following lysis of infected cells. Subunit vaccines may be at a disadvantage because they most often resemble immature envelope molecules and ignore this aspect of viral evasion.  (+info)

Recombinant respiratory syncytial virus bearing a deletion of either the NS2 or SH gene is attenuated in chimpanzees. (4/1481)

The NS2 and SH genes of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) have been separately deleted from a recombinant wild-type RSV strain, A2 (M. N. Teng and P. L. Collins, J. Virol. 73:466-473, 1998; A. Bukreyev et al., J. Virol. 71:8973-8982, 1997; and this study). The resulting viruses, designated rA2DeltaNS2 and rA2DeltaSH, were administered to chimpanzees to evaluate their levels of attenuation and immunogenicity. Recombinant virus rA2DeltaNS2 replicated to moderate levels in the upper respiratory tract, was highly attenuated in the lower respiratory tract, and induced significant resistance to challenge with wild-type RSV. The replication of rA2DeltaSH virus was only moderately reduced in the lower, but not the upper, respiratory tract. However, chimpanzees infected with either virus developed significantly less rhinorrhea than those infected with wild-type RSV. These findings demonstrate that a recombinant RSV mutant lacking either the NS2 or SH gene is attenuated and indicate that these deletions may be useful as attenuating mutations in new, live recombinant RSV vaccine candidates for both pediatric and elderly populations. The DeltaSH mutation was incorporated into a recombinant form of the cpts248/404 vaccine candidate, was evaluated for safety in seronegative chimpanzees, and can now be evaluated as a vaccine for humans.  (+info)

Efficacy of RD3-0028 aerosol treatment against respiratory syncytial virus infection in immunosuppressed mice. (5/1481)

RD3-0028, a benzodithiin compound, has antiviral activity against respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) in cell culture. We used a mouse model of RSV infection to determine the in vivo effect of RD3-0028. Cyclophosphamide (CYP)-treated, immunosuppressed mice were inoculated intranasally. The lungs of the mice were removed on day 4. The virus titers of the lungs of RD3-0028-treated mice were compared to the virus titers of the lungs of virus-inoculated, untreated control mice. In an effort to increase the therapeutic effectiveness of this compound, RD3-0028 was administered by aerosol to RSV-infected mice by using a head-exposure system. Aerosols generated from reservoirs containing RD3-0028 (7 mg/ml) administered for 2 h twice daily for 3 days significantly reduced the pulmonary titer of RSV-infected mice. It is clear that the minimal effective dose of RD3-0028 for RSV-infected mice is significantly less than that of ribavirin, the only compound currently available for use against RSV disease. Furthermore, the RD3-0028 aerosol administration appeared to protect the lungs of infected, CYP-treated mice against tissue damage, as evidenced by the preservation of the lung architecture and a reduction in pulmonary inflammatory infiltrates. RD3-0028 aerosol was not toxic for mice at the therapeutic dose. The present study demonstrates the effectiveness of aerosol administration of RD3-0028 for RSV-infected mice.  (+info)

A simple and reproducible method for collecting nasal secretions in frail elderly adults, for measurement of virus-specific IgA. (6/1481)

The standard method for collection of respiratory secretions, by use of a nasal wash (NW) to measure virus-specific IgA, is problematic in frail elderly adults. Therefore, a simplified collection approach using a nasal swab (NS) is described. NW and NS samples were collected from healthy young and frail elderly adults, and IgA titers to respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) fusion and attachment glycoproteins were determined by enzyme immunoassay. Correlation between IgA titers in NW and NS was excellent for each of the antigens (correlation coefficients,.71-.93). In addition, NS results were reproducible when frail elderly subjects were sampled several weeks apart and were nearly equivalent to results from NW samples. The ability to sample nasal secretions by use of an NS when an NW is not technically feasible will facilitate the study of mucosal immunity to RSV as well as the study of mucosal response to candidate RSV vaccines in frail elderly populations.  (+info)

Surfactant protein-A enhances respiratory syncytial virus clearance in vivo. (7/1481)

To determine the role of surfactant protein-A(SP-A) in antiviral host defense, mice lacking SP-A (SP-A-/-) were produced by targeted gene inactivation. SP-A-/- and control mice (SP-A+/+) were infected with respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) by intratracheal instillation. Pulmonary infiltration after infection was more severe in SP-A-/- than in SP-A+/+ mice and was associated with increased RSV plaque-forming units in lung homogenates. Pulmonary infiltration with polymorphonuclear leukocytes was greater in the SP-A-/- mice. Levels of proinflammatory cytokines tumor necrosis factor-alpha and interleukin-6 were enhanced in lungs of SP-A-/- mice. After RSV infection, superoxide and hydrogen peroxide generation was deficient in macrophages from SP-A-/- mice, demonstrating a critical role of SP-A in oxidant production associated with RSV infection. Coadministration of RSV with exogenous SP-A reduced viral titers and inflammatory cells in the lung of SP-A-/- mice. These findings demonstrate that SP-A plays an important host defense role against RSV in vivo.  (+info)

Induction of CD95 (Fas) and apoptosis in respiratory epithelial cell cultures following respiratory syncytial virus infection. (8/1481)

Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection is associated with epithelial cell death and vigorous inflammation. In mouse models, and in immunosuppressed patients, CD8(+) T cells are necessary for RSV clearance. In vitro, RSV has been shown to induce expression of several proteins on the respiratory epithelial cell, including RSV proteins, ICAM-1, and MHC class I, that can potentially interact with CD8(+) T cells in initiating apoptosis of the target cell. One mechanism of T-cell-directed cell death is the interaction of FasL on the CD8(+) T lymphocytes and Fas expressed on the target cell. In order to determine the ability of RSV to induce Fas on the respiratory epithelium, we studied the RSV infection of a human respiratory epithelial cell line (A549) in vitro. Fas mRNA and protein levels are increased two-to-fourfold following RSV infection, and transcriptional upregulation of Fas was demonstrated using promoter/reporter gene constructs. RSV infection directly resulted in cellular apoptosis, and the frequency of apoptotic cells was further increased by cross-linking with antibodies to Fas. These data demonstrate that RSV infection induces cellular apoptosis and suggest that interactions of surface Fas with T cells may further augment this process in vivo.  (+info)

TY - JOUR. T1 - Suppressive effect of locally produced interleukin-10 on respiratory syncytial virus infection. AU - Ruan, Yan. AU - Okamoto, Yoshitaka. AU - Matsuzaki, Zensei. AU - Endo, Shuichiro. AU - Matsuoka, Tomokazu. AU - Kohno, Tadashi. AU - Chazono, Hideaki. AU - Eiko, Ito. AU - Tsubota, Kazuo. AU - Saito, Ichiro. PY - 2001. Y1 - 2001. N2 - Interleukin (IL)-10 is known to be a multifunctional cytokine. This study was designed to evaluate the role of IL-10 during respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection using a C57BL/6 transgenic (TG) mouse model in which the expression of murine IL-10 cDNA was regulated by a human salivary amylase promoter (IL-10 TG mice). These mice expressed a large amount of IL-10 in the nasal mucosa and in salivary glands. Viral replication in the respiratory tract after intranasal infection with RSV was suppressed significantly in IL-10 TG mice compared to non-transgenic controls. This suppression was IL-10 specific, because it was prevented by treating mice ...
Define respiratory syncytial virus immune globulin intravenous. respiratory syncytial virus immune globulin intravenous synonyms, respiratory syncytial virus immune globulin intravenous pronunciation, respiratory syncytial virus immune globulin intravenous translation, English dictionary definition of respiratory syncytial virus immune globulin intravenous. n. 1. Any of a class of proteins that are widespread in blood plasma, milk, muscle, and plant seeds and that are insoluble in pure water but soluble in...
Respiratory syncytial virus is one of the most important causes of respiratory tract infection in infants and the elderly worldwide. Transmitted by direct and indirect contact, respiratory syncytial virus spreads as readily in the hospital as it does in the community, making healthcare-associated infection common. Respiratory syncytial virus is a major preventable healthcare-associated infection with frequent outbreaks that can lead to high mortality rates in healthcare facilities. Proper infection prevention measures, including hand hygiene, standard and contact precautions, cohorting, and rapid diagnostic techniques, are critical in controlling the spread of respiratory syncytial virus in healthcare facilities and establishing a culture of patient and employee safety. Timely implementation of standard infection control measures will minimize its medical and economic impact.. ...
Polypeptides, nucleotides, and compositions useful for preparing diagnostic reagents for and vaccines against human Respiratory Syncytial Virus are disclosed. The polypeptides include short polypeptides which are related to a neutralizing and fusion epitope of the Respiratory Syncytial Virus fusion protein or a neutralizing epitope of the G protein.
TY - JOUR. T1 - The secreted g protein of human respiratory syncytial virus antagonizes antibody-mediated restriction of replication involving macrophages and complement. AU - Bukreyev, Alexander. AU - Yang, Lijuan. AU - Collins, Peter L.. PY - 2012/10/1. Y1 - 2012/10/1. N2 - The respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) G and F glycoproteins are the neutralization antigens, and G also is expressed in a soluble form (sG). Previously, sG was demonstrated to reduce the efficiency of RSV antibody-mediated neutralization by serving as an antigen decoy and to inhibit the antibody-mediated antiviral effects of Fc receptor-bearing leukocytes. The present study demonstrated that effective antibody-mediated restriction in vivo, and the evasion of this restriction by sG, involves pulmonary macrophages and complement, but not neutrophils.. AB - The respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) G and F glycoproteins are the neutralization antigens, and G also is expressed in a soluble form (sG). Previously, sG was demonstrated ...
TY - JOUR. T1 - Respiratory Syncytial Virus-Induced Activation and Migration of Respiratory Dendritic Cells and Subsequent Antigen Presentation in the Lung-Draining Lymph Node. AU - Lukens, Michaël. AU - Kruijsen, Debby. AU - Coenjaerts, Frank E. J.. AU - Kimpen, Jan L. L.. AU - van Bleek, Grada M.. PY - 2009/7/15. Y1 - 2009/7/15. N2 - In the respiratory tract, different dendritic cell (DC) populations guard a tight balance between tolerance and immunity to infectious or harmless materials to which the airways are continuously exposed. For infectious and noninfectious antigens administered via different routes, different subsets of DC might contribute during the induction of T-cell tolerance and immunity. We studied the impact of primary respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection on respiratory DC composition in C57BL/6 mice. We also tracked the migration of respiratory DC to the lymph nodes and studied antigen presentation by lung-derived and lymph node-resident DC to CD4(+) and CD8(+) T ...
article{1942045, abstract = {Despite the medical importance of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infections, there is no vaccine or therapeutic agent available. Prophylactic administration of palivizumab, a humanized monoclonal RSV fusion (F) protein-specific antibody, can protect high-risk children. Previously, we have demonstrated that RSV can be neutralized by picomolar concentrations of a camelid immunoglobulin single-variable domain that binds the RSV protein F (F-VHHb nanobodies). Here, we investigated the mechanism by which these nanobodies neutralize RSV and tested their antiviral activity in vivo. We demonstrate that bivalent RSV F-specific nanobodies neutralize RSV infection by inhibiting fusion without affecting viral attachment. The ability of RSV F-specific nanobodies to protect against RSV infection was investigated in vivo. Intranasal administration of bivalent RSV F-specific nanobodies protected BALB/c mice from RSV infection, and associated pulmonary inflammation. Moreover, ...
Cell-surface viral proteins most frequently enter the cell through clathrin or caveolae endocytosis. Respiratory syncytial virus antigen internalization by immune cells is via caveolin, however, uptake of paramyxovirus cell membrane proteins by non-immune cells is done through clathrin-coated pits. In this work, the uptake of respiratory syncytial virus cell surface glycoproteins by non-immune human epithelial cells was investigated through indirect immunofluorescence with polyclonal anti-RSV antibody and confocal lasser-scanner microscopy. Clathrin and caveolae internalization pathways were monitored through specific inhibitors monodansylcadaverine (MDC) and methyl-beta-cyclodextrin (MBCD), respectively. Internalization of RSV antigens was inhibited by MDC but not by MBCD, implying that clathrin-mediated endocytosis is the major uptake route of RSV antigens by an epithelial human cell line.
Summary Intergenic and flanking gene regions for the 1C-1B, 1B-N, N-P, M-1A, G-F and F-22K gene junctions of respiratory syncytial virus strain 18537, representing antigenic subgroup B, were determined by dideoxynucleotide sequencing of polycistronic cDNAs and mRNAs. Comparison with their counterparts from the subgroup A strain A2 showed that the intergenic sequences were not conserved within or between the strains. Flanking non-coding gene sequences also were generally not conserved except for the highly conserved gene-start and gene-end transcription signals. The sequence of the overlap between the 22K and L genes was conserved almost exactly between the two subgroups.
Levine, S., Peeples, M. and Hamilton, R. The effect of respiratory syncytial virus infection on HeLa-cell macromolecular synthesis.. J. Gen. Virol. Vol. 37, no. OCT. (January 1977.): 53-63.. Peeples, M.E.. Studies on the polypeptide structure, the metabolic requirements for maturation, and persistence of respiratory syncytial (RS) virus in HeLa cell culture. Doctoral Dissertation. (January 1978.): -.. Peeples, M. and Levine, S.. Respiratory syncytial virus polypeptides: their location in the virion. Virology. Vol. 95, no. 1. (January 1979.): 137-145.. Peeples, M. and Levine, S.. Metabolic requirements for the maturation of respiratory syncytial (RS) virus. J. Gen. Virol. Vol. 50, no. SEP. (January 1980.): 81-88.. Peeples, M.E. and Levine, S.. Characteristics of a persistent respiratory syncytial virus infection in HeLa cells.. Virology. Vol. 113, no. 1. (January 1981.): 141-149.. Peeples, M.E. and Bratt, M.A. UV irradiation analysis of complementation between, and replication of, ...
Title: Prevention of Respiratory Syncytial Virus: A Review. VOLUME: 5 ISSUE: 1. Author(s):Emilio Palumbo. Affiliation:Department of Pediatric, Via DellArcangelo Michele 4, 71100, Foggia, Italy.. Keywords:Prevention, palivuzumab, motavizumab, VRS. Abstract: Antibodies mediate humoral immune responses and play key roles in the defense of viral infection by the recognition, neutralization, and elimination of viruses from the circulation. For the prevention of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection, the pooled human plasma has been harvested and successfully developed as a prophylactic polyclonal RSV hyperimmune globulin, RespiGam (RSV-IGIV; MedImmune, Gaithersburg, MD). The success of RSV-IGIV validated the immunoprophylaxis approach for RSV prevention and led to the development of Synagis (palivizumab; MedImmune, Gaithersburg, MD), a humanized monoclonal antibody (mAb) that binds to the RSV F protein. Palivizumab is a potent anti-RSV mAb that is about 50-fold more potent than RSV-IGIV, and ...
Several broad categories of patients are most vulnerable to RSV infection. These include:. premature infants and all infants less than 1 year of age, children 2 years old with cardiac disease or chronic lung disease (for example, asthma, cystic fibrosis, etc.), those of any age with a compromised immune system, and those 65 years of age or older. Is respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) contagious? Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is contagious. In the United States, its the most common cause of inflammation of the small airways in the lungs (bronchiolitis) and of pneumonia in children under 1 year of age. It also is significant cause of respiratory illnesses in older adults. Nearly all children in the U.S. will have been infected by RSV by 2 years of age. RSV usually causes a mild respiratory infection, but it can occasionally cause more serious infections that require hospitalization from breathing compromise with bronchiolitis or pneumonia. RSV was discovered in 1956 (isolated from a chimpanzee ...
TY - JOUR. T1 - Interleukin-1-inhibitor activity induced by respiratory syncytial virus. T2 - Abrogation of virus-specific and alternate human lymphocyte proliferative responses. AU - Salkind, A. R.. AU - McCarthy, D. O.. AU - Nichols, J. E.. AU - Domurat, F. M.. AU - Walsh, E. E.. AU - Roberts, N. J.. PY - 1991/1/1. Y1 - 1991/1/1. N2 - Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection has been shown to induce human mononuclear leukocyte (MNL) production of net interleukin-1 (IL-1)-inhibitor activity. In the current studies of IL-1-inhibitor effects, RSV-exposed cells were compared with autologous MNL that were sham-exposed or exposed to inactivated RSV or influenza virus (which induces net IL-1 activity and commonly elicits effective homotypic immunity). Exposure of MNL to influenza virus or inactivated RSV resulted in increased expression of human leukocyte antigen-DR, the IL-2 receptor, and the transferrin receptor and increased progression through the cell cycle by 3 days. In contrast, exposure to ...
The worldwide respiratory syncytial virus diagnostics market is poised to grow at a CAGR exceeding 10% over the forecast period (2016 to 2024). RSV Diagnostics Market stood at USD 625 million in 2015. High prevalence of neonatal infections & viral diseases and the need for early RSV detection mechanisms for infants are key drivers of this industry. Respiratory syncytial virus harms the respiratory tract, the immune system, the heart, and lungs; thus leading to serious illnesses. It mainly affects infants in the age group of 0 to 11 months.. However, there are instances of people above the age of 60 years being afflicted by this virus. This is essentially because of weak immunity. Some patients may even need hospitalization. Clinical symptoms of the RSV infection can seldom be distinguished from the symptoms of other respiratory disorders. Hence, there is a pressing need to develop precise & accurate diagnostic solutions for such a disease.. Browse Details of Report @ ...
The worldwide respiratory syncytial virus diagnostics market is poised to grow at a CAGR exceeding 10% over the forecast period (2016 to 2024). RSV Diagnostics Market stood at USD 625 million in 2015. High prevalence of neonatal infections & viral diseases and the need for early RSV detection mechanisms for infants are key drivers of this industry. Respiratory syncytial virus harms the respiratory tract, the immune system, the heart, and lungs; thus leading to serious illnesses. It mainly affects infants in the age group of 0 to 11 months.. However, there are instances of people above the age of 60 years being afflicted by this virus. This is essentially because of weak immunity. Some patients may even need hospitalization. Clinical symptoms of the RSV infection can seldom be distinguished from the symptoms of other respiratory disorders. Hence, there is a pressing need to develop precise & accurate diagnostic solutions for such a disease.. Browse Details of Report @ ...
The worldwide respiratory syncytial virus diagnostics market is poised to grow at a CAGR exceeding 10% over the forecast period (2016 to 2024). RSV Diagnostics Market stood at USD 625 million in 2015. High prevalence of neonatal infections & viral diseases and the need for early RSV detection mechanisms for infants are key drivers of this industry. Respiratory syncytial virus harms the respiratory tract, the immune system, the heart, and lungs; thus leading to serious illnesses. It mainly affects infants in the age group of 0 to 11 months.. However, there are instances of people above the age of 60 years being afflicted by this virus. This is essentially because of weak immunity. Some patients may even need hospitalization. Clinical symptoms of the RSV infection can seldom be distinguished from the symptoms of other respiratory disorders. Hence, there is a pressing need to develop precise & accurate diagnostic solutions for such a disease.. Browse Details of Report @ ...
The worldwide respiratory syncytial virus diagnostics market is poised to grow at a CAGR exceeding 10% over the forecast period (2016 to 2024). RSV Diagnostics Market stood at USD 625 million in 2015. High prevalence of neonatal infections & viral diseases and the need for early RSV detection mechanisms for infants are key drivers of this industry. Respiratory syncytial virus harms the respiratory tract, the immune system, the heart, and lungs; thus leading to serious illnesses. It mainly affects infants in the age group of 0 to 11 months.. However, there are instances of people above the age of 60 years being afflicted by this virus. This is essentially because of weak immunity. Some patients may even need hospitalization. Clinical symptoms of the RSV infection can seldom be distinguished from the symptoms of other respiratory disorders. Hence, there is a pressing need to develop precise & accurate diagnostic solutions for such a disease.. Browse Details of Report @ ...
TY - JOUR. T1 - The enhancement or prevention of airway hyperresponsiveness during reinfection with respiratory syncytial virus is critically dependent on the age at first infection and IL-13 production. AU - Dakhama, Azzeddine. AU - Park, Jung Won. AU - Taube, Christian. AU - Joetham, Anthony. AU - Balhorn, Annette. AU - Miyahara, Nobuaki. AU - Takeda, Katsuyuki. AU - Gelfand, Erwin W.. PY - 2005/8/1. Y1 - 2005/8/1. N2 - Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection in early life is suspected to play a role in the development of postbronchiolitis wheezing and asthma. Reinfection is common at all ages, but factors that determine the development of altered airway function after reinfection are not well understood. This study was conducted in a mouse model to define the role of age in determining the consequences on airway function after reinfection. Mice were infected shortly after birth or at weaning and were reinfected 5 wk later, followed by assessment of airway function, airway inflammation, ...
Respiratory syncytial virus strains (subgroup A) isolated from around the world during the period 1988-1991 were analysed to determine their relatedness. Analysis was by restriction mapping and nucleotide sequencing following amplification of selected regions of the virus genome by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Twenty-three viruses of subgroup A isolated from cities in temperate regions of the Northern and Southern hemispheres and the tropics during the period 1988-1991 fell into distinct groupings closely related to four of the six lineages defined in analysis of recurrent epidemics within the same city (Birmingham, UK) during the same period. These observations confirm that multiple lineages of RS virus co-circulate locally, and show that very similar viruses are present simultaneously in widely separated countries.. ...
We have previously shown that respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) assembly occurs within regions of the host-cell surface membrane that are enriched in the protein caveolin-1 (cav-1). In this report, we have employed immunofluorescence microscopy to further examine the RSV assembly process. Our results show that RSV matures at regions of the cell surface that, in addition to cav-1, are enriched in the lipid-raft ganglioside GM1. Furthermore, a comparison of mock-infected and RSV-infected cells by confocal microscopy revealed a significant change in the cellular distribution of phosphocaveolin-1 (pcav-1). In mock-infected cells, pcav-1 was located at regions of the cell that interact with the extracellular matrix, termed focal adhesions (FA). In contrast, RSV-infected cells showed both a decrease in the levels of pcav-1 associated with FA and the appearance of pcav-1-containing cytoplasmic vesicles, the latter being absent in mock-infected cells. These cytoplasmic vesicles were clearly visible between 9
Human respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is the main viral cause of respiratory tract infection in infants as well as some elderly and high-risk adults with chronic pulmonary disease and the severely immunocompromised. So far, no specific anti-RSV therapeutics or effective anti-RSV vaccines have been reported. Only one humanized monoclonal antibody, Palivizumab, has been approved for use in high-risk infants to prevent RSV infection. Ribavirin is the only drug licensed for therapy of RSV infection, but its clinical use is limited by its nonspecific anti-RSV activity, toxic effect, and relatively high cost. Therefore, development of novel effective anti-RSV therapeutics is urgently needed. The RSV envelope glycoprotein F plays an important role in RSV fusion with, and entry into, the host cell and, consequently, serves as an attractive target for developing RSV entry inhibitors. This article reviews advances made in studies of the structure and function of the F protein and the development of RSV entry
Clinical trial for Respiratory syncytial virus , A Study to Evaluate the Safety Reactogenicity and Immunogenicity of Adenovirus Serotype 26 Based Respiratory Syncytial Virus Pre-fusion (Ad26.RSV.Pre-F) Vaccine in RSV-Seronegative Toddlers 12 to 24 Months of Age
Hela cells were used for culture of the virus. After 2 hours,when respir atory syncytial virus(RSV)attacked the celll,the remained medium was abandoned.The eagle medium with herb of Shuang Huang Lian oral liquid was put in every bottle of the test groups.The time of culture was 7 days. The results showed that Shuang Huang Lian oral liquid has distinct effect of antiRSV as compared with the control groups.
1KWE: Structure-antigenicity relationship studies of the central conserved region of human respiratory syncytial virus protein G.
Human respiratory syncytial virus is a medium-sized (120-200 nm) enveloped virus that contains a linear negative-sense RNA genome (must be converted to a positive RNA prior to translation). The former contains virally encoded F, G, and SH lipoproteins. The F and G lipoproteins are the only two that target the cell membrane, and are highly conserved among RSV isolates. HRSV is divided into two antigenic subgroups, A and B, on the basis of the reactivity of the virus with monoclonal antibodies against the attachment (G) and fusion (F)[6] glycoproteins. Subtype B is characterized as the asymptomatic strains of the virus that the majority of the population experiences. The more severe clinical illnesses involve subtype A strains, which tend to predominate in most outbreaks. Four of the viral genes code for intracellular proteins that are involved in genome transcription, replication, and particle budding, namely N (nucleoprotein), P (phosphoprotein), M (matrix protein), and L (large protein, ...
The respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) fusion glycoprotein (F) can interact with the small intracellular GTPase RhoA, and peptides derived from RhoA inhibit RSV replication. These observations initially suggested that RhoA-derived peptides might inhibit RSV replication by disrupting an in vivo interaction between RSV F and RhoA. However, recent data indicate that the antiviral activity of RhoA-derived peptides is not due to competitive inhibition of an hypothesized F-RhoA interaction, but is rather a function of the peptides intrinsic biophysical properties. We summarize here what is known about the mechanism of RSV inhibition by these peptides and give our opinion regarding the potential implications of this work with regards to RSV biology, and to the development of antiviral agents targeting RSV and other enveloped viruses.. ...
Bronchiolitis is caused by respiratory syncytial virus. Respiratory syncytial virus can be detected by identifying of the respiratory syncytial virus antigen in the nasal aspirates or identifying the respiratory syncytial virus specific antibody.
Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is the most important viral respiratory pathogen in children. Infection due to RSV represents a large public health burden; in Canada, it accounts for 5,800 hospitalizations annually. The peak incidence of RSV disease occurs between 2-6 months of age with half of all infants infected in the first year of life. Palivizumab has been approved for the prevention of serious lower respiratory tract disease caused by RSV in pediatric patients at high-risk of RSV disease. These children include those born premature, those with bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD), and those with hemodynamically significant congenital heart disease (CHD).. With the recent approval of palivizumab in Canada, access to this medication has increased. However, there are limited data on utilization, compliance, and health outcomes, particularly the frequency and severity of RSV infections. The primary objective of this study is to provide insight into the current management (utilization, ...
Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is an enveloped virus that assembles into filamentous virus particles on the surface of infected cells. Morphogenesis of RSV is dependent upon cholesterol-rich (lipid raft) membrane microdomains, but the specific role of individual raft molecules in RSV assembly is not well defined. Here we show that RSV morphogenesis occurs within caveolar membranes and that both caveolin-1 and cavin-1, the two major structural and functional components of caveolae, are actively recruited to and incorporated into the RSV envelope. The recruitment of caveolae occurred just prior to the initiation of RSV filament assembly, and was dependent upon an intact actin network as well as a direct physical interaction between caveolin-1 and the viral G protein. Moreover, cavin-1 protein levels were significantly increased in RSV-infected cells, leading to a virus-induced change in the stoichiometry and biophysical properties of the caveolar coat complex. Our data indicate that RSV ...
Anti-Respiratory Syncytial Virus G Glycoprotein antibody [RSV133] (ab94966) has been cited in 2 publications. Find out more about the references
Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection remains an important medical problem for infants and the elderly. Infection requires the fusion of the vira membrane...
Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV) is a contagious viral disease that is the most common cause of bronchiolitis (inflammation of the small airways in the lung) and pneumonia in children under one year of age in the United States. Almost all children will have had an RSV infection by their second birthday. Of the infants and children exposed to RSV for the first time, 25 to 40 percent of them have signs or symptoms of bronchiolitis or pneumonia. However, only 0.5 to 2 percent will actually require hospitalization. Most children that do require hospitalization are under six months of age.. Premature infants, children under two years of age who have congenital heart or chronic lung disease, or children with a weakened immune system are at highest risk for developing severe disease. People of any age can develop an infection from RSV. However, when infections occur later in life, it is less severe. Adults at high risk for developing severe RSV disease include the elderly, adults with chronic heart or ...
Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is the leading cause of hospitalization especially in young children with respiratory tract infections (RTI). Patterns of circulating RSV genotypes can provide a better understanding of the molecular epidemiology of RSV infection. We retrospectively analyzed the genetic diversity of RSV infection in hospitalized children with acute RTI admitted to University Hospital Heidelberg/Germany between October 2012 and April 2013. Nasopharyngeal aspirates (NPA) were routinely obtained in 240 children younger than 2 years of age who presented with clinical symptoms of upper or lower RTI. We analyzed NPAs via PCR and sequence analysis of the second variable region of the RSV G gene coding for the attachment glycoprotein. We obtained medical records reviewing routine clinical data. RSV was detected in 134/240 children. In RSV-positive patients the most common diagnosis was bronchitis/bronchiolitis (75.4%). The mean duration of hospitalization was longer in RSV-positive compared to
Author Summary Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is a leading cause of pediatric lower respiratory tract disease. RSV has two IFN-I antagonist proteins, NS1 and NS2. In this study, we infected primary human dendritic cells with recombinant RSV from which the NS1 and/or the NS2 genes were deleted, and evaluated effects on the proliferation of autologous T lymphocytes during co-culture in vitro. We found that NS1, but not NS2, has a suppressive effect on two cell populations, namely CD103+ CD8+ T cells and Th17 cells, which are known to protect against viral respiratory infections, and a stimulatory effect on Th2 cells, which are involved in enhanced disease caused by RSV. We also provide evidence that these effects are not due to suppressed IFN-I production or signaling in dendritic cells or T cells, and that they likely result from reduced maturation of dendritic cells caused by the NS1 protein.
Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is a common respiratory pathogen that can cause severe pneumonia. In vivo studies of RSV can be difficult due to variation in viral infection and disease severity in some animal models. Factors that may contribute to the variation are decreases in viral titer due to preparation and storage and method of virus administration. Nebulization is one method of RSV administration that provides even distribution of virus to all lung lobes; however, the exact quantity of the virus killed by nebulization is not defined. To test the hypothesis that sucrose enhances RSV stability and infectivity, a series of in vitro experiments were conducted with RSV strain Memphis 37 stored at varying concentrations (0%, 3%, 5%, 8%, 10%, 15%, and 20%) of sucrose as a possible cryo- and nebulization protectant. The optimal in vitro concentration was then assessed in vivo in a lamb model. Prior to titering the virus on HEp-2 cells, the various virus solutions were subjected to one freeze-thaw
Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is the most frequent cause of bronchiolitis in infants and children worldwide. Many animal models are used to study RSV, but most studies investigate disease in adult animals which does not address the unique physiology and immunology that makes infants more susceptible. The perinatal (preterm and term) lamb is a useful model of infant RSV disease as lambs have similar pulmonary structure including airway branching, Clara and type II cells, submucosal glands and Duox/lactoperoxidase (LPO) oxidative system, and prenatal alveologenesis. Lambs can be born preterm (90% gestation) and survive for experimentation although both preterm and term lambs are susceptible to ovine, bovine and human strains of RSV and develop clinical symptoms including fever, tachypnea, and malaise as well as mild to moderate gross and histologic lesions including bronchiolitis with epithelial injury, neutrophil infiltration and syncytial cell formation. RSV disease in preterm lambs is more severe
Live Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV) Vaccine Candidate Containing Stabilized Temperature-Sensitivity Mutations Is Highly Attenuated in RSV-Seronegative Infants and Children.
Respiratory Syncytial Virus is the leading cause of severe respiratory illnesses such as bronchiolitis and pneumonia in young children. RSV is a paramyxovirus with negative-sense genomic RNA that encodes for eleven proteins, two of which, F and G are major surface proteins. In the present study, we synthesized and used various nanoparticles with and without capping agents to study the inhibition of RSV infection in human cell lines. We used silver, gold and chitosan nanoparticles. Nanoparticles were conjugated to various proteins, DNA as well as poly lactic acid, to study the inhibition of RSV infection in human cell lines. The characteristics of nanoparticles were evaluated by SEM (scanning electron microscopy), TEM (transmission electron microscopy, and EAD analysis. Cell cytotoxicity of each of the nanoparticle was established and the effectiveness of RSV inhibition was evaluated by microscopic examination for syncytia formation and by immunofluorescence microscopy. Our preliminary results revealed
Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV) Fusion Protein antibody [681] for ELISA, ICC/IF. Anti-Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV) Fusion Protein mAb (GTX39259) is tested in Respiratory Syncytial Virus samples. 100% Ab-Assurance.
(2004) Arnold et al. Virology. Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is worldwide the single most important respiratory pathogen in infancy and early childhood. The G glycoprotein of RSV, named attachment protein, is produced by RSV-infected lung epithelial cells in both a membrane-anchored (mG prote...
Nasal swabs offer a sensitive sampling method for the detection of respiratory viruses in children. Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is an exception and it is detected more often in nasopharyngeal aspirates (NPA) than in nasal swabs when it is searched for using immunoassays or viral culture.1 2 Therefore, more laborious and painful NPA have been the first-choice specimen for high-yield recovery of RSV by conventional methods. We wanted to examine whether the use of reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) increases the usefulness of nasal swabs by comparing the performance of nasal swab-RT-PCR with NPA-immunoassays in the detection of RSV infections in children.. We studied 112 children ...
The respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is a human pathogen that causes a lower respiratory infection in infants and healthy adults. The first incidence of RSV was recorded in the 1960s. The greatest success against viruses has always been by increasing immunity through vaccination like in smallpox, measles, influenza, polio. Though RSV spread its roots almost six decades ago, the creation of a vaccine against RSV is still an ongoing challenge. The structural proteins of RSV, mainly F and G, play an essential role in pathogenicity. Structural instability of the F protein is responsible for making the vaccine discovery an uncertain outcome. This review focuses on the details of the vaccine strategies that have been explored so far. It includes an emphasis on the initial formalin-inactivated vaccine, structure-based vaccine, monoclonal antibodies like Palivizumab with a concise portrayal of nanoparticle, chimeric vaccines, and maternal derived immunization. The structure-based vaccine is one of the most
Respiratory Syncytial Virus Clinical Information: RSV infection can cause a variety of respiratory illnesses. Infants with a lower respiratory tract infection typically have a runny nose and a decrease in appetite before any other symptoms appear...
Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) causes respiratory tract infections and is a major cause of lower respiratory tract infection and hospital visits during infancy and childhood. For premature infants and infants with congenital heart disease there is a prophylactic medication. During winter months in temperate climates there is an annual epidemic. Infection in tropical climates is most common during the rainy season. 60% of infants, in the United States, are infected during their first RSV season, and nearly all children will have been infected by the age of 2-3 years of age. 2-3% of those infected develop bronchiolitis which required hospitalization. Infection does provide immunity, although, it wanes over time allowing for people to be infected multiple times. It is a negative-sense, single-stranded RNA virus of the family Paramyxoviridae which can cause measles and mumps. The name comes from the fact that F proteins on the surface of the virus cause the cell membranes on nearby cells to ...
Respiratory syncytial virus is highly contagious. It spreads through droplets containing the virus when someone coughs or sneezes. It also can live on surfaces (like counters or doorknobs) and on hands and clothing. So people can get it if they touch something thats contaminated.. RSV can spread quickly through schools and childcare centers. Babies often get it when older kids carry the virus home from school and pass it to them. Almost all kids have had RSV at least once by the time theyre 2 years old.. RSV infections often happen in epidemics that last from late fall through early spring. Respiratory illness caused by RSV - such as bronchiolitis or pneumonia - usually lasts about a week, but some cases may last several weeks.. ...
Chu, H., Tielsch, J., Katz, J., Magaret, A., Khatry, S., LeClerq, S., Shrestha, L., Kuypers, J., Steinhoff, M., & Englund, J. (2017). Transplacental Transfer of Maternal Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV) Antibody and Protection Against RSV Disease in Infants in Rural Nepal.. Journal of Clinical Virology : The Official Publication of the Pan American Society for Clinical Virology, 95 (). http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jcv.2017.08.017 ...
Human RSV IgA ELISA kit is intended for determining in-vitro quantitative levels of human IgA antibodies against respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) in serum or
|strong|Mouse anti Respiratory syncitial virus, major surface glycoprotein G antibody, clone 8C5|/strong| recognizes the major glycoprotein G of Respiratory Syncytial virus (RSV). RSV is a 100-350 nm …
An experimental vaccine to protect against respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), a leading cause of illness and hospitalization among very young children, elicited high levels of RSV-specific antibodies when tested in animals, according to a report in the journal Science.
Respiratory syncytial virus enters the body through the eyes, nose or mouth. It spreads easily through the air on infected respiratory droplets. You or your child can become infected if someone with RSV coughs or sneezes near you. The virus also passes to others through direct contact, such as shaking hands.. The virus can live for hours on hard objects such as countertops, crib rails and toys. Touch your mouth, nose or eyes after touching a contaminated object and youre likely to pick up the virus.. An infected person is most contagious during the first week or so after infection. But in infants and those with weakened immunity, the virus may continue to spread even after symptoms go away, for up to four weeks. ...
"Global burden of acute lower respiratory infections due to respiratory syncytial virus in young children: a systematic review ... respiratory syncytial virus and influenza vaccines. She has worked extensively with American Indian populations and in Africa ... as an Epidemiologic Intelligence Officer in the Bacterial Respiratory Diseases Branch. In 1996, as part of her job at the CDC, ...
Building on discoveries that Prince made as a doctoral student, VSI pioneered the prevention of respiratory syncytial virus ( ... Gregory A. Prince; Amy Mathews; Spencer J. Curtis; David D. Porter (2000). "Treatment of Respiratory Syncytial Virus ... Marina S. Boukhvalova; Gregory A. Prince; Jorge C. G. Blanco (2007). "Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infects and Abortively ... Linda G. Byrd; Gregory A. Prince (December 1997). "Animal Models of Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infection". Clinical Infectious ...
... human respiratory syncytial virus •Bos primigenius: bovine respiratory syncytial virus •Rodentia: murine pneumonia virus Mild ... Human respiratory syncytial virus (HRSV) is the most known orthopneumovirus because of its direct correlation and importance in ... "Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infection (RSV)". Center for Disease Control and Prevention. Retrieved 2019-06-03. CS1 maint: ... ISBN 978-0-88167-552-8. Collins, Peter L. (1991). "The Molecular Biology of Human Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV) of the ...
2009 Human Metapneumovirus and Respiratory Syncytial Virus Disease in Children, Yemen - Sept. 2006 Respiratory Syncytial Virus ... Najla Al-Sonboli et al., "Respiratory Syncytial Virus and Human Metapneumovirus in Children with Acute Respiratory Infections ... Najla Al-Sonboli et al., "Human Metapneumovirus and Respiratory Syncytial Virus Disease in Children, Yemen - Volume 12, Number ... Tripp, Ralph A. (2010-03-15), "Pneumovirus and Metapneumovirus: Respiratory Syncytial Virus and Human Metapneumovirus", Topley ...
Typical viruses include respiratory syncytial virus, rhinovirus, influenza, and others. Bacteria are uncommon pathogens but may ... These viruses may be spread through the air when people cough or by direct contact. Risk factors include exposure to tobacco ... Upper respiratory tract infections often precede acute bronchitis, with overlapping symptoms including headache, nasal ... Acute bronchitis can be caused by contagious pathogens, most commonly viruses. ...
Caballero MT, Polack FP (May 2018). "Respiratory syncytial virus is an "opportunistic" killer". Pediatric Pulmonology. 53 (5): ... Cytomegalovirus is a family of opportunistic viruses, most frequently associated with respiratory infection. Human Polyomavirus ... Opportunistic infections caused by feline leukemia virus and feline immunodeficiency virus retroviral infections can be treated ... HIV is a virus that targets T cells of the immune system and, as a result, HIV infection can lead to progressively worsening ...
Cases of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) in India mainly occur in North India in the winter. This virus causes lower ... Broor, S; Parveen, S; Maheshwari, M (2018). "Respiratory syncytial virus infections in India: Epidemiology and need for vaccine ... respiratory tract infection. India, like many other countries, uses the World Health Organization system for reporting and ...
"Structural characterization of the human respiratory syncytial virus fusion protein core". Proceedings of the National Academy ...
HS has also been shown to serve as cellular receptor for a number of viruses, including the respiratory syncytial virus. A ... "Glycosaminoglycan sulfation requirements for respiratory syncytial virus infection". Journal of Virology. 74 (22): 10508-13. ... October 1999). "A novel role for 3-O-sulfated heparan sulfate in herpes simplex virus 1 entry". Cell. 99 (1): 13-22. doi: ... and those that generate a herpes simplex virus 1 glycoprotein D (HSV-1 gD) binding site (HS3ST2, HS3ST3A1, HS3ST3B1, HS3ST4, ...
"RSV (Respiratory syncytial virus) Awareness & Prevention - Speaker Biographies". PreemieCare.org. Retrieved 31 March 2017. " ...
27 January 2019). Challenges and Opportunities for Respiratory Syncytial Virus Vaccines. Springer-Verlag. ISBN 9783642389184. ... especially Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV), an important cause of morbidity and mortality in young children and the elderly ... and Chief of the Respiratory and Enteric Viruses Branch of the CDC Division of Viral and Rickettsial Diseases (1982-2006). From ... He was Director of the Division of Viral Diseases in the National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases at the CDC ( ...
... at the cell surface is the receptor for the Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV) fusion protein. Interference with the ... Shakeri A, Mastrangelo P, Griffin JK, Moraes TJ, Hegele RG (Nov 2014). "Respiratory syncytial virus receptor expression in the ... Bilawchuk LM, Griffiths CD, Jensen LD, Elawar F, Marchant DJ (Aug 2017). "The Susceptibilities of Respiratory Syncytial Virus ... "Identification of nucleolin as a cellular receptor for human respiratory syncytial virus". Nature Medicine. 17 (9): 1132-5. doi ...
"Regeneron to Discontinue Development of Suptavumab for Respiratory Syncytial Virus" (Press release). Regeneron. August 14, 2017 ... antibody designed for the prevention of medically attended lower respiratory tract disease due to respiratory syncytial virus. ...
Associated viral infections include respiratory syncytial virus, canine distemper virus, and the measles virus. However, recent ... "Immunohistological demonstration of respiratory syncytial virus antigens in Paget disease of bone". Proceedings of the National ... However, no infectious virus has yet been isolated as a causative agent, and other evidence suggests an intrinsic ... Gordon, M.T.; Anderson, D.C.; Sharpe, P.T. (January 1991). "Canine distemper virus localised in bone cells of patients with ...
He was nearly killed by human respiratory syncytial virus at three months old. He was adopted by his stepfather, Wayne, at 13 ...
August 2018). "Orally Efficacious Broad-Spectrum Ribonucleoside Analog Inhibitor of Influenza and Respiratory Syncytial Viruses ... In experiments in animals favipiravir has shown activity against West Nile virus, yellow fever virus, foot-and-mouth disease ... Nipah virus is a causative agent of outbreaks of encephalitis with pneumonia and has a high case fatality rate. The first ... In a study published in the Scientific Reports, Syrian hamster model for Nipah virus infection was used, which closely mirrors ...
"Passive immunisation against respiratory syncytial virus: a cost-effectiveness analysis". Archives of Disease in Childhood. 95 ... Microantibodies can stop viruses such as HIV from infecting cells in vitro. Antibodies are produced naturally by the body and ... virus-neutralizing microantibody". The Journal of General Virology. 86 (Pt 6): 1791-800. doi:10.1099/vir.0.80812-0. PMID ... which includes the production of antibodies that destroy infectious agents such as bacteria and viruses. Some infections can be ...
Herpes simplex virus, HSV • Immunodeficient virus, HIV • Respiratory Syncytial virus, RSV • Echovirus 11 • Influenza virus ... Mikola H, Waris M, Tenovuo J. Inhibition of herpes simplex virus type 1, respiratory syncytial virus and echovirus type 11 by ... weakened respiratory immune system against bacterial infection. Symptoms of cystic fibrosis include an inability to secrete ... Sclerotinia Respiratory tract antimicrobial defense system Furtmüller PG, Zederbauer M, Jantschko W, Helm J, Bogner M, ...
respiratory Syncytial Virus infection. *rhinovirus; common cold. Diseases of older children[edit]. *Common cold ...
Developed Monoclonal antibodies against JE, Dengue, WN, Chikungunya, Influenza and respiratory syncytial viruses (RSV). ... viruses First visualization of Hepatitis E virus particles, confirmation of the virus as the causative agent of water bore ... Invaluable collection of sera and virus strains: Approx. 260,000 serum samples and >600 strains of viruses isolated from humans ... The Virus Research Center (VRC), Pune came into existence in 1952 under the joint auspices of the ICMR and the Rockefeller ...
In pregnant women, he studied the effectiveness of influenza and respiratory syncytial virus vaccines. He led one of the ... the influenza and respiratory syncytial virus vaccines. Since the global COVID-19 pandemic in 2020, he has been leading COVID- ... "Respiratory and Meningeal Pathogens Reaearch Unit". www.rmpru.com. Archived from the original on 8 February 2021. Retrieved 8 ... Madhi is professor of vaccinology and director of the South African Medical Research Council Respiratory and Meningeal ...
Respiratory tract infections are associated with member viruses such as human respiratory syncytial virus. There are five ... Viruses in this family are often associated with respiratory infections, and are transmitted through respiratory secretions. N ... proteins allow identification of amino acids essential for the function of the respiratory syncytial virus N protein". Journal ... "Overexpression of the M2-2 Protein of Respiratory Syncytial Virus Inhibits Viral Replication". Journal of Virology. 79 (22): ...
Yamada, Yumi; Yoshihara, Shigemi (2010). "Creola Bodies in Infancy with Respiratory Syncytial Virus Bronchiolitis Predict the ... These results were in keeping with the hypothesis that eosinophils cause desquamation of respiratory epithelial cells resulting ...
Wang, KC; Chang, JS; Chiang, LC; Lin, CC (2009). "4-Methoxycinnamaldehyde inhibited human respiratory syncytial virus in a ...
"Increased concordance of severe respiratory syncytial virus infection in identical twins". Pediatrics. 121 (3): 493-6. doi: ...
"Whole blood gene expression in infants with respiratory syncytial virus bronchiolitis". BMC Infectious Diseases. 6: 175. doi: ...
Diseases, Committee on Infectious (1 September 1993). "Use of Ribavirin in the Treatment of Respiratory Syncytial Virus ... was approved under the name Virazole by the Food and Drug Administration for the treatment of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV ... "Press Announcements - FDA approves first test to confirm the presence of Human T-cell Lymphotropic Virus-I/II antibodies". www. ... an upper respiratory tract disease that primarily affects children. In 1991, ICN created the SPAG-2 (Small Particle Aerosol ...
Nosocomial respiratory syncytial virus infections: the "Cold War" has not ended. Clin Infect Dis 2000;31(2):590-6. CDC. Acute ... Modes of transmission of respiratory syncytial virus. J Pediatr 1981;99(1):100-3. Evans MR, Meldrum R, Lane W, et al. An ... Respiratory syncytial viral infection in children with compromised immune function. N Engl J Med 1986;315(2):77-81. Lui SL, Luk ... Update: universal precautions for prevention of transmission of human immunodeficiency virus, hepatitis B virus, and other ...
... has been observed to be downregulated in bronchial epithelial cells infected by respiratory syncytial virus and has ... "A Cross-Study Biomarker Signature of Human Bronchial Epithelial Cells Infected with Respiratory Syncytial Virus". Advances in ...
LK Hallak described the importance of this sugar in respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection. Dermatan sulfate and heparan ... "Iduronic acid-containing glycosaminoglycans on target cells are required for efficient respiratory syncytial virus infection". ...
"Neural mechanisms of respiratory syncytial virus-induced inflammation and prevention of respiratory syncytial virus sequelae". ... Respiratory syncytial and related viruses appear to upregulate SP receptors, and rat studies suggest that NK1RAs may be useful ... and infections such as HIV/AIDS and respiratory syncytial virus,[54] as well as in cancer.[55][56] When assayed in the human, ... "American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine. 163 (3 Pt 2): S18-21. doi:10.1164/ajrccm.163.supplement_1.2011113. ...
... anthrax and respiratory syncytial virus.[41] Korean scientists are looking at using the tomato to express a vaccine against ... "Severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) S protein production in plants: development of recombinant vaccine". Proceedings of ...
Ang respiratory syncytial virus (birus na nagdudulot ng impeksiyon sa paghinga) ay karaniwang nakukuha kapag hinahawakan ng mga ... respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), adenobirus, at parainfluenza.[6][23] Ang Herpes simplex na birus ay bihirang magdulot ng ... Fein, Alan (2006). Diagnosis and management of pneumonia and other respiratory infections (ika-2nd ed. (na) edisyon). Caddo, OK ... McLuckie, [editor] A. (2009). Respiratory disease and its management. New York: Springer. pa. 51. ISBN 978-1-84882-094-4. .. ...
Known viral causes of atypical pneumonia include respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), influenza A and B, parainfluenza, ... "Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS) - multi-country outbreak". Archived from the original on 7 December 2008. Retrieved ... Despite general symptoms and problems with the upper respiratory tract (such as high fever, headache, a dry irritating cough ... When comparing the bacterial-caused atypical pneumonias with these caused by real viruses (excluding bacteria that were wrongly ...
... human respiratory syncytial virus, adenoviruses, Enteroviruses, and metapneumovirus.[12] Frequently, more than one virus is ... In contrast, the respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is contacted by both direct contact and airborne droplets. It then ... Viruses[change , change source]. Coronaviruses are a group of viruses known for causing the common cold. They have a halo, or ... A rhinovirus is an RNA-containing virus of the family Picornaviridae. There are 99 known types of viruses in this family of ...
Hall CB (June 2001). "Respiratory syncytial virus and parainfluenza virus". N. Engl. J. Med. 344 (25): 1917-28. doi:10.1056/ ... In virus classification, influenza viruses are RNA viruses that make up four of the seven genera of the family Orthomyxoviridae ... These viruses are only distantly related to the human parainfluenza viruses, which are RNA viruses belonging to the ... "Mortality associated with influenza and respiratory syncytial virus in the United States". JAMA. 289 (2): 179-86. doi:10.1001/ ...
... respiratory syncytial virus dan rinovirus.[41] Akan tetapi beberapa jenis infeksi lain dapat menurunkan risiko.[41] ... a b c d e f g h i j k l Murray and Nadel's textbook of respiratory medicine. (Edisi ke-5th ed.). Philadelphia, PA: Saunders/ ... European respiratory review : an official journal of the European Respiratory Society 21 (124): 125-39. PMID 22654084. Cite ... "American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine 177 (6): 567-573. PMC 2267336. PMID 18187692. doi:10.1164/rccm. ...
A respiratory syncytial virus vaccine (RSV vaccine) is a vaccine which prevents infection by respiratory syncytial virus. No ... Mejias, Asuncion; Rodriguez-Fernandez, Rosa; Peeples, Mark E.; Ramilo, Octavio (October 2019). "Respiratory Syncytial Virus ... "Respiratory syncytial virus vaccines". Clinical Microbiology Reviews. 11 (3): 430-9. doi:10.1128/CMR.11.3.430. PMC 88889. PMID ... "The respiratory syncytial virus vaccine landscape: lessons from the graveyard and promising candidates" (PDF). The Lancet ...
B97.4) Respiratory syncytial virus as the cause of diseases classified to other chapters ... B20-B24) Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) disease[संपादित करें]. *(B20.) Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) disease Resulting ... A15.) Respiratory tuberculosis, bacteriologically and histologically confirmed. *(A16.) Respiratory tuberculosis, not confirmed ... B24.) Unspecified Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) Disease. (B25-B34) Other viral diseases[संपादित करें]. *(B25.) ...
... and decreased survival in experimental models of respiratory syncytial virus disease, Lyme disease, Toxoplasma gondii disease, ... ALOX5 contributes to non-allergic reactions of the respiratory system and skin such as aspirin-induced asthma, NSAID ... NSAIDs-exacerbated respiratory disease (NERD), i.e. symptoms of bronchial airways obstruction, shortness of breath, and/or ... it may also contribute to hypersensitivity responses of the respiratory system to cold air and possibly even alcohol beverages ...
Inhibition of herpes simplex virus type 1, respiratory syncytial virus and echovirus type 11 by peroxidase-generated ...
Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV),[32] human rhinovirus 14[33] and HCV[34] ... Kumar B, Asha K, Khanna M, Ronsard L, Meseko CA, Sanicas M (April 2018). "The emerging influenza virus threat: status and new ... Roy S, Gupta N, Subramanian N, Mondal T, Banerjea AC, Das S (July 2008). "Sequence-specific cleavage of hepatitis C virus RNA ... Kumar B, Rajput R, Pati DR, Khanna M (September 2015). "Potent Intracellular Knock-Down of Influenza A Virus M2 Gene Transcript ...
... influenza virus,[147][148][149][150] respiratory syncytial virus (RSV),[150] SARS coronavirus (SARS-CoV),[150] adenovirus[150] ... Respiratory syncytial virus infections II Completed Alnylam Pharmaceuticals NCT00658086 PRO-040201 ApoB LNP ... the first applications to reach clinical trials were in the treatment of macular degeneration and respiratory syncytial virus.[ ... Some viruses have evolved mechanisms for suppressing the RNAi response in their host cells, particularly for plant viruses.[81] ...
Leys, S. P. (2003). "The significance of syncytial tissues for the position of the Hexactinellida in the Metazoa". Integrative ... Sponges do not have distinct circulatory, respiratory, digestive, and excretory systems - instead the water flow system ... due to the presence in sponges themselves or their microbial symbionts of chemicals that may be used to control viruses, ...
Respiratory syncytial virus G protein. Hepatitis C. VSPs:. *viral envelope *E1. *E2 ... Green M, Loewenstein PM (December 1988). "Autonomous functional domains of chemically synthesized human immunodeficiency virus ... "Cellular uptake of the tat protein from human immunodeficiency virus". Cell. 55 (6): 1189-93. doi:10.1016/0092-8674(88)90263-2 ... "Mutational analysis of the conserved basic domain of human immunodeficiency virus tat protein". Journal of Virology. 63 (3): ...
"A Novel Inactivated Intranasal Respiratory Syncytial Virus Vaccine Promotes Viral Clearance without Th2 Associated Vaccine- ... Virus. Diseases or conditions. Vaccine(s). Brands Hepatitis A virus. Hepatitis A. Hepatitis A vaccine. Havrix, Avaxim, VAQTA, ... Polio virus. Poliomyelitis. Polio vaccine. Kinrix, Quadracel, Pediarix, Pentacel, Pediacel, Ipol Rabies virus. Rabies. Rabies ... Variola virus. Smallpox. Smallpox vaccine. Dryvax, ACAM2000, Imvanex Yellow fever virus. Yellow fever. Yellow fever vaccine. YF ...
"Involvement of apoptosis in syncytial cell death induced by canine distemper virus". Comparative Immunology, Microbiology and ... Pathological inactivation of apoptosis in cancer cells is correlated with frequent respiratory metabolic shifts toward ... "Apoptosis induced by Oropouche virus infection in HeLa cells is dependent on virus protein expression". Virus Research. 149 (1 ... Many viruses encode proteins that can inhibit apoptosis.[103] Several viruses encode viral homologs of Bcl-2. These homologs ...
... respiratory syncytial virus dan rinovirus.[41] Akan tetapi beberapa jenis infeksi lain dapat menurunkan risiko.[41] ... "American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine. 177 (6): 567-573. doi:10.1164/rccm.200710-1511PP. PMC 2267336 . ... "Primary Care Respiratory Journal. 17 (3): 138-147. doi:10.3132/pcrj.2008.00004. PMID 18264646. Diarsipkan dari versi asli (PDF) ... "European Respiratory Journal. 28 (2): 264-267. doi:10.1183/09031936.06.00056106. PMID 16880365.. Parameter ,month=. yang tidak ...
LeVine AM, Gwozdz J, Stark J (1998). "Surfactant protein-A enhances respiratory syncytial virus clearance in vivo". J Clin ... Hartshorn KL, Sastry K, White MR, (1993). "Human Mannose-binding Protein Functions as an Opsonin for Influenza A Viruses". J. ... Již dříve bylo prokázáno, že SP-D umožňuje eliminovat anti-influenza A virus (velmi podobný mechanismus jako při eliminaci ...
... adenovirus lan virus respiratory syncytial (RSV).[2] Croup spasmodik (Croup sing nganggo watuk njegog) disebabake déning ... Asebab Virus[besut , besut sumber]. Ing 75% kasus virus parainfluenza, mliginé jinis 1 lan 2, dadi virus sing nyebabaké Croup/ ... laringotrakeitis akut.[5] Kadhangkala viruse ya iku virus liyané sing bisa nyebabaké Croup kalebu virus influenza A lan B, ... Infeksi virus mlebu ing njero sèl darah putih banjur nyebabaké abuhing laring, trakea, lan ngambaning bronki[4] (dalan ambegan ...
Associated viral infections include respiratory syncytial virus,[10] canine distemper virus,[11][12] and the measles virus.[13] ... "Immunohistological demonstration of respiratory syncytial virus antigens in Paget disease of bone". Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S. ... However, no infectious virus has yet been isolated as a causative agent, and other evidence suggests an intrinsic ... Paget's disease may be caused by a slow virus infection (i.e., paramyxoviridae) present for many years before symptoms appear. ...
... human respiratory syncytial virus, murine leukemia viruses and Mayaro virus. The most studied mechanism of antiviral activity ... Lactoferrin also suppresses virus replication after the virus penetrated into the cell. Such an indirect antiviral effect is ... including the herpes simplex virus 1 and 2, cytomegalovirus, HIV, hepatitis C virus, hantaviruses, rotaviruses, poliovirus type ... Many viruses tend to bind to the lipoproteins of the cell membranes and then penetrate into the cell. Lactoferrin binds to the ...
The limits of respiratory function: external and internal constraints on insect gas exchange. 106 (Pt 3): 189-198. doi:10.1016/ ... After fertilization of the oocyte, the early embryo (or syncytial embryo) undergoes rapid DNA replication and 13 nuclear ... "Drosophila as a genetic model for studying pathogenic human viruses". Virology. 423 (1): 1-5. doi:10.1016/j.virol.2011.11.016 ...
... respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), parainfluenza virus, and human metapneumovirus (hMPV). The Center for Disease Control (CDC) ... The virus is able to survive for up to seven days in respiratory secretions and remains infective at room temperature Once the ... The virus is found primarily in young children, the elderly, and immunocompromised patients with acute respiratory illness. It ... While the clinical presentation of the virus can be severe, it has also been found in mild cases of respiratory infection. The ...
... bovine virus diarrhoea (BVD Type 1 and BVD Type 2), parainfluenza Type 3 (PI3), and bovine respiratory syncytial (BRSV) viruses ...
"Respiratory Syncytial Virus-Induced RANTES Production from Human Bronchial Epithelial Cells Is Dependent on Nuclear Factor-κB ...
Virus RNA. *▪ Virusul turbării. *▪ Virus Respiratory-Syncytial. *▪ Retrovirusuri. *▪ Rhabdovirus. *▪ Virusul Ross-River ... The Universal Virus Database (Daten zu allen bekannten Viren). *Viruses - From Structure To Biology (eng.) (sehr infomative ... Plant Viruses Online. Index to Virus Species. *Viren / Aufbau / Spezifische Merkmale / Entwicklung / Zellbiologie / Bakterien ... Virusul latent al narciselor (Narcissus latent virus). *Virusul mozaicului castraveților la begonia (Cucumber mosaic virus in ...
"Involvement of apoptosis in syncytial cell death induced by canine distemper virus". Comp. Immunol. Microbiol. Infect. Dis. 27 ... Pathological inactivation of apoptosis in cancer cells is correlated with frequent respiratory metabolic shifts toward ... April 2010). "Apoptosis induced by Oropouche virus infection in HeLa cells is dependent on virus protein expression". Virus Res ... Many viruses encode proteins that can inhibit apoptosis.[94] Several viruses encode viral homologs of Bcl-2. These homologs can ...
... is a major cause of respiratory illness in young children. Learn how to recognize the signs and symptoms of this contagious ... What Is Respiratory Syncytial Virus?. Respiratory syncytial (sin-SISH-ul) virus (RSV) is a major cause of respiratory illness ... How Is Respiratory Syncytial Virus Diagnosed?. Doctors usually diagnose respiratory syncytial virus by taking a medical history ... How Is Respiratory Syncytial Virus Treated?. Most cases of respiratory syncytial virus are mild and dont need medical ...
... is a major cause of respiratory illness in young children. Learn how to recognize the signs and symptoms of this contagious ... Virus respiratorio sincitial. About RSV. Respiratory syncytial (sin-SISH-ul) virus (RSV), which causes infection of the lungs ... Respiratory illness caused by RSV - such as bronchiolitis or pneumonia - usually lasts about a week, but some cases may last ... Babies often get it when older kids carry the virus home from school and pass it to them. Almost all kids are infected with RSV ...
Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV) is a leading cause of hospitalization due to acute lower respiratory infection especially in ... Several countries test for RSV as part of influenza and other respiratory virus surveillance. One of the challenges has been ...
A respiratory syncytial virus vaccine (RSV vaccine) is a vaccine which prevents infection by respiratory syncytial virus. No ... Mejias, Asuncion; Rodriguez-Fernandez, Rosa; Peeples, Mark E.; Ramilo, Octavio (October 2019). "Respiratory Syncytial Virus ... "Respiratory syncytial virus vaccines". Clinical Microbiology Reviews. 11 (3): 430-9. doi:10.1128/CMR.11.3.430. PMC 88889. PMID ... "The respiratory syncytial virus vaccine landscape: lessons from the graveyard and promising candidates" (PDF). The Lancet ...
... virus, or RSV, is a respiratory virus that infects the lungs and breathing passages. ... Respiratory syncytial (sin-SISH-uhl) virus, or RSV, is a common respiratory virus that usually causes mild, cold-like symptoms ... Content source: National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases (NCIRD), Division of Viral Diseases ... Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV) Infection. ...
Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) causes respiratory tract infections and is a major cause of lower respiratory tract infection ... The virus is ubiquitous in all parts of the world so avoiding the infection is impossible. There is research into a new vaccine ... The name comes from the fact that F proteins on the surface of the virus cause the cell membranes on nearby cells to merge, ... It is a negative-sense, single-stranded RNA virus of the family Paramyxoviridae which can cause measles and mumps. ...
Description It induces formation of large syncytial masses in cell cultures, and this ... Definition RSV is a virus that is a major cause of bronchiolitis and pneumonia during infancy and early childhood. ... chances are that he or she has respiratory syncytial virus infection (RSV). ... The virus is endemic in nature and commonly causes reinfection because immunity to it is short-lived. Reinfections are ...
Respiratory Syncytial Virus Outbreak Activity -- United States, 1992 The National Respiratory and Enteric Virus Surveillance ... Association between respiratory syncytial virus outbreaks and lower respiratory tract deaths of infants and young children. J ... was established in 1989 to monitor trends in respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), parainfluenza viruses, adenoviruses, and ... An outbreak of respiratory syncytial virus in a bone marrow transplant center. J Infect Dis 1992;165:987-93. 10. Garner JS, ...
... is a very common virus that leads to mild, cold-like symptoms in adults and older healthy children. It can be more serious in ... Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is a very common virus that leads to mild, cold-like symptoms in adults and older healthy ... RSV; Palivizumab; Respiratory syncytial virus immune globulin; Bronchiolitis - RSV; URI - RSV; Upper respiratory illness - RSV ... Respiratory syncytial virus. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Goldman-Cecil Medicine. 26th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2020: ...
RSV infection is caused by a virus that presents symptoms similar to those of the common cold and occurs most frequently in ... Respiratory syncytial virus. Respiratory syncytial virus, or RSV, is a common virus that can affect people of all ages. ... RSV is one of the most common viruses to cause lung and airway infections in infants and small children. Data from the Centers ... Theres no cure for RSV, but there are ways to reduce your risk of getting and spreading the virus. RSV is spread, like other ...
RSV is a respiratory infection that can be especially dangerous to babies and the elderly. RSV testing is used to diagnose the ... medlineplus.gov/lab-tests/respiratory-syncytial-virus-rsv-tests/ Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV) Tests. ... RSV, which stands for respiratory syncytial virus, is an infection that affects the respiratory tract. Your respiratory tract ... Respiratory Syncytial Virus Antibodies; 457 p.. *HealthyChildren.org [Internet]. Elk Grove Village (IL): American Academy of ...
... include short polypeptides which are related to a neutralizing and fusion epitope of the Respiratory Syncytial Virus fusion ... and compositions useful for preparing diagnostic reagents for and vaccines against human Respiratory Syncytial Virus are ... Respiratory syncytial virus vaccine. WO2002009749A3 *. 31 Jul 2001. 18 Apr 2002. Aventis Pasteur. Respiratory syncytial virus ... Respiratory Syncytial Virus in Disease. RS virus is a major cause of lower respiratory disease in infancy and early childhood ( ...
Respiratory syncytial virus: a community problem. Br Med J 1979; 2 :457 ... Respiratory syncytial virus: a community problem.. Br Med J 1979; 2 doi: https://doi.org/10.1136/bmj.2.6188.457 (Published 25 ...
Respiratory syncytial virus and parainfluenza virus.. Hall CB1.. Author information. 1. University of Rochester School of ... Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infections*/etiology. *Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infections*/therapy. *Respiratory Syncytial ... Respiratory syncytial virus. [N Engl J Med. 2001]. *Respiratory syncytial virus. [N Engl J Med. 2001] ... Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infections*/diagnosis. *Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infections*/epidemiology. * ...
... Published Tuesday 14 March 2017 Published Tue 14 Mar ... "Investigational vaccine protects cattle from respiratory syncytial virus." Medical News Today. MediLexicon, Intl., 14 Mar. 2017 ... 2017, March 14). "Investigational vaccine protects cattle from respiratory syncytial virus." Medical News Today. Retrieved from ... protected cattle from respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection, according to research published online in npj Vaccines. The ...
Human respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is the major cause of lower respiratory tract disease in infants. It is unusual in that ... Molecular epidemiology of respiratory syncytial virus.. Cane PA1.. Author information. 1. Division of Immunity and Infection, ... Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infections/epidemiology*. *Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infections/virology. *Respiratory Syncytial ... The evolution of the virus is discussed, with particular reference to the antigenic and genetic variability of the attachment ...
... is a common virus that affects your breathing. It is common in children under 2. Learn more here. ... What is respiratory syncytial virus (RSV)?. Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is a common virus. It affects your lungs. It ... What causes respiratory syncytial virus (RSV)?. RSV is a virus. Its caused by a common germ found in lung infections. Children ... Can respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) be prevented or avoided?. Reduce your risk of getting the virus by following these tips: ...
Find Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) information, treatments for Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) and Respiratory syncytial ... MedHelps Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) Center for Information, Symptoms, Resources, Treatments and Tools for Respiratory ...
... J Infect Dis. 2007 May 15;195(10):1532-40. doi: 10.1086/515575 ... Background: The objective of this study was to elucidate the relation between respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection and ... Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infections / pathology * Respiratory Syncytial Viruses / genetics* * Respiratory Syncytial Viruses ... 63 of whom were infected with RSV and 13 of whom were infected with other respiratory viruses; in 22 children, no virus was ...
... a common cause of acute respiratory illness in older adults, with the risk of serious infection increasing with age. ... NFID provides resources to educate healthcare professionals about the burden of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), ... Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV). Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is a respiratory virus that infects the lungs and ... Webinar: Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV) in Older Adults: A Hidden Annual Epidemic. NFID Medical Director, William Schaffner ...
... a common cause of acute respiratory illness in older adults, with the risk of serious infection increasing with age. ... NFID provides resources to educate healthcare professionals about the burden of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), ... Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV). Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is a respiratory virus that infects the lungs and ... Respiratory Syncytial Virus in Older Adults: A Hidden Annual Epidemic (2016). Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV) in Older Adults ...
Engineered neutralizing antibodies are potential therapeutics for numerous viruses, such as respiratory syncytial virus (RSV). ... including human respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) and influenza. Here, we develop a modular, synthetic mRNA-based approach to ... and national disease burden estimates of acute lower respiratory infections due to respiratory syncytial virus in young ... Potent single-domain antibodies that arrest respiratory syncytial virus fusion protein in its prefusion state. Nat. Commun. 8, ...
Respiratory syncytial virus G protein is a protein produced by respiratory syncytial virus. It has been proposed as a target ... Li XQ, Fu ZF, Alvarez R, Henderson C, Tripp RA (January 2006). "Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infects neuronal cells and ... Harcourt J, Alvarez R, Jones LP, Henderson C, Anderson LJ, Tripp RA (February 2006). "Respiratory syncytial virus G protein and ... McLellan JS, Ray WC, Peeples ME (2013). "Structure and function of respiratory syncytial virus surface glycoproteins". Current ...
... , Bronchiolitis, RSV, RSV Bronchiolitis, Metapneumovirus. ... RESPIRATORY SYNCYTIAL VIRUS INFECT, INFECT RESPIRATORY SYNCYTIAL VIRUS, respiratory syncytial virus infection, respiratory ... Respiratory Syncytial Virus. Respiratory Syncytial Virus Aka: Respiratory Syncytial Virus, Bronchiolitis, RSV, RSV ... Respiratory syncytial virus infection (disorder), Respiratory syncytial virus infection, NOS, Respiratory Syncytial Virus ...
... About RSV. Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), which causes infection of the lungs and breathing ... Respiratory illness caused by RSV - such as bronchiolitis or pneumonia - usually lasts about a week, but some cases may last ... Babies often get it when older kids carry the virus home from school and pass it to them. Almost all kids are infected with RSV ... RSV is highly contagious and can be spread through droplets containing the virus when someone coughs or sneezes. It also can ...
... wwwn.cdc.gov/nndss/conditions/respiratory-syncytial-virus-associated-mortality/case-definition/2019/) ... Respiratory Syncytial Virus-Associated Mortality (RSV-Associated Mortality) , 2019 Case Definition (https:// ...
Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is worldwide the single most important respiratory pathogen in infancy and early childhood. ... Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is worldwide the single most important respiratory pathogen in infancy and early childhood. ... Respiratory syncytial virus deficient in soluble G protein induced an increased proinflammatory response in human lung ... Arnold, R., König, B., Werchau, H., & König, W. (2004). Respiratory syncytial virus deficient in soluble G protein induced an ...
Find out more about the virus. - BabyCentre UK ... RSV is a very common virus that most babies experience as a ... What is respiratory syncytial virus (RSV)?. Respiratory syncytial (sin-SISH-ul) virus is a common virus that causes chest ... Evidence for a causal relationship between respiratory syncytial virus infection and asthma. Expert Review of Anti-infective ... Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV). Vaccine Knowledge Project University of Oxford. vk.ovg.ox.ac.uk [Accessed June 2017] PHE. ...
Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is classified as a member of the genus Pneumovirus in the family Paramyxoviridae(1-4). Virus ... In some cases, otitis media may occur(4). RSV infections usually begin with upper respiratory tract disease, which has the ... RSV outbreaks involving lower respiratory illness have been reported in nursing homes and institutions(1). ... Primary infection with RSV is generally exhibited as lower respiratory tract disease, pneumonia, bronchiolitis, ...
Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), also called human respiratory syncytial virus (hRSV) and human orthopneumovirus, is a very ... "International Committee on Taxonomy of Viruses (ICTV). Retrieved 27 December 2018.. *^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t ... The virus was later renamed human orthopneumovirus, or human respiratory syncytial virus (hRSV).[citation needed] ... "Ribavirin for respiratory syncytial virus infection of the lower respiratory tract in infants and young children". The Cochrane ...
  • Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV) is a leading cause of hospitalization due to acute lower respiratory infection especially in infants and young children. (who.int)
  • A respiratory syncytial virus vaccine ( RSV vaccine ) is a vaccine which prevents infection by respiratory syncytial virus . (wikipedia.org)
  • [1] The desired vaccine would prevent lower respiratory infection from RSV in at-risk populations and if possible be useful in other populations with less risk. (wikipedia.org)
  • Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) causes respiratory tract infections and is a major cause of lower respiratory tract infection and hospital visits during infancy and childhood. (redorbit.com)
  • The virus is ubiquitous in all parts of the world so avoiding the infection is impossible. (redorbit.com)
  • When a child under two years of age presents in midwinter with a runny nose, dry cough, and mild to moderate fever, chances are that he or she has respiratory syncytial virus infection (RSV). (healthcentral.com)
  • In 30 to 40 percent of cases, infection progresses to involve the lower respiratory tract, with subsequent development of bronchiolitis and pneumonia . (healthcentral.com)
  • Past, present and future approaches to the prevention and treatment of respiratory syncytial virus infection in children. (medlineplus.gov)
  • RSV , which stands for respiratory syncytial virus, is an infection that affects the respiratory tract. (medlineplus.gov)
  • RSV testing checks for the virus that causes an RSV infection. (medlineplus.gov)
  • A negative result means there is no RSV infection and the symptoms are likely caused by another type of virus. (medlineplus.gov)
  • A novel vaccine developed by scientists at the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), part of the National Institutes of Health, protected cattle from respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection, according to research published online in npj Vaccines . (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • The objective of this study was to elucidate the relation between respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection and cytokine/chemokine concentrations, as well as the impact that these factors have on the severity of bronchiolitis. (nih.gov)
  • Primary infection with RSV is generally exhibited as lower respiratory tract disease, pneumonia, bronchiolitis, tracheobronchitis, or upper respiratory tract illness(1-4). (msdsonline.com)
  • Severe infection (involving pneumonia) may develop among elderly patients with underlying respiratory conditions. (msdsonline.com)
  • Infection rates are typically higher during the cold winter months, causing bronchiolitis in infants, common colds in adults, and more serious respiratory illnesses such as pneumonia in the elderly and immunocompromised . (wikipedia.org)
  • RSV infection can present with a wide variety of signs and symptoms that range from mild upper respiratory tract infections (URTI) to severe and potentially life-threatening lower respiratory tract infections (LRTI) requiring hospitalization and mechanical ventilation . (wikipedia.org)
  • Bronchiolitis is a common lower respiratory tract infection characterized by inflammation and obstruction of the small airways in the lungs. (wikipedia.org)
  • Respiratory syncytial virus infection, often called RSV, is a common childhood infection that can cause a runny nose, coughing, and wheezing. (rexhealth.com)
  • The research, published in the leading scientific journal Nature Communications , elucidates how these Nanobodies® interact with and neutralize the virus and demonstrates their ability to successfully protect mice from RSV infection and related inflammation . (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • ranging from protocols for virus growth, isolation, quantification and generation of recombinant RSV virus to procedures for the efficient characterization of the host immune response to RSV infection. (springer.com)
  • High-risk individuals - those that are immuno-compromised, very young, have congenital heart or lung disease - can experience a more severe infection of the lower respiratory tract. (sheknows.com)
  • A listing of Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV) Infection medical research trials actively recruiting patient volunteers. (centerwatch.com)
  • What is respiratory syncytial virus infection? (healthlinkbc.ca)
  • Respiratory syncytial virus infection, usually called RSV, is a lot like a bad cold. (healthlinkbc.ca)
  • A virus causes RSV infection. (healthlinkbc.ca)
  • People with RSV infection may spread the virus through their secretions (saliva or mucus) when they cough, sneeze, or talk. (healthlinkbc.ca)
  • You are most likely to spread the virus within the first several days after symptoms of RSV infection begin. (healthlinkbc.ca)
  • RSV also can cause infection in the lower respiratory tract, such as pneumonia in the lung tissue and bronchiolitis inside the smallest airways (bronchioles) in the lungs. (harvard.edu)
  • RSV infection is a significant cause of illness and disease among the most vulnerable populations," said NIAID Director Anthony S. Fauci, M.D. "A vaccine to prevent disease from this pervasive and sometimes deadly virus is urgently needed. (eurekalert.org)
  • Infants and young children undergoing their primary infection with common human respiratory viruses are at risk of serious, even life-threatening, lower respiratory tract infection, A multiplicity of viruses infect the human respiratory tract but a relatively small number are responsible for the majority of significant illness. (springer.com)
  • Significant lower respiratory tract disease may also result from infection with the parainfluenza viruses, the influenza viruses, and adenoviruses. (springer.com)
  • There are a number of routes to the diagnoses of a respiratory virus infection, not all of which are suitable for routine pediatric use. (springer.com)
  • CT) Bovine Respiratory Syncytial virus (BRSV) infection was confirmed by PCR of lung tissue from a 5-month-old heifer that was representative of 10 sick calves with temperatures ranging from 103.4-105.5 and respiratory signs. (cornell.edu)
  • Air pollutants significantly increased the risk of respiratory syncytial virus infection with dosage, lag and cumulative effects. (greenmedinfo.com)
  • Selenium supplementation may promote recovery from respiratory syncytial virus infection. (greenmedinfo.com)
  • Vitamin A supplementation may have therapeutic activity in the treatment of measles and respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection. (greenmedinfo.com)
  • RSV (Respiratory Syncytial Virus) causes bronchiolitis and pneumonia in children under 3 years old and may look like an upper respiratory tract infection or cold in children over 3. (clevelandclinic.org)
  • Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infection (RSV) Accessed 6/27/2017. (clevelandclinic.org)
  • RSV infection produces a variety of signs and symptoms involving different areas of the respiratory tract, from the nose to the lungs. (abcam.com)
  • The Interferon Type I/III Response to Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infection in Airway Epithelial Cells Can Be Attenuated or Amplified by Antiviral Treatment. (abcam.com)
  • From 1997 to 2000, all children who were admitted for acute lower respiratory tract infection between October 1 and March 31 had a nasopharyngeal aspirate obtained and tested for RSV by commercial enzyme immunoassay kits. (aappublications.org)
  • During 3 RSV seasons (1997-2000), 51.3% of 1837 admissions for acute lower respiratory tract infection among children younger than 2 years were attributed to RSV infection. (aappublications.org)
  • Respiratory syncytial virus, or RSV, is a contagious viral infection of the respiratory tract, as stated by WebMD. (reference.com)
  • Respiratory syncytial virus is a contagious virus that causes pulmonary diseases, such as pneumonia, or terminal airway infection, and bronchiolitis, or te. (reference.com)
  • Between 1 December 2007 and 31 May 2008, we analysed 120 nasopharyngeal swabs for the presence respiratory syncytial virus [‎RSV]‎ infection in 120 children aged 15 days to 6 years, hospitalized in 2 hospitals in North Lebanon. (who.int)
  • We discuss three surveillance components: active sentinel community surveillance, active sentinel hospital surveillance, and passive laboratory surveillance, using the EU acute respiratory infection (ARI) and WHO extended severe acute respiratory infection (SARI) case definitions. (nivel.nl)
  • In addition these researchers have shown that PGs prevent the intercellular spreading of the RSV virus, after infection is established. (nationaljewish.org)
  • and intranasal administration of PG suppresses influenza A virus infection in mice. (nationaljewish.org)
  • Clinical observations link respiratory virus infection and Pseudomonas aeruginosa colonization in chronic lung disease, including cystic fibrosis (CF) and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. (pnas.org)
  • RSV infection is caused by a group of viruses found worldwide. (encyclopedia.com)
  • In children under two, the virus causes a serious lower respiratory infection in the lungs. (encyclopedia.com)
  • It has been shown that if a person with RSV infection sneezes, the virus can be carried to others within a radius of 6 f (1.8 m). (encyclopedia.com)
  • Ackermann, M.R. Perinatal Lamb Model of Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV) Infection. (mdpi.com)
  • Derscheid RJ, Ackermann MR. Perinatal Lamb Model of Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV) Infection. (mdpi.com)
  • Exposure to the rhinovirus, the most frequent cause of the common cold, can protect against infection by the SARS-CoV-2 virus which causes COVID-19, as per a study at the Yale University, published in the Journal of Experimental Medicine. (medindia.net)
  • Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection is a widespread infant ill. (bio-medicine.org)
  • Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection is a widespread infant illness that has been linked to asthma and can be deadly but may be curable by the development of this new vaccine technology by the Sir Albert Sakzewski Virus Research Centre and The University of Queensland's Faculty of Biological and Chemical Sciences. (bio-medicine.org)
  • It can lead to severe and lifethreatening lower respiratory tract infection or bronchiolitis. (bio-medicine.org)
  • HEp2 cells were only minimally infected by the ΔF virus, while A549 cells and Vbac cells, allowed for a robust infection with the ΔF virus. (hindawi.com)
  • An RSV infection can also be spread through the air by coughing or sneezing, which is how preemies often come into contact with this virus. (whattoexpect.com)
  • Every family member 6 months of age and older should also receive a flu vaccination to limit the chances of getting infected with other viruses that can weaken the immune system during the winter season, when RSV infection rates are higher. (whattoexpect.com)
  • Infection with the virus can lead to severe respiratory illness and pneumonia, and may become life threatening. (integrisok.com)
  • Are you sure your patient has respiratory syncytial virus infection? (oncologynurseadvisor.com)
  • For a discussion of bronchiolitis, the most common manifestation of lower respiratory tract infection in infants, please see the Bronchiolitis chapter. (oncologynurseadvisor.com)
  • The major emphasis of this chapter will be the role of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection in the childhood population that has undergone hematopoietic or solid organ transplantation. (oncologynurseadvisor.com)
  • First is an upper respiratory infection that includes symptoms of a common cold with rhinorrhea and nasal congestion. (oncologynurseadvisor.com)
  • After the age of 2 years, respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) no longer causes a lower respiratory tract infection in the child who has a normal immune system. (oncologynurseadvisor.com)
  • Despite the fact that RSV is the most common cause of hospitalization for lower respiratory tract infection (LRTI) in the first 2 years, the virus typically only causes an upper respiratory infection after 2 years of age. (oncologynurseadvisor.com)
  • Particularly in developing countries, malnutrition and diarrhea increases the risk of severe respiratory infection associated with RSV. (oncologynurseadvisor.com)
  • It is the major cause of lower respiratory tract infection and hospital visits during infancy and childhood. (medicalxpress.com)
  • The cell response to virus infection and virus perturbation of that response is dynamic and is reflected by changes in cell susceptibility to infection. (mdpi.com)
  • In this study, we evaluated the response of human epithelial cells to sequential infections with human respiratory syncytial virus strains A2 and B to determine if a primary infection with one strain will impact the ability of cells to be infected with the second as a function of virus strain and time elapsed between the two exposures. (mdpi.com)
  • In children older than 3 years old, and healthy adults, RSV typically causes an upper respiratory infection or cold. (grandstrandmed.com)
  • In most cases, antibiotics are not needed because the infection is caused by a virus, not bacteria. (grandstrandmed.com)
  • Finding out your child has a respiratory syncytial virus ( RSV ) infection can be scary. (verywellhealth.com)
  • Most of the time a doctor will diagnose RSV infection based purely on these symptoms, although it is possible to detect the virus in nasal secretions. (verywellhealth.com)
  • Because RSV is a virus, antibiotics won't be helpful, but if a child develops a secondary bacterial infection , such as an ear infection , she may need an antibiotic to clear it up. (verywellhealth.com)
  • RSV is one of the most common viruses to cause lung and airway infections in infants and small children. (healthline.com)
  • Acute respiratory infections are responsible for the hospitalization and deaths of millions of individuals annually worldwide 1 . (nature.com)
  • RSV infections usually begin with upper respiratory tract disease, which has the tendency to progress to lower respiratory tract disease (in ~50% cases)(1,2). (msdsonline.com)
  • Respiratory syncytial virus ( RSV ), also called human respiratory syncytial virus ( hRSV ) and human orthopneumovirus , is a very common, contagious virus that causes infections of the respiratory tract . (wikipedia.org)
  • [7] While RSV can cause respiratory tract infections in people of all ages and is among the most common childhood infections, its presentation often varies between age groups and immune status. (wikipedia.org)
  • [8] Most childhood RSV infections are fairly self-limited with typical upper respiratory tract signs and symptoms, such as nasal congestion, runny nose , cough, and low-grade fever. (wikipedia.org)
  • [9] Approximately 15-50% of children will go on to develop more serious lower respiratory tracts infections, such as bronchiolitis , viral pneumonia , or croup . (wikipedia.org)
  • Two meetings, one sponsored by the Wellcome Trust in 2012 and the other by the Global Virology Foundation in 2013, assembled academic, public health and pharmaceutical industry experts to assess the challenges and opportunities for developing antivirals for the treatment of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infections. (nih.gov)
  • An RNA-containing virus that causes minor respiratory infections in adults and bronchitis and bronchopneumonia in children. (dictionary.com)
  • A virus of the family Paromyxoviridae and the genus Pneumovirus that causes severe childhood respiratory infections, especially bronchiolitis in infants. (dictionary.com)
  • Researchers from VIB, UGent, the Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth and several collaborators developed a new antiviral strategy to fight human respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), a leading cause of lower respiratory tract infections in children. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • RSV causes upper respiratory infections in most adults and older children, says Dr. Lee Muskovitz, neonatologist and NICU medical director at Essential Health's St. Mary's Medical Center in Duluth. (sheknows.com)
  • Many different viruses can cause lower respiratory tract infections in children. (healthlinkbc.ca)
  • Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is one of the many viruses that cause the common cold and infections in the upper parts of the respiratory tract. (harvard.edu)
  • The RSV virus is the most common cause of lung infections in infants and young children. (drugs.com)
  • Acute respiratory tract infections caused by RSV result in approximately 90,000 hospitalizations and 4,500 deaths per year in the United States (ref. 2). (google.es)
  • Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is a viral organism that can cause upper and lower respiratory tract infections. (childrenshospital.org)
  • American ginseng is safe, well tolerated, and potentially effective for preventing acute respiratory illness due to influenza and respiractory syncytial virus infections. (greenmedinfo.com)
  • Respiratory syncytial virus immune globulin intravenous (RSV-IGIV) has been approved by the Food and Drug Administration for use in the prevention of severe RSV infections in infants and children younger than 24 months with bronchopulmonary dysplasia or a history of premature birth (≤35 weeks of gestation). (aappublications.org)
  • 15 - 18 These populations also have high rates of mortality and morbidity from acute lower respiratory tract infections (ALRIs). (aappublications.org)
  • Respiratory syncytial virus infections in premature infants, infants with a weakened immune system and infants born with heart disease can lead to life-threatening complications. (reference.com)
  • RSV was determined to be the leading cause of lower respiratory tract infections particularly in young infants. (kenyon.edu)
  • Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is a common cause of acute lower respiratory tract infections (ALRI) and hospitalizations among young children and is globally responsible for many deaths in young children, especially in infants below 6 months of age. (nivel.nl)
  • Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is a virus that can cause severe lower respiratory infections in children under the age of two, and milder upper respiratory infections in older children and adults. (encyclopedia.com)
  • As the physical distancing norms for COVID-19 are relaxed, Canada should foresee a resurgence of respiratory virus infections among children. (medindia.net)
  • The Toll-like receptor 8 (TLR8) has an important role in innate immune responses to RNA viral infections, including respiratory syncytial virus (RSV). (jci.org)
  • RSV can cause upper respiratory tract infections (such as colds) and lower respiratory tract infections (such as bronchiolitis and pneumonia). (sedgwickcounty.org)
  • Upper and lower respiratory infections may result from a wide variety of viral, bacterial, fungal, and protozoal organisms. (oncologynurseadvisor.com)
  • Human respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) causes respiratory tract infections. (medicalxpress.com)
  • RSV causes lower respiratory tract infections and commonly infects children. (sciencephoto.com)
  • Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is a virus that increases the susceptibility to respiratory infections and affects almost all children in the first 2-3 years of life. (organicfacts.net)
  • These respiratory infections can often be handled through supportive methods, just as a bad cold. (organicfacts.net)
  • While moistness is often associated with being a breeding ground for bacteria , respiratory infections can be very detrimental to the airways and respiratory tract. (organicfacts.net)
  • Excessive coughing and sore throats commonly accompany respiratory infections, so it is advisable to make the child comfortable and reduce crying. (organicfacts.net)
  • Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is a common cause of many types of infections of the respiratory system. (grandstrandmed.com)
  • To prevent serious RSV-related respiratory disease, at-risk infants can get a monthly injection of a medicine with RSV antibodies during peak RSV season (roughly November to April in the U.S.). The protection it gives doesn't last long, though. (kidshealth.org)
  • To prevent serious RSV-related respiratory disease, at-risk infants can get a monthly injection of a medicine with RSV antibodies during peak RSV season (roughly November to April). (kidshealth.org)
  • The calves vaccinated with the pre-F protein had high levels of neutralizing antibodies (more than 100-fold higher than those that received the post-F protein), and four of five were protected from RSV viral replication in the upper and lower respiratory tracts. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • The approach hinges on the use of single-domain antibodies, also known as Nanobodies®, which target and neutralize a vital protein in the virus, rendering it unable to enter lung cells. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • SeVRSV contains a modified mouse virus (Sendai virus) designed to carry RSV genetic material that will express RSV fusion protein in the vaccine recipient to stimulate RSV-specific antibodies and T-cells. (eurekalert.org)
  • An experimental vaccine to protect against respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), a leading cause of illness and hospitalization among very young children, elicited high levels of RSV-specific antibodies when tested in animals, according to a report in the journal Science . (eurekalert.org)
  • Although this approach can be speeded up by the immunofluorescence staining of early cultures with virus-specific monoclonal antibodies (MAbs), culture can never match the speed of direct antigen detection in specimens using either immunofluorescence or enzyme immunoassay. (springer.com)
  • This test measures the level of antibodies the body has formed against the virus. (encyclopedia.com)
  • 5 6 Retrospective analysis of clinical trials has suggested that the use of anti-respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) antibodies may decrease the incidence of subsequent asthma-like symptoms, 7 but prospective data are lacking. (bmj.com)
  • Your search returned 15 Bovine Respiratory Syncytial Virus (BRSV) Antibodies across 4 suppliers. (biocompare.com)
  • We offer Respiratory Syncytial Virus Glycoprotein F Antibodies for use in common research applications: ELISA, Immunofluorescence, Immunohistochemistry, Western Blot. (novusbio.com)
  • Our Respiratory Syncytial Virus Glycoprotein F Antibodies can be used in a variety of model species: Human, Viral, Virus. (novusbio.com)
  • Choose from our Respiratory Syncytial Virus Glycoprotein F monoclonal antibodies. (novusbio.com)
  • The Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV) IgG ELISA Kit is intended for the measurement of IgG antibodies to Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV) in a sample. (mpbio.com)
  • Palivizumab (Synagis) is an antibody targeted specifically at the RSV virus. (healthline.com)
  • Additionally, prophylaxis remains limited to antivirals and, in the case of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), the broadly neutralizing antibody palivizumab is the only FDA approved treatment for high-risk populations. (nature.com)
  • The lungs of three infants, two with bronchiolitis and one with pneumonia, were examined by fluorescent antibody techniques for the distribution of respiratory syncytial (R.S.) virus, and also for the presence of human globulin. (bmj.com)
  • Each Respiratory Syncytial Virus Glycoprotein F Antibody is fully covered by our Guarantee+, to give you complete peace of mind and the support when you need it. (novusbio.com)
  • The National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), part of the National Institutes of Health (NIH), has launched a clinical trial of an investigational vaccine designed to protect against respiratory syncytial virus (RSV). (eurekalert.org)
  • The Sendai virus vaccine platform has been well-tolerated to date in human clinical trials of vaccines for other infectious diseases, including HIV. (eurekalert.org)
  • A recombinant influenza virus vaccine expressing the F protein of respiratory syncytial virus. (abcam.com)
  • UQ research heralds vaccine technology breakthrough ( Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infec. (bio-medicine.org)
  • Hepatitis B surface antigen forms virus-like particles, which are the vaccine used for Hepatitis B vaccine all around the world," Professor Tindle said. (bio-medicine.org)
  • We're taking advantage of that to piggyback, if you like, the respiratory syncytial virus peptides into the vaccine. (bio-medicine.org)
  • Unfortunately, respiratory syncytial virus is one of those infant and childhood illnesses that your little one can't be immunized against, since there is no RSV vaccine yet. (whattoexpect.com)
  • Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) remains a major cause of morbidity and mortality in infants and the elderly and is a continuing challenge for vaccine development. (rupress.org)
  • Furthermore, DNA immunization can elicit lifelong immunity against viruses (( 19 )), a highly desirable property for an RSV vaccine. (rupress.org)
  • Palivizumab is not a vaccine and does not prevent the virus. (integrisok.com)
  • What Are the Signs & Symptoms of Respiratory Syncytial Virus? (kidshealth.org)
  • Respiratory syncytial (sin-SISH-uhl) virus, or RSV, is a common respiratory virus that usually causes mild, cold-like symptoms . (cdc.gov)
  • In infants with upper respiratory tract symptoms only, the process generally resolves in 4 to 7 days, much like an ordinary cold. (healthcentral.com)
  • Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is a very common virus that leads to mild, cold-like symptoms in adults and older healthy children. (medlineplus.gov)
  • Symptoms appear 4 to 6 days after catching the virus. (familydoctor.org)
  • Although its symptoms are like the common cold, RSV - respiratory syncytial virus - can be deadly. (sheknows.com)
  • RSV, a common virus, typically causes mild, cold-like symptoms that resolve within two weeks. (eurekalert.org)
  • However, the virus can cause severe symptoms, especially among infants and young children. (eurekalert.org)
  • Most of the time, this virus only causes minor cold-like symptoms. (clevelandclinic.org)
  • After being exposed to the virus, symptoms may not appear for four to six days. (childrenshospital.org)
  • Lambs can be born preterm (90% gestation) and survive for experimentation although both preterm and term lambs are susceptible to ovine, bovine and human strains of RSV and develop clinical symptoms including fever, tachypnea, and malaise as well as mild to moderate gross and histologic lesions including bronchiolitis with epithelial injury, neutrophil infiltration and syncytial cell formation. (mdpi.com)
  • Those most at risk from RSV are children aged two and under, especially those with weak respiratory symptoms, elderly people and the immunocompromised, such as people with HIV or those who have weakened immune systems due to treatments such as chemotherapy. (bio-medicine.org)
  • This is a prospective, multicenter, observational study in participants who completed the 24-week, placebo-controlled MK-0476 Protocol 272 (NCT00076973) study of montelukast in the treatment of respiratory symptoms subsequent to RSV-induced bronchiolitis. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • The virus and its accompanying cold-like symptoms typically cause a week or two of discomfort for your baby, but luckily it's usually not something to be worried about. (whattoexpect.com)
  • RSV is a contagious virus that affects the nose and upper part of the lungs, leading to a runny nose, low-grade fever and other symptoms similar to those of the common cold. (whattoexpect.com)
  • In adults, RSV usually causes upper respiratory tract symptoms but can cause lower respiratory tract disease, especially in elderly and in immunocompromised persons (4-6). (cdc.gov)
  • The most common symptoms of lower respiratory involvement include cough, retractions, and wheeze. (oncologynurseadvisor.com)
  • Some viruses do not produce rapid lysis of host cells, but rather remain latent for long periods in the host before the appearance of clinical symptoms. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • The goal is to ease the symptoms to reduce discomfort while the body fights the virus. (grandstrandmed.com)
  • There are also treatments available to help ease your baby's symptoms should she become infected with the virus. (momtastic.com)
  • however, if your baby gets a serious illness caused by this virus, she may be given oxygen, IV fluids, and frequent nasal suctioning to help with symptoms. (momtastic.com)
  • Respiratory illness caused by RSV - such as bronchiolitis or pneumonia - usually lasts about a week, but some cases may last several weeks. (kidshealth.org)
  • RSV is a virus that is a major cause of bronchiolitis and pneumonia during infancy and early childhood. (healthcentral.com)
  • and, paradoxically, while in bronchiolitis human globulin had the same scanty distribution as virus it was absent in pneumonia. (bmj.com)
  • It is suggested that the essential process in bronchiolitis is a widespread type 1 allergic reaction dependent on a second encounter with R.S. virus antigen, whereas in R.S. virus pneumonia the mucosal necrosis and alveolar and interstitial inflammation are the result of direct virus damage to the lungs. (bmj.com)
  • Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), a negative-strand RNA virus belonging to the Paramyxoviridae family of viruses, is the major viral pathogen responsible for bronchiolitis and pneumonia in infants and young children (ref. 1--Throughout this application, various references are referred to in parenthesis to more fully describe the state of the art to which this invention pertains. (google.es)
  • Respiratory Syncytial Virus is the leading cause of severe respiratory illnesses such as bronchiolitis and pneumonia in young children. (nsti.org)
  • One in three patients hospitalized for COVID-19 pneumonia may develop lung damage even after a year, revealed study published in The Lancet Respiratory Medicine. (medindia.net)
  • It can also lead to severe respiratory illness and pneumonia, and may become life threatening, so it should always be taken seriously. (integrisok.com)
  • Polypeptides, nucleotides, and compositions useful for preparing diagnostic reagents for and vaccines against human Respiratory Syncytial Virus are disclosed. (google.co.uk)
  • The present invention is related to the field of Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV) vaccines and is particularly concerned with vaccines comprising nucleic acid sequences encoding the fusion (F) protein of RSV. (google.es)
  • In addition, IGIV is known to interfere with the immune response to some live-virus vaccines. (aappublications.org)
  • Vaccines won't prevent your child from getting RSV or other viruses that cause colds, but they will protect your child from some of the complications a cold can cause. (cps.ca)
  • Three proteins are associated with the nucleocaspid and include nucleoprotein (N), phosphoprotein (P), and polymerase or large protein (L). The other five viral proteins are contained within the virus envelope and include nonglycosylated matrix protein (M), M2, fusion protein (F), glycoprotein (G), and short hydrophobic protein (SH). (msdsonline.com)
  • Prof. Jason McLellan (Geisel School of Medicine, Dartmouth College): "Due to the small size of the Nanobodies®, these molecules can bind to a recessed cavity on the surface of the viral fusion protein and prevent this molecular machine from allowing the virus to enter lung cells. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • Fresh ginger (Zingiber officinale) has anti-viral activity against human respiratory syncytial virus in human respiratory tract cell lines. (greenmedinfo.com)
  • The ΔF virus utilizes the baculovirus GP64 protein for viral entry. (hindawi.com)
  • We investigated whether the glycoproteins of HRSV were involved in the late stages of viral replication by utilizing recombinant viruses where each individual glycoprotein gene was deleted and replaced with a reporter gene to maintain wild-type levels of gene expression. (hindawi.com)
  • During the past two decades, a large number of studies have addressed the association of viral respiratory events in early life and the subsequent development of recurrent wheezing and asthma later in life. (bmj.com)
  • Respiratory and Enteric Viruses Br, Div of Viral and Rickettsial Diseases, National Center for Infectious Diseases, CDC. (cdc.gov)
  • Re-exposure to antigen, including that of viral origin, affords the potential for immune-specific induction of an interferon (IFN-ᵧ) differing in several respects from that induced by viruses (1, 2). (annals.org)
  • When a complete virus particle ( virion ) comes in contact with a host cell, only the viral nucleic acid and, in some viruses, a few enzymes are injected into the host cell. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • Within the host cell the genetic material of a DNA virus is replicated and transcribed into messenger RNA by host cell enzymes, and proteins coded for by viral genes are synthesized by host cell ribosomes. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • Some of these may already have been present within the initial virus, and others may be coded for by the viral genome for production within the host cell. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • Because host cells do not have the ability to replicate "viral RNA" but are able to transcribe messenger RNA, RNA viruses must contain enzymes to produce genetic material for new virions. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • For certain viruses the RNA is replicated by a viral enzyme ( transcriptase ) contained in the virion, or produced by the host cell using the viral RNA as a messenger. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • In other viruses a reverse transcriptase contained in the virion transcribes the genetic message on the viral RNA into DNA, which is then replicated by the host cell. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • In viruses that have membranes, membrane-bound viral proteins are synthesized by the host cell and move, like host cell membrane proteins, to the cell surface. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • The hospitalization rate for infants with lower respiratory tract involvement is 2 percent to 6 percent, but this drops to only 0.5 percent if all cases of upper and lower respiratory tract disease are considered. (healthcentral.com)
  • This indicates that the majority of palivizumab injected IM is not delivered to the appropriate organ compartment to neutralize the virus, potentially explaining the limited reduction in hospitalization rates observed in treated infants 10 . (nature.com)
  • While RSV is the single most common cause of respiratory hospitalization in infants, reinfection remains common throughout the lifetime and it is an important pathogen in all age groups. (wikipedia.org)
  • No data exist on respiratory syncytial virus (RSV)-specific hospitalization rates among high-risk Native Americans other than Alaska Natives, for whom the incidence of RSV hospitalization was estimated at 150 per 1000 among infants younger than 1 year. (aappublications.org)
  • Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is a leading cause of lower respiratory tract disease and hospitalization among young children throughout the world. (aappublications.org)
  • Furthermore, RSV is a common cause of severe respiratory disease and hospitalization among the elderly. (nivel.nl)
  • Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV) is the most common cause of hospitalization for respiratory illness in young children and 90% of children under the age of 2 will be infected by this virus. (nationaljewish.org)
  • Is Respiratory Syncytial Virus Contagious? (kidshealth.org)
  • RSV is highly contagious, and spreads through droplets containing the virus when someone coughs or sneezes. (kidshealth.org)
  • RSV is a highly contagious, airborne virus. (babycentre.co.uk)
  • Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is highly contagious, meaning it spreads easily from person to person. (healthlinkbc.ca)
  • RSV is a very common (and extremely contagious) virus that affects children and babies. (momtastic.com)
  • Respiratory syncytial (sin-SISH-ul) virus (RSV) is a major cause of respiratory illness in young children. (kidshealth.org)
  • In addition, RSV is being recognized more often as a significant cause of respiratory illness in older adults and is estimated to cause 177,000 hospitalizations and 14,000 deaths in adults 65 and older in the US every year. (nfid.org)
  • RSV outbreaks involving lower respiratory illness have been reported in nursing homes and institutions(1). (msdsonline.com)
  • A respiratory syncytial virus (RSV)-associated death is defined for surveillance purposes as a death resulting from a clinically compatible illness that was confirmed to be RSV by an appropriate laboratory or rapid diagnostic test. (cdc.gov)
  • The respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is responsible for a common childhood illness. (eurekalert.org)
  • RSV is a major cause of respiratory illness in all age groups. (wisconsin.gov)
  • Human Respiratory Syncytial Virus was first isolated in 1956 from a laboratory chimpanzee with a respiratory illness and was later discovered to be of human origin (1). (kenyon.edu)
  • The World Health Organization estimates that 33.8 million new episodes annually of RSV-associated lower respiratory tract illness (LRTI) occurred worldwide in children younger than 5 years of age. (oncologynurseadvisor.com)
  • Because the health and safety of our patients, families, visitors and staff is of utmost importance to us and to prevent the spread of the virus causing COVID19 illness, new visitation restrictions are effective beginning March 11, 2020. (luriechildrens.org)
  • Most cases of respiratory syncytial virus are mild and don't need medical treatment from doctors. (kidshealth.org)
  • Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), a common cause of winter outbreaks of acute respiratory disease, results in an estimated 90,000 hospitalizations and 4500 deaths each year from lower respiratory tract disease among infants and young children in the United States (1). (cdc.gov)
  • A systematic literature search was conducted to identify pharmacoeconomic analyzes of palivizumab compared to no prophylaxis for respiratory syncytial virus in infants and young children. (biomedsearch.com)
  • What are some signs of respiratory syncytial virus in babies? (reference.com)
  • Signs of respiratory syncytial virus in babies are similar to those of a cold, such as a runny nose and a cough, and they last a week or two, according to WebMD. (reference.com)
  • A runny nose and cough could be signs of respiratory syncytial virus, or RSV, a common virus that usually runs its course in a week or so. (whattoexpect.com)
  • Non-replicating vectors containing a nucleotide sequence coding for an F protein of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) and a promoter for such sequence, preferably a cytomegalovirus promoter, are described for in vivo immunization. (google.es)
  • Human respiratory syncytial virus (HRSV) is an enveloped RNA virus that assembles and buds from the plasma membrane of infected cells. (hindawi.com)
  • Although in most studies virus culture shows marginally greater sensitivity than the rapid techniques, occasionally antigen detection may succeed where virus culture fails, Whether antigen detection methods alone, without the backup of virus culture, are adequate to provide a reliable diagnostic service remains a controversial issue. (springer.com)
  • Since July 1992, a total of 100 clinical and public health laboratories in 47 states have participated in NREVSS and have reported weekly to CDC the number of specimens tested for RSV by the antigen-detection and virus-isolation methods and the number of positive results. (cdc.gov)
  • It is a negative-sense, single-stranded RNA virus of the family Paramyxoviridae which can cause measles and mumps. (redorbit.com)
  • Measles virus, currently relatively rare in countries operating a successful vaccination regime, may also be regarded as an important respiratory pathogen. (springer.com)
  • RSV is a negative-sense, single-stranded RNA virus of the family Paramyxoviridae , which includes common respiratory viruses such as those causing measles and mumps. (medicalxpress.com)
  • But the virus may lead to serious breathing problems , especially in young babies, the elderly, and people with weakened immune systems. (medlineplus.gov)
  • Respiratory syncytial virus immune globulin has been assigned to pregnancy category C by the FDA. (drugs.com)
  • Respiratory syncytial virus immune globulin is only recommended for use during pregnancy when benefit outweighs risk. (drugs.com)
  • There are no data on the excretion of respiratory syncytial virus immune globulin into human milk. (drugs.com)
  • We have observed that respiratory virus coinfection and the antiviral immune response aid in the transition of P . aeruginosa to a biofilm mode of growth through inappropriate release of the nutrient iron. (pnas.org)
  • This is an herbal remedy that has been shown to stimulate the respiratory system and increase circulation , which can help eliminate toxins and increase overall immune health. (organicfacts.net)
  • The virus infects the lungs and breathing passages. (kidshealth.org)
  • Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is a respiratory virus that infects the lungs and breathing passages. (nfid.org)
  • however, in elderly and immunocompromised patients, serious disease of the lower respiratory tract may result. (healthcentral.com)
  • Lower respiratory tract involvement is indicated by the onset of expiratory wheezing or inspiratory sounds, marked cough, tachypnea (rapid breathing) and retractions (heavy breathing), and varying degrees of cyanosis (bluish/purple color of the skin). (healthcentral.com)
  • Human respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is the major cause of lower respiratory tract disease in infants. (nih.gov)
  • Following inoculation of the eyes or nose, the virus will infect the epithelial cells of the upper and lower airway , causing inflammation, cell damage, and airway obstruction. (wikipedia.org)
  • Nonetheless all may be associated, at least occasionally, with serious lower respiratory tract disease. (springer.com)
  • RespiGam, Massachusetts Public Health Biologic Laboratories and MedImmune, Inc, Gaithersburg, MD) was licensed by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in January 1996 for use in the prevention of severe RSV lower respiratory tract disease in infants and children younger than 24 months with bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) or a history of premature birth (≤35 weeks of gestation). (aappublications.org)
  • Scientists have yet to understand why RSV viruses attack the lower respiratory system in infants and the upper respiratory system in adults. (encyclopedia.com)
  • these children were more likely to wheeze with lower respiratory illnesses if they had lower lung function values as measured by maximal expiratory flow at functional residual capacity [V′maxFRC]. (bmj.com)
  • In severe cases of respiratory failure , intubation and mechanical ventilation may be required. (wikipedia.org)
  • For this reason, you cannot have full immunity to the virus. (healthlinkbc.ca)
  • A review of cost-effectiveness of palivizumab for respiratory syncytial virus. (biomedsearch.com)
  • Palivizumab prophylaxis has been demonstrated to reduce the number of hospitalizations attributable to respiratory syncytial virus in high-risk infants. (biomedsearch.com)
  • While there is no vaccination for this virus, a medication called palivizumab may protect high-risk babies from getting Respiratory Syncytial Virus. (momtastic.com)
  • A study of children age 7 and younger coming to Children's Emergency Department with acute respiratory illnesses found that those infected with RSV had more than twice as many emergency department visits and six times more hospitalizations than those with seasonal flu. (childrenshospital.org)
  • While the Respiratory Syncytial Virus can develop into serious illnesses for babies, it is preventable and treatable if detected right away. (momtastic.com)
  • The virus is common in children under 2. (familydoctor.org)
  • in 22 children, no virus was detected. (nih.gov)
  • Children are known to shed virus for long periods (up to weeks) even after clinical recovery(1,2). (msdsonline.com)
  • Children attending school often spread the virus to their parents and siblings. (healthlinkbc.ca)
  • Babies and young children may spread the virus for at least 3 to 4 weeks. (healthlinkbc.ca)
  • Almost all children get the virus at least once before they are 2 years old. (cps.ca)
  • S in children and the contributing role of respiratory treptococcus pneumoniae is a major cause of pneumo- viruses toward these estimates. (cdc.gov)
  • For most children and infants, RSV is a virus that can be managed on an outpatient basis. (childrenshospital.org)
  • Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is the most frequent cause of bronchiolitis in infants and children worldwide. (mdpi.com)
  • Medindia provides you with the latest news and research breakthroughs on RSV (Respiratory Syncytial Virus) in Children. (medindia.net)
  • Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is such a common virus that nearly all adults and children are affected by it sooner or later. (whattoexpect.com)
  • Children can get RSV by touching an infected playmate's hand and then putting their own hands in their mouths, eyes or noses, picking up toys a sick child was using and then putting their hands in their mouths, or sharing cups and utensils with someone who has the virus. (whattoexpect.com)
  • Editorial Note: During the RSV season, health-care providers should consider RSV as a cause of acute respiratory disease in both children and adults. (cdc.gov)
  • Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is a virus that affects babies and children. (integrisok.com)
  • HealthDay)-A common respiratory virus that circulates in winter can pose a serious threat to children, an expert warns. (medicalxpress.com)
  • In the United States, 60% of infants are infected during their first RSV season, and nearly all children will have been infected with the virus by 2-3 years of age. (medicalxpress.com)
  • Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infects most children at least once before the age of two, and can sometimes be quite serious. (luriechildrens.org)
  • In fact, most children suffer from the virus by the age of 2. (momtastic.com)
  • Children catch the virus easily because they touch these things and then put their fingers in their nose or mouth. (momtastic.com)
  • Babies with chronic lung disease (a condition that may develop following respiratory disease as premature infants) are also at increased risk of developing RSV. (integrisok.com)
  • Adults over 65 with heart and lung disease are at a higher risk for getting the virus. (familydoctor.org)
  • With the goal of developing a new therapy to fight this disease, Prof. Xavier Saelens (VIB-UGent) and his team developed Nanobodies® that target the protein that the virus needs to enter lung cells. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • A disease caused by a virus. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • Pseudomonas aeruginosa is the major respiratory pathogen that promotes disease progression in chronic lung diseases such as cystic fibrosis (CF) and resides in antibiotic-resistant biofilm communities in the lungs of patients. (pnas.org)
  • The lung is a critical prophylaxis target for clinically important infectious agents, including human respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) and influenza. (nature.com)
  • Explore lung, breathing and allergy disorders, treatments, tests and prevention services provided by the Cleveland Clinic Respiratory Institute. (clevelandclinic.org)
  • Influenza A virus (IAV) is a worldwide public health problem causing 500,000 deaths each year with the highest death rates among newborns, the elderly and adults with chronic lung diseases. (nationaljewish.org)
  • Enhanced lung pathology observed in mice vaccinated with FI-RSV and challenged with live virus is mediated by CD4 + T cells and is associated with Th2 cytokines (IL-4, IL-5, and IL-10). (rupress.org)
  • These engineered viruses allowed us to study the roles of the glycoproteins in assembly and budding in the context of infectious virus. (hindawi.com)
  • Molecular epidemiology of respiratory syncytial virus. (nih.gov)
  • Share this infographic about the prevalence of Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) in adults age 65 years and older. (nfid.org)
  • NFID Medical Director, William Schaffner, MD, will be joined by Edward E. Walsh, MD, Professor of Medicine at the University of Rochester School of Medicine, to discuss the hidden annual epidemic of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) among older adults in the US. (nfid.org)
  • The virus spreads through tiny droplets that go into the air when a sick person blows their nose, coughs, or sneezes. (medlineplus.gov)
  • You touch your nose, eyes, or mouth after you have touched something contaminated by the virus, such as a toy or doorknob. (medlineplus.gov)
  • Your respiratory tract includes your lungs, nose, and throat. (medlineplus.gov)
  • The virus can live on surfaces, such as countertops, desks, phones and computer keyboards, so if you touch these items and then rub your eyes, or touch your nose or mouth, you may become infected. (sheknows.com)
  • Touching an object or surface contaminated with the virus and then touching your nose, eyes, or mouth without first washing your hands. (healthlinkbc.ca)
  • The secretions from the eye, mouth, or nose (and possibly from a sneeze) contain the virus. (childrenshospital.org)
  • The virus most often enters the body from touching the mouth, nose, or eyes. (grandstrandmed.com)
  • The name comes from the fact that F proteins on the surface of the virus cause the cell membranes on nearby cells to merge, forming syncytia. (redorbit.com)
  • Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV)capsid proteins, computer artwork. (sciencephoto.com)
  • Some viruses have only a few genes coding for capsid proteins. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • Although in general viruses "steal" their lipid envelope from the host cell, virtually all of them produce "envelope proteins" that penetrate the envelope and serve as receptors. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • Respiratory Syncytial Virus isolate, confirmed. (abcam.com)
  • Respiratory syncytial virus and parainfluenza virus. (nih.gov)
  • Virus particles are enveloped and pleomorphic, occurring as irregular spherical particles that are 100 to 350 nm in diameter, and as long filamentous fibres that are 60 to 200 nm in diameter and 10 mm in length(2). (msdsonline.com)
  • Another RSV protein is the matrix protein M, located in the inner layer of the lipid bilayer, and is found to play a role in the formation of virus-like particles. (kenyon.edu)
  • RSV particles (virions) are composed of an outer protein coat (capsid) encasing RNA (ribonucleic acid), the genetic material of the virus. (sciencephoto.com)
  • Babies often get it when older kids carry the virus home from school and pass it to them. (kidshealth.org)
  • And just like the common cold, most babies will get respiratory syncytial virus (in fact, about two-thirds of all infants are infected with RSV sometime during their first year of life) - often between October and April. (whattoexpect.com)
  • Babies can also be reinfected with the virus. (integrisok.com)
  • The term respiratory system refers to the lungs and breathing passages. (grandstrandmed.com)
  • It spreads through droplets containing the virus when someone coughs or sneezes. (kidshealth.org)
  • RSV is spread, like other viruses, through microscopic droplets released into the air or on surfaces. (healthline.com)
  • Typically kids are exposed to RSV either by direct contact with respiratory secretions (droplets spewed into the air when an infected person coughs or sneezes, for example) or by touching toys or other objects a sick child has touched. (verywellhealth.com)
  • Despite intensive research and the virus' status as a major pathogen, current methods of treatment rely almost exclusively on supportive care. (medicalnewstoday.com)