A branch of the abdominal aorta which supplies the kidneys, adrenal glands and ureters.
Narrowing or occlusion of the RENAL ARTERY or arteries. It is due usually to ATHEROSCLEROSIS; FIBROMUSCULAR DYSPLASIA; THROMBOSIS; EMBOLISM, or external pressure. The reduced renal perfusion can lead to renovascular hypertension (HYPERTENSION, RENOVASCULAR).
The vessels carrying blood away from the heart.
Hypertension due to RENAL ARTERY OBSTRUCTION or compression.
The short wide vessel arising from the conus arteriosus of the right ventricle and conveying unaerated blood to the lungs.
Either of the two principal arteries on both sides of the neck that supply blood to the head and neck; each divides into two branches, the internal carotid artery and the external carotid artery.
The main artery of the thigh, a continuation of the external iliac artery.
Arteries which arise from the abdominal aorta and distribute to most of the intestines.
Radiography of blood vessels after injection of a contrast medium.
Either of two large arteries originating from the abdominal aorta; they supply blood to the pelvis, abdominal wall and legs.
The arterial blood vessels supplying the CEREBRUM.
Short thick veins which return blood from the kidneys to the vena cava.
The artery formed by the union of the right and left vertebral arteries; it runs from the lower to the upper border of the pons, where it bifurcates into the two posterior cerebral arteries.
Use of a balloon catheter for dilation of an occluded artery. It is used in treatment of arterial occlusive diseases, including renal artery stenosis and arterial occlusions in the leg. For the specific technique of BALLOON DILATION in coronary arteries, ANGIOPLASTY, BALLOON, CORONARY is available.
Body organ that filters blood for the secretion of URINE and that regulates ion concentrations.
Devices that provide support for tubular structures that are being anastomosed or for body cavities during skin grafting.
Pathological outpouching or sac-like dilatation in the wall of any blood vessel (ARTERIES or VEINS) or the heart (HEART ANEURYSM). It indicates a thin and weakened area in the wall which may later rupture. Aneurysms are classified by location, etiology, or other characteristics.
Persistent high BLOOD PRESSURE due to KIDNEY DISEASES, such as those involving the renal parenchyma, the renal vasculature, or tumors that secrete RENIN.
The aorta from the DIAPHRAGM to the bifurcation into the right and left common iliac arteries.
The arterial trunk that arises from the abdominal aorta and after a short course divides into the left gastric, common hepatic and splenic arteries.
The circulation of the BLOOD through the vessels of the KIDNEY.
The first branch of the SUBCLAVIAN ARTERY with distribution to muscles of the NECK; VERTEBRAE; SPINAL CORD; CEREBELLUM; and interior of the CEREBRUM.
Surgical therapy of ischemic coronary artery disease achieved by grafting a section of saphenous vein, internal mammary artery, or other substitute between the aorta and the obstructed coronary artery distal to the obstructive lesion.
A large vessel supplying the whole length of the small intestine except the superior part of the duodenum. It also supplies the cecum and the ascending part of the colon and about half the transverse part of the colon. It arises from the anterior surface of the aorta below the celiac artery at the level of the first lumbar vertebra.
The direct continuation of the brachial trunk, originating at the bifurcation of the brachial artery opposite the neck of the radius. Its branches may be divided into three groups corresponding to the three regions in which the vessel is situated, the forearm, wrist, and hand.
Arteries originating from the subclavian or axillary arteries and distributing to the anterior thoracic wall, mediastinal structures, diaphragm, pectoral muscles and mammary gland.
The largest branch of the celiac trunk with distribution to the spleen, pancreas, stomach and greater omentum.
Reconstruction or repair of a blood vessel, which includes the widening of a pathological narrowing of an artery or vein by the removal of atheromatous plaque material and/or the endothelial lining as well, or by dilatation (BALLOON ANGIOPLASTY) to compress an ATHEROMA. Except for ENDARTERECTOMY, usually these procedures are performed via catheterization as minimally invasive ENDOVASCULAR PROCEDURES.
Branch of the common carotid artery which supplies the anterior part of the brain, the eye and its appendages, the forehead and nose.
Artery arising from the brachiocephalic trunk on the right side and from the arch of the aorta on the left side. It distributes to the neck, thoracic wall, spinal cord, brain, meninges, and upper limb.
A branch of the celiac artery that distributes to the stomach, pancreas, duodenum, liver, gallbladder, and greater omentum.
PRESSURE of the BLOOD on the ARTERIES and other BLOOD VESSELS.
Evaluation undertaken to assess the results or consequences of management and procedures used in combating disease in order to determine the efficacy, effectiveness, safety, and practicability of these interventions in individual cases or series.
Pathological conditions involving the CAROTID ARTERIES, including the common, internal, and external carotid arteries. ATHEROSCLEROSIS and TRAUMA are relatively frequent causes of carotid artery pathology.
Non-invasive method of vascular imaging and determination of internal anatomy without injection of contrast media or radiation exposure. The technique is used especially in CEREBRAL ANGIOGRAPHY as well as for studies of other vascular structures.
The continuation of the axillary artery; it branches into the radial and ulnar arteries.
Tomography using x-ray transmission and a computer algorithm to reconstruct the image.
Excision of kidney.
Graphic tracing over a time period of radioactivity measured externally over the kidneys following intravenous injection of a radionuclide which is taken up and excreted by the kidneys.
Radiographic visualization of the aorta and its branches by injection of contrast media, using percutaneous puncture or catheterization procedures.
A method of delineating blood vessels by subtracting a tissue background image from an image of tissue plus intravascular contrast material that attenuates the X-ray photons. The background image is determined from a digitized image taken a few moments before injection of the contrast material. The resulting angiogram is a high-contrast image of the vessel. This subtraction technique allows extraction of a high-intensity signal from the superimposed background information. The image is thus the result of the differential absorption of X-rays by different tissues.
The veins and arteries of the HEART.
Surgical insertion of BLOOD VESSEL PROSTHESES to repair injured or diseased blood vessels.
The two principal arteries supplying the structures of the head and neck. They ascend in the neck, one on each side, and at the level of the upper border of the thyroid cartilage, each divides into two branches, the external (CAROTID ARTERY, EXTERNAL) and internal (CAROTID ARTERY, INTERNAL) carotid arteries.
An abnormal balloon- or sac-like dilatation in the wall of the ABDOMINAL AORTA which gives rise to the visceral, the parietal, and the terminal (iliac) branches below the aortic hiatus at the diaphragm.
The physiological narrowing of BLOOD VESSELS by contraction of the VASCULAR SMOOTH MUSCLE.
An iodine-containing compound used in pyelography as a radiopaque medium. If labeled with radioiodine, it can be used for studies of renal function.
Ultrasonography applying the Doppler effect combined with real-time imaging. The real-time image is created by rapid movement of the ultrasound beam. A powerful advantage of this technique is the ability to estimate the velocity of flow from the Doppler shift frequency.
Operative procedures for the treatment of vascular disorders.
The physiological widening of BLOOD VESSELS by relaxing the underlying VASCULAR SMOOTH MUSCLE.
Thickening and loss of elasticity of the walls of ARTERIES of all sizes. There are many forms classified by the types of lesions and arteries involved, such as ATHEROSCLEROSIS with fatty lesions in the ARTERIAL INTIMA of medium and large muscular arteries.
Pathological processes which result in the partial or complete obstruction of ARTERIES. They are characterized by greatly reduced or absence of blood flow through these vessels. They are also known as arterial insufficiency.
Artery originating from the internal carotid artery and distributing to the eye, orbit and adjacent facial structures.
Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.
The domestic dog, Canis familiaris, comprising about 400 breeds, of the carnivore family CANIDAE. They are worldwide in distribution and live in association with people. (Walker's Mammals of the World, 5th ed, p1065)
The degree to which BLOOD VESSELS are not blocked or obstructed.
The nonstriated involuntary muscle tissue of blood vessels.
Device constructed of either synthetic or biological material that is used for the repair of injured or diseased blood vessels.
Studies used to test etiologic hypotheses in which inferences about an exposure to putative causal factors are derived from data relating to characteristics of persons under study or to events or experiences in their past. The essential feature is that some of the persons under study have the disease or outcome of interest and their characteristics are compared with those of unaffected persons.
Specialized arterial vessels in the umbilical cord. They carry waste and deoxygenated blood from the FETUS to the mother via the PLACENTA. In humans, there are usually two umbilical arteries but sometimes one.
The largest of the cerebral arteries. It trifurcates into temporal, frontal, and parietal branches supplying blood to most of the parenchyma of these lobes in the CEREBRAL CORTEX. These are the areas involved in motor, sensory, and speech activities.
A highly specific (Leu-Leu) endopeptidase that generates ANGIOTENSIN I from its precursor ANGIOTENSINOGEN, leading to a cascade of reactions which elevate BLOOD PRESSURE and increase sodium retention by the kidney in the RENIN-ANGIOTENSIN SYSTEM. The enzyme was formerly listed as EC 3.4.99.19.
A potent and specific inhibitor of PEPTIDYL-DIPEPTIDASE A. It blocks the conversion of ANGIOTENSIN I to ANGIOTENSIN II, a vasoconstrictor and important regulator of arterial blood pressure. Captopril acts to suppress the RENIN-ANGIOTENSIN SYSTEM and inhibits pressure responses to exogenous angiotensin.
Arteries originating from the subclavian or axillary arteries and distributing to the anterior thoracic wall, mediastinal structures, diaphragm, pectoral muscles, mammary gland and the axillary aspect of the chest wall.
A technetium imaging agent used in renal scintigraphy, computed tomography, lung ventilation imaging, gastrointestinal scintigraphy, and many other procedures which employ radionuclide imaging agents.
Single pavement layer of cells which line the luminal surface of the entire vascular system and regulate the transport of macromolecules and blood components.
Arteries arising from the external carotid or the maxillary artery and distributing to the temporal region.
Ultrasonography applying the Doppler effect, with frequency-shifted ultrasound reflections produced by moving targets (usually red blood cells) in the bloodstream along the ultrasound axis in direct proportion to the velocity of movement of the targets, to determine both direction and velocity of blood flow. (Stedman, 25th ed)
Left bronchial arteries arise from the thoracic aorta, the right from the first aortic intercostal or the upper left bronchial artery; they supply the bronchi and the lower trachea.
Studies in which individuals or populations are followed to assess the outcome of exposures, procedures, or effects of a characteristic, e.g., occurrence of disease.
Persistently high systemic arterial BLOOD PRESSURE. Based on multiple readings (BLOOD PRESSURE DETERMINATION), hypertension is currently defined as when SYSTOLIC PRESSURE is consistently greater than 140 mm Hg or when DIASTOLIC PRESSURE is consistently 90 mm Hg or more.
Drugs used to cause constriction of the blood vessels.
The continuation of the femoral artery coursing through the popliteal fossa; it divides into the anterior and posterior tibial arteries.
The larger of the two terminal branches of the brachial artery, beginning about one centimeter distal to the bend of the elbow. Like the RADIAL ARTERY, its branches may be divided into three groups corresponding to their locations in the forearm, wrist, and hand.
The volume of water filtered out of plasma through glomerular capillary walls into Bowman's capsules per unit of time. It is considered to be equivalent to INULIN clearance.
Radiography of the vascular system of the heart muscle after injection of a contrast medium.
The flow of BLOOD through or around an organ or region of the body.
A method of hemostasis utilizing various agents such as Gelfoam, silastic, metal, glass, or plastic pellets, autologous clot, fat, and muscle as emboli. It has been used in the treatment of spinal cord and INTRACRANIAL ARTERIOVENOUS MALFORMATIONS, renal arteriovenous fistulas, gastrointestinal bleeding, epistaxis, hypersplenism, certain highly vascular tumors, traumatic rupture of blood vessels, and control of operative hemorrhage.
Drugs used to cause dilation of the blood vessels.
Ultrasonography applying the Doppler effect, with the superposition of flow information as colors on a gray scale in a real-time image. This type of ultrasonography is well-suited to identifying the location of high-velocity flow (such as in a stenosis) or of mapping the extent of flow in a certain region.
A thickening and loss of elasticity of the walls of ARTERIES that occurs with formation of ATHEROSCLEROTIC PLAQUES within the ARTERIAL INTIMA.
A branch arising from the internal iliac artery in females, that supplies blood to the uterus.
The movement and the forces involved in the movement of the blood through the CARDIOVASCULAR SYSTEM.
Pathologic processes that affect patients after a surgical procedure. They may or may not be related to the disease for which the surgery was done, and they may or may not be direct results of the surgery.
A chronic inflammatory process that affects the AORTA and its primary branches, such as the brachiocephalic artery (BRACHIOCEPHALIC TRUNK) and CAROTID ARTERIES. It results in progressive arterial stenosis, occlusion, and aneurysm formation. The pulse in the arm is hard to detect. Patients with aortitis syndrome often exhibit retinopathy.
Branch of the common carotid artery which supplies the exterior of the head, the face, and the greater part of the neck.
Observation of a population for a sufficient number of persons over a sufficient number of years to generate incidence or mortality rates subsequent to the selection of the study group.
The act of constricting.
Damages to the CAROTID ARTERIES caused either by blunt force or penetrating trauma, such as CRANIOCEREBRAL TRAUMA; THORACIC INJURIES; and NECK INJURIES. Damaged carotid arteries can lead to CAROTID ARTERY THROMBOSIS; CAROTID-CAVERNOUS SINUS FISTULA; pseudoaneurysm formation; and INTERNAL CAROTID ARTERY DISSECTION. (From Am J Forensic Med Pathol 1997, 18:251; J Trauma 1994, 37:473)
A hypoperfusion of the BLOOD through an organ or tissue caused by a PATHOLOGIC CONSTRICTION or obstruction of its BLOOD VESSELS, or an absence of BLOOD CIRCULATION.
Any of various animals that constitute the family Suidae and comprise stout-bodied, short-legged omnivorous mammals with thick skin, usually covered with coarse bristles, a rather long mobile snout, and small tail. Included are the genera Babyrousa, Phacochoerus (wart hogs), and Sus, the latter containing the domestic pig (see SUS SCROFA).
An imbalance between myocardial functional requirements and the capacity of the CORONARY VESSELS to supply sufficient blood flow. It is a form of MYOCARDIAL ISCHEMIA (insufficient blood supply to the heart muscle) caused by a decreased capacity of the coronary vessels.
Surgical union or shunt between ducts, tubes or vessels. It may be end-to-end, end-to-side, side-to-end, or side-to-side.
Not an aneurysm but a well-defined collection of blood and CONNECTIVE TISSUE outside the wall of a blood vessel or the heart. It is the containment of a ruptured blood vessel or heart, such as sealing a rupture of the left ventricle. False aneurysm is formed by organized THROMBUS and HEMATOMA in surrounding tissue.
Laboratory tests used to evaluate how well the kidneys are working through examination of blood and urine.
Minimally invasive procedures, diagnostic or therapeutic, performed within the BLOOD VESSELS. They may be perfomed via ANGIOSCOPY; INTERVENTIONAL MAGNETIC RESONANCE IMAGING; INTERVENTIONAL RADIOGRAPHY; or INTERVENTIONAL ULTRASONOGRAPHY.
The plan and delineation of prostheses in general or a specific prosthesis.
A strain of albino rat used widely for experimental purposes because of its calmness and ease of handling. It was developed by the Sprague-Dawley Animal Company.
Drugs used in the treatment of acute or chronic vascular HYPERTENSION regardless of pharmacological mechanism. Among the antihypertensive agents are DIURETICS; (especially DIURETICS, THIAZIDE); ADRENERGIC BETA-ANTAGONISTS; ADRENERGIC ALPHA-ANTAGONISTS; ANGIOTENSIN-CONVERTING ENZYME INHIBITORS; CALCIUM CHANNEL BLOCKERS; GANGLIONIC BLOCKERS; and VASODILATOR AGENTS.
The artery supplying nearly all the left half of the transverse colon, the whole of the descending colon, the sigmoid colon, and the greater part of the rectum. It is smaller than the superior mesenteric artery (MESENTERIC ARTERY, SUPERIOR) and arises from the aorta above its bifurcation into the common iliac arteries.

The evolution of early fibromuscular lesions hemodynamically induced in the dog renal artery. I. Light and transmission electron microscopy. (1/1299)

In view of the important roles of arterial intimal fibromuscular lesions as precursors of atherosclerotic plaque and occlusive lesions in arterial reconstructions, a model has been developed for the rapid hemodynamic induction of these lesions by anastomosis of the dog right renal artery to the inferior vena cava. Light and transmission electron microscopic observations were made on the arterial shunt after periods of rapid flow ranging form 10 minutes to 2 hours to identify initial factor(s) and evolutionary mechanisms in the etiology of the lesions. The sequence of events included aberrations in ruthenium red staining of the endothelial luminal membrane at 10 minutes, multilayered thickening of the subendothelial basement membrane (BM) at 15 minutes, and initial reorientation and migration of smooth muscle cells (SMC) into the intima along with the appearance of areas of degeneration of the internal elastic lamina (IEL) at 30 minutes. The endothelial cells were still intact in some areas overlying the SMC migration and IEL degeneration, but they were separating from the surface in other such areas. As subendothelium became exposed, some platelet adherence was noted. By 2 hours, the entire wall reaction was fully developed. Initial observations indicate that in the evolution of this hemodynamically induced lesion visible alteration in the endothelial cells is not prerequisite to degeneration of the underlying IEL and reorientation and migration of medial SMC.  (+info)

Prevalence of angiographic atherosclerotic renal artery disease and its relationship to the anatomical extent of peripheral vascular atherosclerosis. (2/1299)

BACKGROUND: Recognition of the possible presence of atherosclerotic renal artery disease (ARAD) is important because of its progressive nature, and because of the potential for precipitating an acute deterioration in renal function by administration of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors. The aim of this study was to identify the prevalence of ARAD in patients undergoing peripheral angiography and its relationship to the extent of their peripheral vascular disease (PVD). METHODS: The reports of the 218 patients who underwent peripheral angiography to investigate PVD in one centre in a calendar year, and in whom it was possible to image the renal arteries, were analysed retrospectively. The presence of atherosclerotic disease in the renal, aortic, iliac, femoral and distal areas was recorded for each patient. RESULTS: The prevalence of ARAD was 79/218 (36.2%). The greater the number of atherosclerotic areas of the arterial tree, the higher the prevalence of ARAD. Patients with aortic disease and bilateral iliac, femoral and distal vessel disease had the highest incidence of ARAD 19/38 (50%). The incidence of ARAD in those with femoral artery atherosclerosis was significantly higher than in those without femoral artery atherosclerosis (42.1% compared with 9.7%, P=0.001 chi2). There was no significant difference in those groups with or without iliac and distal disease. None of the 11 patients with normal femoral and iliac arteries had ARAD. CONCLUSIONS: Renal artery atherosclerosis is a common occurrence in patients with PVD. If extensive PVD is recognized during aortography, a high flush should be considered to examine the renal arteries, if they are not included in the main study.  (+info)

NH2-terminal fragments of the 130 kDa subunit of myosin phosphatase increase the Ca2+ sensitivity of porcine renal artery. (3/1299)

1. The effects of the NH2-terminal fragments of M130, a 130 kDa regulatory subunit of smooth muscle myosin phosphatase, on contraction and myosin light chain phosphorylation were investigated in Triton X-100-permeabilized porcine renal artery. 2. Incubation of the permeabilized fibres with M1301-633 (a fragment containing amino acid residues 1-633) or M13044-633 enhanced the Ca2+-induced contraction and shifted the [Ca2+]i-force relationship to the left (EC50 of Ca2+: 330 nM, control, without fragment; 145 nM, M1301-633; 163 nM, M13044-633). Pre-incubation for 1-3 h was needed for these long constructs. 3. M1301-374, M130304-511 and M130297-374, i.e. relatively short constructs compared with M1301-633 and M13044-633, also induced leftward shifts of the [Ca2+]i-force relationship (EC50 of Ca2+: 65 nM, 72 nM and 180 nM, respectively). However, these required no pre-incubation. 4. Deletion of residues 304-374 from the most potent construct, M1301-374, abolished the Ca2+-sensitizing effect. 5. Wortmannin inhibited the enhancement of contraction induced by M130 fragments when added before contraction was initiated and partially inhibited the effects when added after steady-state contraction. 6. M1301-374 slowed the rate of relaxation in Ca2+-free medium. The time for 50 % relaxation with this fragment was 510 +/- 51 s, compared with 274 +/- 14 s for control. 7. The levels of myosin light chain phosphorylation (22.4 %) and force (34. 5 %) obtained with 300 nM Ca2+ were increased by 3 microM M1301-374 to 35.7 and 92.2 %, respectively. However, M1301-374 had no effect on the phosphorylation-force relationship. 8. In conclusion, the NH2-terminal M130 fragments containing residues 304-374 inhibited myosin phosphatase, increased myosin light chain phosphorylation and increased the Ca2+ sensitivity of the contractile apparatus in permeabilized porcine renal artery.  (+info)

Altered renal hemodynamics and impaired myogenic responses in the fawn-hooded rat. (4/1299)

The present study examined whether an abnormality in the myogenic response of renal arterioles that impairs autoregulation of renal blood flow (RBF) and glomerular capillary pressure (PGC) contributes to the development of renal damage in fawn-hooded hypertensive (FHH) rats. Autoregulation of whole kidney, cortical, and medullary blood flow and PGC were compared in young (12 wk old) FHH and fawn-hooded low blood pressure (FHL) rats in volume-replete and volume-expanded conditions. Baseline RBF, cortical and medullary blood flow, and PGC were significantly greater in FHH than in FHL rats. Autoregulation of renal and cortical blood flow was significantly impaired in FHH rats compared with results obtained in FHL rats. Myogenically mediated autoregulation of PGC was significantly greater in FHL than in FHH rats. PGC rose from 46 +/- 1 to 71 +/- 2 mmHg in response to an increase in renal perfusion pressure from 100 to 150 mmHg in FHH rats, whereas it only increased from 39 +/- 2 to 53 +/- 1 mmHg in FHL rats. Isolated perfused renal interlobular arteries from FHL rats constricted by 10% in response to elevations in transmural pressure from 70 to 120 mmHg. In contrast, the diameter of vessels from FHH rats increased by 15%. These results indicate that the myogenic response of small renal arteries is altered in FHH rats, and this contributes to an impaired autoregulation of renal blood flow and elevations in PGC in this strain.  (+info)

Cyclosporine-induced renal artery smooth muscle contraction is associated with increases in the phosphorylation of specific contractile regulatory proteins. (5/1299)

Cyclosporine A (CSA) is a type 2B phosphatase inhibitor which can induce contraction of renal artery smooth muscle. In this investigation, we examined the phosphorylation events associated with CSA-induced contraction of bovine renal artery smooth muscle. Contractile responses were determined in a muscle bath and the corresponding phosphorylation events were determined with whole cell phosphorylation and two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. CSA-induced contractions were associated with increases in the phosphorylation of the 20 kDa myosin light chains (MLC20) and different isoforms of the small heat shock protein, HSP27. Cyclic nucleotide-dependent relaxation of CSA-induced contractions was associated with increases in the phosphorylation of another small heat shock protein, HSP20, and decreases in the phosphorylation of the MLC20, and some isoforms of HSP27. These data suggest that CSA-induced contraction and relaxation of vascular smooth muscle is associated with increases in the phosphorylation of specific contractile regulatory proteins.  (+info)

Hypotensive response to captopril: a potential pitfall of scintigraphic assessment for renal artery stenosis. (6/1299)

A characteristic pattern seen on captopril renography is described that is due to systemic hypotensive response. Most patients with these findings on captopril renography do not receive renal artery angiograms in our clinic because it is usually recognized. However, this pattern has received little attention in the medical literature and may be misinterpreted as being due to physiologically significant renal artery hypertension. METHODS: Over the last 3 y, renal artery angiograms were performed on three patients with systemic hypotensive response pattern on captopril renography. This allowed a unique opportunity to correlate the results of the captopril renogram with the renal artery angiograms in this patient population. Captopril renography was performed with a glomerular filtration agent, diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid (DTPA), and a tubular agent, o-iodohipurate (OIH). RESULTS: Renal artery angiograms showed no evidence of renal artery stenosis in three patients with systemic hypotensive response pattern on captopril renography. Systemic hypotension on captopril renograms results in preserved uptake of both DTPA and OIH and hyperconcentration in the cortex and collecting system. CONCLUSION: The systemic hypotensive response pattern seen on captopril renography is a distinctive pattern that does not represent physiologically significant renal artery stenosis.  (+info)

The effects of crossing porcine renal artery ostia with various endovascular stents. (7/1299)

OBJECTIVES: To compare the effects of crossing renal artery ostia with various stents. METHODS: The renal artery ostia of 24 large white pigs were covered with a Wallstent (nine ostia), a Palmaz stent (nine ostia) and a Memotherm stent (13 ostia). After an interval of 6-15 weeks, aortography, renal pressure and blood samples were performed and the pigs then sacrificed for histological examination. RESULTS: Histological examination revealed an organised collagen matrix with endothelial cells covering the struts in contact with the aorta. This occurred with all stents but was most organised with the Wallstent. This matrix did not involve the renal artery ostia crossed by Wallstents, but in one Palmaz stent and in 12/13 Memotherm stents, a disorganised acellular matrix caused partial ostial occlusion. There was no mean fall in renal artery pressure but traces were damped in 8/13 cases of partial occlusion. There was a rise in serum creatinine in two cases using the Palmaz stent. CONCLUSIONS: Covering renal arteries with the Wallstent appears to be safe in the short-term. Placement of stents with larger struts across renal arteries will require imaging methods, such as intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) to ensure that the ostia are not obstructed.  (+info)

Inhibition of prostaglandin and nitric oxide synthesis prevents cortisol-induced renal vasodilatation in sheep. (8/1299)

Glucocorticoids increase renal blood flow (RBF) and glomerular filtration rate in many species, but the mechanisms involved are unclear. We investigated whether cortisol-induced renal vasodilatation in conscious sheep depends on interactions with prostaglandins or angiotensin II. Intravenous infusion of cortisol (5 mg/h) for 5 h increased renal conductance (RC) by 1.06 +/- 0.24 ml. min-1. mmHg-1 more than vehicle. During intrarenal infusion of indomethacin (0.25 mg. kg-1. h-1), the cortisol-induced increase in RC (0.28 +/- 0.21 ml. min-1. mmHg-1) was significantly reduced. The cortisol-induced rise in RBF (103 +/- 17 ml/min) was not significantly reduced by indomethacin treatment (76 +/- 9 ml/min). Combined intrarenal infusion of indomethacin (0.25 mg. kg-1. h-1) with Nomega-nitro-L-arginine (2.0 mg. kg-1. h-1), a nitric oxide synthase inhibitor, abolished the cortisol-induced increases in both RC and RBF. Inhibition of angiotensin II synthesis with intravenous captopril (40 mg/h) blocked the renal vasoconstrictor action of angiotensin I but did not inhibit the cortisol-induced increases in RBF and RC. This study provides evidence that nitric oxide and prostaglandins play a role in cortisol-induced renal vasodilatation but indicates that this response is independent of an interaction with angiotensin.  (+info)

Superselective transcatheter renal artery embolization for the treatment of hemorrhage from non-iatrogenic blunt renal trauma: report of 16 clinical cases Dapang Rao,1 Haifeng Yu,2 Haibo Zhu,2 Kaiyuan Yu,2 Xiao Hu,3 Liping Xie11Department of Urology, First Affiliated Hospital, Medical College, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, People's Republic of China; 2Department of Urology, Second Affiliated Hospital of Wenzhou Medical College, Wenzhou, People’s Republic of China; 3Zhejiang University Medical College, Hangzhou, People’s Republic of ChinaObjective: To explore the therapeutic efficacy and outcome of superselective transcatheter renal artery embolization for the treatment of hemorrhage from non-iatrogenic blunt renal trauma (BRT).Methods: Sixteen patients who received superselective transcatheter renal artery embolization for non-iatrogenic BRT hemorrhage between January 2003 and December 2012 were reviewed retrospectively. Spring steel coils with gelatin sponge particles were used to
Renal artery duplex imaging evaluates blood flow velocities and patterns in the aorta and renal arteries. According to the American College of Radiology, Ultrasound using grayscale imaging, Doppler spectral analysis, and color Doppler imaging is a proven and useful procedure for evaluating the renovascular system.. Many patients with hypertension are referred for a renal artery duplex because of their increased risk of renal artery stenosis. Some cases of renovascular hypertension actually develop as a result of an obstruction in the renal arteries. These cases of hypertension can usually be effectively treated by treating the obstruction.. Flow patterns within the kidneys can provide information about damage to the kidneys and extent of renal artery disease from chronic poor blood flow. Color Doppler can show renal artery perfusion and venous return. It may also be used to determine renal transplant rejection.. Indications:. ...
Our study confirms that high-frequency electric stimulation of nerves in renal arteries (RNS), both main and accessory, elicits a substantial BP increase. The amplitude of BP increase after RNS in accessory arteries was similar to that observed in main renal artery trunks, suggesting that sympathetic fibers innervating accessory arteries may play an important role in patients with resistant hypertension. In agreement with our previous work,15 successful RDN of main renal arteries led to a substantial blunting of RNS-related BP increase after electric stimulation of denervated arteries. However, RNS of (nondenervated) accessory arteries was associated with an unchanged BP increase. This residual source of sympathetic activity may explain the lesser benefits of incomplete RDN limited to the main renal artery trunks in patients with accessory arteries.11,12. Our findings may prove to be of major practical relevance. Indeed, the prevalence of renal accessory and multiple arteries varies between 15% ...
Recent studies have indicated that renal arteries can produce 20-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid (20-HETE) and suggest the potential involvement of a P450 metabolite of arachidonic acid in the myogenic activation of canine renal arteries. In the present study, the effects of 20-HETE on isolated canine renal arcuate arteries were studied. Administration of 20-HETE to the bath or the lumen at concentrations of 0.01-1 microM produced a graded reduction in the diameter of these vessels. In contrast, 19(R)-HETE was a vasodilator, whereas 19(S)-HETE was relatively inactive. The vasoconstrictor response to 20-HETE was not altered by the cyclooxygenase inhibitor indomethacin, endoperoxide/thromboxane receptor antagonist SQ29548, or combined blockade of the cyclooxygenase, lipoxygenase, and P450 pathways using indomethacin, baicalein, and 7-ethoxyresorufin. The response to 20-HETE was associated with depolarization and a sustained increase in the intracellular calcium concentration in renal vascular smooth ...
We performed EVAR using Gore Excluder. At first, mainbody was implanted under the left renal artery. Next, on the proximal site, wedelivered aortic extender and Zilver stent in advance. After aortic extenderwas implanted just under the right renal artery, we implanted the Zilver stentfor left renal artery. And, final KBT (Kissing balloon technique) was done. Anyendoleak was not detected by final angiography and both side of renal arteryflow was enough. One day after procedure, serum creatinine level increased onblood test. Because we did not detect reduction of renal flow by duplexultra-sonography, we observed as contrast nephropathy. But, serum creatininelevel did not improve. Accordingly, we checked the CT imaging. We weresuspicious of right renal artery occlusion due to stent graft. And, we decided to perform re-intervention for right renalartery occlusion. We inserted 5 Frguiding sheath from right brachial artery. Initial angiogram revealed rightrenal occlusion. After wire crossing with ...
Knowledge of anatomical features of the renal artery is important in prediction, management and control of atherosclerotic renal artery stenosis. These features show population variations but data from black African populations are scarce. The aim of this study was therefore to describe the anatomical features of the renal artery in a black Kenyan population. Six hundred and ten (610) single renal arteries from 305 adult black Kenyans [206 males, 99 females; age range 22 - 79 years] were studied by dissection at Department of Human Anatomy, University of Nairobi, Kenya. Specimens with macroscopic features of stenosis and dilatation were excluded. The implantation angle, length and branching pattern were studied. These features were correlated with intima-media thickness and luminal diameter. The latter were determined by micrometry on Eosin/hematoxylin stained 5 micron sections obtained from the proximal segment of the renal artery. Data was analysed by SPSS version 16.0. Students t-test, was ...
The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of renal artery embolization with small and narrowly calibrated microparticles on the coagulation diameter, volume, and shape of radiofrequency...
Another name for Renal Artery Thrombosis is Renal Artery Occlusion. Renal artery occlusion may occur suddenly or gradually. A sudden renal artery occlusion ...
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One-kidney, one clip (1K1C) and two-kidney, one clip (2K1C) Goldblatt hypertension was produced in rats by placing 0.30, 0.25, or 0.20 mm silver clips on the left renal artery. Mean arterial pressure (MAP) and plasma renin activity (PRA) were measured in conscious rats 24 to 28 days after clipping. The MAP in control rats (n = 38) was 116 +/- 1 mm Hg (mean +/- SEM). The 0.30, 0.25, and 0.20 mm clips produced MAPs of 133 +/- 2, 161 +/- 5, and 189 +/- 5 mm Hg, respectively, in 1K1C rats, and 123 +/- 2, 129 +/- 3, and 172 +/- 5 mm Hg in 2K1C rats (n = 17-20). When 1K1C and 2K1C groups were compared, MAP was significantly greater in 1K1C rats at all clip sizes. No treatment groups PRA was different than control (4.8 +/- 0.4 ng AI/ml/hr), except for the 0.20 mm 2K1C rats (16.2 +/- 3.1 ng AI/ml/hr). Renal artery pressure (RAP) was measured in another series of experiments and was not different from control in all but the 0.20 mm 1K1C rats. With identical clip sizes, 2K1C rats showed smaller pressure ...
Accessory renal arteries are a common variant and are present in ~25% (range 20-30%) and are bilateral in ~10% of the population 7. Their proper identification is of utmost importance for surgical planning prior to live donor transplantation 2,3 ...
We have investigated the effects of recombinant human erythropoietin (EPO) on the responses of rat renal arcuate arteries to dopamine, noradrenaline and acetylcholine and on the release of NO from human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) in culture. Noradrenaline induced a concentration-dependent constriction and acetylcholine a concentration-dependent relaxation of the vessels. The effects of dopamine were concentration-dependent, leading to relaxation of the vessels at low concentrations and contraction of the vessels at high concentrations. NG-Nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME; 0.1 mM) did not change the vasoconstrictor responses to noradrenaline and dopamine, but inhibited the acetylcholine- and dopamine-induced vasorelaxation. Neither 0.1 nor 20 units·ml-1 EPO affected noradrenaline-induced constriction, or dopamine- or acetylcholine-induced relaxation, of the vessels. EPO at 20 units·ml-1 attenuated dopamine-induced constriction of the vessels. This effect was blunted by ...
The kidney receive 20-25 percent of the total cardiac output. In normal healthy individuals, about 1200ml of blood flows through the kidneys each minute. The blood supply to each kidney is usually a single renal artery originates along the lateral surface of the adominal aorta near the level of the superior mesenteric artery. However, there may sometimes be additional small vessels from superior mesenteric, adrenal, spermatic or ovarian arteries.. Almost all of the blood which enters the kidneys at renal hilus, via the renal artery. The renal artery branches to form several interlobar arteries which radiate outward through the renal column between the renal pyramids. The interlobar arteries subdivide themselves to arcuate arteries, which pass along the boundary between cortex and medulla. Each arcuate artery branches and travel out at a right angle, through the cortex towards the capsule and gives rise to a number of interlobular arteries, which supply the cortical portions of the adjacent renal ...
My peak systolic velocity of right renal artery is 95 cm/sec whereas left renal artery is 215cm/sec. (Normal being around 100cm/sec) with turbulence in the mid arterial segment. My renal artery to aortic ratio is within normal limits at 1.24. There may be a stenosis and it may not be hemodynamically significant ...
Renal artery disease is a form of peripheral artery disease that reduces blood flow through the renal arteries, which supply blood to the kidneys
Renal artery disease is a form of peripheral artery disease that reduces blood flow through the renal arteries, which supply blood to the kidneys
Looking for intrarenal arteries? Find out information about intrarenal arteries. blood vessel that conveys blood away from the heart heart, muscular organ that pumps blood to all parts of the body. The rhythmic beating of the heart is a... Explanation of intrarenal arteries
The importance of beta and gamma epithelial Na(+) channel (ENaC) proteins in vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC)-mediated pressure-induced constriction in renal interlobar arteries has been demonstrated recently. In renal epithelial tissue, ENaC expre
Archives of cardiovascular diseases - Vol. 104 - N° 5 - p. 363-364 - Iconography : Coexisting renal artery aneurysm and adrenal adenoma in resistant hypertension - EM|consulte
Often clinically silent and discovered incidentally, FMD accounts for less than 10% of cases of renal artery stenosis (RAS), and although it can affect the intima, in the majority of cases it involves the media, resulting in the typical string of beads appearance (Figure 32-1).1 The cause remains largely unknown; however it may have a genetic component and it is more frequent in hypertensive patients and smokers.2 FMD usually affects women between 15 and 50 years of age, but it can be also observed in males and older patients as well.1 It occurs most frequently in the renal artery, but can also involve the carotid and vertebral arteries, sometimes in association with intracranial aneurysms, as well as other visceral vessels.1,3,4 ...
The aim of this trial is a prospective, randomized comparison of three different techniques for catheter based renal sympathetic denervation. Patients with larger (,5.5 mm) renal arteries are randomized to a treatment with a radiofrequency based catheter of the main renal artery, the main renal artery, its side-branches and accessories or an ultrasound-based denervation of the main renal artery only. The primary endpoint is the change in daytime blood pressure acquired in ambulatory blood pressure measurement at 3 months ...
Another name for Renal Artery Occlusion is Renal Artery Occlusion. The following are some important questions to ask before and after the treatment of ...
A new study published in Journal of endovascular therapy (2014;21:181-190) has evaluated the efficacy of renal denervation therapy for hypertension refractory to renal artery stenting.. The study included ten patients (6 women; mean age 70.0±5.1 years) with an office systolic blood pressure ,160 mmHg despite taking ≥3 antihypertensive drugs and uni- or bilateral renal artery stenting. These patients were treated with RDN. Radiofrequency (RF) energy was delivered to the native segment of the artery keeping a 5-mm safe distance from the stented segments. Standardized office and ambulatory blood pressure measurements, medication, and renal assessment, including renal duplex ultrasound and renal function, were determined at baseline and on follow-up to 12 months.. ...
There have been varied definitions in the literature of renal functional benefit after renal artery stent placement, with most reports relying on an absolute value of the change in serum creatinine (binary or dichotomous outcome) as the parameter for success. In this model, the absolute value of GFR after treatment is used to construct thresholds, which define discrete reporting of outcomes, ie, failure or benefit. However, although such absolute binary determinations may be used in assessing renal function, it is important to recognize that the impact of intervention may be manifested not only by a change in the absolute value of GFR but also as stabilization or slowed decline in previously diminishing GFR.153-157⇓⇓⇓⇓ In other words, the trend in renal function over time may provide an equally valid and valuable assessment of treatment effect as the absolute measure of renal function at discrete time points after intervention. Hence, renal function benefit may be evaluated by both ...
TY - JOUR. T1 - Renal angiography. AU - Viamonte, Manuel. AU - Parks, Raymond E.. PY - 1963/12. Y1 - 1963/12. N2 - The authors present well selected examples to point up the diagnostic value of renal angiography in instonces of both hypertension and in local disease.. AB - The authors present well selected examples to point up the diagnostic value of renal angiography in instonces of both hypertension and in local disease.. UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=75549104415&partnerID=8YFLogxK. UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=75549104415&partnerID=8YFLogxK. U2 - 10.1097/00007611-196312000-00001. DO - 10.1097/00007611-196312000-00001. M3 - Article. C2 - 14103112. AN - SCOPUS:75549104415. VL - 56. SP - 1335. EP - 1343. JO - Southern Medical Journal. JF - Southern Medical Journal. SN - 0038-4348. IS - 12. ER - ...
Find Vascular Surgeons that treat Renal Artery Stent, See Reviews and Book Online Instantly. Its free! All appointment times are guaranteed by our dentists and doctors.
Chest X-Ray to evaluate cardiac size; echocardiogram to assess valves and ejection fraction as well as LVH; bloodwork includes a basic chemistry to asses for electrolytes and creatinine; 24 hours fractionated urinary metanephrines and cathecolamines; renal ultrasound; nuclear imaging of kidneys with Lasix to assess renal function; MRA of renal arteries as a non invasive approach to renovascular hypertension ...
I have had uncontrolled hypertension for 18 months now, despite being on Antenolol w/ diuretic and Clonidine .2 mg/1per day, plus trying all the different types of bp meds that didnt work. I went to the dr for something unrelated and my bp was 155/115, so he suggested a renal artery scan. I showed some blockage in one of my arteries. I went to a surgeon for follow up and she suggested a renal bypass. She said since I am young, 27, that I would outlive a stint and therefore wanted to do something more permanent. Im getting a second opinion in a few weeks ...
In most cases it is possible to trace the artery back to its anastomosis with the iliac artery, using colour Doppler. If the site of the stenosis is identified, spectral Doppler will demonstrate an increase in peak systolic velocity at the lesion, followed by poststenotic turbulence (Fig. ultrasound images below). This can be difficult to pinpoint with MRA, especially if bowel is overlying the vessel. A delayed systolic rise (the parvus tardus waveform) can be identified in the intrarenal spectral Doppler waveforms, as for the native kidney (see above). The diagnosis however is primarily made on the peak systolic velocity within the renal artery. A value of , 2.5 m/s is normal while , 2.5 m/s constitutes RAS. If the stenosis is severe, it may be difficult to identify colour flow in the kidney and the waveform may be reduced in velocity with a tiny, damped trace in the main vessel. A stenosis affecting an interlobar artery may result in focal, segmental changes in the kidney. In general, contrast ...
In the present study we investigated the mechanism of nitric oxide induced relaxation of renal arteries, with or without endothelium, taken from normotensive and spontaneously hypertensive (SH) rats. With this purpose in mind, the effects of the nitric oxide donor, sodium nitroprusside (SNP), with and without L-arg in the medium, on isolated rat renal artery relaxation were studied. Relaxing effect of SNP was higher in normotensive (10-5 M of SNP caused 220% of relaxation in the cases with endothelium and 240% without endothelium), in comparison with SH rats (100% of relaxation with endothelium and 150% without). L-arg antagonized the relaxing effect of SNP in the examined renal arteries, more in normotensive (100-160% with endothelium and 110-195% without) than in hypertensive ones (0-10% with endothelium and 35-75% without) at SNP concentrations 10-7-10-5 M, respectively (*P,0.05; **P,0.001). L-arg did not significantly change relaxing effect of SNP in the isolated renal arteries with ...
In the present study we investigated the mechanism of nitric oxide induced relaxation of renal arteries, with or without endothelium, taken from normotensive and spontaneously hypertensive (SH) rats. With this purpose in mind, the effects of the nitric oxide donor, sodium nitroprusside (SNP), with and without L-arg in the medium, on isolated rat renal artery relaxation were studied. Relaxing effect of SNP was higher in normotensive (10-5 M of SNP caused 220% of relaxation in the cases with endothelium and 240% without endothelium), in comparison with SH rats (100% of relaxation with endothelium and 150% without). L-arg antagonized the relaxing effect of SNP in the examined renal arteries, more in normotensive (100-160% with endothelium and 110-195% without) than in hypertensive ones (0-10% with endothelium and 35-75% without) at SNP concentrations 10-7-10-5 M, respectively (*P,0.05; **P,0.001). L-arg did not significantly change relaxing effect of SNP in the isolated renal arteries with ...
Before reaching the hilus of the kidney, each artery divides into four or five branches; the greater number of these (anterior branches) lie between the renal vein and ureter, the vein being in front, the ureter behind, but one or more branches (posterior branches) are usually situated behind the ureter. Each vessel gives off some small inferior suprarenal branches to the suprarenal gland, the ureter, and the surrounding cellular tissue and muscles. One or two accessory renal arteries are frequently found, especially on the left side since they usually arise from the aorta, and may come off above (more common) or below the main artery. Instead of entering the kidney at the hilus, they usually pierce the upper or lower part of the organ. ...
The purpose of this study was to gain more information on the structure of different layers of renal arteryand comparing these structures in post-natal male and female sheep. To do so, right and left renal arteries of6 adult and 6 newborn animals were dissected; the middle parts of arteries were only collected. After tissueprocessing using paraffin embedding method, 5-6-μm sections were cut and stained with haematoxylin andeosin, green Massons trichrome and Verhoeffs elastic fiber methods. Three layers were identified in thewall of artery in both sexes. In tunica media the number of rows of circular smooth muscle cells was 15-25rows in newborn and 30-40 in adult sheep. External elastic membrane was visible in adult and wasstructurally thinner than the internal membrane. Tunica adventitia was visible in all samples and collagenfibers and smooth muscles bundle were distinguished. The existence of these muscle bundles in externallayer of renal artery was not reported previously in domestic animals and
WHAT IS THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN CAROTID AND RENAL ANGIOGRAPHY / ANGIOPLASTY?. There is no difference as far as the procedure is concerned except the location of the deployment of the catheter. The catheter is inserted from the same location in the groin/arm, as the case may be. In this case the catheter is moved to the kidneys region instead of the heart.. During renal Angiography usually only non ionic contrast material is used to prevent any lasting effect on the kidneys.. ...
Variations in the urogenital vascular anomalies in the abdomen are very common. However, they warrant attention due to their importance in operative, diagnostic, and endovascular procedures. During routine dissection of abdomen in a male cadaver, unique urogenital vascular anomalies were observed. On the right side, the right renal artery was found to be originated from the abdominal aorta at the level of L2 and divided into five branches; the right testicular artery and inferior suprarenal artery originated from the lower branch. We also observed, accessory renal artery arising from abdominal aorta at the level of L3 and double renal veins on right side. On the left side, we found left renal artery originating from the abdominal aorta at the level of L2 and divided into two branches. Double testicular (medial and lateral) arteries were also observed. In addition to these vascular variations, bilateral kinking of ureter at the pelviureteric junction was also observed. Although the variations in ...
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ABSTRACT The peculiarity of renal vascular variations challenges the surgeons and interventional radiologists with the task of defining the singular pattern of origin and entry of arteries into the kidney. Presence of multiple renal arteries is a perplexing predicament for the surgeon during interventional procedures as there are uncertainties about the future outcome. The present study reports a variant renal vasculature and aspires to emphasize its embryological basis and surgical implications. During routine cadaveric dissection, we observed three renal arteries arising separately from the abdominal aorta and entering the left kidney at the hilum. The inferior suprarenal artery emerged from the most superior renal artery while the inferior most renal artery crossed superficial to the ureter to enter the hilum. The persistence of mesonephric arteries is the culprit in most renal vascular variants as was seen in the present study. Morphometric analysis revealed the three arteries had similar ...
Renal Artery Calcium Is Independently Associated With Hypertension. Matthew A. Allison, Elizabeth O. Lillie, Dominic DiTomasso, C. Michael Wright, Michael H. Criqui. It has been proposed that renal microvascular disease is the central and unifying pathophysiologic mechanism of hypertension. The extent of calcified atheromatous plaque found on computed tomography is a valid and reproducible measure of the total atherosclerotic plaque burden in a vascular bed. In this study of 1,435 men and women, the presence of calcified atherosclerosis in the renal arteries was significantly associated with the diagnosis of hypertension, independent of traditional cardiovascular disease risk factors and the extent of calcified atherosclerosis in the nonrenal vasculature. ...
Patient History. An 83-year-old patient presents with chronic angina and difficult to control hypertension. In spite of 3 different antihypertensive medications, her blood pressure is consistently over 180/90. Noninvasive testing suggested right renal artery stenosis.. Methods. We went in the right groin and used a Jr4 diagnostic catheter for a renal angiogram. The right renal artery was 80% stenosed (Video 1). We passed a .014 Cougar wire (Medtronic) and predilated the stenosis with a 3.5 AngioScore balloon (Spectranetics,). We then passed a 5.0mm x 18mm Herculink stent (Abbott) (Video 2). We then passed the Flash Ostial balloon system (Cardinal Health) 5.0mm x 14mm. We passed the middle marker of the balloon 2mm inside of the stent ostium (Video 3). The proximal Flash balloon was dilated twice to large diameter (Video 4). The resultant residual was minimal and there was excellent proximal flaring of the stent (Videos 5 and 6). Discussion. Renal artery stenting is still controversial; however, ...
Feasibility of renal artery stenting before, during, and after endovascular aneurysm repair with suprarenal fixation endograft.: Suprarenal fixation by means of
Left renal artery aka Arteria renalis sinistra in the latin terminology and part of arteries of the small intestine with focus on the superior mesenteric artery. Learn more now!
If patients could recognise themselves, or anyone else could recognise a patient from your description, please obtain the patients written consent to publication and send them to the editorial office before submitting your response [Patient consent forms] ...
This graph shows the total number of publications written about Renal Artery by people in this website by year, and whether Renal Artery was a major or minor topic of these publications ...
The left renal artery passes laterally from the abdominal aorta into the left kidney. It then divides into several smaller branches within the kidney tissues.
Renal angiography, the standard diagnostic procedure used to confirm the presence of renal artery stenosis before surgery or angioplasty, is associated with renal complications that include renal failure. Consequently, alternative but accurate screening procedures with minimal adverse effects have been sought. Captopril renal scans have shown promise toward achieving this goal (1). A recent prospective study showed that patients with captopril-induced changes during preoperative scintigraphy had marked improvement in blood pressure control after revascularization (2). Preoperative scintigraphy, however, is operator-dependent, resulting in greater sensitivity and specificity in some academic centers than in community hospitals. The study by Olin and colleagues shows that duplex ultrasound scanning can have a sensitivity and a specificity of , 95% for detecting renal arterial lesions. Although this is impressive, it should be noted that these data were derived from a group of persons with severe ...
Retrograde cannulation of the left renal artery with a 4 Fr JR catheter; injection of contrast medium through the catheter confirming the successful reenterin
abdomen: arteries (L1 (lumbar) (SMA, suprarenal arteries, renal arteries),…: abdomen: arteries (L1 (lumbar), T12, (x paired visceral arteries, v paired visceral arteries), (v paired parietal arteries, x paired parietal arteries), abdominal aorta, L2 (lumbar), L3 (lumbar), L5 (lumbar), L4 (lumbar), )
The right interlobar artery is not visible, because it is not surrounded by aerated lung but by the collapsed lower lobe, which is adjacent to the right atrium.. On a follow-up chest film the atelectasis has resolved. We assume that the atelectasis was a result of post-traumatic poor ventilation with mucus plugging.. Notice the reappearance of the right interlobar artery (red arrow) and the normal right heart border (blue arrow).. ...
Renal arteries are very essential for the kidney as the major function of these arteries is to provide blood to the kidneys. Renal arteries are present above the renal veins. There may be two or more than two arteries serving each kidney. The arteries present in the kidney are the pair of large blood vessel Read more ...
Open Abdominal Procedures Used to Treat the Following: AAAs (Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms) TAAs (Thoracic Aortic Aneurysms) TAAAs (Thorocoabdominal Aortic Aneurysms Renal Artery Aneurysms Renal Artery Stenosis or Renovascular Hypertension Aortoilliac Occlusion Superior Mesenteric Artery Stenosis Removal of Infected Graft
Renal artery stenosis - is the narrowing of renal arteries that carry blood to the kidneys from the aorta.[2] ... "Renal Artery Stenosis". www.niddk.nih.gov. Retrieved 2015-06-23.. *^ a b "Vascular Diseases: MedlinePlus". www.nlm.nih.gov. ... Treatment varies with the type of vascular disease; in the case of renal artery disease, information from a meta-analysis ... Peripheral artery disease - happens when atheromatous plaques build up in the arteries that supply blood to the arms and legs, ...
femoral, renal and saphenous artery tonic contraction 5 μM[24] Chicken gizzard contraction 20 μM[24] ...
The legs, including the popliteal arteries.[citation needed]. *The kidney, including renal artery aneurysm and intraparechymal ... Renal aneurysmsEdit. Renal aneurysms are very rare consisting of only 0.1-0.09%[31] while rupture is even more rare.[31][32] ... Lumsden AB, Salam TA, Walton KG (1996). "Renal artery an?eurysm: a report of 28 cases". Cardiovasc Surg. 4 (2): 185-189.. ... 1997). "Kidney salvage in a case of ruptured renal artery aneurysm: case report and literature review". Cardiovasc Surg. 5 (1 ...
"Renal artery embolization for managing uncontrolled hypertension in a kidney transplant candidate". Avicenna J Med. 3 (1): 23-5 ... Micrograph of embolic material in the artery of a kidney. The kidney was surgically removed because of cancer. H&E stain. ... Particulate embolic agents - These are only used for precapillary arterioles or small arteries. These are also very good for ... However it does cause hemolysis and renal failure in large doses.. *sotradecol - This agent is used for superficial lower ...
... , short for ex vivo renal artery reconstruction and autotransplantation, is a technique mainly used for ... Belzer, FO; Salvatierra, O; Palubinskas, A; Stoney, RJ (1975). "Ex vivo renal artery reconstruction" (PDF). Ann. Surg. 182: 456 ...
Ma, Y. H.; Harder, D. R.; Clark, J. E.; Roman, R. J. (1991). "Effects of 12-HETE on isolated dog renal arcuate arteries". The ... HETE constrict the renal artery of dogs and 12-HETE (stereoisomer undetermined) is implicated in the angiotensin II-induced ... This antagonistic activity was responsible for the ability of 12(S)-HETE and 12(R)-HETE to relax mouse mesenteric arteries pre- ... 12(S)-HETE and 12(S)-HpETE stimulate the dilation of rat mesenteric arteries; 12(S)-HETE stimulates the dilation of coronary ...
... renal artery stenosis) or during shock. Hypoperfusion can also be caused by embolism of the renal arteries. Given their ... Acute tubular necrosis is classified as a "renal" (i.e. not pre-renal or post-renal) cause of acute kidney injury. Diagnosis is ... Renal Papillary Necrosis. References[edit]. *^ a b c d "Acute Tubular Necrosis (ATN)". Nephrology Channel. HealthCommunities. ... Acute tubular necrosis (ATN) is a medical condition involving the death of tubular epithelial cells that form the renal tubules ...
Tobian, L.; Binion, J. T. (1954). "Artery Wall Electrolytes in Renal and DCA Hypertension". Journal of Clinical Investigation. ... Schacht, R. G.; Lowenstein, J.; Baldwin, D. S. (1971). "Renal mechanism for DOCA escape in man". Bulletin of New York Academy ... Pearce, J. W.; Sonnenberg, H.; Veress, A. T.; Ackermann, U. (1969). "Evidence for a humoral factor modifying the renal response ... Majima, M.; Hayashi, I.; Fujita, T.; Ito, H.; Nakajima, S.; Katori, M. (1999). "Facilitation of renal kallikrein-kinin system ...
Powers, TA; Lorenz, CH; Holburn, GE; Price, RR (1991). "Renal artery stenosis: in vivo perfusion MR imaging". Radiology. 178 (2 ... A limitation of BOLD fMRI is its spatial resolution, as flow increase in somewhat large arteries or veins feed or drain large ...
However, the decrease may be significant in conditions of decreased renal perfusion, such as renal artery stenosis, heart ... as scleroderma renal crisis). In those with stable coronary artery disease, but no heart failure, benefits are similar to other ... A decrease renal protein kinase C. With ACE inhibitor use, the production of ATII is decreased, which prevents aldosterone ... Therefore, renal function should be closely monitored over the first few days after initiation of treatment with ACE inhibitor ...
Kidney disease / renal artery stenosis - the normal physiological response to low blood pressure in the renal arteries is to ... it is thought that decreased perfusion of renal tissue due to stenosis of a main or branch renal artery activates the renin- ... Voiculescu A, Rump LC (January 2009). "[Hypertension in patients with renal artery stenosis]". Der Internist (in German). 50 (1 ... Malformed aorta, slow pulse, ischemia: these cause reduced blood flow to the renal arteries, with physiological responses as ...
Arterial stenosis, which is particularly useful for potential kidney donors in detecting renal artery stenosis. DSA is the gold ... It also helps detect and diagnose lesions in the carotid arteries, a potential cause of strokes. IV-DSA has also been useful in ... standard investigation for renal artery stenosis. Cerebral aneurysms and arteriovenous malformations (AVM). DSA is done less ... However, IV-DSA has been used successfully to study the vessels of the brain and heart and has helped detect carotid artery ...
Bilateral renal artery stenosis should always be considered as a differential diagnosis for the presentation of HN. Kidney ... This leads to a build-up of plaques and they can be deposited in the renal arteries causing stenosis and ischemic kidney ... The large renal arteries exhibit intimal thickening, medial hypertrophy, duplication of the elastic layer. The changes in small ... "Renal Pathology". library.med.utah.edu. Retrieved 2016-11-12.. *^ "Malignant nephrosclerosis". Farlex medical dictionary, ...
Bilateral renal artery stenosis should always be considered as a differential diagnosis for the presentation of HN. Kidney ... The large renal arteries exhibit intimal thickening, medial hypertrophy, duplication of the elastic layer. The changes in small ... This leads to a build-up of plaques and they can be deposited in the renal arteries causing stenosis and ischemic kidney ... the kidney supplied blood by the narrowed renal artery suffers from inadequate blood flow, which in turn causes the size of the ...
Compression of the left renal vein (marked by the arrow) between the superior mesenteric artery (above) and the aorta (below) ... of the renal vein (superior mesenteric artery syndrome) as the cause of gastrointestinal complaints]". Dtsch. Med. Wochenschr ... Renal vein re-implantation. Gonadal vein embolization. Kurklinsky A, Rooke T (June 2010). "Nutcracker Phenomenon and Nutcracker ... This condition is not to be confused with superior mesenteric artery syndrome, which is the compression of the third portion of ...
... and may signify renal artery stenosis.[19] Prevention of recurrence is based on managing hypertension, coronary artery disease ... Recurrent pulmonary oedema in hypertension due to bilateral renal artery stenosis: treatment by angioplasty or surgical ... Blood tests are performed for electrolytes (sodium, potassium) and markers of renal function (creatinine, urea). Liver enzymes ... high central venous pressures and high pulmonary artery pressures. ...
Affected arteries develop endothelial dysfunction and impairment of normal vasodilation, which alter renal autoregulation. When ... and renal artery embolization in cases of anesthesia risk. It is also important that the blood pressure is lowered smoothly, ... In the kidneys, chronic hypertension has a great impact on the renal vasculature, leading to pathologic changes in the small ... During a hypertensive crisis, this can lead to acute renal ischemia, with hypoperfusion, involvement of other organs, and ...
Thrombosis usually occurs in the renal veins although it can also occur in arteries. Treatment is with oral anticoagulants (not ... In addition, myeloma light chains are also directly toxic on proximal renal tubules, further adding to renal dysfunction. ... Fundamentals of Renal Pathology. Springer. ISBN 978-0-387-31126-5. *^ a b "Nephrotic syndrome". Archived from the original on ... "Indicaciones de la biospsia renal en niños". Retrieved 2008-09-14.. *^ "Diagnóstico diferencial en el síndrome nefrótico". ...
The legs, including the popliteal arteries.[citation needed] The kidney, including renal artery aneurysm and intraparechymal ... Lumsden AB, Salam TA, Walton KG (1996). "Renal artery an?eurysm: a report of 28 cases". Cardiovasc Surg. 4 (2): 185-189. "Brain ... 1997). "Kidney salvage in a case of ruptured renal artery aneurysm: case report and literature review". Cardiovasc Surg. 5 (1 ... doi:10.1016/s0967-2109(95)00041-0. Tham G, Ekelund L, Herrlin K (1983). "Renal artery aneurysms. Natural history and prognosis ...
The symptoms are caused by calcification of large and medium-sized arteries, including the aorta, coronary arteries, and renal ... main pulmonary artery, and coronary arteries unusually. Abdominal ultrasound can reveal hepatosplenomegaly, ascites, renal ... and renal arteries, as well as peritoneal calcifications involving the visceral peritoneum overlying the liver and intestine ... renal, mesenteric and cardiac arteries Echo-dense aortic annulus, ascending aorta, transverse arch, descending aorta, ...
... or occlusion of othe renal artery have been associated with renal artery FMD. The carotid and vertebral arteries are most ... or focal disease involving multiple branches of the renal arteries may develop renal artery dissection or progressive renal ... Ex vivo renal artery reconstruction is sometimes used for complex diseases where branches of the renal artery are affected. ... FMD can be found in almost every artery in the human body, but most often affects the carotid, vertebral, renal arteries and ...
... which can interfere with renal autoregulation and produce acute renal failure in patients with bilateral renal artery stenosis ... Additionally, hypertensive encephalopathy may occur in pheochromocytoma, Cushing's syndrome, renal artery thrombosis. The ... See "Renal effects of ACE inhibitors in hypertension".) Several parenteral antihypertensive agents are most often used in the ... A change in medication, however, is indicated if the decline in renal function is temporally related to therapy with an ...
Atherosclerotic obstruction of the renal artery can be treated with angioplasty with or without stenting of the renal artery. ... Renal artery stenosis can lead to hypertension and loss of renal function. Angioplasty is occasionally used to treat venous ... It is commonly done to treat atherosclerotic narrowings of the abdomen, leg and renal arteries caused by peripheral artery ... The dilated artery stayed open until her death from pneumonia two and a half years later. Charles Dotter is commonly known as ...
It is used to assist in the diagnosis of renal artery stenosis. It is not generally considered a useful test for children, and ... Subtraction angiography is considered a more suitable test for renal artery stenosis in adults. Contrast with captopril ...
Angiograms of mesenteri or renal arteries in polyarteritis nodosa may show aneurysms, occlusions, and vascular wall ... Pulmonary-renal syndrome. Individuals who are coughing up blood and have kidney involvement are likely to have granulomatosis ... Classically involves arteries of lungs and skin, but may be generalized. At least 4 criteria yields sensitivity and specificity ... Granulomatosis with polyangiitis (GPA). Systemic vasculitis of medium and small arteries, including venules and arterioles. ...
The afferent arterioles branch from the renal artery, which supplies blood to the kidneys. The afferent arterioles later ... When renal blood flow is reduced (indicating hypotension) or there is a decrease in sodium or chloride ion concentration, the ... "Renal Vasculature: Efferent Arterioles & Peritubular Capillaries" Anatomy photo: Urinary/mammal/vasc0/vasc2 - Comparative ... Efferent arteriole Tubuloglomerular feedback Macula densa Renal corpuscle http://jasn.asnjournals.org/content/21/7/1093.full ...
Another is renal artery stenosis, in which the reduced blood supply across the juxtaglomerular apparatus stimulates the ... Likewise, fibromuscular dysplasia may cause stenosis of the renal artery, and therefore secondary hyperaldosteronism. Other ...
"Contribution to the study of human renal artery (after own observations)", so was acclaimed Doctor of Medicine from the ... Contribution to the study of human renal artery (after own observations) (doctoral thesis) (1939). • About the position of the ... Bumpy ekfysis the right subclavian artery and both carotids (1955). • Human Anatomy in four volumes (Volume 1st, 1957). • On ...
Before reaching the branchial heart, each branch of the vena cava expands to form renal appendages which are in direct contact ... The blood vessels consist of arteries, capillaries and veins and are lined with a cellular endothelium which is quite unlike ... The Dicyemidae are a family of tiny worms that are found in the renal appendages of many species;[105] it is unclear whether ... and selective absorption from the renal appendages, as it is passed along the associated duct and through the nephridiopore ...
Renal artery stenosis. *Renal ischemia. *Hypertensive nephropathy. *Renovascular hypertension. *Renal cortical necrosis ... and the Renal Association represents renal physicians and works closely with the National Service Framework for kidney disease ... and the care of those requiring renal replacement therapy, including dialysis and renal transplant patients. Many diseases ... Renal transplantation replaces kidney function by inserting into the body a healthier kidney from an organ donor and inducing ...
Renal artery stenosis. *Renal ischemia. *Hypertensive nephropathy. *Renovascular hypertension. *Renal cortical necrosis ...
Ejerblad E, Fored CM, Lindblad P, Fryzek J, McLaughlin JK, Nyrén O. Obesity and risk for chronic renal failure. J. Am. Soc. ... Association of bodyweight with total mortality and with cardiovascular events in coronary artery disease: A systematic review ...
"Edinburgh Artery Study: prevalence of asymptomatic and symptomatic peripheral arterial disease in the general population". Int ... It is classically associated with early-stage peripheral artery disease, and can progress to critical limb ischemia unless ... Renal vein thrombosis. *upper limb / torso *Mondor's disease. *Paget-Schroetter disease. *head *Cerebral venous sinus ... testing is often performed to confirm the diagnosis of peripheral artery disease. ...
Renal artery stenosis. *Renal ischemia. *Hypertensive nephropathy. *Renovascular hypertension. *Renal cortical necrosis ... "Renal Pathology". Retrieved 2008-11-25.. *^ Obana M, Nakanishi K, Sako M, Yata N, Nozu K, Tanaka R, Iijima K, Yoshikawa N (July ... "Renal Pathology". Retrieved 2008-11-25.. *^ Ziakas PD, Giannouli S, Psimenou E, Nakopoulou L, Voulgarelis M (July 2004). " ...
Acute renal failure. Acute respiratory distress syndrome. Acute liver failure. Respiratory failure. Multiple organ dysfunction ...
... of the carotid arteries. These arteries are the large blood vessels in your neck that feed your brain. Transcranial Doppler ( ... Glioblastomas are the most common primary malignancies to hemorrhage while thyroid, renal cell carcinoma, melanoma, and lung ...
... including renal, mesenteric, and coronary arteries.[8] to cause a reduction in systemic vascular resistance. Fenoldopam has a ... The renal effect of fenoldopam and dopamine may involve physiological antagonism of the renin-angiotensin system in the kidney. ... Hughes AD, Sever PS (1989). "Action of fenoldopam, a selective dopamine (DA1) receptor agonist, on isolated human arteries". ... Since fenoldopam is the only intravenous agent that improves renal perfusion, in theory it could be beneficial in hypertensive ...
This 'Grow Your Own Arteries' technique is helping patients survive coronary heart disease, renal failure and other life- ... thickening in arteries subjected to injury, rather than solely from cells of the artery wall. This showed that current ... Grow Your Own Arteries' Campbell, Julie. St. George Girls High School, An Academically Selective High School for girls. Notable ... She has other research that involves basic cellular interactions in the artery wall, and the definition of single transduction ...
Renal artery stenosis. *Renal ischemia. *Hypertensive nephropathy. *Renovascular hypertension. *Renal cortical necrosis ... Some, such as the American Academy of Pediatrics recommends renal ultrasound and voiding cystourethrogram (watching a person's ...
Inferior suprarenal artery. Vein. suprarenal veins. Nerve. celiac plexus, renal plexus. ... Artery. superior suprarenal artery, middle suprarenal artery, ...
... coronary artery disease, heart arrhythmia and peripheral artery disease. Radiation-induced fibrosis, vascular cell damage and ... Renal cell cancer and melanoma are generally considered to be radioresistant but radiation therapy is still a palliative option ... These treatments begin by guiding a catheter up through the femoral artery in the leg, navigating to the desired target site ... Another example is the injection of yttrium-90 radioactive glass or resin microspheres into the hepatic artery to radioembolize ...
Bilateral renal agenesis[edit]. Main article: Renal agenesis. Bilateral renal agenesis has been estimated to occur at a ... and a single umbilical artery. Presence of a diaphragmatic hernia is also common in these fetuses/infants. Additionally, the ... It can be caused by renal diseases such as bilateral renal agenesis (BRA), atresia of the ureter or urethra causing obstruction ... Buchta RM, Viseskul C, Gilbert EF, Sarto GE, Opitz JM (August 1973). "Familial bilateral renal agenesis and hereditary renal ...
The morphology for heat exchange occurs via cerebral arteries and the ophthalmic rete, a network of arteries originating from ... Though there have been no official detailed renal studies conducted[77] on the flow rate (Poiseuille's Law) and composition of ... The interatrial artery of the ostrich is small in size and exclusively supplies blood to only part of the left auricle and ... The coronary arteries start in the right and left aortic sinus and provide blood to the heart muscle in a similar fashion to ...
Ejerblad E, Fored CM, Lindblad P, Fryzek J, McLaughlin JK, Nyrén O (2006). "Obesity and risk for chronic renal failure". J. Am ... 2006). "Association of bodyweight with total mortality and with cardiovascular events in coronary artery disease: A systematic ...
Renal artery stenosis. *Renal ischemia. *Hypertensive nephropathy. *Renovascular hypertension. *Renal cortical necrosis ... there was a lower chance of reaching end-stage renal disease (renal function so poor that dialysis was required) in the steroid ... Other renal causes of isolated hematuria include thin basement membrane disease and Alport syndrome, the latter being a ... From the fact that IgAN can recur after renal transplant, it can be postulated that the disease is caused by a problem in the ...
Acute renal failure. Acute respiratory distress syndrome. Acute liver failure. Respiratory failure. Multiple organ dysfunction ... Therefore, no dose adjustment is needed in elderly patients, or in patients with renal or hepatic dysfunction. ...
As a result, birds have more blood in their capillaries per unit of volume of lung than a mammal.[83] The arteries are composed ... The postcava receives blood from the limbs via the renal portal system. Unlike in mammals, the circulating red blood cells in ... Veins, unlike arteries, are thin and rigid as they do not need to withstand extreme pressure. As blood travels through the ... In birds, the main arteries taking blood away from the heart originate from the right aortic arch (or pharyngeal arch), unlike ...
The brain can regulate blood flow over a range of blood pressure values by vasoconstriction and vasodilation of the arteries.[ ... Renal compensation can help the bicarbonate buffer system. The sensor for the plasma bicarbonate concentration is not known for ... Here it causes the reabsorption of sodium ions from the renal tubular fluid, in exchange for potassium ions which are secreted ... It is very probable that the renal tubular cells of the distal convoluted tubules are themselves sensitive to the pH of the ...
... but calcium supplements are associated with a higher risk of coronary artery calcification.[8] ... "Calcium intake from diet and supplements and the risk of coronary artery calcification and its progression among older adults ...
Padmanaban, P.; Toora, B. (2011). "Hemoglobin: Emerging marker in stable coronary artery disease". Chronicles of Young ... and the circulating hemoglobin can cause renal failure. ... shows its importance in coronary artery disease.[83] ...
Acute pancreatitis can trigger a build-up of fluid, particularly in abdominal and thoracic (chest) areas, acute renal failure, ... and cause inflammation in arteries and veins. The inflammation triggers the body's clotting factors, possibly depleting them to ...
High blood pressure, valvular heart disease, coronary artery disease, cardiomyopathy, congenital heart disease, COPD, obesity, ... "Atrial fibrillation and risks of cardiovascular disease, renal disease, and death: systematic review and meta-analysis" (PDF) ... An embolus proceeds through smaller and smaller arteries until it plugs one of them and prevents blood from flowing through the ... Cardiovascular factors known to be associated with the development of AF include high blood pressure, coronary artery disease, ...
However, the left ovary drains from the plexus to the left ovarian vein, and from there drains to the left renal vein before ... It acts as a countercurrent heat exchanger, cooling blood in adjacent arteries. An abnormal enlargement of the pampiniform ... and on the left side into the left renal vein, at a right angle.The pampiniform plexus forms the chief mass of the cord. ...
Median sacral artery. Visceral branches:. Celiac trunk. Middle suprarenal arteries. Superior mesenteric artery. Renal arteries ... renal and middle suprarenal arteries, and visceral arteries (the celiac trunk, the superior mesenteric artery and the inferior ... Gonadal arteries testicular in males, ovarian in females. Inferior mesenteric artery. Terminal branches: Common iliac arteries ... Left subclavian artery. Descending aorta, thoracic part: Left bronchial arteries. esophageal arteries to the thoracic part of ...
... and the renal pelvis is sometimes called the renal infundibulum. The form *renal choana is logical but is not used. ... The renal pelvis or pelvis of the kidney is the funnel-like dilated part of the ureter in the kidney. In humans, the renal ... Renal pelvis. Cross-section of the kidney, with major structures labelled. The renal pelvis, located in the middle of the image ... Like the bony pelvis, the renal pelvis (/ˈriːnəl ˈpɛlvɪs/) gets its English name via New Latin from the older Latin word pelvis ...
Renal artery stenosis, or narrowing of one or both renal arteries will lead to hypertension as the affected kidneys release ... It is located above the renal vein. Supernumerary renal arteries (two or more arteries to a single kidney) are the most common ... the right renal artery is normally longer than the left renal artery.[5][6] ... "Correlation between the diameter of the main renal artery and the presence of an accessory renal artery: sonographic and ...
The left renal artery passes laterally from the abdominal aorta into the left kidney. It then divides into several smaller ... Home > Cardiovascular System > Cardiovascular System of the Lower Torso > Blood Supply to the Kidneys > Left Renal Artery ... The left renal artery passes laterally from the abdominal aorta into the left kidney. It then divides into several smaller ... Left Renal Artery * Left Renal Vein * Left Suprarenal Arteries * Left Suprarenal Vein ...
Find Vascular Surgeons that treat Renal Artery Stent, See Reviews and Book Online Instantly. Its free! All appointment times ...
... so he suggested a renal artery scan. I showed some blockage in one of my arteries. I went to a surgeon for follow up and she ... so he suggested a renal artery scan. I showed some blockage in one of my arteries. I went to a surgeon for follow up and she ... Re: Need Renal Artery Bypass....Have Some Questions. Yes, I cross-posted on the kidney board last night and havent gotten an ... Need Renal Artery Bypass....Have Some Questions. Hi all,. I have had uncontrolled hypertension for 18 months now, despite being ...
My peak systolic velocity of right renal artery is 95 cm/sec whereas left renal artery is 215cm/sec. (Normal being around 100cm ... Hi guys! Recently ive been suspected of having renal artery stenosis after a doppler ultrasound of my renal arteries showed ... Thus the artery become narrow. Anyone have similar experiences with renal artery stenosis or renovascular hypertension, can be ... My renal artery to aortic ratio is within normal limits at 1.24. There may be a stenosis and it may not be hemodynamically ...
A. Renal Artery Stenosis. Renal artery stenosis (RAS) is defined as narrowing of the lumen of the renal artery. The most common ... Renal artery stent placement in renal artery stenosis: technical and early clinical results. Clin Radiol. 1997; 52: 451-457. ... renal angioplasty,24-47⇓⇓⇓⇓⇓⇓⇓⇓⇓⇓⇓⇓⇓⇓⇓⇓⇓⇓⇓⇓⇓⇓⇓ and surgical renal revascularization,48-66⇓⇓⇓⇓⇓⇓⇓⇓⇓⇓⇓⇓⇓⇓⇓⇓⇓⇓ few prospective ... c) Renal Function. There have been varied definitions in the literature of renal functional benefit after renal artery stent ...
Renal artery disease is a form of peripheral artery disease that reduces blood flow through the renal arteries, which supply ... Kidney (Renal) Artery Disease. *In Peripheral Vascular Disease. What is kidney (renal) artery disease?. Renal artery disease is ... it is called Renal Artery Stenosis (RAS).. Illustration of renal arteries and kidneys showing early stages of renal artery ... Women with renal artery disease often have some degree of coronary artery disease, carotid artery disease, peripheral artery ...
Renal artery occlusion may occur suddenly or gradually. A sudden renal artery occlusion ... ... Another name for Renal Artery Thrombosis is Renal Artery Occlusion. ... A sudden renal artery occlusion is usually caused by a blood clot in the renal artery, called a renal artery thrombosis. Causes ... PubMed Renal Artery Thrombosis References *Gasparini M, Hofmann R, Stoller M. Renal artery embolism: clinical features and ...
Another name for Renal Artery Occlusion is Renal Artery Occlusion. The following are some important questions to ask before and ... PubMed Renal Artery Occlusion References *Gasparini M, Hofmann R, Stoller M. Renal artery embolism: clinical features and ... Continue to Renal Artery Occlusion Specialist Last Updated: Nov 6, 2008 References Authors: Stephen J. Schueler, MD; John H. ... Renal Artery Occlusion Questions For Doctor. The following are some important questions to ask before and after the treatment ...
Renal Artery Superior Mesenteric Artery Renovascular Hypertension Left Renal Artery Vessel Loop These keywords were added by ... Bianchi C., Ballard J.L. (2006) Transaortic Renal Artery Endarterectomy. In: Hoballah J.J., Scott-Conner C.E.H. (eds) Operative ...
Renal artery stenosis symptoms include high blood pressure that does not respond to treatment, or severe high blood pressure. ... Renal artery stenosis causes include high cholesterol, high blood pressure, smoking, and diabetes. ... Renal artery stenosis is a narrowing of the diameter of the renal arteries. When the renal arteries narrow, the result is ... Picture of Renal Artery Stenosis. Narrowing of the major artery that supplies blood to the kidney. See a picture of the Renal ...
Renal artery stenosis symptoms include high blood pressure that does not respond to treatment, or severe high blood pressure. ... Learn about renal artery stenosis causes like high cholesterol, high blood pressure, smoking, and diabetes. ... home / high blood pressure health center / high blood pressure a-z list / renal artery stenosis center / renal artery stenosis ... Renal artery stenosis (narrowing) is a decrease in the diameter of the renal arteries. The resulting restriction of blood flow ...
Renal Artery Stenosis News and Research. RSS The term renal artery stenosis (RAS) applies to a cluster of disease conditions ... Renal Stent System for the treatment of renal artery stenosis (narrowing of the main arteries supplying blood to the kidneys) ... for its new balloon expandable stent for renal artery disease. Intended for patients suffering from renal artery stenosis, a ... FDA approves Abbotts RX Herculink Elite Renal Stent System for renal artery stenosis Abbott today announced it has received U. ...
Learn about treatment options for diseases of arteries supplying blood to the intestines and kidneys, including open surgical ( ... Renal Artery Disease Treatments Renal artery stenosis is the narrowing of one or both renal arteries. "Renal" means "kidney" ... Such as angioplasty (the opening of a renal artery using a balloon or other method) or placement of a stent (a tiny expandable ... The renal arteries are blood vessels that carry blood to the kidneys from the aorta-the main blood vessel that carries blood ...
... of the renal artery has become an increasingly widespread peripheral vascular intervention for the treatment of renovascular ... Bax et al found that in patients with atherosclerotic renal artery stenosis, renal artery stenting had no clear effect on renal ... encoded search term (Renal Artery Angioplasty) and Renal Artery Angioplasty What to Read Next on Medscape. Related Conditions ... The utility of duplex ultrasound scanning of the renal arteries for diagnosing significant renal artery stenosis. Ann Intern ...
Renal artery definition at Dictionary.com, a free online dictionary with pronunciation, synonyms and translation. Look it up ... renal artery, renal carcinosarcoma, renal cast, renal clearance, renal column, renal corpuscle ... renal artery. renaissance man, renaissance revival, renaissance woman, renaissant, renal, ... An artery with its origin in the aorta and with distribution to the kidney. ...
Transluminal dilatation of transplant renal artery stenosis. Br Med J 1980; 281 :196 ... Transluminal dilatation of transplant renal artery stenosis.. Br Med J 1980; 281 doi: https://doi.org/10.1136/bmj.281.6234.196 ...
Reversible renal failure with renal artery occlusion. Br Med J 1972; 2 :27 ... Reversible renal failure with renal artery occlusion.. Br Med J 1972; 2 doi: https://doi.org/10.1136/bmj.2.5804.27 (Published ...
Renal artery stenosis symptoms include high blood pressure that does not respond to treatment, or severe high blood pressure. ... Learn about renal artery stenosis causes like high cholesterol, high blood pressure, smoking, and diabetes. ... Renal artery stenosis (narrowing) is a decrease in the diameter of the renal arteries. The resulting restriction of blood flow ... If renal artery stenosis is also present, then a bypass renal artery surgery may be done at the same time. ...
The first published report of a renal artery aneurysm (RAA) was in 1770 by Rouppe, who described the demise of a sailor who ... A renal artery aneurysm (RAA) is defined as a dilated segment of renal artery that exceeds twice the diameter of a normal renal ... A great deal of variety can be found in the anatomy of the renal artery and its branches, but most often the main renal artery ... encoded search term (Renal Artery Aneurysm) and Renal Artery Aneurysm What to Read Next on Medscape ...
The renal artery is one of these two blood vessels. The renal artery enters through the hilum, which is located where the ... Receptors located in the smooth muscle wall of the renal artery allow the arteries to expand or contract to compensate for high ... The renal artery enters through the hilum, which is located where the kidney curves inward in a concave shape. Under normal ... Renal artery. Medically reviewed by Healthlines Medical Network on. December 12, 2014. ...
Renal artery stenosis is a narrowing of the arteries that supply blood to the kidneys. Learn what causes RAS, and how to treat ... Renal artery stenosis (RAS) is a condition in which the arteries that supply blood to the kidneys narrow. The renal arteries ... Complications of renal artery stenosis. Decreased blood flow through your renal arteries can increase your overall blood ... in the renal arteries. These substances harden as they accumulate in the arterial walls. This not only narrows the arteries, ...
... , Renovascular Hypertension, Ischemic Nephropathy, Renal Artery Hyperplasia, Renal Artery Fibromuscular ... artery;renal, arteries renal stenosis, stenosis artery renal, artery renal stenosis, stenosis renal artery, RAS - Renal artery ... Renal Artery Stenoses, Renal Artery Stenosis, Stenoses, Renal Artery, Stenosis, Renal Artery, RENAL ARTERY STENOSIS, renal ... artery, renal, stenosis; renal artery, artery; stenosis, renal, Renal artery stenosis, NOS, Renal artery stenosis of unknown ...
... and medical therapy alone for adults with atherosclerotic renal artery stenosis (ARAS), according to findings of an updated ... There is insufficient evidence to choose between percutaneous transluminal renal angioplasty with stent placement (PTRAS) ... Cite this: Insufficient Evidence to Choose Best Management of Renal Artery Stenosis - Medscape - Aug 17, 2016. ... and medical therapy alone for adults with atherosclerotic renal artery stenosis (ARAS), according to findings of an updated ...
... treatment of narrowing of the arteries leading to the kidneys. ... Renal artery stenosis. Sectionsfor Renal artery stenosis. * ... Renal artery stenosis - Comprehensive overview covers causes, diagnosis, ... Renal artery bypass surgery. During a bypass procedure, doctors graft a substitute blood vessel to the renal artery to make a ... Renal arteriography. This special type of X-ray exam helps your doctor find the blockage in the renal arteries and sometimes ...
Renal Artery Digital Subtraction Angiography Renal Artery Stenosis Renovascular Hypertension Left Renal Artery ... 1996) Value of Doppler parameters in the diagnosis of renal artery stenosis. J Vasc Surg 23:428-435PubMedGoogle Scholar ... 2003) Aortoiliac and renal arteries: prospective intraindividual comparison of contrast-enhanced 3D MR angiography and multi- ... 1995) Technical optimization of spiral CT for depiction of renal artery stenosis: in vitro analysis. Radiology 194:157-163 ...
Renal artery dissection can be acute or chronic. Acute renal artery dissection is divided into three types: iatrogenic (guide ... However, full length of main renal artery could not be seen due to obesity and bowel gas. Origin of right renal artery was seen ... Chronic renal artery dissection is classified as functional and silent [2]. Spontaneous renal artery dissection (SRAD) is a ... Spontaneous renal artery dissection is a rare but important cause of flank pain. We report a case of isolated spontaneous renal ...
Renal artery stenting conferred no added benefit to medical management for the treatment of patients with atherosclerotic ... Renal artery angioplasty has been suggested to reduce hypertension, a common complication of renal artery stenosis, in several ... Renal artery stenosis often occurs in combination with peripheral arterial or coronary artery disease, and its prevalence among ... "Renal artery stenting remains a common procedure in current clinical practice," Christopher J. Cooper, MD, of the University of ...
... stents had no clear effect on the progression of impaired renal function, European researchers said. ... TORONTO -- In patients with narrowing of the renal artery, ... with atherosclerotic renal artery stenosis and impaired renal ... In patients with narrowing of the renal artery, stents had no clear effect on the progression of impaired renal function, ... Explain to interested patients that narrowing of the renal artery is often treated with a stent, although there is little ...
Find best Vascular Surgeons for Renal Artery Aneurysm near you & make an appointment online instantly! Renal Artery Aneurysm ... Renal Artery Aneurysm Doctors Near You. Need to make a doctor appointment for Renal Artery Aneurysm this week? Use Zocdoc to ...
Renal artery disease Renal artery disease is usually caused by atherosclerosis, hardening of the arteries due to the build up ... Renal artery disease can also be caused by fibromuscular dysplasia (FMD), a condition usually found in young women between the ... FMD results in the overgrowth of tissue inside the artery in a characteristic "chain of beads" pattern. This condition can ... of fatty deposits or plaques along the artery wall. This build-up can reduce blood-flow to one or both kidneys, or block flow ...
... blocked or hardened arteries caused by plaque buildup. ... Renal artery intervention at Loyola Medicine offers several ... Renal artery stenosis - Also called renovascular hypertension, occurs when an artery in the kidney narrows. Renal artery ... renal artery angioplasty with stenting is the preferred treatment for renal artery disease. But, in certain cases, renal ... If both renal arteries are blocked, kidney failure occurs.. If you have plaque buildup in the renal arteries, you will also ...
Renal artery stenosis is a narrowing of the arteries that supply blood to the kidneys.. More about Renal Artery Disease ... In renal artery stenosis (RAS), blood flow is decreased because of a narrowing of the renal artery. The lower blood flow is ... The renal arteries carry blood to the kidneys. If blood flow is decreased or flowing at a lower pressure, the kidneys interpret ... The renal arteries typically narrow from one of two causes: *development of plaque, or atherosclerosis, in the vessel ...
A renal artery aneurysm is a weak area in the artery that goes to the kidney. Although a renal artery aneurysm usually doesnt ... A renal artery aneurysm is a weak area in the artery that goes to the kidney. The majority of renal artery aneurysms are small ... Treatment for a renal artery aneurysm involves surgery. Of the aneurysms that affect the renal arteries, there are four ... A dissecting renal artery aneurysm is often painful. It is caused by a tear in the inner layer of the artery, resulting in a ...
We found an early renal artery spasm, which was probably caused by direct manipulation of the catheter. This renal artery ... Bilateral Renal Artery Stenosis After Renal Denervation. Fernando Jaén Águila, Juan Diego Mediavilla García, Eduardo Molina ... Renal artery stenosis, after renal denervation, with spontaneous resolution two year follow-up from procedure. Fernando Jaen ... Bilateral Renal Artery Stenosis After Renal Denervation. Fernando Jaén Águila, Juan Diego Mediavilla García, Eduardo Molina ...
renal artery stenosis entire renal artery blood pressure renal artery stent structure of renal artery heart failure renal ... renal artery occlusion blocked renal artery hilar renal artery renal replacement therapy renal artery atherosclerosis entire ... Zapping Renal Nerves Cuts Hypertension. lesions in renal arteries that disrupt the nerve pathways that lie within the renal ... widen narrow or blocked arteries. The arteries can... known as peripheral artery disease Renal vascular... ...
  • Due to the position of the aorta , the inferior vena cava , and the kidneys in the body, the right renal artery is normally longer than the left renal artery. (wikipedia.org)
  • My peak systolic velocity of right renal artery is 95 cm/sec whereas left renal artery is 215cm/sec. (healingwell.com)
  • Anatomic variations of the renal vessels: focus on the precaval right renal artery. (ijmhr.org)
  • page needed] Renal Artery Aneurysm at eMedicine Aytac, Suat K. (wikipedia.org)
  • Computed tomography of a right adrenal adenoma (26 mm diameter), coexisting with homolateral distal renal artery aneurysm (11.7 mm diameter). (em-consulte.com)
  • Feasibility of renal artery stenting before, during, and after endovascular aneurysm repair with suprarenal fixation endograft. (mysciencework.com)
  • The contribution of renal sympathetic nerve activity to the development and progression of resistant hypertension, has been convincingly demonstrated in both preclinical and human experiments. (springer.com)
  • Preclinical experiments in hypertension models of hypertension [5, 6, 14], have successfully used renal denervation as both an experimental tool and a therapeutic strategy, but even earlier, in the absence of appropriate drugs to pharmacologically reduce blood pressure in severely hypertensive patients, therapeutic splanchnicectomy and even radical surgical sympathectomy were used since the 1930s. (springer.com)
  • Esler MD, Krum H, Sobotka PA, Schlaich MP, Schmieder RE, Bohm M. Renal sympathetic denervation in patients with treatment-resistant hypertension (The Symplicity HTN-2 Trial): a randomised controlled trial. (springer.com)
  • Catheter-based renal sympathetic denervation: a targeted approach to resistant hypertension. (springer.com)
  • Glodny B, Cromme S, Wortler K, Winde G. A possible explanation for the frequent concomitance of arterial hypertension and multiple renal arteries. (ijmhr.org)
  • Trueta phenomenon: caused by catheter side holes being close to origin of (L) renal artery and causing neuro-vascular reflex. (uct.ac.za)
  • The peculiarity of renal vascular variations challenges the surgeons and interventional radiologists with the task of defining the singular pattern of origin and entry of arteries into the kidney. (ijmhr.org)
  • The persistence of mesonephric arteries is the culprit in most renal vascular variants as was seen in the present study. (ijmhr.org)
  • The renal arteries normally arise off the left interior side of the abdominal aorta , immediately below the superior mesenteric artery , and supply the kidneys with blood . (wikipedia.org)
  • The renal arteries carry a large portion of total blood flow to the kidneys. (wikipedia.org)
  • Up to a third of total cardiac output can pass through the renal arteries to be filtered by the kidneys. (wikipedia.org)
  • Supernumerary renal arteries (two or more arteries to a single kidney) are the most common renovascular anomaly, occurrence ranging from 25% to 40% of kidneys. (wikipedia.org)
  • Atherosclerosis can also affect the renal arteries and can lead to poor perfusion of the kidneys leading to reduced kidney function and, possibly, renal failure . (wikipedia.org)
  • Morphometric analysis revealed the three arteries had similar dimensions with different angulations that suggested a possible role in segmental ischemia of the kidneys. (ijmhr.org)
  • My renal artery to aortic ratio is within normal limits at 1.24. (healingwell.com)
  • Arteries of the small intestine with focus on the superior mesenteric artery. (kenhub.com)
  • This article describes the superior mesenteric artery, including its branches, functions and relevant clinical conditions. (kenhub.com)
  • Left kidney measures 11.1cm, right kidney 11.3cm (normal) Both have normal renal parenchymal echoes and smooth cortical margins. (healingwell.com)
  • One or two accessory renal arteries are frequently found, especially on the left side since they usually arise from the aorta, and may come off above (more common) or below the main artery. (wikipedia.org)
  • During routine cadaveric dissection, we observed three renal arteries arising separately from the abdominal aorta and entering the left kidney at the hilum. (ijmhr.org)
  • Feasibility of renal artery stenting before, during, and after. (mysciencework.com)
  • Suprarenal fixation endograft seems not to affect renal artery stenting regardless the timing of the procedure. (mysciencework.com)
  • Accessory renal arteries are a common variant and are present in ~25% (range 20-30%) and are bilateral in ~10% of the population 7 . (radiopaedia.org)
  • Anastomosis of accessory arteries via microsurgical technique in renal transplantation. (ijmhr.org)
  • The first recorded case of multiple renal arteries was described by Eustachius in 1552 1 . (radiopaedia.org)
  • Presence of multiple renal arteries is a perplexing predicament for the surgeon during interventional procedures as there are uncertainties about the future outcome. (ijmhr.org)
  • left artery lies behind the left renal vein, the body of the pancreas and the splenic vein , and is crossed by the inferior mesenteric vein . (wikipedia.org)
  • The right passes behind the inferior vena cava , the right renal vein , the head of the pancreas , and the descending part of the duodenum . (wikipedia.org)
  • the greater number of these (anterior branches) lie between the renal vein and ureter , the vein being in front, the ureter behind, but one or more branches (posterior branches) are usually situated behind the ureter. (wikipedia.org)
  • It is located above the renal vein. (wikipedia.org)
  • In the present study we investigated the mechanism of nitric oxide induced relaxation of renal arteries, with or without endothelium, taken from normotensive and spontaneously hypertensive (SH) rats. (akjournals.com)
  • L-arg did not significantly change relaxing effect of SNP in the isolated renal arteries with endothelium taken from SH rats, which show that L-arg, by modifying the chemical versatility of NO into redox active forms -nitrosonium (NO + ) and -nitroxyl (NO - ), produces different relaxing effects in normotensive and hypertensive isolated arteries of rats, with or without endothelium, potentiating the role of nitroxyl induced relaxation in SH rats. (akjournals.com)
  • The inferior suprarenal artery emerged from the most superior renal artery while the inferior most renal artery crossed superficial to the ureter to enter the hilum. (ijmhr.org)
  • An aberrant renal vasculature is treated with suspicion and thought to increase the complexity of anastomotic techniques. (ijmhr.org)
  • Renal artery origins and variations: angiographic evaluation of 855 consecutive patients. (radiopaedia.org)
  • Ozkan U, Oguzkurt L, Tercan F, Kizilkilic O, Koc Z, Koca N. Renal artery origins and variations: angiographic evaluation of 855 consecutive patients. (ijmhr.org)
  • Low frequency stimulation of the sympathetic system resulted in renin excretion only, intermediate frequency stimulation results on decreased urinary sodium excretion and high frequency stimulation, results on direct renal artery vasoconstriction, decrease in renal blood flow and decrease glomerular filtration rate [2, 5, 10]. (springer.com)
  • Non-contrast MR angiography provides clear, high-quality images and can be used as an effective tool for diagnosing renal artery stenosis. (news-medical.net)
  • Describe the advantages and disadvantages of this technique for diagnosing renal artery stenosis. (oncologynurseadvisor.com)
  • V. Describe the advantages and disadvantages of the alternative techniques for diagnosing renal artery stenosis. (oncologynurseadvisor.com)
  • Less common causes of renal artery stenosis are rare conditions such as fibromuscular dysplasia of the vessels (narrowing of the vessel due to internal thickening of the blood vessel wall), arteritis (inflammation of the blood vessel), or dissection (tearing and division of the blood vessel wall). (medicinenet.com)
  • In younger patients, the narrowing of the renal artery usually is due to the thickening of the artery (fibromuscular dysplasia) and it is more common in women than men. (medicinenet.com)
  • In fibromuscular dysplasia, the muscle in the artery wall grows abnormally. (mayoclinic.org)
  • Atherosclerosis and fibromuscular dysplasia can affect other arteries in your body as well as your kidney (renal) arteries and cause complications. (mayoclinic.org)
  • Renal artery disease can also be caused by fibromuscular dysplasia (FMD), a condition usually found in young women between the ages of 20 and 40. (ucdavis.edu)
  • The balance is generally caused by fibromuscular dysplasia, a congenital disorder that causes thickening of the artery walls without plaque build-up.The kidneys play an important role in regulating blood pressure by secreting a hormone called renin. (clevelandclinic.org)
  • Fibromuscular dysplasia-An inherited disorder where muscle and fibrous tissue of the renal artery wall thicken and harden into rings that block blood flow to the kidneys. (medicalcityhospital.com)
  • Young patients with fibromuscular dysplasia in the proximal renal artery often respond to balloon dilatation. (edren.org)
  • Renal artery stenosis is the narrowing of one of the renal arteries, most often caused by atherosclerosis or fibromuscular dysplasia. (wikipedia.org)
  • Angioplasty with or without stenting is the best option for the treatment of renal artery stenosis due to fibromuscular dysplasia. (wikipedia.org)
  • The two most common etiologies are fibromuscular dysplasia and atherosclerotic renal artery disease with atherosclerotic disease accounting for the vast majority of cases. (dovepress.com)
  • In fibromuscular dysplasia an abnormality of the artery causes progressive narrowing of the renal artery during growth. (edren.org)
  • The second most common cause of renal artery disease is fibromuscular dysplasia(FMD), a genetic disease that makes cells in the artery walls grow abnormally, reducing blood flow. (simstat.com)
  • Renal artery disease can also develop as a result of fibromuscular dysplasia (FMD). (nyp.org)
  • As opposed to ARAS, fibromuscular dysplasia usually affects the distal two-thirds of the main renal artery with a characteristic beaded angiographic appearance. (onlinejacc.org)
  • Cerebral angiography showed irregularities of the V3 segment of the left vertebral artery compatible with fibromuscular dysplasia. (ahajournals.org)
  • Angiography showed extensive signs of fibromuscular dysplasia involving carotid, vertebral, renal, iliac, and mesenteric arteries as well as a dissection of the left renal artery. (ahajournals.org)
  • Some of these patients may respond favorably to dilating the narrowed artery, using the technique of angioplasty . (medicinenet.com)
  • The patients that can benefit from angioplasty have a severe stenosis (75 % or greater narrowing) of the renal artery and do not have a very high renal vascular resistance. (medicinenet.com)
  • AngioScore, Inc., a developer of novel angioplasty catheters for use in the treatment of cardiovascular disease, announced today that the company has received 510(k) clearance from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to market its AngioSculpt® PTA Scoring Balloon Catheter for dilatation of lesions in renal arteries. (news-medical.net)
  • Such as angioplasty (the opening of a renal artery using a balloon or other method) or placement of a stent (a tiny expandable metal coil placed inside an artery to keep the artery open). (ohsu.edu)
  • Renal arteriogram obtained after renal percutaneous transluminal angioplasty. (medscape.com)
  • Since its introduction in 1978, percutaneous transluminal renal angioplasty (PTRA) has emerged as a highly effective technique for the correction of renal artery stenosis (RAS). (medscape.com)
  • Renal angioplasty has notable physiologic, psychological, and economic advantages over other treatment modalities, and it should now be considered the therapy of choice for renovascular HTN. (medscape.com)
  • NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - There is insufficient evidence to choose between percutaneous transluminal renal angioplasty with stent placement (PTRAS) and medical therapy alone for adults with atherosclerotic renal artery stenosis (ARAS), according to findings of an updated systematic review. (medscape.com)
  • Renal angioplasty and stenting. (mayoclinic.org)
  • Renal angioplasty - A small catheter carrying a tiny balloon is inserted through a small puncture in the groin and guided by X-ray to the renal artery. (loyolamedicine.org)
  • Surgical treatment - With the development of new and improved types of stents, renal artery angioplasty with stenting is the preferred treatment for renal artery disease. (loyolamedicine.org)
  • If angioplasty cannot be done on the artery, a surgeon may decide to repair the condition through an incision in your abdomen. (medicalcityhospital.com)
  • Although the treatment of atherosclerotic renal artery stenosis with percutaneous angioplasty, stenting, and surgical revascularization has gained widespread use, few prospective randomized controlled trials (RCTs) exist that compare these techniques with each other or against the standard of medical management alone. (ahajournals.org)
  • Renal artery stent placement, in particular, has gained increasing acceptance on the basis of historical results of renal angioplasty 1-3 ⇓ ⇓ and the attractiveness of percutaneous compared with surgical revascularization. (ahajournals.org)
  • Angioplasty is stretching an artery to widen a narrowed part of it. (edren.org)
  • Patients will be treated by standard medical therapy + stenting angioplasty of renal artery. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • Treatment is with either balloon angioplasty or a stent to re-open the artery. (sciencephoto.com)
  • If a pressure wire has not been used, once the target lesion and its severity have been confirmed, a 0.014-inch coronary angioplasty guidewire is advanced through the 4-Fr angiographic catheter and across the renal artery stenosis. (oncologynurseadvisor.com)
  • We report a 40-year-old female patient who was treated for transplant renal artery stenosis (TRAS) with angioplasty and primary stenting. (urotoday.com)
  • We present our institutional experience of endovascular management for TRAS using CO2 digital subtraction angiography (CO2-DSA) and balloon angioplasty to manage failing renal transplants. (medworm.com)
  • left artery lies behind the left renal vein, the body of the pancreas and the splenic vein , and is crossed by the inferior mesenteric vein . (wikipedia.org)
  • The left renal artery passes laterally from the abdominal aorta into the left kidney. (innerbody.com)
  • L.RA, left renal artery) suggestive of significant bilateral renal arteries stenosis. (bmj.com)
  • A nuclear renal scan (MAG3) confirmed equal right and left renal function. (sages.org)
  • My peak systolic velocity of right renal artery is 95 cm/sec whereas left renal artery is 215cm/sec. (healingwell.com)
  • The renal and systemic changes after stenosis of the left renal artery (n = 5) or sham stenosis (n = 6) in conscious dogs were studied sequentially over 25 days. (ahajournals.org)
  • Complete occulusion of left renal artery in pediatric-onset Takayasu's arteritis. (biomedsearch.com)
  • A-16-year-old male adolescent with a 4-year history of protean clinical manifestations such as fever, abdominal pain, back pain, erythema nodosum and uveitis developed complete occlusion of left renal artery. (biomedsearch.com)
  • Finally, an angiography disclosed stenosis of abdominal aorta just beneath the origin of the renal arteries as well as complete occlusion of left renal artery. (biomedsearch.com)
  • The computed tomographic (CT) scan showed a left renal infarct. (ahajournals.org)
  • Coloured frontal angiogram of the abdomen of a 48-year-old patient with stenosis (narrowing) of the left renal artery. (sciencephoto.com)
  • The left renal artery has become narrowed (indicated by arrow). (sciencephoto.com)
  • The left renal vein also receives left suprarenal and left gonadal veins, in addition to the vein coming out from the kidney. (omicsonline.org)
  • The aorta was cross-clamped distally a few centimeters below the left renal artery. (ctsnet.org)
  • The celiac, superior mesenteric, and right and left renal arteries were divided and cannulated. (ctsnet.org)
  • The left renal artery was then anastomosed via a separate graft in an end-to-side fashion to the main graft and flow was re-established. (ctsnet.org)
  • A 49 year old man was referred to our interventionist for percutaneous revascularisation for suspected bilateral renal artery stenosis. (bmj.com)
  • Bilateral renal artery stenosis, or stenosis to a solitary functioning kidney, merits specific consideration because of its additional contribution to fluid retention, loss of kidney function, and congestive heart failure. (uptodate.com)
  • Patients who have received a new kidney are significantly more likely to develop transplant renal artery stenosis (TRAS) if they are obese or over 50, according to research published in the September issue of the Journal of Renal Care. (news-medical.net)
  • Transluminal dilatation of transplant renal artery stenosis. (bmj.com)
  • Quin R O , Hamilton D N , Briggs J D , Junor B J , Semple P F . Transluminal dilatation of transplant renal artery stenosis. (bmj.com)
  • Renal dysfunction that is observed in cases of transplant renal artery stenosis (TRAS) is the direct result of significant allograft hypoperfusion that is also likely to compromise the blood supply to the distal ureter [6]. (urotoday.com)
  • One or two accessory renal arteries are frequently found, especially on the left side since they usually arise from the aorta, and may come off above (more common) or below the main artery. (wikipedia.org)
  • Provides detailed evaluation of surrounding viscera and accurately detects small accessory renal arteries. (oncologynurseadvisor.com)
  • However, accessory renal arteries can also exist. (pulsus.com)
  • The normal renal arteries enter the kidney through its hilum whereas the accessory renal arteries might enter the kidney through the hilum or through the surfaces of the kidney. (pulsus.com)
  • The more inferior accessory renal artery was initially selected and revealed no evidence of active extravasation, pseudoaneurysm, or arteriovenous (AV) fistula. (appliedradiology.com)
  • Accessory renal arteries are countered as common abdominal vascular variant. (radiopaedia.org)
  • Bilateral accessory renal arteries can occur in 10-15% of cases. (radiopaedia.org)
  • Accessory renal arteries arise from the abdominal aorta and supply the inferior pole of the kidney in majority of cases. (radiopaedia.org)
  • They found low-strength evidence of no difference in mortality, progression to end-stage renal disease, cardiovascular disease event rates, or blood pressure control between PTRAS and medical therapy, although none of the studies was powered to detect these differences. (medscape.com)
  • The newly published study is one of the largest randomized trials ever to assess the impact of renal artery stenting in patients with moderately severe obstructive renovascular disease, with the incidence of important cardiovascular and renal adverse events its major endpoints. (medpagetoday.com)
  • Primary endpoints included death from cardiovascular or renal causes, stroke, heart attack, hospitalization for congestive heart failure, progressive renal insufficiency, or the need for permanent renal-replacement therapy. (medpagetoday.com)
  • They concluded that this regimen provided " remarkably good cardiovascular and renal outcomes" despite the advanced age and comorbidities of the study participants. (medpagetoday.com)
  • There were also no significant differences in blood pressure control and cardiovascular morbidity and mortality, the researchers said, or in the composite outcome of worsening renal function and death. (medpagetoday.com)
  • If you have plaque buildup in the renal arteries, you will also need treatment for cardiovascular risk factors such as high blood pressure , high cholesterol and diabetes . (loyolamedicine.org)
  • Lipidlowering drugs (statins) could reduce renal failure progression and could reduce the overall high cardiovascular risk. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • The Stenting of Renal Artery Stenosis in Coronary Artery Disease (RASCAD) study is a randomized controlled trial designed to evaluate the effect of renal artery stenting+medical therapy versus medical therapy alone on left ventricular mass progression and cardiovascular morbidity and mortality in patients affected by coronary artery disease and renal artery stenosis. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • The CORAL (Cardiovascular Outcomes in Renal Atherosclerotic Lesions) study, which was the first randomized, controlled study to look at this issue, involved 947 participants at more than 100 sites in the U.S., Canada, South American, Europe, Australia and New Zealand. (medindia.net)
  • Participants were then followed for up to seven years to monitor for significant clinical events, such as cardiovascular or renal death, myocardial infarction, stroke, hospitalization for congestive heart failure, progressive renal insufficiency or renal replacement therapy. (medindia.net)
  • The goal for either pharmacological or revascularization therapy of ARAS should be normalization of blood pressure, preservation of renal function, and reduction of the risk of cardiovascular events. (onlinejacc.org)
  • Since, optimal therapy in patients with ARAS should include optimal blood pressure control with pharmacological agents, modification of cardiovascular risk factors, the appropriate use of antiplatelet therapy, and lipid-lowering therapy, the clinically relevant question then becomes which patients are likely to benefit from renal artery revascularization and who should be targeted for such therapies. (onlinejacc.org)
  • Cardiovascular disease is common in older adults with end-stage renal disease who are undergoing regular dialysis, but little is known about the prevalence and extent of cardiovascular disease in children and young adults with end-stage renal disease. (nih.gov)
  • 2.3.3 The Specialist Advisers listed key additional efficacy outcomes as reduction in cardiovascular morbidity and mortality, improvement in the parameters of renal function and regression in left ventricular mass. (nice.org.uk)
  • Kidney (or renal) artery disease is one way that cardiovascular disease affects the system that distributes blood throughout your body. (secondscount.org)
  • Effective treatment of renal artery stenosis can improve blood pressure control, stabilize kidney function, and reduce incidence of serious cardiovascular events. (healthcanal.com)
  • The Cardiovascular Outcomes in Renal Atherosclerotic Lesions study, known as CORAL, studied 947 patients whose plaque build-up in the renal artery narrowed the blood vessel by 60 percent or more. (healthcanal.com)
  • We can help you prevent future cardiovascular problems with renal artery stenosis treatment on the Central Coast of California. (dignityhealth.org)
  • Dignity Health's award-winning cardiovascular doctors provide effective renal artery disease treatment on the Central Coast of California. (dignityhealth.org)
  • TORONTO, June 17 -- In patients with narrowing of the renal artery, stents had no clear effect on the progression of impaired renal function, European researchers said. (medpagetoday.com)
  • According to Dworkin, these results are significant as they will lead to a reduction in the number of renal stents that are inserted in patients who experience renal-artery stenosis. (medindia.net)
  • Stents do a good job in opening the arteries, but less invasive medical therapies, which have only gotten better over time, means that patients can often avoid more invasive stenting procedures," he said. (medindia.net)
  • You found that stents successfully opened the arteries. (healthcanal.com)
  • Andreas Gruntzig revolutionized the technique in 1974 when he developed a soft, flexible, double-lumen balloon catheter for use in coronary arteries. (medscape.com)
  • The test is performed by threading a catheter through the main vessel of the pelvis, up to the renal artery that leads into the kidney. (medlineplus.gov)
  • Contrast medium is then injected into the renal artery through the catheter, and images of the vessels of the kidney are taken. (medlineplus.gov)
  • Before an X-ray is taken, your doctor injects a dye into the renal arteries through a long, thin tube (catheter) to outline the arteries and show blood flow more clearly. (mayoclinic.org)
  • When the catheter is guided to the narrowed part of the artery, the balloon is inflated. (loyolamedicine.org)
  • Renal artery stenting - A catheter is inserted through a small puncture site or incision into a blood vessel in the arm or leg and guided into the renal artery. (loyolamedicine.org)
  • The catheter has a small balloon that inflates to widen the narrowing in the artery. (loyolamedicine.org)
  • We found an early renal artery spasm, which was probably caused by direct manipulation of the catheter. (ahajournals.org)
  • The deflated balloon catheter is inserted through an artery in the groin and guided to the narrowed segment of the artery. (nyp.org)
  • When the catheter reaches the blockage, the balloon is inflated to widen the narrowed artery. (nyp.org)
  • If renal or mesenteric artery disease is very advanced, or if blockages develop in an artery that is difficult to reach with a catheter, arterial bypass surgery may be necessary to restore blood flow. (nyp.org)
  • If imaging of the renal arteries has been obtained, radial or brachial artery access is often preferred if the renal arteries are oriented cephalad for ease of engagement of the guiding catheter and stent delivery. (oncologynurseadvisor.com)
  • Typically the target renal artery is engaged with a long 4-Fr angiographic catheter (internal mammary, Judkins right-4, etc.) placed through the lumen of a 6-Fr guiding catheter (125 cm multipurpose from the arm, or 55 cm hockey stick or renal curve from the femoral access). (oncologynurseadvisor.com)
  • A catheter is introduced via the femoral artery and advanced into each renal artery under fluoroscopic control. (nice.org.uk)
  • The catheter is connected to a generator which delivers low-power radiofrequency energy in 2-minute applications to each renal artery at 4-6 points along its length, in a spiral pattern. (nice.org.uk)
  • A 4 French cobra 2 catheter was advanced into a sub-segmental artery in the inter-upper polar region supplying a large pseudoaneurysm and AV fistula. (appliedradiology.com)
  • Possible complications of renal artery stenosis are chronic kidney disease and coronary artery disease. (wikipedia.org)
  • Follow-up visits at times ranging from 6 months to 9 years after the procedure showed normal renal function without evidence of complications in all surviving patients. (dovepress.com)
  • Complications of Renal Artery Stenosis are secondary conditions, symptoms, or other disorders that are caused by Renal Artery Stenosis. (rightdiagnosis.com)
  • In many cases the distinction between symptoms of Renal Artery Stenosis and complications of Renal Artery Stenosis is unclear or arbitrary. (rightdiagnosis.com)
  • The procedure appears to be safe in patients with multiple arteries, with similar complications rates. (scielo.br)
  • Thickening and loss of elasticity of the walls of medium and large muscular arteries with lesions in the innermost layer. (citizendium.org)
  • Renal artery stenosis may cause renal failure in some patients. (medicinenet.com)
  • Renal artery stenosis may cause no signs or symptoms until the condition reaches an advanced state. (mayoclinic.org)
  • Typically, unilateral (one-sided) renal artery stenosis may be related to high blood pressure whereas bilateral (two-sided) renal artery stenosis is more often related to diminished kidney function. (rxlist.com)
  • 4,6,7 Although most renal artery aneurysms are solitary and unilateral, as many as 30% are multiple and 20% are bilateral. (hcplive.com)
  • Unilateral Aciduria in Renal Artery Stenosis. (annals.org)
  • To explore the therapeutic efficacy and outcome of superselective transcatheter renal artery embolization for the treatment of hemorrhage from non-iatrogenic blunt renal trauma (BRT). (dovepress.com)
  • Sixteen patients who received superselective transcatheter renal artery embolization for non-iatrogenic BRT hemorrhage between January 2003 and December 2012 were reviewed retrospectively. (dovepress.com)
  • Superselective transcatheter renal artery embolization is an effective minimally invasive therapy for the treatment of BRT hemorrhage. (dovepress.com)
  • Zieliński H. Renal artery embolization in renal cell carcinoma patients. (termedia.pl)
  • Play media Most cases of renal artery stenosis are asymptomatic, and the main problem is high blood pressure that cannot be controlled with medication. (wikipedia.org)
  • This special type of X-ray exam helps your doctor find the blockage in the renal arteries and sometimes open the narrowed part with a balloon and stent. (mayoclinic.org)
  • I showed some blockage in one of my arteries. (healthboards.com)
  • A stent is a small tube that holds open the artery at the site of the blockage. (nyp.org)
  • Imaging tests allow doctors to determine if one or both of your main kidney arteries is narrowed or blocked and how severe the blockage is. (simstat.com)
  • It is associated with increased morbidity because patients with severe HTN who have renovascular HTN are at increased risk for renal insufficiency. (medscape.com)
  • Consider alternative screening in Renal Insufficiency (esp. (fpnotebook.com)
  • Most people with renal artery stenosis have no signs and symptoms. (mayoclinic.org)
  • Novel, vessel anatomy adjusting drug-coated balloon-Preclinical evaluation in peripheral porcine arteries. (bioportfolio.com)
  • Filing for pre-market approval with the FDA is a significant step forward for us in bringing our new renal stent to market in the U.S.,' said Rob Lyles, vice president and global business unit leader of Cook Medical's Peripheral Intervention division. (news-medical.net)