Renal Artery: A branch of the abdominal aorta which supplies the kidneys, adrenal glands and ureters.Renal Artery Obstruction: Narrowing or occlusion of the RENAL ARTERY or arteries. It is due usually to ATHEROSCLEROSIS; FIBROMUSCULAR DYSPLASIA; THROMBOSIS; EMBOLISM, or external pressure. The reduced renal perfusion can lead to renovascular hypertension (HYPERTENSION, RENOVASCULAR).Arteries: The vessels carrying blood away from the heart.Hypertension, Renovascular: Hypertension due to RENAL ARTERY OBSTRUCTION or compression.Pulmonary Artery: The short wide vessel arising from the conus arteriosus of the right ventricle and conveying unaerated blood to the lungs.Carotid Arteries: Either of the two principal arteries on both sides of the neck that supply blood to the head and neck; each divides into two branches, the internal carotid artery and the external carotid artery.Femoral Artery: The main artery of the thigh, a continuation of the external iliac artery.Mesenteric Arteries: Arteries which arise from the abdominal aorta and distribute to most of the intestines.Angiography: Radiography of blood vessels after injection of a contrast medium.Iliac Artery: Either of two large arteries originating from the abdominal aorta; they supply blood to the pelvis, abdominal wall and legs.Cerebral Arteries: The arterial blood vessels supplying the CEREBRUM.Renal Veins: Short thick veins which return blood from the kidneys to the vena cava.Basilar Artery: The artery formed by the union of the right and left vertebral arteries; it runs from the lower to the upper border of the pons, where it bifurcates into the two posterior cerebral arteries.Angioplasty, Balloon: Use of a balloon catheter for dilation of an occluded artery. It is used in treatment of arterial occlusive diseases, including renal artery stenosis and arterial occlusions in the leg. For the specific technique of BALLOON DILATION in coronary arteries, ANGIOPLASTY, BALLOON, CORONARY is available.Kidney: Body organ that filters blood for the secretion of URINE and that regulates ion concentrations.Stents: Devices that provide support for tubular structures that are being anastomosed or for body cavities during skin grafting.Aneurysm: Pathological outpouching or sac-like dilatation in the wall of any blood vessel (ARTERIES or VEINS) or the heart (HEART ANEURYSM). It indicates a thin and weakened area in the wall which may later rupture. Aneurysms are classified by location, etiology, or other characteristics.Hypertension, Renal: Persistent high BLOOD PRESSURE due to KIDNEY DISEASES, such as those involving the renal parenchyma, the renal vasculature, or tumors that secrete RENIN.Aorta, Abdominal: The aorta from the DIAPHRAGM to the bifurcation into the right and left common iliac arteries.Celiac Artery: The arterial trunk that arises from the abdominal aorta and after a short course divides into the left gastric, common hepatic and splenic arteries.Renal Circulation: The circulation of the BLOOD through the vessels of the KIDNEY.Vertebral Artery: The first branch of the SUBCLAVIAN ARTERY with distribution to muscles of the NECK; VERTEBRAE; SPINAL CORD; CEREBELLUM; and interior of the CEREBRUM.Coronary Artery Bypass: Surgical therapy of ischemic coronary artery disease achieved by grafting a section of saphenous vein, internal mammary artery, or other substitute between the aorta and the obstructed coronary artery distal to the obstructive lesion.Mesenteric Artery, Superior: A large vessel supplying the whole length of the small intestine except the superior part of the duodenum. It also supplies the cecum and the ascending part of the colon and about half the transverse part of the colon. It arises from the anterior surface of the aorta below the celiac artery at the level of the first lumbar vertebra.Radial Artery: The direct continuation of the brachial trunk, originating at the bifurcation of the brachial artery opposite the neck of the radius. Its branches may be divided into three groups corresponding to the three regions in which the vessel is situated, the forearm, wrist, and hand.Mammary Arteries: Arteries originating from the subclavian or axillary arteries and distributing to the anterior thoracic wall, mediastinal structures, diaphragm, pectoral muscles and mammary gland.Splenic Artery: The largest branch of the celiac trunk with distribution to the spleen, pancreas, stomach and greater omentum.Angioplasty: Reconstruction or repair of a blood vessel, which includes the widening of a pathological narrowing of an artery or vein by the removal of atheromatous plaque material and/or the endothelial lining as well, or by dilatation (BALLOON ANGIOPLASTY) to compress an ATHEROMA. Except for ENDARTERECTOMY, usually these procedures are performed via catheterization as minimally invasive ENDOVASCULAR PROCEDURES.Carotid Artery, Internal: Branch of the common carotid artery which supplies the anterior part of the brain, the eye and its appendages, the forehead and nose.Subclavian Artery: Artery arising from the brachiocephalic trunk on the right side and from the arch of the aorta on the left side. It distributes to the neck, thoracic wall, spinal cord, brain, meninges, and upper limb.Hepatic Artery: A branch of the celiac artery that distributes to the stomach, pancreas, duodenum, liver, gallbladder, and greater omentum.Blood Pressure: PRESSURE of the BLOOD on the ARTERIES and other BLOOD VESSELS.Treatment Outcome: Evaluation undertaken to assess the results or consequences of management and procedures used in combating disease in order to determine the efficacy, effectiveness, safety, and practicability of these interventions in individual cases or series.Carotid Artery Diseases: Pathological conditions involving the CAROTID ARTERIES, including the common, internal, and external carotid arteries. ATHEROSCLEROSIS and TRAUMA are relatively frequent causes of carotid artery pathology.Magnetic Resonance Angiography: Non-invasive method of vascular imaging and determination of internal anatomy without injection of contrast media or radiation exposure. The technique is used especially in CEREBRAL ANGIOGRAPHY as well as for studies of other vascular structures.Brachial Artery: The continuation of the axillary artery; it branches into the radial and ulnar arteries.Tomography, X-Ray Computed: Tomography using x-ray transmission and a computer algorithm to reconstruct the image.Nephrectomy: Excision of kidney.Radioisotope Renography: Graphic tracing over a time period of radioactivity measured externally over the kidneys following intravenous injection of a radionuclide which is taken up and excreted by the kidneys.Aortography: Radiographic visualization of the aorta and its branches by injection of contrast media, using percutaneous puncture or catheterization procedures.Angiography, Digital Subtraction: A method of delineating blood vessels by subtracting a tissue background image from an image of tissue plus intravascular contrast material that attenuates the X-ray photons. The background image is determined from a digitized image taken a few moments before injection of the contrast material. The resulting angiogram is a high-contrast image of the vessel. This subtraction technique allows extraction of a high-intensity signal from the superimposed background information. The image is thus the result of the differential absorption of X-rays by different tissues.Coronary Vessels: The veins and arteries of the HEART.Blood Vessel Prosthesis Implantation: Surgical insertion of BLOOD VESSEL PROSTHESES to repair injured or diseased blood vessels.Carotid Artery, Common: The two principal arteries supplying the structures of the head and neck. They ascend in the neck, one on each side, and at the level of the upper border of the thyroid cartilage, each divides into two branches, the external (CAROTID ARTERY, EXTERNAL) and internal (CAROTID ARTERY, INTERNAL) carotid arteries.Aortic Aneurysm, Abdominal: An abnormal balloon- or sac-like dilatation in the wall of the ABDOMINAL AORTA which gives rise to the visceral, the parietal, and the terminal (iliac) branches below the aortic hiatus at the diaphragm.Vasoconstriction: The physiological narrowing of BLOOD VESSELS by contraction of the VASCULAR SMOOTH MUSCLE.Iodohippuric Acid: An iodine-containing compound used in pyelography as a radiopaque medium. If labeled with radioiodine, it can be used for studies of renal function.Ultrasonography, Doppler, Duplex: Ultrasonography applying the Doppler effect combined with real-time imaging. The real-time image is created by rapid movement of the ultrasound beam. A powerful advantage of this technique is the ability to estimate the velocity of flow from the Doppler shift frequency.Vascular Surgical Procedures: Operative procedures for the treatment of vascular disorders.Vasodilation: The physiological widening of BLOOD VESSELS by relaxing the underlying VASCULAR SMOOTH MUSCLE.Arteriosclerosis: Thickening and loss of elasticity of the walls of ARTERIES of all sizes. There are many forms classified by the types of lesions and arteries involved, such as ATHEROSCLEROSIS with fatty lesions in the ARTERIAL INTIMA of medium and large muscular arteries.Arterial Occlusive Diseases: Pathological processes which result in the partial or complete obstruction of ARTERIES. They are characterized by greatly reduced or absence of blood flow through these vessels. They are also known as arterial insufficiency.Ophthalmic Artery: Artery originating from the internal carotid artery and distributing to the eye, orbit and adjacent facial structures.Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Dogs: The domestic dog, Canis familiaris, comprising about 400 breeds, of the carnivore family CANIDAE. They are worldwide in distribution and live in association with people. (Walker's Mammals of the World, 5th ed, p1065)Vascular Patency: The degree to which BLOOD VESSELS are not blocked or obstructed.Muscle, Smooth, Vascular: The nonstriated involuntary muscle tissue of blood vessels.Blood Vessel Prosthesis: Device constructed of either synthetic or biological material that is used for the repair of injured or diseased blood vessels.Retrospective Studies: Studies used to test etiologic hypotheses in which inferences about an exposure to putative causal factors are derived from data relating to characteristics of persons under study or to events or experiences in their past. The essential feature is that some of the persons under study have the disease or outcome of interest and their characteristics are compared with those of unaffected persons.Umbilical Arteries: Specialized arterial vessels in the umbilical cord. They carry waste and deoxygenated blood from the FETUS to the mother via the PLACENTA. In humans, there are usually two umbilical arteries but sometimes one.Middle Cerebral Artery: The largest of the cerebral arteries. It trifurcates into temporal, frontal, and parietal branches supplying blood to most of the parenchyma of these lobes in the CEREBRAL CORTEX. These are the areas involved in motor, sensory, and speech activities.Renin: A highly specific (Leu-Leu) endopeptidase that generates ANGIOTENSIN I from its precursor ANGIOTENSINOGEN, leading to a cascade of reactions which elevate BLOOD PRESSURE and increase sodium retention by the kidney in the RENIN-ANGIOTENSIN SYSTEM. The enzyme was formerly listed as EC 3.4.99.19.Captopril: A potent and specific inhibitor of PEPTIDYL-DIPEPTIDASE A. It blocks the conversion of ANGIOTENSIN I to ANGIOTENSIN II, a vasoconstrictor and important regulator of arterial blood pressure. Captopril acts to suppress the RENIN-ANGIOTENSIN SYSTEM and inhibits pressure responses to exogenous angiotensin.Thoracic Arteries: Arteries originating from the subclavian or axillary arteries and distributing to the anterior thoracic wall, mediastinal structures, diaphragm, pectoral muscles, mammary gland and the axillary aspect of the chest wall.Technetium Tc 99m Pentetate: A technetium imaging agent used in renal scintigraphy, computed tomography, lung ventilation imaging, gastrointestinal scintigraphy, and many other procedures which employ radionuclide imaging agents.Endothelium, Vascular: Single pavement layer of cells which line the luminal surface of the entire vascular system and regulate the transport of macromolecules and blood components.Temporal Arteries: Arteries arising from the external carotid or the maxillary artery and distributing to the temporal region.Ultrasonography, Doppler: Ultrasonography applying the Doppler effect, with frequency-shifted ultrasound reflections produced by moving targets (usually red blood cells) in the bloodstream along the ultrasound axis in direct proportion to the velocity of movement of the targets, to determine both direction and velocity of blood flow. (Stedman, 25th ed)Bronchial Arteries: Left bronchial arteries arise from the thoracic aorta, the right from the first aortic intercostal or the upper left bronchial artery; they supply the bronchi and the lower trachea.Follow-Up Studies: Studies in which individuals or populations are followed to assess the outcome of exposures, procedures, or effects of a characteristic, e.g., occurrence of disease.Hypertension: Persistently high systemic arterial BLOOD PRESSURE. Based on multiple readings (BLOOD PRESSURE DETERMINATION), hypertension is currently defined as when SYSTOLIC PRESSURE is consistently greater than 140 mm Hg or when DIASTOLIC PRESSURE is consistently 90 mm Hg or more.Vasoconstrictor Agents: Drugs used to cause constriction of the blood vessels.Popliteal Artery: The continuation of the femoral artery coursing through the popliteal fossa; it divides into the anterior and posterior tibial arteries.Ulnar Artery: The larger of the two terminal branches of the brachial artery, beginning about one centimeter distal to the bend of the elbow. Like the RADIAL ARTERY, its branches may be divided into three groups corresponding to their locations in the forearm, wrist, and hand.Glomerular Filtration Rate: The volume of water filtered out of plasma through glomerular capillary walls into Bowman's capsules per unit of time. It is considered to be equivalent to INULIN clearance.Coronary Angiography: Radiography of the vascular system of the heart muscle after injection of a contrast medium.CreatinineRegional Blood Flow: The flow of BLOOD through or around an organ or region of the body.Embolization, Therapeutic: A method of hemostasis utilizing various agents such as Gelfoam, silastic, metal, glass, or plastic pellets, autologous clot, fat, and muscle as emboli. It has been used in the treatment of spinal cord and INTRACRANIAL ARTERIOVENOUS MALFORMATIONS, renal arteriovenous fistulas, gastrointestinal bleeding, epistaxis, hypersplenism, certain highly vascular tumors, traumatic rupture of blood vessels, and control of operative hemorrhage.Vasodilator Agents: Drugs used to cause dilation of the blood vessels.Ultrasonography, Doppler, Color: Ultrasonography applying the Doppler effect, with the superposition of flow information as colors on a gray scale in a real-time image. This type of ultrasonography is well-suited to identifying the location of high-velocity flow (such as in a stenosis) or of mapping the extent of flow in a certain region.Atherosclerosis: A thickening and loss of elasticity of the walls of ARTERIES that occurs with formation of ATHEROSCLEROTIC PLAQUES within the ARTERIAL INTIMA.Uterine Artery: A branch arising from the internal iliac artery in females, that supplies blood to the uterus.Hemodynamics: The movement and the forces involved in the movement of the blood through the CARDIOVASCULAR SYSTEM.Postoperative Complications: Pathologic processes that affect patients after a surgical procedure. They may or may not be related to the disease for which the surgery was done, and they may or may not be direct results of the surgery.Takayasu Arteritis: A chronic inflammatory process that affects the AORTA and its primary branches, such as the brachiocephalic artery (BRACHIOCEPHALIC TRUNK) and CAROTID ARTERIES. It results in progressive arterial stenosis, occlusion, and aneurysm formation. The pulse in the arm is hard to detect. Patients with aortitis syndrome often exhibit retinopathy.Carotid Artery, External: Branch of the common carotid artery which supplies the exterior of the head, the face, and the greater part of the neck.Prospective Studies: Observation of a population for a sufficient number of persons over a sufficient number of years to generate incidence or mortality rates subsequent to the selection of the study group.Constriction: The act of constricting.Carotid Artery Injuries: Damages to the CAROTID ARTERIES caused either by blunt force or penetrating trauma, such as CRANIOCEREBRAL TRAUMA; THORACIC INJURIES; and NECK INJURIES. Damaged carotid arteries can lead to CAROTID ARTERY THROMBOSIS; CAROTID-CAVERNOUS SINUS FISTULA; pseudoaneurysm formation; and INTERNAL CAROTID ARTERY DISSECTION. (From Am J Forensic Med Pathol 1997, 18:251; J Trauma 1994, 37:473)Ischemia: A hypoperfusion of the BLOOD through an organ or tissue caused by a PATHOLOGIC CONSTRICTION or obstruction of its BLOOD VESSELS, or an absence of BLOOD CIRCULATION.Swine: Any of various animals that constitute the family Suidae and comprise stout-bodied, short-legged omnivorous mammals with thick skin, usually covered with coarse bristles, a rather long mobile snout, and small tail. Included are the genera Babyrousa, Phacochoerus (wart hogs), and Sus, the latter containing the domestic pig (see SUS SCROFA).Coronary Disease: An imbalance between myocardial functional requirements and the capacity of the CORONARY VESSELS to supply sufficient blood flow. It is a form of MYOCARDIAL ISCHEMIA (insufficient blood supply to the heart muscle) caused by a decreased capacity of the coronary vessels.Anastomosis, Surgical: Surgical union or shunt between ducts, tubes or vessels. It may be end-to-end, end-to-side, side-to-end, or side-to-side.Aneurysm, False: Not an aneurysm but a well-defined collection of blood and CONNECTIVE TISSUE outside the wall of a blood vessel or the heart. It is the containment of a ruptured blood vessel or heart, such as sealing a rupture of the left ventricle. False aneurysm is formed by organized THROMBUS and HEMATOMA in surrounding tissue.Kidney Function Tests: Laboratory tests used to evaluate how well the kidneys are working through examination of blood and urine.Endovascular Procedures: Minimally invasive procedures, diagnostic or therapeutic, performed within the BLOOD VESSELS. They may be perfomed via ANGIOSCOPY; INTERVENTIONAL MAGNETIC RESONANCE IMAGING; INTERVENTIONAL RADIOGRAPHY; or INTERVENTIONAL ULTRASONOGRAPHY.Prosthesis Design: The plan and delineation of prostheses in general or a specific prosthesis.Rats, Sprague-Dawley: A strain of albino rat used widely for experimental purposes because of its calmness and ease of handling. It was developed by the Sprague-Dawley Animal Company.Antihypertensive Agents: Drugs used in the treatment of acute or chronic vascular HYPERTENSION regardless of pharmacological mechanism. Among the antihypertensive agents are DIURETICS; (especially DIURETICS, THIAZIDE); ADRENERGIC BETA-ANTAGONISTS; ADRENERGIC ALPHA-ANTAGONISTS; ANGIOTENSIN-CONVERTING ENZYME INHIBITORS; CALCIUM CHANNEL BLOCKERS; GANGLIONIC BLOCKERS; and VASODILATOR AGENTS.Mesenteric Artery, Inferior: The artery supplying nearly all the left half of the transverse colon, the whole of the descending colon, the sigmoid colon, and the greater part of the rectum. It is smaller than the superior mesenteric artery (MESENTERIC ARTERY, SUPERIOR) and arises from the aorta above its bifurcation into the common iliac arteries.Aneurysm, Dissecting: Aneurysm caused by a tear in the TUNICA INTIMA of a blood vessel leading to interstitial HEMORRHAGE, and splitting (dissecting) of the vessel wall, often involving the AORTA. Dissection between the intima and media causes luminal occlusion. Dissection at the media, or between the media and the outer adventitia causes aneurismal dilation.Infarction: Formation of an infarct, which is NECROSIS in tissue due to local ISCHEMIA resulting from obstruction of BLOOD CIRCULATION, most commonly by a THROMBUS or EMBOLUS.Constriction, Pathologic: The condition of an anatomical structure's being constricted beyond normal dimensions.Catheterization: Use or insertion of a tubular device into a duct, blood vessel, hollow organ, or body cavity for injecting or withdrawing fluids for diagnostic or therapeutic purposes. It differs from INTUBATION in that the tube here is used to restore or maintain patency in obstructions.Norepinephrine: Precursor of epinephrine that is secreted by the adrenal medulla and is a widespread central and autonomic neurotransmitter. Norepinephrine is the principal transmitter of most postganglionic sympathetic fibers and of the diffuse projection system in the brain arising from the locus ceruleus. It is also found in plants and is used pharmacologically as a sympathomimetic.Technetium Tc 99m Mertiatide: A technetium diagnostic aid used in renal function determination.Infarction, Middle Cerebral Artery: NECROSIS occurring in the MIDDLE CEREBRAL ARTERY distribution system which brings blood to the entire lateral aspects of each CEREBRAL HEMISPHERE. Clinical signs include impaired cognition; APHASIA; AGRAPHIA; weak and numbness in the face and arms, contralaterally or bilaterally depending on the infarction.Axillary Artery: The continuation of the subclavian artery; it distributes over the upper limb, axilla, chest and shoulder.Risk Factors: An aspect of personal behavior or lifestyle, environmental exposure, or inborn or inherited characteristic, which, on the basis of epidemiologic evidence, is known to be associated with a health-related condition considered important to prevent.Flank Pain: Pain emanating from below the RIBS and above the ILIUM.Nitric Oxide: A free radical gas produced endogenously by a variety of mammalian cells, synthesized from ARGININE by NITRIC OXIDE SYNTHASE. Nitric oxide is one of the ENDOTHELIUM-DEPENDENT RELAXING FACTORS released by the vascular endothelium and mediates VASODILATION. It also inhibits platelet aggregation, induces disaggregation of aggregated platelets, and inhibits platelet adhesion to the vascular endothelium. Nitric oxide activates cytosolic GUANYLATE CYCLASE and thus elevates intracellular levels of CYCLIC GMP.Endarterectomy: Surgical excision, performed under general anesthesia, of the atheromatous tunica intima of an artery. When reconstruction of an artery is performed as an endovascular procedure through a catheter, it is called ATHERECTOMY.Vascular Diseases: Pathological processes involving any of the BLOOD VESSELS in the cardiac or peripheral circulation. They include diseases of ARTERIES; VEINS; and rest of the vasculature system in the body.Retinal Artery Occlusion: Sudden ISCHEMIA in the RETINA due to blocked blood flow through the CENTRAL RETINAL ARTERY or its branches leading to sudden complete or partial loss of vision, respectively, in the eye.Aortic Aneurysm: An abnormal balloon- or sac-like dilatation in the wall of AORTA.Aneurysm, Ruptured: The tearing or bursting of the weakened wall of the aneurysmal sac, usually heralded by sudden worsening pain. The great danger of a ruptured aneurysm is the large amount of blood spilling into the surrounding tissues and cavities, causing HEMORRHAGIC SHOCK.Angiotensin II: An octapeptide that is a potent but labile vasoconstrictor. It is produced from angiotensin I after the removal of two amino acids at the C-terminal by ANGIOTENSIN CONVERTING ENZYME. The amino acid in position 5 varies in different species. To block VASOCONSTRICTION and HYPERTENSION effect of angiotensin II, patients are often treated with ACE INHIBITORS or with ANGIOTENSIN II TYPE 1 RECEPTOR BLOCKERS.Aortic Diseases: Pathological processes involving any part of the AORTA.Rabbits: The species Oryctolagus cuniculus, in the family Leporidae, order LAGOMORPHA. Rabbits are born in burrows, furless, and with eyes and ears closed. In contrast with HARES, rabbits have 22 chromosome pairs.Acetylcholine: A neurotransmitter found at neuromuscular junctions, autonomic ganglia, parasympathetic effector junctions, a subset of sympathetic effector junctions, and at many sites in the central nervous system.Carotid Artery Thrombosis: Blood clot formation in any part of the CAROTID ARTERIES. This may produce CAROTID STENOSIS or occlusion of the vessel, leading to TRANSIENT ISCHEMIC ATTACK; CEREBRAL INFARCTION; or AMAUROSIS FUGAX.Ligation: Application of a ligature to tie a vessel or strangulate a part.Aorta, Thoracic: The portion of the descending aorta proceeding from the arch of the aorta and extending to the DIAPHRAGM, eventually connecting to the ABDOMINAL AORTA.Aorta: The main trunk of the systemic arteries.Meningeal Arteries: Arteries which supply the dura mater.Kidney Transplantation: The transference of a kidney from one human or animal to another.Acute Kidney Injury: Abrupt reduction in kidney function. Acute kidney injury encompasses the entire spectrum of the syndrome including acute kidney failure; ACUTE KIDNEY TUBULAR NECROSIS; and other less severe conditions.Rats, Wistar: A strain of albino rat developed at the Wistar Institute that has spread widely at other institutions. This has markedly diluted the original strain.Injections, Intra-Arterial: Delivery of drugs into an artery.Cerebral Angiography: Radiography of the vascular system of the brain after injection of a contrast medium.Incidental Findings: Unanticipated information discovered in the course of testing or medical care. Used in discussions of information that may have social or psychological consequences, such as when it is learned that a child's biological father is someone other than the putative father, or that a person tested for one disease or disorder has, or is at risk for, something else.Disease Models, Animal: Naturally occurring or experimentally induced animal diseases with pathological processes sufficiently similar to those of human diseases. They are used as study models for human diseases.Feasibility Studies: Studies to determine the advantages or disadvantages, practicability, or capability of accomplishing a projected plan, study, or project.Carotid Stenosis: Narrowing or stricture of any part of the CAROTID ARTERIES, most often due to atherosclerotic plaque formation. Ulcerations may form in atherosclerotic plaques and induce THROMBUS formation. Platelet or cholesterol emboli may arise from stenotic carotid lesions and induce a TRANSIENT ISCHEMIC ATTACK; CEREBROVASCULAR ACCIDENT; or temporary blindness (AMAUROSIS FUGAX). (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, pp 822-3)Saphenous Vein: The vein which drains the foot and leg.Anuria: Absence of urine formation. It is usually associated with complete bilateral ureteral (URETER) obstruction, complete lower urinary tract obstruction, or unilateral ureteral obstruction when a solitary kidney is present.Pulsatile Flow: Rhythmic, intermittent propagation of a fluid through a BLOOD VESSEL or piping system, in contrast to constant, smooth propagation, which produces laminar flow.Radiography, Interventional: Diagnostic and therapeutic procedures that are invasive or surgical in nature, and require the expertise of a specially trained radiologist. In general, they are more invasive than diagnostic imaging but less invasive than major surgery. They often involve catheterization, fluoroscopy, or computed tomography. Some examples include percutaneous transhepatic cholangiography, percutaneous transthoracic biopsy, balloon angioplasty, and arterial embolization.Predictive Value of Tests: In screening and diagnostic tests, the probability that a person with a positive test is a true positive (i.e., has the disease), is referred to as the predictive value of a positive test; whereas, the predictive value of a negative test is the probability that the person with a negative test does not have the disease. Predictive value is related to the sensitivity and specificity of the test.Iohexol: An effective non-ionic, water-soluble contrast agent which is used in myelography, arthrography, nephroangiography, arteriography, and other radiographic procedures. Its low systemic toxicity is the combined result of low chemotoxicity and low osmolality.Contrast Media: Substances used to allow enhanced visualization of tissues.Sympathectomy: The removal or interruption of some part of the sympathetic nervous system for therapeutic or research purposes.Sensitivity and Specificity: Binary classification measures to assess test results. Sensitivity or recall rate is the proportion of true positives. Specificity is the probability of correctly determining the absence of a condition. (From Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 2d ed)Renal Insufficiency: Conditions in which the KIDNEYS perform below the normal level in the ability to remove wastes, concentrate URINE, and maintain ELECTROLYTE BALANCE; BLOOD PRESSURE; and CALCIUM metabolism. Renal insufficiency can be classified by the degree of kidney damage (as measured by the level of PROTEINURIA) and reduction in GLOMERULAR FILTRATION RATE.Vascular Malformations: A spectrum of congenital, inherited, or acquired abnormalities in BLOOD VESSELS that can adversely affect the normal blood flow in ARTERIES or VEINS. Most are congenital defects such as abnormal communications between blood vessels (fistula), shunting of arterial blood directly into veins bypassing the CAPILLARIES (arteriovenous malformations), formation of large dilated blood blood-filled vessels (cavernous angioma), and swollen capillaries (capillary telangiectases). In rare cases, vascular malformations can result from trauma or diseases.Severity of Illness Index: Levels within a diagnostic group which are established by various measurement criteria applied to the seriousness of a patient's disorder.Dose-Response Relationship, Drug: The relationship between the dose of an administered drug and the response of the organism to the drug.Risk Assessment: The qualitative or quantitative estimation of the likelihood of adverse effects that may result from exposure to specified health hazards or from the absence of beneficial influences. (Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 1988)Vascular Resistance: The force that opposes the flow of BLOOD through a vascular bed. It is equal to the difference in BLOOD PRESSURE across the vascular bed divided by the CARDIAC OUTPUT.Papaverine: An alkaloid found in opium but not closely related to the other opium alkaloids in its structure or pharmacological actions. It is a direct-acting smooth muscle relaxant used in the treatment of impotence and as a vasodilator, especially for cerebral vasodilation. The mechanism of its pharmacological actions is not clear, but it apparently can inhibit phosphodiesterases and it may have direct actions on calcium channels.Indomethacin: A non-steroidal anti-inflammatory agent (NSAID) that inhibits the enzyme cyclooxygenase necessary for the formation of prostaglandins and other autacoids. It also inhibits the motility of polymorphonuclear leukocytes.Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitors: A class of drugs whose main indications are the treatment of hypertension and heart failure. They exert their hemodynamic effect mainly by inhibiting the renin-angiotensin system. They also modulate sympathetic nervous system activity and increase prostaglandin synthesis. They cause mainly vasodilation and mild natriuresis without affecting heart rate and contractility.Rats, Inbred WKY: A strain of Rattus norvegicus used as a normotensive control for the spontaneous hypertensive rats (SHR).Phenylephrine: An alpha-1 adrenergic agonist used as a mydriatic, nasal decongestant, and cardiotonic agent.NG-Nitroarginine Methyl Ester: A non-selective inhibitor of nitric oxide synthase. It has been used experimentally to induce hypertension.Thrombosis: Formation and development of a thrombus or blood clot in the blood vessel.Biological Factors: Endogenously-synthesized compounds that influence biological processes not otherwise classified under ENZYMES; HORMONES or HORMONE ANTAGONISTS.Ultrasonography, Interventional: The use of ultrasound to guide minimally invasive surgical procedures such as needle ASPIRATION BIOPSY; DRAINAGE; etc. Its widest application is intravascular ultrasound imaging but it is useful also in urology and intra-abdominal conditions.Maxillary Artery: A branch of the external carotid artery which distributes to the deep structures of the face (internal maxillary) and to the side of the face and nose (external maxillary).Kidney Diseases: Pathological processes of the KIDNEY or its component tissues.Pentetic Acid: An iron chelating agent with properties like EDETIC ACID. DTPA has also been used as a chelator for other metals, such as plutonium.Aortic Coarctation: A birth defect characterized by the narrowing of the AORTA that can be of varying degree and at any point from the transverse arch to the iliac bifurcation. Aortic coarctation causes arterial HYPERTENSION before the point of narrowing and arterial HYPOTENSION beyond the narrowed portion.15-Hydroxy-11 alpha,9 alpha-(epoxymethano)prosta-5,13-dienoic Acid: A stable prostaglandin endoperoxide analog which serves as a thromboxane mimetic. Its actions include mimicking the hydro-osmotic effect of VASOPRESSIN and activation of TYPE C PHOSPHOLIPASES. (From J Pharmacol Exp Ther 1983;224(1): 108-117; Biochem J 1984;222(1):103-110)Coronary Circulation: The circulation of blood through the CORONARY VESSELS of the HEART.Carotid Artery, Internal, Dissection: The splitting of the vessel wall in one or both (left and right) internal carotid arteries (CAROTID ARTERY, INTERNAL). Interstitial hemorrhage into the media of the vessel wall can lead to occlusion of the internal carotid artery and aneurysm formation.Infusions, Intra-Arterial: Regional infusion of drugs via an arterial catheter. Often a pump is used to impel the drug through the catheter. Used in therapy of cancer, upper gastrointestinal hemorrhage, infection, and peripheral vascular disease.Calcinosis: Pathologic deposition of calcium salts in tissues.Reperfusion Injury: Adverse functional, metabolic, or structural changes in ischemic tissues resulting from the restoration of blood flow to the tissue (REPERFUSION), including swelling; HEMORRHAGE; NECROSIS; and damage from FREE RADICALS. The most common instance is MYOCARDIAL REPERFUSION INJURY.Embolism, Cholesterol: Blocking of a blood vessel by CHOLESTEROL-rich atheromatous deposits, generally occurring in the flow from a large artery to small arterial branches. It is also called arterial-arterial embolization or atheroembolism which may be spontaneous or iatrogenic. Patients with spontaneous atheroembolism often have painful, cyanotic digits of acute onset.Urography: Radiography of any part of the urinary tract.Multidetector Computed Tomography: Types of spiral computed tomography technology in which multiple slices of data are acquired simultaneously improving the resolution over single slice acquisition technology.Muscle Relaxation: That phase of a muscle twitch during which a muscle returns to a resting position.Blood Flow Velocity: A value equal to the total volume flow divided by the cross-sectional area of the vascular bed.Nitroprusside: A powerful vasodilator used in emergencies to lower blood pressure or to improve cardiac function. It is also an indicator for free sulfhydryl groups in proteins.Coronary Artery Bypass, Off-Pump: Coronary artery bypass surgery on a beating HEART without a CARDIOPULMONARY BYPASS (diverting the flow of blood from the heart and lungs through an oxygenator).Internal Mammary-Coronary Artery Anastomosis: Direct myocardial revascularization in which the internal mammary artery is anastomosed to the right coronary artery, circumflex artery, or anterior descending coronary artery. The internal mammary artery is the most frequent choice, especially for a single graft, for coronary artery bypass surgery.Nitric Oxide Synthase: An NADPH-dependent enzyme that catalyzes the conversion of L-ARGININE and OXYGEN to produce CITRULLINE and NITRIC OXIDE.Muscle Contraction: A process leading to shortening and/or development of tension in muscle tissue. Muscle contraction occurs by a sliding filament mechanism whereby actin filaments slide inward among the myosin filaments.Coronary Stenosis: Narrowing or constriction of a coronary artery.Recurrence: The return of a sign, symptom, or disease after a remission.Myocardial Infarction: NECROSIS of the MYOCARDIUM caused by an obstruction of the blood supply to the heart (CORONARY CIRCULATION).Vertebral Artery Dissection: Splitting of the vessel wall in the VERTEBRAL ARTERY. Interstitial hemorrhage into the media of the vessel wall can lead to occlusion of the vertebral artery, aneurysm formation, or THROMBOEMBOLISM. Vertebral artery dissection is often associated with TRAUMA and injuries to the head-neck region but can occur spontaneously.Catheterization, Peripheral: Insertion of a catheter into a peripheral artery, vein, or airway for diagnostic or therapeutic purposes.Nitroglycerin: A volatile vasodilator which relieves ANGINA PECTORIS by stimulating GUANYLATE CYCLASE and lowering cytosolic calcium. It is also sometimes used for TOCOLYSIS and explosives.Vascular Grafting: Surgical insertion of BLOOD VESSEL PROSTHESES, or transplanted BLOOD VESSELS, or other biological material to repair injured or diseased blood vessels.Reoperation: A repeat operation for the same condition in the same patient due to disease progression or recurrence, or as followup to failed previous surgery.Vascular Access Devices: Devices to be inserted into veins or arteries for the purpose of carrying fluids into or from a peripheral or central vascular location. They may include component parts such as catheters, ports, reservoirs, and valves. They may be left in place temporarily for therapeutic or diagnostic purposes.Breath Holding: An involuntary or voluntary pause in breathing, sometimes accompanied by loss of consciousness.Graft Occlusion, Vascular: Obstruction of flow in biological or prosthetic vascular grafts.Embolism: Blocking of a blood vessel by an embolus which can be a blood clot or other undissolved material in the blood stream.Rats, Inbred SHR: A strain of Rattus norvegicus with elevated blood pressure used as a model for studying hypertension and stroke.Aortic Aneurysm, Thoracic: An abnormal balloon- or sac-like dilatation in the wall of the THORACIC AORTA. This proximal descending portion of aorta gives rise to the visceral and the parietal branches above the aortic hiatus at the diaphragm.Cardiac Catheterization: Procedures in which placement of CARDIAC CATHETERS is performed for therapeutic or diagnostic procedures.Dilatation, Pathologic: The condition of an anatomical structure's being dilated beyond normal dimensions.
... plaque causes the arteries to narrow or become blocked. Renal artery stenosis - is the narrowing of renal arteries that carry ... "Renal Artery Stenosis". www.niddk.nih.gov. Retrieved 2015-06-23. "Vascular Diseases: MedlinePlus". www.nlm.nih.gov. Retrieved ... Treatment varies with the type of vascular disease; in the case of renal artery disease, information from a meta-analysis ... citation needed] Peripheral artery disease - happens when atheromatous plaques build up in the arteries that supply blood to ...
Tobian, L.; Binion, J. T. (1954). "Artery Wall Electrolytes in Renal and DCA Hypertension". Journal of Clinical Investigation. ... Schacht, R. G.; Lowenstein, J.; Baldwin, D. S. (1971). "Renal mechanism for DOCA escape in man". Bulletin of New York Academy ... Pearce, J. W.; Sonnenberg, H.; Veress, A. T.; Ackermann, U. (1969). "Evidence for a humoral factor modifying the renal response ... Majima, M.; Hayashi, I.; Fujita, T.; Ito, H.; Nakajima, S.; Katori, M. (1999). "Facilitation of renal kallikrein-kinin system ...
... , short for ex vivo renal artery reconstruction and autotransplantation, is a technique mainly used for ... Belzer, FO; Salvatierra, O; Palubinskas, A; Stoney, RJ (1975). "Ex vivo renal artery reconstruction" (PDF). Ann. Surg. 182: 456 ...
Ma, Y. H.; Harder, D. R.; Clark, J. E.; Roman, R. J. (1991). "Effects of 12-HETE on isolated dog renal arcuate arteries". The ... HETE constrict the renal artery of dogs and 12-HETE (stereoisomer undetermined) is implicated in the angiotensin II-induced ... This antagonistic activity was responsible for the ability of 12(S)-HETE and 12(R)-HETE to relax mouse mesenteric arteries pre- ... 12(S)-HETE and 12(S)-HpETE stimulate the dilation of rat mesenteric arteries; 12(S)-HETE stimulates the dilation of coronary ...
... renal artery stenosis) or during shock. Hypoperfusion can also be caused by embolism of the renal arteries. Given their ... Acute tubular necrosis is classified as a "renal" (i.e. not pre-renal or post-renal) cause of acute kidney injury. Diagnosis is ... Renal Cortical Necrosis Acute Interstitial Nephritis Renal Papillary Necrosis "Acute Tubular Necrosis (ATN)". Nephrology ... Acute tubular necrosis (ATN) is a medical condition involving the death of tubular epithelial cells that form the renal tubules ...
Powers, TA; Lorenz, CH; Holburn, GE; Price, RR (1991). "Renal artery stenosis: in vivo perfusion MR imaging". Radiology. 178 (2 ... A limitation of BOLD fMRI is its spatial resolution, as flow increase in somewhat large arteries or veins feed or drain large ...
Of note is the function of renal artery stenosis in the causation of high blood pressure: Normally perfused kidneys produce a ... Stenosis of the renal arteries causes hypoperfusion (decreased blood flow) of the juxtaglomerular apparatus, resulting in ... Due to obstruction of the main branches of the aorta, including the left common carotid artery, the brachiocephalic artery, and ... Involvement of renal arteries may lead to a presentation of renovascular hypertension. Some people develop an initial " ...
Arterial stenosis, which is particularly useful for potential kidney donors in detecting renal artery stenosis. DSA is the gold ... It also helps detect and diagnose lesions in the carotid arteries, a potential cause of strokes. IV-DSA has also been useful in ... standard investigation for renal artery stenosis. Cerebral aneurysms and arteriovenous malformations (AVM). DSA is done less ... However, IV-DSA has been used successfully to study the vessels of the brain and heart and has helped detect carotid artery ...
The afferent arterioles branch from the renal artery, which supplies blood to the kidneys. The afferent arterioles later ... When renal blood flow is reduced (indicating hypotension) or there is a decrease in sodium or chloride ion concentration, the ... "Renal Vasculature: Efferent Arterioles & Peritubular Capillaries" Anatomy photo: Urinary/mammal/vasc0/vasc2 - Comparative ... Efferent arteriole Tubuloglomerular feedback Macula densa Renal corpuscle http://jasn.asnjournals.org/content/21/7/1093.full ...
... renal artery stenosis - the normal physiological response to low blood pressure in the renal arteries is to increase cardiac ... it is thought that decreased perfusion of renal tissue due to stenosis of a main or branch renal artery activates the renin- ... Hypertension can also be produced by diseases of the renal arteries supplying the kidney. This is known as renovascular ... Here, however, increased CO cannot solve the structural problems causing renal artery hypotension, with the result that CO ...
Bilateral renal artery stenosis should always be considered as a differential diagnosis for the presentation of HN. Kidney ... The large renal arteries exhibit intimal thickening, medial hypertrophy, duplication of the elastic layer. The changes in small ... This leads to a build-up of plaques and they can be deposited in the renal arteries causing stenosis and ischemic kidney ... the kidney supplied blood by the narrowed renal artery suffers from inadequate blood flow, which in turn causes the size of the ...
"Contribution to the study of human renal artery (after own observations)", so was acclaimed Doctor of Medicine from the ... Contribution to the study of human renal artery (after own observations) (doctoral thesis) (1939). • About the position of the ... Bumpy ekfysis the right subclavian artery and both carotids (1955). • Human Anatomy in four volumes (Volume 1st, 1957). • On ...
Thrombosis usually occurs in the renal veins although it can also occur in arteries. Treatment is with oral anticoagulants (not ... In addition, myeloma light chains are also directly toxic on proximal renal tubules, further adding to renal dysfunction. ... The renal glomerulus filters the blood that arrives at the kidney. It is formed of capillaries with small pores that allow ... Multiple myeloma: renal impairment is caused by the accumulation and precipitation of light chains, which form casts in the ...
The legs, including the popliteal arteries.[citation needed] The kidney, including renal artery aneurysm and intraparechymal ... Lumsden AB, Salam TA, Walton KG (1996). "Renal artery an?eurysm: a report of 28 cases". Cardiovasc Surg. 4 (2): 185-189. "Brain ... 1997). "Kidney salvage in a case of ruptured renal artery aneurysm: case report and literature review". Cardiovasc Surg. 5 (1 ... doi:10.1016/s0967-2109(95)00041-0. Tham G, Ekelund L, Herrlin K (1983). "Renal artery aneurysms. Natural history and prognosis ...
The symptoms are caused by calcification of large and medium-sized arteries, including the aorta, coronary arteries, and renal ... main pulmonary artery, and coronary arteries unusually. Abdominal ultrasound can reveal hepatosplenomegaly, ascites, renal ... and renal arteries, as well as peritoneal calcifications involving the visceral peritoneum overlying the liver and intestine ... renal, mesenteric and cardiac arteries Echo-dense aortic annulus, ascending aorta, transverse arch, descending aorta, ...
Ra, Rb, and Rn are the resistances of the renal, hepatic, and other arteries respectively. The total resistance is less than ... Each organ is supplied by a large artery, smaller arteries, arterioles, capillaries, and veins arranged in series. The total ... Each organ is supplied by an artery that branches off the aorta. The total resistance of this parallel arrangement is expressed ... the resistance of any of the individual arteries. Network analysis (electrical circuits) Wheatstone bridge Y-Δ transform ...
... which can interfere with renal autoregulation and produce acute renal failure in patients with bilateral renal artery stenosis ... Additionally, hypertensive encephalopathy may occur in pheochromocytoma, Cushing's syndrome, renal artery thrombosis. The ... See "Renal effects of ACE inhibitors in hypertension".) Several parenteral antihypertensive agents are most often used in the ... A change in medication, however, is indicated if the decline in renal function is temporally related to therapy with an ...
Atherosclerotic obstruction of the renal artery can be treated with angioplasty with or without stenting of the renal artery. ... Renal artery stenosis can lead to hypertension and loss of renal function. Angioplasty is occasionally used to treat venous ... It is commonly done to treat atherosclerotic narrowings of the abdomen, leg and renal arteries caused by peripheral artery ... The dilated artery stayed open until her death from pneumonia two and a half years later. Charles Dotter is commonly known as ...
It is used to assist in the diagnosis of renal artery stenosis. It is not generally considered a useful test for children, and ... Subtraction angiography is considered a more suitable test for renal artery stenosis in adults. Contrast with captopril ...
If the ulcerated plaque is below the renal arteries the manifestations appear in both lower extremities. Very rarely the ... If the kidneys are involved, tests of renal function (such as urea and creatinine) are elevated. The complete blood count may ... Kidney involvement leads to the symptoms of renal failure, which are non-specific but usually cause nausea, reduced appetite ( ... When the kidneys are involved, the disease is referred to as atheroembolic renal disease (AERD). The diagnosis usually involves ...
Renal artery anomalies or pheochromocytoma and associated chronic hypertension Schwannoma Plexiform fibromas Optic glioma ...
Normal mean renal artery RI for an adult is 0.6 with 0.7 the upper limit of normal. In children, RI commonly exceeds 0.7 ... RI is also commonly used to monitor renal status, especially following renal transplant. Following renal transplantation, ... It is used in ultrasound testing of umbilical artery for placental insufficiency. RI should not exceed 0.60 at 30 weeks of ... and post-glomerular resistance and vascular compliance improve the diagnostic accuracy of renal transplant doppler ultrasound ...
Emboli may, rarely, lodge in other locations, most commonly the right front limb and the renal arteries. Clopidogrel (Plavix) ... elevated pulmonary artery wedge pressure, and low blood pressures should be done with caution. Dihydropyridine calcium channel ... occluding either one or both of the common iliac arteries. Clinically this presents as a cat with complete loss of function in ... due to reduced blood flow to the coronary arteries, uncomfortable awareness of the heart beat (palpitations), as well as ...
Angiograms of mesenteri or renal arteries in polyarteritis nodosa may show aneurysms, occlusions, and vascular wall ... Classically involves arteries of lungs and skin, but may be generalized. At least 4 criteria yields sensitivity and specificity ... Pulmonary-renal syndrome. Individuals who are coughing up blood and have kidney involvement are likely to have granulomatosis ... December 1999). "Temporal artery biopsy: a diagnostic tool for systemic necrotizing vasculitis. French Vasculitis Study Group ...
... or occlusion of othe renal artery have been associated with renal artery FMD. The carotid and vertebral arteries are most ... or focal disease involving multiple branches of the renal arteries may develop renal artery dissection or progressive renal ... Ex vivo renal artery reconstruction is sometimes used for complex diseases where branches of the renal artery are affected. ... FMD can be found in almost every artery in the human body, but most often affects the carotid, vertebral, renal arteries and ...
Before reaching the branchial heart, each branch of the vena cava expands to form renal appendages which are in direct contact ... The blood vessels consist of arteries, capillaries and veins and are lined with a cellular endothelium which is quite unlike ... The Dicyemidae are a family of tiny worms that are found in the renal appendages of many species;[105] it is unclear whether ... and selective absorption from the renal appendages, as it is passed along the associated duct and through the nephridiopore ...
... renal artery involvement frequently causes hypertension; and proximal dilatation of the aorta can cause aortic regurgitation, ...
Renal artery stenosis, or narrowing of one or both renal arteries will lead to hypertension as the affected kidneys release ... It is located above the renal vein. Supernumerary renal arteries (two or more arteries to a single kidney) are the most common ... the right renal artery is normally longer than the left renal artery.[5][6] ... "Correlation between the diameter of the main renal artery and the presence of an accessory renal artery: sonographic and ...
The test is performed by threading a catheter through the main vessel of the pelvis, up to the renal artery that leads into ... A renal angiogram is a test used to examine the blood vessels of the kidneys. ... up to the renal artery that leads into the kidney. Contrast medium is then injected into the renal artery through the catheter ... A renal angiogram is a test used to examine the blood vessels of the kidneys. The test is performed by threading a catheter ...
Renal Artery Digital Subtraction Angiography Renal Artery Stenosis Renovascular Hypertension Left Renal Artery ... 1996) Value of Doppler parameters in the diagnosis of renal artery stenosis. J Vasc Surg 23:428-435PubMedGoogle Scholar ... 2003) Aortoiliac and renal arteries: prospective intraindividual comparison of contrast-enhanced 3D MR angiography and multi- ... 1995) Technical optimization of spiral CT for depiction of renal artery stenosis: in vitro analysis. Radiology 194:157-163 ...
Renal Artery Superior Mesenteric Artery Renovascular Hypertension Left Renal Artery Vessel Loop These keywords were added by ... Bianchi C., Ballard J.L. (2006) Transaortic Renal Artery Endarterectomy. In: Hoballah J.J., Scott-Conner C.E.H. (eds) Operative ...
The left renal artery passes laterally from the abdominal aorta into the left kidney. It then divides into several smaller ... Home > Cardiovascular System > Cardiovascular System of the Lower Torso > Blood Supply to the Kidneys > Left Renal Artery ... The left renal artery passes laterally from the abdominal aorta into the left kidney. It then divides into several smaller ... Left Renal Artery * Left Renal Vein * Left Suprarenal Arteries * Left Suprarenal Vein ...
Renal artery stenosis is most often caused by atherosclerosis which causes the renal arteries to harden and narrow due to the ... Renal artery stenosis is the narrowing of one of the renal arteries, most often caused by atherosclerosis or fibromuscular ... "Treatment of hypertension in patients with renal artery stenosis due to fibromuscular dysplasia of the renal arteries - ... When high-grade renal artery stenosis is documented and blood pressure cannot be controlled with medication, or if renal ...
Renal artery stenosis symptoms include high blood pressure that does not respond to treatment, or severe high blood pressure. ... Learn about renal artery stenosis causes like high cholesterol, high blood pressure, smoking, and diabetes. ... home / high blood pressure health center / high blood pressure a-z list / renal artery stenosis center / renal artery stenosis ... Renal artery stenosis (narrowing) is a decrease in the diameter of the renal arteries. The resulting restriction of blood flow ...
Renal Artery Stenosis News and Research. RSS The term renal artery stenosis (RAS) applies to a cluster of disease conditions ... Renal Stent System for the treatment of renal artery stenosis (narrowing of the main arteries supplying blood to the kidneys) ... for its new balloon expandable stent for renal artery disease. Intended for patients suffering from renal artery stenosis, a ... FDA approves Abbotts RX Herculink Elite Renal Stent System for renal artery stenosis Abbott today announced it has received U. ...
The first published report of a renal artery aneurysm (RAA) was in 1770 by Rouppe, who described the demise of a sailor who ... A renal artery aneurysm (RAA) is defined as a dilated segment of renal artery that exceeds twice the diameter of a normal renal ... encoded search term (Renal Artery Aneurysm) and Renal Artery Aneurysm What to Read Next on Medscape. Related Conditions and ... A great deal of variety can be found in the anatomy of the renal artery and its branches, but most often the main renal artery ...
... of the renal artery has become an increasingly widespread peripheral vascular intervention for the treatment of renovascular ... Bax et al found that in patients with atherosclerotic renal artery stenosis, renal artery stenting had no clear effect on renal ... encoded search term (Renal Artery Angioplasty) and Renal Artery Angioplasty What to Read Next on Medscape. Related Conditions ... The utility of duplex ultrasound scanning of the renal arteries for diagnosing significant renal artery stenosis. Ann Intern ...
Renal artery definition at Dictionary.com, a free online dictionary with pronunciation, synonyms and translation. Look it up ... renal artery, renal carcinosarcoma, renal cast, renal clearance, renal column, renal corpuscle ... renal artery. renaissance man, renaissance revival, renaissance woman, renaissant, renal, ... An artery with its origin in the aorta and with distribution to the kidney. ...
Transluminal dilatation of transplant renal artery stenosis. Br Med J 1980; 281 :196 ... Transluminal dilatation of transplant renal artery stenosis.. Br Med J 1980; 281 doi: https://doi.org/10.1136/bmj.281.6234.196 ...
Reversible renal failure with renal artery occlusion. Br Med J 1972; 2 :27 ... Reversible renal failure with renal artery occlusion.. Br Med J 1972; 2 doi: https://doi.org/10.1136/bmj.2.5804.27 (Published ...
Renal artery stenosis symptoms include high blood pressure that does not respond to treatment, or severe high blood pressure. ... Learn about renal artery stenosis causes like high cholesterol, high blood pressure, smoking, and diabetes. ... Renal artery stenosis (narrowing) is a decrease in the diameter of the renal arteries. The resulting restriction of blood flow ... If renal artery stenosis is also present, then a bypass renal artery surgery may be done at the same time. ...
The renal artery is one of these two blood vessels. The renal artery enters through the hilum, which is located where the ... Receptors located in the smooth muscle wall of the renal artery allow the arteries to expand or contract to compensate for high ... The renal artery enters through the hilum, which is located where the kidney curves inward in a concave shape. Under normal ... Renal artery. Medically reviewed by Healthlines Medical Network on. December 12, 2014. ...
Renal artery stenosis is a narrowing of the arteries that supply blood to the kidneys. Learn what causes RAS, and how to treat ... Renal artery stenosis (RAS) is a condition in which the arteries that supply blood to the kidneys narrow. The renal arteries ... Complications of renal artery stenosis. Decreased blood flow through your renal arteries can increase your overall blood ... in the renal arteries. These substances harden as they accumulate in the arterial walls. This not only narrows the arteries, ...
... , Renovascular Hypertension, Ischemic Nephropathy, Renal Artery Hyperplasia, Renal Artery Fibromuscular ... artery;renal, arteries renal stenosis, stenosis artery renal, artery renal stenosis, stenosis renal artery, RAS - Renal artery ... Renal Artery Stenoses, Renal Artery Stenosis, Stenoses, Renal Artery, Stenosis, Renal Artery, RENAL ARTERY STENOSIS, renal ... artery, renal, stenosis; renal artery, artery; stenosis, renal, Renal artery stenosis, NOS, Renal artery stenosis of unknown ...
... and medical therapy alone for adults with atherosclerotic renal artery stenosis (ARAS), according to findings of an updated ... There is insufficient evidence to choose between percutaneous transluminal renal angioplasty with stent placement (PTRAS) ... Cite this: Insufficient Evidence to Choose Best Management of Renal Artery Stenosis - Medscape - Aug 17, 2016. ... and medical therapy alone for adults with atherosclerotic renal artery stenosis (ARAS), according to findings of an updated ...
... treatment of narrowing of the arteries leading to the kidneys. ... Renal artery stenosis. Sectionsfor Renal artery stenosis. * ... Renal artery stenosis - Comprehensive overview covers causes, diagnosis, ... Renal artery bypass surgery. During a bypass procedure, doctors graft a substitute blood vessel to the renal artery to make a ... Renal arteriography. This special type of X-ray exam helps your doctor find the blockage in the renal arteries and sometimes ...
... treatment of narrowing of the arteries leading to the kidneys. ... Renal artery stenosis. Renal artery stenosis. In renal artery ... Renal artery stenosis - Comprehensive overview covers causes, diagnosis, ... Renal artery stenosis is the narrowing of one or more arteries that carry blood to your kidneys (renal arteries). ... Most cases of renal artery stenosis result from atherosclerosis. Risk factors for atherosclerosis of the renal arteries are the ...
Renal artery dissection can be acute or chronic. Acute renal artery dissection is divided into three types: iatrogenic (guide ... However, full length of main renal artery could not be seen due to obesity and bowel gas. Origin of right renal artery was seen ... Chronic renal artery dissection is classified as functional and silent [2]. Spontaneous renal artery dissection (SRAD) is a ... Spontaneous renal artery dissection is a rare but important cause of flank pain. We report a case of isolated spontaneous renal ...
... Atilla Yoldas1 and Mustafa Orhun Dayan2 ... Atilla Yoldas and Mustafa Orhun Dayan, "Morphological Characteristics of Renal Artery and Kidney in Rats," The Scientific World ...
Renal artery stenting conferred no added benefit to medical management for the treatment of patients with atherosclerotic ... Renal artery angioplasty has been suggested to reduce hypertension, a common complication of renal artery stenosis, in several ... Renal artery stenosis often occurs in combination with peripheral arterial or coronary artery disease, and its prevalence among ... "Renal artery stenting remains a common procedure in current clinical practice," Christopher J. Cooper, MD, of the University of ...
... stents had no clear effect on the progression of impaired renal function, European researchers said. ... TORONTO -- In patients with narrowing of the renal artery, ... with atherosclerotic renal artery stenosis and impaired renal ... In patients with narrowing of the renal artery, stents had no clear effect on the progression of impaired renal function, ... Explain to interested patients that narrowing of the renal artery is often treated with a stent, although there is little ...
  • One or two accessory renal arteries are frequently found, especially on the left side since they usually arise from the aorta, and may come off above (more common) or below the main artery. (wikipedia.org)
  • They branch directly from the aorta (the main artery coming off the heart) on either side and extend to each kidney. (medicinenet.com)
  • The renal arteries arise from the aorta at the level of the intervertebral disc between L1 and L2. (medscape.com)
  • An artery with its origin in the aorta and with distribution to the kidney. (dictionary.com)
  • Renal arteries are a pair of lateral branches from abdominal aorta. (pulsus.com)
  • Subsequent magnetic resonance arteriography confirmed a segmental coarctation of the thoracic aorta immediately distal to the takeoff of the left subclavian artery (right, lower panel, arrow points to coarctation). (bmj.com)
  • The renal arteries are a pair of lateral branches arising from the abdominal aorta below the level of superior mesenteric artery at the upper lumbar level (L1-L3). (omicsonline.org)
  • A chronic inflammatory process that affects the AORTA and its primary branches, such as the brachiocephalic artery (BRACHIOCEPHALIC TRUNK) and CAROTID ARTERIES. (bioportfolio.com)
  • Each renal artery is directed across the crus of the diaphragm almost forming a right angle with the aorta. (omicsonline.org)
  • The large blood vessel running from top to bottom is the aorta, the main artery of the body. (sciencephoto.com)
  • In classic anatomic descriptions, typical renal vascularization is described as a single renal artery originating from the abdominal aorta at the level of the intervertebral disc between L1 and L2, just below the inception of the superior mesenteric artery. (termedia.pl)
  • The aorta was mobilized at the level of the left inferior pulmonary ligament and below the renal arteries. (ctsnet.org)
  • A 22 mm graft with three previously constructed branches corresponding to the celiac, SMA, and right renal arteries was anastomosed to the descending thoracic aorta in a continuous fashion. (ctsnet.org)
  • In a 78-year-old patient I would not prefer thoracophernolaparotomy and cardiopulmonary bypass when there is an easier alternative such as abdominal de-branching (implantation of the both renal arteries, celiac and superior mesenteric arteries with the use of a self made quadrifurcated ringed PTFE graft to the distal infra-renal abdominal aorta) and endovascular stent grafting. (ctsnet.org)
  • Accessory renal arteries arise from the abdominal aorta and supply the inferior pole of the kidney in majority of cases. (radiopaedia.org)
  • Renal artery stenosis, after renal denervation, with spontaneous resolution two year follow-up from procedure. (ahajournals.org)
  • 2.4.2 The following serious adverse events (requiring admission to hospital) were reported in 1 patient treated by renal artery denervation in the randomised controlled trial of 100 patients: nausea, oedema, and a hypotensive episode requiring a reduction in antihypertensive medication (timing of events not stated). (nice.org.uk)
  • It considered sympathetic denervation of the renal artery to be a promising procedure, which might offer benefit to many patients, but a larger evidence base of well-designed trials is required. (nice.org.uk)
  • SAN DIEGO, CA-Concordant with studies of other technologies for renal denervation, the presence of untreated accessory arteries was associated with a reduced blood pressure-lowering response to the Paradise ultrasound system (ReCor Medical), an analysis of the RADIANCE-HTN SOLO trial shows. (tctmd.com)
  • That suggests, at least to me, that if we're not able to essentially ablate the nerves in all of the distribution supplying the renal arteries, then we're getting a less complete denervation and as a result we may have a less efficacious response," Kirtane told TCTMD. (tctmd.com)
  • Evaluating predictors of response to renal denervation has taken on greater importance as the field moves forward following the failure of the SYMPLICITY HTN-3 trial to show that the procedure improves blood pressure control compared with a sham procedure. (tctmd.com)
  • It is known, however, that one-quarter to one-third of patients do not respond to renal denervation, and there are questions about whether that is related to clinical factors, procedural variables, or anatomy. (tctmd.com)
  • Kirtane and colleagues explored the issue by looking at data on 71 patients from the renal denervation arm of RADIANCE-HTN SOLO trial who received at least one ablation and had both baseline and 2-month ambulatory blood pressure readings. (tctmd.com)
  • We know now from randomized trials-robust sham-controlled trials across devices-that renal denervation can lower blood pressure," Kirtane said during his presentation. (tctmd.com)
  • medical citation needed] Changes include: Fibrosis Tubular cell size (decrease) Thickening of Bowman capsule Tubulosclerosis Glomerular capillary tuft (atrophy) Play media The diagnosis of renal artery stenosis can use many techniques to determine if the condition is present, a clinical prediction rule is available to guide diagnosis. (wikipedia.org)