Pseudomonas aeruginosa: A species of gram-negative, aerobic, rod-shaped bacteria commonly isolated from clinical specimens (wound, burn, and urinary tract infections). It is also found widely distributed in soil and water. P. aeruginosa is a major agent of nosocomial infection.Pseudomonas Infections: Infections with bacteria of the genus PSEUDOMONAS.Drug Resistance, Multiple, Bacterial: The ability of bacteria to resist or to become tolerant to several structurally and functionally distinct drugs simultaneously. This resistance may be acquired through gene mutation or foreign DNA in transmissible plasmids (R FACTORS).Anti-Bacterial Agents: Substances that reduce the growth or reproduction of BACTERIA.Microbial Sensitivity Tests: Any tests that demonstrate the relative efficacy of different chemotherapeutic agents against specific microorganisms (i.e., bacteria, fungi, viruses).Drug Resistance, Microbial: The ability of microorganisms, especially bacteria, to resist or to become tolerant to chemotherapeutic agents, antimicrobial agents, or antibiotics. This resistance may be acquired through gene mutation or foreign DNA in transmissible plasmids (R FACTORS).Pseudomonas: A genus of gram-negative, aerobic, rod-shaped bacteria widely distributed in nature. Some species are pathogenic for humans, animals, and plants.Tobramycin: An aminoglycoside, broad-spectrum antibiotic produced by Streptomyces tenebrarius. It is effective against gram-negative bacteria, especially the PSEUDOMONAS species. It is a 10% component of the antibiotic complex, NEBRAMYCIN, produced by the same species.Bacteria: One of the three domains of life (the others being Eukarya and ARCHAEA), also called Eubacteria. They are unicellular prokaryotic microorganisms which generally possess rigid cell walls, multiply by cell division, and exhibit three principal forms: round or coccal, rodlike or bacillary, and spiral or spirochetal. Bacteria can be classified by their response to OXYGEN: aerobic, anaerobic, or facultatively anaerobic; by the mode by which they obtain their energy: chemotrophy (via chemical reaction) or PHOTOTROPHY (via light reaction); for chemotrophs by their source of chemical energy: CHEMOLITHOTROPHY (from inorganic compounds) or chemoorganotrophy (from organic compounds); and by their source for CARBON; NITROGEN; etc.; HETEROTROPHY (from organic sources) or AUTOTROPHY (from CARBON DIOXIDE). They can also be classified by whether or not they stain (based on the structure of their CELL WALLS) with CRYSTAL VIOLET dye: gram-negative or gram-positive.Bacterial Proteins: Proteins found in any species of bacterium.Pseudomonas putida: A species of gram-negative, aerobic bacteria isolated from soil and water as well as clinical specimens. Occasionally it is an opportunistic pathogen.Pseudomonas fluorescens: A species of nonpathogenic fluorescent bacteria found in feces, sewage, soil, and water, and which liquefy gelatin.Cystic Fibrosis: An autosomal recessive genetic disease of the EXOCRINE GLANDS. It is caused by mutations in the gene encoding the CYSTIC FIBROSIS TRANSMEMBRANE CONDUCTANCE REGULATOR expressed in several organs including the LUNG, the PANCREAS, the BILIARY SYSTEM, and the SWEAT GLANDS. Cystic fibrosis is characterized by epithelial secretory dysfunction associated with ductal obstruction resulting in AIRWAY OBSTRUCTION; chronic RESPIRATORY INFECTIONS; PANCREATIC INSUFFICIENCY; maldigestion; salt depletion; and HEAT PROSTRATION.Gram-Negative Bacteria: Bacteria which lose crystal violet stain but are stained pink when treated by Gram's method.Pseudomonas Phages: Viruses whose host is Pseudomonas. A frequently encountered Pseudomonas phage is BACTERIOPHAGE PHI 6.Pyocyanine: Antibiotic pigment produced by Pseudomonas aeruginosa.Alginates: Salts of alginic acid that are extracted from marine kelp and used to make dental impressions and as absorbent material for surgical dressings.Gene Expression Regulation, Bacterial: Any of the processes by which cytoplasmic or intercellular factors influence the differential control of gene action in bacteria.Biofilms: Encrustations, formed from microbes (bacteria, algae, fungi, plankton, or protozoa) embedding in extracellular polymers, that adhere to surfaces such as teeth (DENTAL DEPOSITS); PROSTHESES AND IMPLANTS; and catheters. Biofilms are prevented from forming by treating surfaces with DENTIFRICES; DISINFECTANTS; ANTI-INFECTIVE AGENTS; and antifouling agents.ADP Ribose Transferases: Enzymes that transfer the ADP-RIBOSE group of NAD or NADP to proteins or other small molecules. Transfer of ADP-ribose to water (i.e., hydrolysis) is catalyzed by the NADASES. The mono(ADP-ribose)transferases transfer a single ADP-ribose. POLY(ADP-RIBOSE) POLYMERASES transfer multiple units of ADP-ribose to protein targets, building POLY ADENOSINE DIPHOSPHATE RIBOSE in linear or branched chains.Molecular Sequence Data: Descriptions of specific amino acid, carbohydrate, or nucleotide sequences which have appeared in the published literature and/or are deposited in and maintained by databanks such as GENBANK, European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), National Biomedical Research Foundation (NBRF), or other sequence repositories.Genes, Bacterial: The functional hereditary units of BACTERIA.DNA, Bacterial: Deoxyribonucleic acid that makes up the genetic material of bacteria.Gram-Positive Bacteria: Bacteria which retain the crystal violet stain when treated by Gram's method.Quorum Sensing: A phenomenon where microorganisms communicate and coordinate their behavior by the accumulation of signaling molecules. A reaction occurs when a substance accumulates to a sufficient concentration. This is most commonly seen in bacteria.Pyocins: Bacteriocins elaborated by mutant strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. They are protein or protein-lipopolysaccharide complexes lethal to other strains of the same or related species.Virulence Factors: Those components of an organism that determine its capacity to cause disease but are not required for its viability per se. Two classes have been characterized: TOXINS, BIOLOGICAL and surface adhesion molecules that effect the ability of the microorganism to invade and colonize a host. (From Davis et al., Microbiology, 4th ed. p486)Glucuronic Acid: A sugar acid formed by the oxidation of the C-6 carbon of GLUCOSE. In addition to being a key intermediate metabolite of the uronic acid pathway, glucuronic acid also plays a role in the detoxification of certain drugs and toxins by conjugating with them to form GLUCURONIDES.Carbenicillin: Broad-spectrum semisynthetic penicillin derivative used parenterally. It is susceptible to gastric juice and penicillinase and may damage platelet function.Mutation: Any detectable and heritable change in the genetic material that causes a change in the GENOTYPE and which is transmitted to daughter cells and to succeeding generations.Exotoxins: Toxins produced, especially by bacterial or fungal cells, and released into the culture medium or environment.Culture Media: Any liquid or solid preparation made specifically for the growth, storage, or transport of microorganisms or other types of cells. The variety of media that exist allow for the culturing of specific microorganisms and cell types, such as differential media, selective media, test media, and defined media. Solid media consist of liquid media that have been solidified with an agent such as AGAR or GELATIN.Escherichia coli: A species of gram-negative, facultatively anaerobic, rod-shaped bacteria (GRAM-NEGATIVE FACULTATIVELY ANAEROBIC RODS) commonly found in the lower part of the intestine of warm-blooded animals. It is usually nonpathogenic, but some strains are known to produce DIARRHEA and pyogenic infections. Pathogenic strains (virotypes) are classified by their specific pathogenic mechanisms such as toxins (ENTEROTOXIGENIC ESCHERICHIA COLI), etc.Ceftazidime: Semisynthetic, broad-spectrum antibacterial derived from CEPHALORIDINE and used especially for Pseudomonas and other gram-negative infections in debilitated patients.Imipenem: Semisynthetic thienamycin that has a wide spectrum of antibacterial activity against gram-negative and gram-positive aerobic and anaerobic bacteria, including many multiresistant strains. It is stable to beta-lactamases. Clinical studies have demonstrated high efficacy in the treatment of infections of various body systems. Its effectiveness is enhanced when it is administered in combination with CILASTATIN, a renal dipeptidase inhibitor.Amino Acid Sequence: The order of amino acids as they occur in a polypeptide chain. This is referred to as the primary structure of proteins. It is of fundamental importance in determining PROTEIN CONFORMATION.Drug Resistance, Bacterial: The ability of bacteria to resist or to become tolerant to chemotherapeutic agents, antimicrobial agents, or antibiotics. This resistance may be acquired through gene mutation or foreign DNA in transmissible plasmids (R FACTORS).4-Butyrolactone: One of the FURANS with a carbonyl thereby forming a cyclic lactone. It is an endogenous compound made from gamma-aminobutyrate and is the precursor of gamma-hydroxybutyrate. It is also used as a pharmacological agent and solvent.Pseudomonas syringae: A species of gram-negative, fluorescent, phytopathogenic bacteria in the genus PSEUDOMONAS. It is differentiated into approximately 50 pathovars with different plant pathogenicities and host specificities.Colony Count, Microbial: Enumeration by direct count of viable, isolated bacterial, archaeal, or fungal CELLS or SPORES capable of growth on solid CULTURE MEDIA. The method is used routinely by environmental microbiologists for quantifying organisms in AIR; FOOD; and WATER; by clinicians for measuring patients' microbial load; and in antimicrobial drug testing.beta-Lactamases: Enzymes found in many bacteria which catalyze the hydrolysis of the amide bond in the beta-lactam ring. Well known antibiotics destroyed by these enzymes are penicillins and cephalosporins.Bacterial Outer Membrane Proteins: Proteins isolated from the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria.Gentamicins: A complex of closely related aminoglycosides obtained from MICROMONOSPORA purpurea and related species. They are broad-spectrum antibiotics, but may cause ear and kidney damage. They act to inhibit PROTEIN BIOSYNTHESIS.Bacterial Adhesion: Physicochemical property of fimbriated (FIMBRIAE, BACTERIAL) and non-fimbriated bacteria of attaching to cells, tissue, and nonbiological surfaces. It is a factor in bacterial colonization and pathogenicity.Base Sequence: The sequence of PURINES and PYRIMIDINES in nucleic acids and polynucleotides. It is also called nucleotide sequence.Virulence: The degree of pathogenicity within a group or species of microorganisms or viruses as indicated by case fatality rates and/or the ability of the organism to invade the tissues of the host. The pathogenic capacity of an organism is determined by its VIRULENCE FACTORS.Bacterial Toxins: Toxic substances formed in or elaborated by bacteria; they are usually proteins with high molecular weight and antigenicity; some are used as antibiotics and some to skin test for the presence of or susceptibility to certain diseases.Eye Infections, Bacterial: Infections in the inner or external eye caused by microorganisms belonging to several families of bacteria. Some of the more common genera found are Haemophilus, Neisseria, Staphylococcus, Streptococcus, and Chlamydia.Hexuronic Acids: Term used to designate tetrahydroxy aldehydic acids obtained by oxidation of hexose sugars, i.e. glucuronic acid, galacturonic acid, etc. Historically, the name hexuronic acid was originally given to ascorbic acid.Thienamycins: Beta-lactam antibiotics that differ from PENICILLINS in having the thiazolidine sulfur atom replaced by carbon, the sulfur then becoming the first atom in the side chain. They are unstable chemically, but have a very broad antibacterial spectrum. Thienamycin and its more stable derivatives are proposed for use in combinations with enzyme inhibitors.Sequence Analysis, DNA: A multistage process that includes cloning, physical mapping, subcloning, determination of the DNA SEQUENCE, and information analysis.Ciprofloxacin: A broad-spectrum antimicrobial carboxyfluoroquinoline.Carbapenems: A group of beta-lactam antibiotics in which the sulfur atom in the thiazolidine ring of the penicillin molecule is replaced by a carbon atom. THIENAMYCINS are a subgroup of carbapenems which have a sulfur atom as the first constituent of the side chain.Plasmids: Extrachromosomal, usually CIRCULAR DNA molecules that are self-replicating and transferable from one organism to another. They are found in a variety of bacterial, archaeal, fungal, algal, and plant species. They are used in GENETIC ENGINEERING as CLONING VECTORS.Anti-Infective Agents: Substances that prevent infectious agents or organisms from spreading or kill infectious agents in order to prevent the spread of infection.Colistin: Cyclic polypeptide antibiotic from Bacillus colistinus. It is composed of Polymyxins E1 and E2 (or Colistins A, B, and C) which act as detergents on cell membranes. Colistin is less toxic than Polymyxin B, but otherwise similar; the methanesulfonate is used orally.Aminoglycosides: Glycosylated compounds in which there is an amino substituent on the glycoside. Some of them are clinically important ANTIBIOTICS.Enterobacteriaceae: A family of gram-negative, facultatively anaerobic, rod-shaped bacteria that do not form endospores. Its organisms are distributed worldwide with some being saprophytes and others being plant and animal parasites. Many species are of considerable economic importance due to their pathogenic effects on agriculture and livestock.Bacteria, AnaerobicPseudomonas Vaccines: Vaccines or candidate vaccines used to prevent or treat PSEUDOMONAS INFECTIONS.Amikacin: A broad-spectrum antibiotic derived from KANAMYCIN. It is reno- and oto-toxic like the other aminoglycoside antibiotics.Pancreatic Elastase: A protease of broad specificity, obtained from dried pancreas. Molecular weight is approximately 25,000. The enzyme breaks down elastin, the specific protein of elastic fibers, and digests other proteins such as fibrin, hemoglobin, and albumin. EC 3.4.21.36.Pseudomonas stutzeri: A species of gram-negative bacteria in the genus PSEUDOMONAS, containing multiple genomovars. It is distinguishable from other pseudomonad species by its ability to use MALTOSE and STARCH as sole carbon and energy sources. It can degrade ENVIRONMENTAL POLLUTANTS and has been used as a model organism to study denitrification.Cloning, Molecular: The insertion of recombinant DNA molecules from prokaryotic and/or eukaryotic sources into a replicating vehicle, such as a plasmid or virus vector, and the introduction of the resultant hybrid molecules into recipient cells without altering the viability of those cells.Azurin: A bacterial protein from Pseudomonas, Bordetella, or Alcaligenes which operates as an electron transfer unit associated with the cytochrome chain. The protein has a molecular weight of approximately 16,000, contains a single copper atom, is intensively blue, and has a fluorescence emission band centered at 308nm.PhenazinesAzlocillin: A semisynthetic ampicillin-derived acylureido penicillin.Cephalosporins: A group of broad-spectrum antibiotics first isolated from the Mediterranean fungus ACREMONIUM. They contain the beta-lactam moiety thia-azabicyclo-octenecarboxylic acid also called 7-aminocephalosporanic acid.Aztreonam: A monocyclic beta-lactam antibiotic originally isolated from Chromobacterium violaceum. It is resistant to beta-lactamases and is used in gram-negative infections, especially of the meninges, bladder, and kidneys. It may cause a superinfection with gram-positive organisms.Corneal Ulcer: Loss of epithelial tissue from the surface of the cornea due to progressive erosion and necrosis of the tissue; usually caused by bacterial, fungal, or viral infection.Operon: In bacteria, a group of metabolically related genes, with a common promoter, whose transcription into a single polycistronic MESSENGER RNA is under the control of an OPERATOR REGION.Pneumonia, Bacterial: Inflammation of the lung parenchyma that is caused by bacterial infections.Species Specificity: The restriction of a characteristic behavior, anatomical structure or physical system, such as immune response; metabolic response, or gene or gene variant to the members of one species. It refers to that property which differentiates one species from another but it is also used for phylogenetic levels higher or lower than the species.Keratitis: Inflammation of the cornea.RNA, Ribosomal, 16S: Constituent of 30S subunit prokaryotic ribosomes containing 1600 nucleotides and 21 proteins. 16S rRNA is involved in initiation of polypeptide synthesis.Cross Infection: Any infection which a patient contracts in a health-care institution.Staphylococcus aureus: Potentially pathogenic bacteria found in nasal membranes, skin, hair follicles, and perineum of warm-blooded animals. They may cause a wide range of infections and intoxications.Sputum: Material coughed up from the lungs and expectorated via the mouth. It contains MUCUS, cellular debris, and microorganisms. It may also contain blood or pus.Phylogeny: The relationships of groups of organisms as reflected by their genetic makeup.Polymyxins: Basic lipopeptide antibiotic group obtained from Bacillus polymyxa. They affect the cell membrane by detergent action and may cause neuromuscular and kidney damage. At least eleven different members of the polymyxin group have been identified, each designated by a letter.Bacteria, AerobicBacterial Infections: Infections by bacteria, general or unspecified.Siderophores: Low-molecular-weight compounds produced by microorganisms that aid in the transport and sequestration of ferric iron. (The Encyclopedia of Molecular Biology, 1994)Genetic Complementation Test: A test used to determine whether or not complementation (compensation in the form of dominance) will occur in a cell with a given mutant phenotype when another mutant genome, encoding the same mutant phenotype, is introduced into that cell.Piperacillin: Semisynthetic, broad-spectrum, AMPICILLIN derived ureidopenicillin antibiotic proposed for PSEUDOMONAS infections. It is also used in combination with other antibiotics.Pigments, Biological: Any normal or abnormal coloring matter in PLANTS; ANIMALS or micro-organisms.Fimbriae, Bacterial: Thin, hairlike appendages, 1 to 20 microns in length and often occurring in large numbers, present on the cells of gram-negative bacteria, particularly Enterobacteriaceae and Neisseria. Unlike flagella, they do not possess motility, but being protein (pilin) in nature, they possess antigenic and hemagglutinating properties. They are of medical importance because some fimbriae mediate the attachment of bacteria to cells via adhesins (ADHESINS, BACTERIAL). Bacterial fimbriae refer to common pili, to be distinguished from the preferred use of "pili", which is confined to sex pili (PILI, SEX).Microbial Viability: Ability of a microbe to survive under given conditions. This can also be related to a colony's ability to replicate.Gram-Negative Bacterial Infections: Infections caused by bacteria that show up as pink (negative) when treated by the gram-staining method.Biodegradation, Environmental: Elimination of ENVIRONMENTAL POLLUTANTS; PESTICIDES and other waste using living organisms, usually involving intervention of environmental or sanitation engineers.Wound Infection: Invasion of the site of trauma by pathogenic microorganisms.RNA, Bacterial: Ribonucleic acid in bacteria having regulatory and catalytic roles as well as involvement in protein synthesis.Water Microbiology: The presence of bacteria, viruses, and fungi in water. This term is not restricted to pathogenic organisms.Polysaccharides, Bacterial: Polysaccharides found in bacteria and in capsules thereof.Lipopolysaccharides: Lipid-containing polysaccharides which are endotoxins and important group-specific antigens. They are often derived from the cell wall of gram-negative bacteria and induce immunoglobulin secretion. The lipopolysaccharide molecule consists of three parts: LIPID A, core polysaccharide, and O-specific chains (O ANTIGENS). When derived from Escherichia coli, lipopolysaccharides serve as polyclonal B-cell mitogens commonly used in laboratory immunology. (From Dorland, 28th ed)Soil Microbiology: The presence of bacteria, viruses, and fungi in the soil. This term is not restricted to pathogenic organisms.Bacteriological Techniques: Techniques used in studying bacteria.Fimbriae Proteins: Proteins that are structural components of bacterial fimbriae (FIMBRIAE, BACTERIAL) or sex pili (PILI, SEX).Hydrogen Cyanide: Hydrogen cyanide (HCN); A toxic liquid or colorless gas. It is found in the smoke of various tobacco products and released by combustion of nitrogen-containing organic materials.Phenotype: The outward appearance of the individual. It is the product of interactions between genes, and between the GENOTYPE and the environment.Genome, Bacterial: The genetic complement of a BACTERIA as represented in its DNA.Anaerobiosis: The complete absence, or (loosely) the paucity, of gaseous or dissolved elemental oxygen in a given place or environment. (From Singleton & Sainsbury, Dictionary of Microbiology and Molecular Biology, 2d ed)Conjugation, Genetic: A parasexual process in BACTERIA; ALGAE; FUNGI; and ciliate EUKARYOTA for achieving exchange of chromosome material during fusion of two cells. In bacteria, this is a uni-directional transfer of genetic material; in protozoa it is a bi-directional exchange. In algae and fungi, it is a form of sexual reproduction, with the union of male and female gametes.Kanamycin: Antibiotic complex produced by Streptomyces kanamyceticus from Japanese soil. Comprises 3 components: kanamycin A, the major component, and kanamycins B and C, the minor components.Gram-Negative Aerobic Bacteria: A large group of aerobic bacteria which show up as pink (negative) when treated by the gram-staining method. This is because the cell walls of gram-negative bacteria are low in peptidoglycan and thus have low affinity for violet stain and high affinity for the pink dye safranine.HomoserineSequence Homology, Amino Acid: The degree of similarity between sequences of amino acids. This information is useful for the analyzing genetic relatedness of proteins and species.Mutagenesis, Insertional: Mutagenesis where the mutation is caused by the introduction of foreign DNA sequences into a gene or extragenic sequence. This may occur spontaneously in vivo or be experimentally induced in vivo or in vitro. Proviral DNA insertions into or adjacent to a cellular proto-oncogene can interrupt GENETIC TRANSLATION of the coding sequences or interfere with recognition of regulatory elements and cause unregulated expression of the proto-oncogene resulting in tumor formation.beta-Lactams: Four-membered cyclic AMIDES, best known for the PENICILLINS based on a bicyclo-thiazolidine, as well as the CEPHALOSPORINS based on a bicyclo-thiazine, and including monocyclic MONOBACTAMS. The BETA-LACTAMASES hydrolyze the beta lactam ring, accounting for BETA-LACTAM RESISTANCE of infective bacteria.DNA, Ribosomal: DNA sequences encoding RIBOSOMAL RNA and the segments of DNA separating the individual ribosomal RNA genes, referred to as RIBOSOMAL SPACER DNA.DNA Transposable Elements: Discrete segments of DNA which can excise and reintegrate to another site in the genome. Most are inactive, i.e., have not been found to exist outside the integrated state. DNA transposable elements include bacterial IS (insertion sequence) elements, Tn elements, the maize controlling elements Ac and Ds, Drosophila P, gypsy, and pogo elements, the human Tigger elements and the Tc and mariner elements which are found throughout the animal kingdom.Quinolones: A group of derivatives of naphthyridine carboxylic acid, quinoline carboxylic acid, or NALIDIXIC ACID.Penicillins: A group of antibiotics that contain 6-aminopenicillanic acid with a side chain attached to the 6-amino group. The penicillin nucleus is the chief structural requirement for biological activity. The side-chain structure determines many of the antibacterial and pharmacological characteristics. (Goodman and Gilman's The Pharmacological Basis of Therapeutics, 8th ed, p1065)Kinetics: The rate dynamics in chemical or physical systems.Bacteriophages: Viruses whose hosts are bacterial cells.Acyl-Butyrolactones: Cyclic esters of acylated BUTYRIC ACID containing four carbons in the ring.Antibodies, Bacterial: Immunoglobulins produced in a response to BACTERIAL ANTIGENS.Porins: Porins are protein molecules that were originally found in the outer membrane of GRAM-NEGATIVE BACTERIA and that form multi-meric channels for the passive DIFFUSION of WATER; IONS; or other small molecules. Porins are present in bacterial CELL WALLS, as well as in plant, fungal, mammalian and other vertebrate CELL MEMBRANES and MITOCHONDRIAL MEMBRANES.Flagellin: A protein with a molecular weight of 40,000 isolated from bacterial flagella. At appropriate pH and salt concentration, three flagellin monomers can spontaneously reaggregate to form structures which appear identical to intact flagella.Lung: Either of the pair of organs occupying the cavity of the thorax that effect the aeration of the blood.Polymyxin B: A mixture of polymyxins B1 and B2, obtained from Bacillus polymyxa strains. They are basic polypeptides of about eight amino acids and have cationic detergent action on cell membranes. Polymyxin B is used for infections with gram-negative organisms, but may be neurotoxic and nephrotoxic.Burkholderia cepacia: A species of BURKHOLDERIA considered to be an opportunistic human pathogen. It has been associated with various types of infections of nosocomial origin.Burns: Injuries to tissues caused by contact with heat, steam, chemicals (BURNS, CHEMICAL), electricity (BURNS, ELECTRIC), or the like.Acinetobacter: A genus of gram-negative bacteria of the family MORAXELLACEAE, found in soil and water and of uncertain pathogenicity.Ticarcillin: An antibiotic derived from penicillin similar to CARBENICILLIN in action.Antibiosis: A natural association between organisms that is detrimental to at least one of them. This often refers to the production of chemicals by one microorganism that is harmful to another.Chromosomes, Bacterial: Structures within the nucleus of bacterial cells consisting of or containing DNA, which carry genetic information essential to the cell.
These bacteria are referred to as multidrug resistant (MDR). Pseudomonas aeruginosa is the most common MDR Gram-negative ... Resistant bacteria are spread in much the same ways as any communicable disease. Proper hand washing, sterile technique for ... Empiric antibiotics should take into account both the risk factors a particular individual has for resistant bacteria as well ... Prevention of VAP involves limiting exposure to resistant bacteria, discontinuing mechanical ventilation as soon as possible, ...
It is not active against MRSA, ampicillin-resistant enterococci, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, or Acinetobacter species. Ertapenem ... are broadly active antibacterials that are used for infections caused by difficult to treat or multidrug-resistant bacteria ( ... not against Pseudomonas aeruginosa), and in that its extended serum half-life allows it to be administered once every 24 hours ... Methicillin-resistant staphylococci and Enterococcus spp. are resistant to ertapenem. Aerobic and facultative gram-negative ...
Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Xanthomonas maltophilia. Gram positive bacteria it was inactive against include Staphylococcus ... epidermidis and methicillin-resistant Streptococcus aureus. In this trial, bacteria were considered susceptible if 90% or more ... A 1992 study conducted in vitro susceptibility studies for cefodizime and found that gram negative bacteria with consistent ... In vitro susceptible gram positive bacteria include: methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus, and Streptococcus agalactiae ...
... has strong activity against susceptible Gram-negative bacteria, including Pseudomonas aeruginosa. It is resistant to ... is an antibiotic used primarily to treat infections caused by gram-negative bacteria such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa. This may ... aeruginosa has been suggested. Acinetobacter anitratus, Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Proteus mirabilis are ... "Synergy with aztreonam and arbekacin or tobramycin against Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolated from blood". J Antimicrob Chemother ...
... including Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Gram-positive bacteria. Bacteroides fragilis, enterococci, Pseudomonas spp. and ... staphylococci are resistant to cefpirome sulfate, and some Haemophilus spp. and pneumococci have developed resistance to it to ... Cefpirome is considered highly active against Gram-negative bacteria, ...
These factors increase the activity of cefepime against otherwise resistant organisms including Pseudomonas aeruginosa and ... Some of these bacteria include Pseudomonas, Escherichia, and Streptococcus species. The following represents MIC susceptibility ... Cefepime has good activity against important pathogens including Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus, and multiple ... 128 μg/ml Pseudomonas aeruginosa: 0.06 - >256 μg/ml Streptococcus pneumoniae: ≤0.007 - >8 μg/ml The combination of the syn- ...
Typical uses are for infections caused by strains of multiple drug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa or carbapenemase-producing ... Gram-negative bacteria can develop resistance to polymyxins through various modifications of the LPS structure that inhibit the ... Polymyxins are a group of cyclic non-ribosomal polypeptide (NRPs) which are biosynthesized by bacteria belonging to the genus ... After binding to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria, polymyxins disrupt both the outer ...
When these patients develop a hospital-acquired pneumonia, more hardy bacteria like Pseudomonas aeruginosa are potentially ... However, many bacteria are known to be resistant to several classes of antibiotics, and treatment is not so straightforward. ... Small wafers containing antibiotics are placed onto a plate upon which bacteria are growing. If the bacteria are sensitive to ... Some antibiotics actually kill the bacteria (bactericidal), whereas others merely prevent the bacteria from multiplying ( ...
... is a β-lactamase-resistant penicillin. It is not active against Gram-positive bacteria or bacteria with altered ... Temocillin has no useful activity against Acinetobacter species or Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Its primary use is against ... It is used primarily for the treatment of multiple drug-resistant, Gram-negative bacteria. It is a carboxypenicillin. ... Temocillin is a β-lactamase-resistant penicillin introduced by Beecham, marketed by Eumedica Pharmaceuticals as Negaban. ...
Infections caused by the non-fermenting gram-negative bacteria Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Acinetobacter baumanni are most ... and efflux pumps make Pseudomonas resistant to most beta lactams. The clinical efficacy of carbapenems in Pseudomonas infection ... Morita Y, Tomida J, Kawamura Y (2014). "Responses of Pseudomonas aeruginosa to antimicrobials". Front Microbiol. 4: 422. doi: ... Imipenem, doripenem, and meropenem also exhibit good activity against most strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Acinetobacter ...
... is active against a number of gentamicin-resistant Gram-negative bacteria but is less active against Pseudomonas aeruginosa ... These antibiotics have the ability to kill a wide variety of bacteria. Netilmicin is not absorbed from the gut and is therefore ... It is only used in the treatment of serious infections particularly those resistant to gentamicin. Available dosage forms ...
Currently bacteria like Enterobacter aerogenes, Morganella morganii and Pseudomonas aeruginosa are resistant to cefprozil, ... Some bacteria like Brucella abortus, Moraxella catarrhalis and Streptococcus pneumoniae have developed resistance towards ...
... increases the activity of ceftazidime against otherwise resistant Gram-negative organisms including Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The ... It is in the third-generation cephalosporin family of medications and works by interfering with the bacteria's cell wall. ... Ceftazidime is one of the few in this class with activity against Pseudomonas. It is not active against methicillin-resistant ... Labeled indications include the treatment of patients with: Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections other Gram-negative, aerobic ...
Dvorsky, George (13 September 2017). "Alarming Study Indicates Why Certain Bacteria Are More Resistant to Drugs in Space". ... April 29, 2013). "Spaceflight Promotes Biofilm Formation by Pseudomonas aeruginosa". PLOS One. 8 (4): e6237. Bibcode:2013PLoSO ... Antibiotics only work for bacteria and do not affect viruses. Antibiotics work by slowing down the multiplication of bacteria ... bacteria were found to be more resistant to antibiotics and to thrive in the near-weightlessness of space. Microorganisms have ...
Dvorsky, George (13 September 2017). "Alarming Study Indicates Why Certain Bacteria Are More Resistant to Drugs in Space". ... April 29, 2013). "Spaceflight Promotes Biofilm Formation by Pseudomonas aeruginosa". PLOS ONE. 8 (4): e6237. Bibcode:2013PLoSO ... bacteria were found to be more resistant to antibiotics and to thrive in the near-weightlessness of space. Microorganisms have ... A 2006 Space Shuttle experiment found that Salmonella typhimurium, a bacterium that can cause food poisoning, became more ...
The ureidopenicillins are a group of penicillins which are active against Pseudomonas aeruginosa. There are three ... Ureidopenicillins are not resistant to beta-lactamases. They are used parenterally, and are particularly indicated in ... infections caused by Gram-negative bacteria. "Mayo Clinic Proceedings". Retrieved 2008-12-26. [dead link]. ...
It is less active than ciprofloxacin against Gram-negative bacteria, especially Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and lacks the anti- ... and Pseudomonas aeruginosa), Gram positive (methicillin-sensitive but not methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, ... especially Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Levofloxacin is available in tablet form, injection, and oral solution. Package inserts ... levofloxacin exhibits greater activity towards Gram-positive bacteria but lesser activity toward Gram-negative bacteria, ...
Klebsiella and Pseudomonas aeruginosa are resistant to it. Some E. coli and most clinical strains of Staphylococcus aureus have ... Amoxicillin is susceptible to degradation by β-lactamase-producing bacteria, which are resistant to most β-lactam antibiotics, ... Gram negative bacteria are not generally susceptible to Beta-lactam antibiotics. It has two ionizable groups in the ... Amoxicillin attaches to the cell wall of susceptible bacteria and results in their death. It also is a bactericidal compound. ...
It remains one of the last-resort antibiotics for multidrug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Klebsiella pneumoniae, and ... As multi-drug resistant bacteria became more prevalent in the 1990s, colistin started to get a second look as an emergency ... "In vitro interaction of colistin and rifampin on multidrug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa". J Chemother. 15 (4): 235-8. doi: ... With respect to Pseudomonas aeruginosa, colistimethate is the inactive prodrug of colistin. The two drugs are not ...
... and rates of multi drug resistant pathogens such as Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa were not as high as seen ... Dental plaque might also be a reservoir for bacteria in HCAP. Bacteria have been the most commonly isolated pathogens, although ... 5%). In the ICU results were S. aureus (17.4%), Pseudomonas aeruginosa (17.4%), Klebsiella pneumoniae and Enterobacter spp. ( ... and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and less Streptococcus pneumoniae and Haemophilus influenzae. In European and Asian studies, the ...
... methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), Staphylococcus, Enterobacter aerogenes, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The EPA ... of the bacteria within two hours; Kill more than 99.9% of the bacteria within two hours, and continue to kill 99% of the ... Pseudomonas aeruginosa Salmonella enteritidis These and many other damaging contaminants can infiltrate critical areas in a ... "TouchSurfaces Clinical Trials: Bacteria". The Institute of Environmental Sciences and Technology (IEST) Cleanrooms in Ireland ...
Oritavancin Tedizolid Telavancin Tigecycline Antibiotics that cover Pseudomonas aeruginosa: Aminoglycosides Carbapenems ... Timeline of antibiotics, listed by year of introduction Pathogenic bacteria Note: Malaria is caused by a protist and not a ... Antibiotics that cover methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA): Vancomycin Ceftobiprole(5th generation) Ceftaroline ... Bactericidals kill bacteria directly, whereas bacteriostatics prevent them from dividing. However, these classifications are ...
It has a broad spectrum of activity including many multi-drug resistant strains of bacteria. Phase III studies in complicated ... eravacylcine is poorly active against Pseudomonas aeruginosa with and MIC90 = 16 mcg/mL (range 0.06-64 mcg/mL). Eravacycline ... including multi-drug resistant strains, such as methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and carbapenem-resistant ... including vancomycin resistant strains) Non-lactose fermenting Gram-negative bacteria Acinetobacter baumannii Stenotrophomonas ...
... as a treatment for multidrug-resistant Gram-negative bacterial infections such as multidrug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa ... It is primarily used for the treatment of infections caused by multi-resistant bacteria including methicillin-resistant ... another novel agent for treating infections due to methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and multidrug-resistant Gram- ... Arbekacin is approved for the treatment of pneumonia and sepsis caused by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). ...
... worms are more resistant to infection with the pathogenic bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa [21], which is a common bacterium in ... Tan MW, Mahajan-Miklos S, Ausubel FM (1999). "Killing of Caenorhabditis elegans by Pseudomonas aeruginosa used to model ... After death C. elegans is then used as a food source for the bacteria. Only larvae in the L4 stage seem to be able to escape by ... Bacteria can help the host to fight against pathogens either by directly stimulating the immune response or by competing with ...
Rates of asymptomatic bacteria in the urine among men over 75 are between 7-10%.[10] Asymptomatic bacteria in the urine occurs ... Pseudomonas (11%), the fungal pathogen Candida albicans (9%), and Enterococcus (7%) among others.[6][24][25] Urinary tract ... "Antimicrobial-resistant pathogens associated with healthcare-associated infections: summary of data reported to the National ... The most common cause of infection is Escherichia coli, though other bacteria or fungi may rarely be the cause.[2] Risk factors ...
Pseudomonas aeruginosa-derived rhamnolipids and other detergents modulate colony morphotype and motility in the Burkholderia ... Burkholderia cepacia complex infections: More complex than the bacterium name suggest. J Infect 77:166-170. Link to the article ... A case of pan-resistant Burkholderia cepacia complex bacteremic pneumonia, after lung transplantation treated with a targeted ... Genome mining identifies cepacin as a plant-protective metabolite of the biopesticidal bacterium Burkholderia ambifaria. Nat ...
Methicillin-resistant bacteria, MRSA (methicillin-resistant Stapylococcus aureas), Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus ... Medical-Grade Honey and Antibiotic-Resistant Bacteria.. Posted on November 25, 2008. by Dr. Gary Pack ... Miscellaneous: Antibacterial, Antimicrobial, Aspergillus mold, Bacteria, Candida albicans, Escherichia coli, Proteus mirabilis ... KEY WORDS: Antibacterial, Antifungal, Athletes foot, Bacteria, Candida albicans, Ciprofloxacin, Dioscorea pentaphylla (yam ...
Summary Pharmaceutical and Healthcare disease pipeline guide Resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa Infections - Pipeline Review, H1 ... Magnetically Guided Bacteria Move Confidently Within Strong Currents, May Soon Deliver Drugs Inside Body. TetraGraph Monitors ... Resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa Infections - Drug Profiles. Biologic for Multi-Drug Resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa ... Resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa Infections - Overview. Resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa Infections - Therapeutics Development ...
Pseudomonas Aeruginosa. Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a common bacteria found in soil, water and on the skin and has been ... Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus Aureus. One of the most serious forms of bacteria, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus ... Pseudomonas aeruginosa that live on a mascara wand that can nick the eye or penetrate into the soft tissues or membranes of the ... Some strains of this bacteria are resistant to antibiotic treatment and can severely affect the intestines if left untreated. ...
CDC Modeling Predicts Growth of Drug-resistant Infections and C. difficile. *Lethal, Drug-resistant Bacteria Spreading in U.S. ... Bacteria are constantly finding new ways to avoid the effects of antibiotics. For example, some Pseudomonas can produce enzymes ... Carbapenem antibiotics are typically reserved to treat multidrug-resistant bacterial infections, so when bacteria develop ... Imipenemase (IMP): A less common carbapenemase in the United States but concerning because it can be resistant to even more ...
... there has been debate regarding the usefulness of PFGE for evaluating the long-term global epidemiology of this bacterium. The ... Most Multidrug-Resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa Isolates from Hospitals in Eastern France Belong to a Few Clonal Types Pascal ... Multidrug-resistant epidemic clones among bloodstream isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in the Czech Republic. Res. Microbiol. ... Most Multidrug-Resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa Isolates from Hospitals in Eastern France Belong to a Few Clonal Types ...
We investigated 16S rRNA methyltransferases in 38 blaNDM-1-positive Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates and found RmtC in 3 ... Rapid Spread and Control of Multidrug-Resistant Gram-Negative Bacteria in COVID-19 Patient Care Units Bedaquiline for ... Discriminatory power of three DNA-based typing techniques for Pseudomonas aeruginosa. J Clin Microbiol. 1995;33:528-34 .PubMed ... Further, spread of multidrug-resistant P. aeruginosa strains expressing RmtC with and without an intact ISEcp1 element and NDM- ...
We investigated 16S rRNA methyltransferases in 38 blaNDM-1-positive Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates and found RmtC in 3 ... Methylation of 16S rRNA makes bacteria highly resistant to aminoglycosides (2). Increasing instances are reported of 16S rRNA ... Discriminatory power of three DNA-based typing techniques for Pseudomonas aeruginosa. J Clin Microbiol. 1995;33:528-34 .PubMed ... Further, spread of multidrug-resistant P. aeruginosa strains expressing RmtC with and without an intact ISEcp1 element and NDM- ...
Bacteria can acquire an accessory genome through the horizontal transfer of genetic elements from non-parental lineages. This ... drug resistant ocular isolate of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PA34.". Bacteria can acquire an accessory genome through the horizontal ... Accessory genome of the multi-drug resistant ocular isolate of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PA34.. 08:00 EDT 15th April 2019 , ... MRSA (methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus) MRSA (methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus) is a family of bacteria ...
"Increasing prevalence of imipenem-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa and molecular typing of metallo-β-lactamase producers in a ... This bacterium is often resistant to many antimicrobial agents. The cause of resistance can be efflux pumps, decreased outer ... PCR Reaction for Confirmation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Strains (oprL Gene). PCR reaction for identification of P. aeruginosa ... aeruginosa in Iran. Production of MBLs was determined both by E-test and PCR method. Among 41 imipenem resistant P. aeruginosa ...
Many strains are antibiotic-resistant and produce biofilms. A biofilm is a colony of bacteria that forms a coating on a surface ... P. aeruginosa causes skin infections, urinary tract infections and septicaemia. It produces a blue-green pigment, pyocyanin, ... Common places for biofilms of P. aeruginosa to develop are on contact lenses, where they can cause eye infections, on catheters ... Pseudomonas aeruginosa bacteria inside biofilm, computer illustration. This is a Gram-negative, aerobic, enteric, rod ...
Sometimes doctors have difficulty selecting the proper antibiotics, as the bacteria... ... Because bacteria cause Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections, doctors treat them with antibiotics, reports WebMD. ... Multi-drug resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections are sometimes fatal to critical care patients. People using swimming ... Because bacteria cause Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections, doctors treat them with antibiotics, reports WebMD. Sometimes doctors ...
Medical-grade honey kills antibiotic-resistant bacteria in vitro and eradicates skin colonization. Clin Infect Dis. 2008 Jun 1; ... Pseudomonas aeruginosa *↑ Balcht, Aldona & Smith, Raymond. Pseudomonas Aeruginosa: Infections and Treatment. Informa Health ... Pseudomonas aeruginosa (o bacil piociànic, bacil del pus blau, bacil del pus verd) és un bacteri comú que causa malalties en ... Rahme LG, Tan MW, Le L, et al. «Use of model plant hosts to identify Pseudomonas aeruginosa virulence factors». Proc. Natl. ...
Pseudomonas aeruginosa; Salmonella enterica; Staphylococcus epidermidis; Proteus mirabilis; Vancomycin Resistant Enterococcus ... It also kills 99.9 percent of bacteria, and when used as directed, is effective against 16 types of bacteria providing a ... Before Offering Your Hotel Guests a Seat, Consider That Your Plush Chairs or Loveseats May Be Teeming With Bacteria New Febreze ... Until now there has not been a soft surface solution that kills 99.9 percent of bacteria and provides odor eliminating ...
MG50 Finding of gram negative bacteria resistant to antimicrobial drugs. H00313 Multidrug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa ... H00313 Multidrug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection. Human diseases in ICD-11 classification [BR:br08403]. 21 Symptoms ... Complete genome sequence of highly multidrug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa NCGM2.S1, a representative strain of a cluster ... Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic pathogen that may cause severe invasive diseases in critically ill patients. In the ...
Evaluation of colistin as an agent against multi-resistant Gram-negative bacteria. Int. J. Antimicrob. Agents. 25:11-25. ... Visualization of two distinctly different subpopulations in monoclonal Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms.P. aeruginosa often ... Biofilm formation by Pseudomonas aeruginosa wild type, flagella and type IV pili mutants. Mol. Microbiol. 48:1511-1524. ... Pseudomonas aeruginosa displays multiple phenotypes during development as a biofilm. J. Bacteriol. 184:1140-1154. ...
... colonized by opportunistic Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PA), antibiotics fail to eradicate the infecting multidrug-resistant (MDR) ... naturally hosted by bacteria. Although the only phage types used in therapy, lytic phages, lyse PA aggregated in biofilm matrix ... naturally hosted by bacteria. Although the only phage types used in therapy, lytic phages, lyse PA aggregated in biofilm matrix ... also involving mucoid and non-mucoid multidrug-resistant PA in CF, and overcome problems in Western international regulations, ...
The deaths of two patients at a Los Angeles hospital are linked to the deadly bacteria CRE, a spokeswoman for the UCLA Health ... Photos: Antibiotic-resistant bacteria. Multi drug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Hide Caption. 10 of 17 ... Drug-resistant bacteria linked to two deaths at UCLA hospital. By Steve Almasy, CNN ... Some CRE bacteria can resist most antibiotics, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says on its website. The bacteria ...
The production of rhamnolipid biosurfactant by Pseudomonas aeruginosa growing in biofilms.. Closing date: Tuesday 1 September ... Harnessing the communication machinery of antibiotic resistant, gastrointestinal bacteria to develop novel pathogen detection ... Plasmid-free bacteria produce the pheromones and resistance gene transfer is initiated by binding of pheromones to cell surface ... However, multi-drug resistant enterococcal infections are now a leading cause of Healthcare Associated Infection (HAI). A ...
... notably carried out by the Gram-negative bacteria species: Pseudomonas aeruginosa or Escherichia coli. But the last Gram- ATB ... New ATB with genuine mode of action to target current resistant types are out of scope. In this context, MDR Gram- infections ... Evaluation of phage therapy for the treatment of Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa burn wound infections (Phase I-II ... Evaluation of phage therapy for the treatment of Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa burn wound infections (Phase I-II ...
Metallo-β-lactamases (MBL) producing P. aeruginosa are known to be resistant to almost the entire anti-pseudomonas agent via ... Key words: Metallo-β-lactamases, multi-drug resistance, phenotyping method, Pseudomonas aeruginosa. ... aeruginosa. Among 52 various sources of water samples, 13 water samples had positive P. aeruginosa isolates. 6 out of 13 ... These P. aeruginosa isolates were processed to these phenotypic methods, Hodge test which is used to detect the carbapenemase ...
... display excellent activity against multidrug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa (MDR-PA) and other antibiotics-resistant bacteria ... multiple guanidinium groups against antibiotics-resistant bacteria should be noted. The synthesized polyoctamethylene ... Pseudomonas aeruginosa; membrane polymeric monoguanidine; antibiotics resistant; Pseudomonas aeruginosa; membrane ... display excellent activity against multidrug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa (MDR-PA) and other antibiotics-resistant bacteria ...
A new peptide inspired by the blood of Komodo dragons killed two strains of antibiotic-resistant bacteria and hastened wound- ... the team tested DRGN-1 on mice with wounds that were infected with two strains of antibiotic-resistant bacteria: Pseudomonas ... aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus. The synthetic peptide attacked and destroyed the biofilm of the wounds, before killing ... "Synthetic germ-fighter peptides are a new approach to potentially defeat bacteria that have grown resistant to conventional ...
Efficacy of intraventricular amikacin treatment in pan-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa postsurgical meningitis. ... Dual colors fluorescent timer enables detection of growth-arrested pathogenic bacterium.. ACS Infect Dis 2018. ... With the widespread use of antibiotics an increase in the incidence of blood stream invasion by Pseudomonas aeruginosa has been ... Bacterial Endocarditis Due to Pseudomonas Aeruginosa KENNETH M. LLOYD II, M.D.; JAMES N. GORDON, M.D. ...
  • According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), every year, at least 2 million people in the U.S. become infected with drug-resistant bacteria, and at least 23,000 deaths occur as a direct result. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • The researchers behind the new study, from Winston-Salem State University in the US and Universiti Malaysia Sarawak in Malaysia, have found that adding similar, but smaller polycationic molecules onto a new kind of material called carbon nanodots makes them even better at killing drug-resistant bacteria. (eurekalert.org)
  • We urgently need new and better antimicrobial materials if we are to tackle drug-resistant bacteria," said Dr Maria Ngu-Schwemlein, lead author of the study from Winston-Salem State University. (eurekalert.org)
  • But the emergence of drug-resistant bacteria is reversing the miracles of these medicines, with drug choices becoming increasingly limited, expensive, and, in some cases, nonexistent. (sci-tech-today.com)
  • Iino R, Matsumoto Y, Nishino K, Yamaguchi A, Noji H (2013) Design of a large-scale femtoliter droplet array for single cell analysis of drug-tolerant and drug-resistant bacteria. (springer.com)
  • 4 Utahns who had surgery in Mexico are infected by drug-resistant bacteria. (sltrib.com)
  • To reduce the development of drug-resistant bacteria and maintain the effectiveness of ZOSYN and other antibacterial drugs, ZOSYN should be used only to treat or prevent infections that are proven or strongly suspected to be caused by bacteria. (rxlist.com)
  • What is happening now is but a throwback to that era when medical science had to cope without the drugs to treat or prevent infections caused by bacteria, parasites, viruses and fungi. (punchng.com)
  • Reports on either bacteria , fungi , microbial parasites or viruses can be submitted. (formatex.org)
  • Emerging and re-emerging bacteria and fungi in humans, animals, and plants. (formatex.org)
  • Previous studies have provided evidence of bahera's ability to improve blood sugar, relieve pain, cure ulcers, improve blood pressure, and eliminate fungi and bacteria. (naturalnews.com)
  • The antibacterial activity of clove oil & its extract (50% ethanol) was tested against ten bacteria (seven Gram positive & three Gram negative) & seven fungi by agar well diffusion assays. (ispub.com)
  • The clove oil was found to be better antagonistic agent as compared to its extract counterpart by inhibiting both bacteria & fungi. (ispub.com)
  • The bacteria and fungi were cultured on nutrient agar medium and Sabouraud's dextrose agar (SDA) medium (Hi-Media, Mumbai, India), respectively. (ispub.com)
  • Iino R., Sakakihara S., Matsumoto Y., Nishino K. (2018) Large-Scale Femtoliter Droplet Array for Single Cell Efflux Assay of Bacteria. (springer.com)
  • Nearly half of Healthcare surfaces alone are soft surfaces, harboring harmful bacteria. (businesswire.com)
  • The EPA-registered formula is ideal for healthcare, hospitality, educational, and even office settings that have public spaces and high concentrations of people and are filled with 'un-washable' soft surfaces like sofas and chairs, rugs, duvets, bedspreads, and decorative pillows - all of which can harbor harmful bacteria. (businesswire.com)
  • According to van Hoek and team, the reptile rarely becomes ill, despite eating decaying flesh and possessing saliva that is rich in harmful bacteria. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • Vital Technologies, Inc. produces green and environmentally friendly products to help protect schools, hospitals, daycare centers, cruise ships and homes from harmful bacteria and microbials. (prlog.org)
  • Active steps should be taken to limit the spread of harmful bacteria, as nosocomial infections present a known risk to patients. (orfit.com)
  • Infections caused by carbapenem-resistant P. aeruginosa (CRPA) are a matter of concern because they are associated with a 3-fold higher mortality rate, a 9-fold higher rate of secondary bacteremia, a 2-fold increase in the duration of hospital stay, and a considerable increase in health care costs ( 3 ). (asm.org)
  • It also kills 99.9 percent of bacteria, and when used as directed, is effective against 16 types of bacteria providing a sanitizing solution for high-touch, but little washed soft surfaces. (businesswire.com)
  • Through changes in their molecular structure it was possible to improve the active ingredients so that, for example, they were effective against even more types of bacteria or were better able to reach the affected tissue. (vfa.de)
  • That's because years of testing in standard laboratory media - the nutrient broth that helps bacteria grow - concluded that azithromycin doesn't kill these types of bacteria. (ucsd.edu)
  • Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections are most dangerous at hospitals, where patients already have weakened immune systems from sickness and treatments, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. (reference.com)
  • The San Diego County Health and Human Services Agency this week alerted the medical community that four patients have popped up in local hospitals with drug-resistant superbug infections of the same type that prompted the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention to issue a travel advisory in early January. (latimes.com)
  • These bacteria have become so hard to treat that the Centers for Disease Control deemed it a serious threat to the nation. (wvu.edu)