Materia Medica: Materials or substances used in the composition of traditional medical remedies. The use of this term in MeSH was formerly restricted to historical articles or those concerned with traditional medicine, but it can also refer to homeopathic remedies. Nosodes are specific types of homeopathic remedies prepared from causal agents or disease products.Medicine, Traditional: Systems of medicine based on cultural beliefs and practices handed down from generation to generation. The concept includes mystical and magical rituals (SPIRITUAL THERAPIES); PHYTOTHERAPY; and other treatments which may not be explained by modern medicine.Homeopathy: A system of therapeutics founded by Samuel Hahnemann (1755-1843), based on the Law of Similars where "like cures like". Diseases are treated by highly diluted substances that cause, in healthy persons, symptoms like those of the disease to be treated.Phytotherapy: Use of plants or herbs to treat diseases or to alleviate pain.Herbal Medicine: The study of medicines derived from botanical sources.Plant Preparations: Material prepared from plants.Plants, Medicinal: Plants whose roots, leaves, seeds, bark, or other constituent parts possess therapeutic, tonic, purgative, curative or other pharmacologic attributes, when administered to man or animals.Organotherapy: Historically, the treatment of disease by the administration of animal organs or their extracts (after Brown-Sequard). At present synthetic preparations substitute for the extracts of a gland. (From Stedman, 26th ed)Medicine, African Traditional: A system of traditional medicine which is based on the beliefs and practices of the African peoples. It includes treatment by medicinal plants and other materia medica as well as by the ministrations of diviners, medicine men, witch doctors, and sorcerers.Plant Extracts: Concentrated pharmaceutical preparations of plants obtained by removing active constituents with a suitable solvent, which is evaporated away, and adjusting the residue to a prescribed standard.Ethnobotany: The study of plant lore and agricultural customs of a people. In the fields of ETHNOMEDICINE and ETHNOPHARMACOLOGY, the emphasis is on traditional medicine and the existence and medicinal uses of PLANTS and PLANT EXTRACTS and their constituents, both historically and in modern times.Pulsatilla: A plant genus of the family RANUNCULACEAE. Members contain cernuosides and other oleanane and hederagenin saponins.Lycopodium: A plant genus of the family LYCOPODIACEAE. Members contain ALKALOIDS. Lycopodium oil is obtained from L. clavatum.Naturopathy: A drugless system of therapy, making use of physical forces such as air, light, water, heat, massage. Treatments are often diet- and nutrition-oriented with attention given to the patient's personal history and lifestyle. (From Cassileth, Alternative Medicine Handbook, 1998, p329)Strychnos nux-vomica: A plant genus of the genus STRYCHNOS, family LOGANIACEAE that is the source of STRYCHNINE.Arnica: A plant genus of the family ASTERACEAE. The dried flower heads of Arnica montana are used externally as a counterirritant and tincture for sprains and bruises, either as crude extract or in homeopathic dilution (HOMEOPATHY). Arnica contains volatile oils (OILS, VOLATILE), arnicin, arnisterol, FLAVONOIDS; TANNINS; and resin. The common name of Wolf's Bane is similar to the common name for ACONITUM.Drugs, Chinese Herbal: Chinese herbal or plant extracts which are used as drugs to treat diseases or promote general well-being. The concept does not include synthesized compounds manufactured in China.Herb-Drug Interactions: The effect of herbs, other PLANTS, or PLANT EXTRACTS on the activity, metabolism, or toxicity of drugs.Complementary Therapies: Therapeutic practices which are not currently considered an integral part of conventional allopathic medical practice. They may lack biomedical explanations but as they become better researched some (PHYSICAL THERAPY MODALITIES; DIET; ACUPUNCTURE) become widely accepted whereas others (humors, radium therapy) quietly fade away, yet are important historical footnotes. Therapies are termed as Complementary when used in addition to conventional treatments and as Alternative when used instead of conventional treatment.Nonprescription Drugs: Medicines that can be sold legally without a DRUG PRESCRIPTION.Self Medication: The self administration of medication not prescribed by a physician or in a manner not directed by a physician.Plant Structures: The parts of plants, including SEEDS.Ethnopharmacology: The study of the actions and properties of medicinal agents, often derived from PLANTS, indigenous to populations or ETHNIC GROUPS.Pimpinella: A plant genus in the family APIACEAE (Umbelliferae) that is used in SPICES and is a source of anethole.New Brunswick: A province of eastern Canada, one of the Maritime Provinces with NOVA SCOTIA; PRINCE EDWARD ISLAND; and sometimes NEWFOUNDLAND AND LABRADOR. Its capital is Fredericton. It was named in honor of King George III, of the House of Hanover, also called Brunswick. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p828 & Room, Brewer's Dictionary of Names, 1992, p375)Bupleurum: A plant genus of the family APIACEAE that is the source of bupleurum root and of bupleurotoxin and is an ingredient of sho-saiko-to.Tripterygium: A plant genus of the family CELASTRACEAE that is a source of triterpenoids and diterpene epoxides such as triptolide.Allostasis: Biological adaptation, such as the rise of EPINEPHRINE in response to exercise, stress or perceived danger, followed by a fall of epinephrine during RELAXATION. Allostasis is the achievement of stability by turning on and turning off the allostatic systems including the IMMUNE SYSTEM; the AUTONOMIC NERVOUS SYSTEM and NEUROENDOCRINE SYSTEMS.Medicine, Ayurvedic: The traditional Hindu system of medicine which is based on customs, beliefs, and practices of the Hindu culture. Ayurveda means "the science of Life": veda - science, ayur - life.Comfrey: Perennial herb Symphytum officinale, in the family Boraginaceae, used topically for wound healing. It contains ALLANTOIN, carotene, essential oils (OILS, VOLATILE); GLYCOSIDES; mucilage, resin, SAPONINS; TANNINS; triterpenoids, VITAMIN B12, and ZINC. Comfrey also contains PYRROLIZIDINE ALKALOIDS and is hepatotoxic if ingested.Trinidad and Tobago: An independent state in the Lesser Antilles in the West Indies, north of Venezuela, comprising the islands of Trinidad and Tobago. Its capital is Port of Spain. Both islands were discovered by Columbus in 1498. The Spanish, English, Dutch, and French figure in their history over four centuries. Trinidad and Tobago united in 1898 and were made part of the British colony of Trinidad and Tobago in 1899. The colony became an independent state in 1962. Trinidad was so named by Columbus either because he arrived on Trinity Sunday or because three mountain peaks suggested the Holy Trinity. Tobago was given the name by Columbus from the Haitian tambaku, pipe, from the natives' habit of smoking tobacco leaves. (Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p1228, 1216 & Room, Brewer's Dictionary of Names, 1992, p555, 547)Medicine, Chinese Traditional: A system of traditional medicine which is based on the beliefs and practices of the Chinese culture.Nasal Decongestants: Drugs designed to treat inflammation of the nasal passages, generally the result of an infection (more often than not the common cold) or an allergy related condition, e.g., hay fever. The inflammation involves swelling of the mucous membrane that lines the nasal passages and results in inordinate mucus production. The primary class of nasal decongestants are vasoconstrictor agents. (From PharmAssist, The Family Guide to Health and Medicine, 1993)Magic: Beliefs and practices concerned with producing desired results through supernatural forces or agents as with the manipulation of fetishes or rituals.Veterinary Medicine: The medical science concerned with the prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of diseases in animals.Communications Media: The means of interchanging or transmitting and receiving information. Historically the media were written: books, journals, newspapers, and other publications; in the modern age the media include, in addition, radio, television, computers, and information networks.Boswellia: A plant genus of the family BURSERACEAE used medicinally since ancient times. It is a source of salai guggal (the gum resin), boswellic acid (ursane type TRITERPENES), and FRANKINCENSE.Pesticide Synergists: Chemicals that, while not possessing inherent pesticidal activity, nonetheless promote or enhance the effectiveness of other pesticides when combined.Scutellaria baicalensis: A plant species of the genus SCUTELLARIA, family LAMIACEAE, that contains skullcapflavone and is used in CHINESE HERBAL DRUGS.Echinacea: A genus of perennial herbs used topically and internally. It contains echinacoside, GLYCOSIDES; INULIN; isobutyl amides, resin, and SESQUITERPENES.Kava: Dried rhizome and roots of Piper methysticum, a shrub native to Oceania and known for its anti-anxiety and sedative properties. Heavy usage results in some adverse effects. It contains ALKALOIDS; LACTONES; kawain, methysticin, mucilage, STARCH, and yangonin. Kava is also the name of the pungent beverage prepared from the plant's roots.Animal DiseasesVernonia: A plant genus of the family ASTERACEAE. Members contain germacrane and sesquiterpene LACTONES.Hypericum: Genus of perennial plants in the family CLUSIACEAE (sometimes classified as Hypericaceae). Herbal and homeopathic preparations are used for depression, neuralgias, and a variety of other conditions. Hypericum contains flavonoids; GLYCOSIDES; mucilage, TANNINS; volatile oils (OILS, ESSENTIAL), hypericin and hyperforin.Artemisia absinthium: A plant species of the genus ARTEMISIA, family ASTERACEAE that has been used in ABSINTHE. The oil contains neurotoxic 1-thujone and d-isothujone.Theales: A plant order of the subclass Dilleniidae, class Magnoliopsida. It includes 18 families, approximately 175 genera, and 3,400 species. Its members are mostly tropical trees and shrubs.Hypoxis: Hypoxis is a plant genus in the family LILIACEAE (sometimes classified as Hypoxidaceae).Amygdalin: A cyanogenic glycoside found in the seeds of Rosaceae.Sesame Oil: The refined fixed oil obtained from the seed of one or more cultivated varieties of Sesamum indicum. It is used as a solvent and oleaginous vehicle for drugs and has been used internally as a laxative and externally as a skin softener. It is used also in the manufacture of margarine, soap, and cosmetics. (Dorland, 28th ed & Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed)Viperidae: A family of snakes comprising three subfamilies: Azemiopinae (the mountain viper, the sole member of this subfamily), Viperinae (true vipers), and Crotalinae (pit vipers). They are widespread throughout the world, being found in the United States, Central and South America, Europe, Asia and Africa. Their venoms act on the blood (hemotoxic) as compared to the venom of elapids which act on the nervous system (neurotoxic). (Goin, Goin, and Zug, Introduction to Herpetology, 3d ed, pp333-36)Calendula: A plant genus of the family ASTERACEAE. Members contain CAROTENOIDS, essential oils (OILS, VOLATILE), flavonoids, mucilage, SAPONINS, and STEROLS. The plants are used both topically and internally. The common name of Marigold is also used for TAGETES.Antidiarrheals: Miscellaneous agents found useful in the symptomatic treatment of diarrhea. They have no effect on the agent(s) that cause diarrhea, but merely alleviate the condition.Quackery: The fraudulent misrepresentation of the diagnosis and treatment of disease.Pediculus: Lice of the genus Pediculus, family Pediculidae. Pediculus humanus corporus is the human body louse and Pediculus humanus capitis is the human head louse.Honey: A sweet viscous liquid food, produced in the honey sacs of various bees from nectar collected from flowers. The nectar is ripened into honey by inversion of its sucrose sugar into fructose and glucose. It is somewhat acidic and has mild antiseptic properties, being sometimes used in the treatment of burns and lacerations.Eleusine: A plant genus of the family POACEAE. Finger millet or raggee (E. coracana) is an important food grain in southern Asia and parts of Africa.History, 18th Century: Time period from 1701 through 1800 of the common era.Aristolochic Acids: Nitro-phenanthrenes occurring in ARISTOLOCHIACEAE and other plants. They derive from stephanine (APORPHINES) by oxidative ring cleavage. The nitro group is a reactive alkylator (ALKYLATING AGENTS) that binds to biological macromolecules. Ingestion by humans is associated with nephropathy (NEPHRITIS). There is no relationship to the similar named aristolochene (SESQUITERPENES).Common Cold: A catarrhal disorder of the upper respiratory tract, which may be viral or a mixed infection. It generally involves a runny nose, nasal congestion, and sneezing.Jurisprudence: The science or philosophy of law. Also, the application of the principles of law and justice to health and medicine.History, 17th Century: Time period from 1601 through 1700 of the common era.Plant Bark: The outer layer of the woody parts of plants.Crataegus: A genus in the family ROSACEAE of shrubs and small trees native to the North Temperate Zone. It is best known for a traditional medication for the heart.Piperonyl Butoxide: An insecticide synergist, especially for pyrethroids and ROTENONE.Phenylpropanolamine: A sympathomimetic that acts mainly by causing release of NOREPINEPHRINE but also has direct agonist activity at some adrenergic receptors. It is most commonly used as a nasal vasoconstrictor and an appetite depressant.Aloe: A plant genus of the family Aloeaceae, order Liliales (or Asphodelaceae, Asparagales in APG system) which is used medicinally. It contains anthraquinone glycosides such as aloin-emodin or aloe-emodin (EMODIN).Complex Mixtures: Mixtures of many components in inexact proportions, usually natural, such as PLANT EXTRACTS; VENOMS; and MANURE. These are distinguished from DRUG COMBINATIONS which have only a few components in definite proportions.Ginger: Deciduous plant rich in volatile oil (OILS, VOLATILE). It is used as a flavoring agent and has many other uses both internally and topically.Angiosperms: Members of the group of vascular plants which bear flowers. They are differentiated from GYMNOSPERMS by their production of seeds within a closed chamber (OVARY, PLANT). The Angiosperms division is composed of two classes, the monocotyledons (Liliopsida) and dicotyledons (Magnoliopsida). Angiosperms represent approximately 80% of all known living plants.Coffea: A plant genus of the family RUBIACEAE. It is best known for the COFFEE beverage prepared from the beans (SEEDS).Scalp DermatosesPistacia: A plant genus in the ANACARDIACEAE family known for the Pistachio nuts and for gum Mastic.Meliaceae: The mahogany plant family of the order Sapindales, subclass Rosidae, class Magnoliopsida.Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice: Knowledge, attitudes, and associated behaviors which pertain to health-related topics such as PATHOLOGIC PROCESSES or diseases, their prevention, and treatment. This term refers to non-health workers and health workers (HEALTH PERSONNEL).Mental Healing: The use of mind to cure disease, particularly physical illness.Pharmacopoeias as Topic: Authoritative treatises on drugs and preparations, their description, formulation, analytic composition, physical constants, main chemical properties used in identification, standards for strength, purity, and dosage, chemical tests for determining identity and purity, etc. They are usually published under governmental jurisdiction (e.g., USP, the United States Pharmacopoeia; BP, British Pharmacopoeia; P. Helv., the Swiss Pharmacopoeia). They differ from FORMULARIES in that they are far more complete: formularies tend to be mere listings of formulas and prescriptions.Medicine, Tibetan Traditional: A system of traditional medicine which is based on the beliefs and practices of the Tibetan culture.Apiaceae: A large plant family in the order Apiales, also known as Umbelliferae. Most are aromatic herbs with alternate, feather-divided leaves that are sheathed at the base. The flowers often form a conspicuous flat-topped umbel. Each small individual flower is usually bisexual, with five sepals, five petals, and an enlarged disk at the base of the style. The fruits are ridged and are composed of two parts that split open at maturity.Malathion: A wide spectrum aliphatic organophosphate insecticide widely used for both domestic and commercial agricultural purposes.Atropa belladonna: A plant species of the genus ATROPA, family SOLANACEAE that contains ATROPINE; SCOPOLAMINE; BELLADONNA ALKALOIDS and other SOLANACEOUS ALKALOIDS. Some species in this genus are called deadly nightshade which is also a common name for SOLANUM.Coriandrum: A plant genus of the family APIACEAE. The leaves are the source of cilantro and the seeds are the source of coriander, both of which are used in SPICES.Panax: An araliaceous genus of plants that contains a number of pharmacologically active agents used as stimulants, sedatives, and tonics, especially in traditional medicine. Sometimes confused with Siberian ginseng (ELEUTHEROCOCCUS).Medicine, Korean Traditional: Medical practice or discipline that is based on the knowledge, cultures, and beliefs of the people of KOREA.Jaundice: A clinical manifestation of HYPERBILIRUBINEMIA, characterized by the yellowish staining of the SKIN; MUCOUS MEMBRANE; and SCLERA. Clinical jaundice usually is a sign of LIVER dysfunction.Resins, Plant: Flammable, amorphous, vegetable products of secretion or disintegration, usually formed in special cavities of plants. They are generally insoluble in water and soluble in alcohol, carbon tetrachloride, ether, or volatile oils. They are fusible and have a conchoidal fracture. They are the oxidation or polymerization products of the terpenes, and are mixtures of aromatic acids and esters. Most are soft and sticky, but harden after exposure to cold. (From Grant & Hackh's Chemical Dictionary, 5th ed & Dorland, 28th ed)Ginkgo biloba: The only specie of the genus Ginkgo, family Ginkgoacea. It is the source of extracts of medicinal interest, especially Egb 761. Ginkgo may refer to the genus or species.Interviews as Topic: Conversations with an individual or individuals held in order to obtain information about their background and other personal biographical data, their attitudes and opinions, etc. It includes school admission or job interviews.Sambucus nigra: A plant species in the genus SAMBUCUS, known for the elderberry fruit. The plant is also a source of Sambucus nigra lectins and ribosome-inactivating protein.Questionnaires: Predetermined sets of questions used to collect data - clinical data, social status, occupational group, etc. The term is often applied to a self-completed survey instrument.Asteraceae: A large plant family of the order Asterales, subclass Asteridae, class Magnoliopsida. The family is also known as Compositae. Flower petals are joined near the base and stamens alternate with the corolla lobes. The common name of "daisy" refers to several genera of this family including Aster; CHRYSANTHEMUM; RUDBECKIA; TANACETUM.Lead PoisoningDrug Contamination: The presence of organisms, or any foreign material that makes a drug preparation impure.Reishi: A mushroom, Ganoderma lucidum, of the POLYPORALES order of basidiomycetous fungi. It has long been used in traditional Chinese medicine in various forms.Antitussive Agents: Agents that suppress cough. They act centrally on the medullary cough center. EXPECTORANTS, also used in the treatment of cough, act locally.Anti-Inflammatory Agents: Substances that reduce or suppress INFLAMMATION.Malpractice: Failure of a professional person, a physician or lawyer, to render proper services through reprehensible ignorance or negligence or through criminal intent, especially when injury or loss follows. (Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed)Skin DiseasesGastrointestinal Diseases: Diseases in any segment of the GASTROINTESTINAL TRACT from ESOPHAGUS to RECTUM.Physician-Patient Relations: The interactions between physician and patient.Drug Therapy: The use of DRUGS to treat a DISEASE or its symptoms. One example is the use of ANTINEOPLASTIC AGENTS to treat CANCER.PeruAttitude to Health: Public attitudes toward health, disease, and the medical care system.Plant Leaves: Expanded structures, usually green, of vascular plants, characteristically consisting of a bladelike expansion attached to a stem, and functioning as the principal organ of photosynthesis and transpiration. (American Heritage Dictionary, 2d ed)Venoms: Poisonous animal secretions forming fluid mixtures of many different enzymes, toxins, and other substances. These substances are produced in specialized glands and secreted through specialized delivery systems (nematocysts, spines, fangs, etc.) for disabling prey or predator.United StatesPatient Acceptance of Health Care: The seeking and acceptance by patients of health service.Nigeria: A republic in western Africa, south of NIGER between BENIN and CAMEROON. Its capital is Abuja.Drug-Induced Liver Injury: A spectrum of clinical liver diseases ranging from mild biochemical abnormalities to ACUTE LIVER FAILURE, caused by drugs, drug metabolites, and chemicals from the environment.PhenanthrenesDietary Supplements: Products in capsule, tablet or liquid form that provide dietary ingredients, and that are intended to be taken by mouth to increase the intake of nutrients. Dietary supplements can include macronutrients, such as proteins, carbohydrates, and fats; and/or MICRONUTRIENTS, such as VITAMINS; MINERALS; and PHYTOCHEMICALS.Commerce: The interchange of goods or commodities, especially on a large scale, between different countries or between populations within the same country. It includes trade (the buying, selling, or exchanging of commodities, whether wholesale or retail) and business (the purchase and sale of goods to make a profit). (From Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed, p411, p2005 & p283)Zimbabwe: A republic in southern Africa, east of ZAMBIA and BOTSWANA and west of MOZAMBIQUE. Its capital is Harare. It was formerly called Rhodesia and Southern Rhodesia.Plant Oils: Oils derived from plants or plant products.Cultural Characteristics: Those aspects or characteristics which identify a culture.Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders: Disorders characterized by impairment of the ability to initiate or maintain sleep. This may occur as a primary disorder or in association with another medical or psychiatric condition.Dose-Response Relationship, Drug: The relationship between the dose of an administered drug and the response of the organism to the drug.Edema: Abnormal fluid accumulation in TISSUES or body cavities. Most cases of edema are present under the SKIN in SUBCUTANEOUS TISSUE.Administration, Topical: The application of drug preparations to the surfaces of the body, especially the skin (ADMINISTRATION, CUTANEOUS) or mucous membranes. This method of treatment is used to avoid systemic side effects when high doses are required at a localized area or as an alternative systemic administration route, to avoid hepatic processing for example.Treatment Outcome: Evaluation undertaken to assess the results or consequences of management and procedures used in combating disease in order to determine the efficacy, effectiveness, safety, and practicability of these interventions in individual cases or series.Self Care: Performance of activities or tasks traditionally performed by professional health care providers. The concept includes care of oneself or one's family and friends.Cough: A sudden, audible expulsion of air from the lungs through a partially closed glottis, preceded by inhalation. It is a protective response that serves to clear the trachea, bronchi, and/or lungs of irritants and secretions, or to prevent aspiration of foreign materials into the lungs.Lignans: A class of dibenzylbutane derivatives which occurs in higher plants and in fluids (bile, serum, urine, etc.) in man and other animals. These compounds, which have a potential anti-cancer role, can be synthesized in vitro by human fecal flora. (From Singleton & Sainsbury, Dictionary of Microbiology and Molecular Biology, 2d ed)Antimalarials: Agents used in the treatment of malaria. They are usually classified on the basis of their action against plasmodia at different stages in their life cycle in the human. (From AMA, Drug Evaluations Annual, 1992, p1585)Antioxidants: Naturally occurring or synthetic substances that inhibit or retard the oxidation of a substance to which it is added. They counteract the harmful and damaging effects of oxidation in animal tissues.Rural Population: The inhabitants of rural areas or of small towns classified as rural.Random Allocation: A process involving chance used in therapeutic trials or other research endeavor for allocating experimental subjects, human or animal, between treatment and control groups, or among treatment groups. It may also apply to experiments on inanimate objects.Administration, Cutaneous: The application of suitable drug dosage forms to the skin for either local or systemic effects.Great BritainDrug Evaluation, Preclinical: Preclinical testing of drugs in experimental animals or in vitro for their biological and toxic effects and potential clinical applications.Coffee: A beverage made from ground COFFEA beans (SEEDS) infused in hot water. It generally contains CAFFEINE and THEOPHYLLINE unless it is decaffeinated.IndiaData Interpretation, Statistical: Application of statistical procedures to analyze specific observed or assumed facts from a particular study.Diterpenes: Twenty-carbon compounds derived from MEVALONIC ACID or deoxyxylulose phosphate.TriterpenesCross-Sectional Studies: Studies in which the presence or absence of disease or other health-related variables are determined in each member of the study population or in a representative sample at one particular time. This contrasts with LONGITUDINAL STUDIES which are followed over a period of time.Models, Theoretical: Theoretical representations that simulate the behavior or activity of systems, processes, or phenomena. They include the use of mathematical equations, computers, and other electronic equipment.Algorithms: A procedure consisting of a sequence of algebraic formulas and/or logical steps to calculate or determine a given task.Kenya: A republic in eastern Africa, south of ETHIOPIA, west of SOMALIA with TANZANIA to its south, and coastline on the Indian Ocean. Its capital is Nairobi.Drug Interactions: The action of a drug that may affect the activity, metabolism, or toxicity of another drug.Adverse Drug Reaction Reporting Systems: Systems developed for collecting reports from government agencies, manufacturers, hospitals, physicians, and other sources on adverse drug reactions.Culture: A collective expression for all behavior patterns acquired and socially transmitted through symbols. Culture includes customs, traditions, and language.Plant Roots: The usually underground portions of a plant that serve as support, store food, and through which water and mineral nutrients enter the plant. (From American Heritage Dictionary, 1982; Concise Dictionary of Biology, 1990)Biphenyl CompoundsSulfur: An element that is a member of the chalcogen family. It has an atomic symbol S, atomic number 16, and atomic weight [32.059; 32.076]. It is found in the amino acids cysteine and methionine.Drug Monitoring: The process of observing, recording, or detecting the effects of a chemical substance administered to an individual therapeutically or diagnostically.Anti-Infective Agents: Substances that prevent infectious agents or organisms from spreading or kill infectious agents in order to prevent the spread of infection.ItalyAdministration, Oral: The giving of drugs, chemicals, or other substances by mouth.Anti-Inflammatory Agents, Non-Steroidal: Anti-inflammatory agents that are non-steroidal in nature. In addition to anti-inflammatory actions, they have analgesic, antipyretic, and platelet-inhibitory actions.They act by blocking the synthesis of prostaglandins by inhibiting cyclooxygenase, which converts arachidonic acid to cyclic endoperoxides, precursors of prostaglandins. Inhibition of prostaglandin synthesis accounts for their analgesic, antipyretic, and platelet-inhibitory actions; other mechanisms may contribute to their anti-inflammatory effects.Pediatrics: A medical specialty concerned with maintaining health and providing medical care to children from birth to adolescence.Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Nanoparticles: Nanometer-sized particles that are nanoscale in three dimensions. They include nanocrystaline materials; NANOCAPSULES; METAL NANOPARTICLES; DENDRIMERS, and QUANTUM DOTS. The uses of nanoparticles include DRUG DELIVERY SYSTEMS and cancer targeting and imaging.Socioeconomic Factors: Social and economic factors that characterize the individual or group within the social structure.Clinical Trials as Topic: Works about pre-planned studies of the safety, efficacy, or optimum dosage schedule (if appropriate) of one or more diagnostic, therapeutic, or prophylactic drugs, devices, or techniques selected according to predetermined criteria of eligibility and observed for predefined evidence of favorable and unfavorable effects. This concept includes clinical trials conducted both in the U.S. and in other countries.Double-Blind Method: A method of studying a drug or procedure in which both the subjects and investigators are kept unaware of who is actually getting which specific treatment.Diarrhea: An increased liquidity or decreased consistency of FECES, such as running stool. Fecal consistency is related to the ratio of water-holding capacity of insoluble solids to total water, rather than the amount of water present. Diarrhea is not hyperdefecation or increased fecal weight.Granuloma: A relatively small nodular inflammatory lesion containing grouped mononuclear phagocytes, caused by infectious and noninfectious agents.Research Design: A plan for collecting and utilizing data so that desired information can be obtained with sufficient precision or so that an hypothesis can be tested properly.Geography: The science dealing with the earth and its life, especially the description of land, sea, and air and the distribution of plant and animal life, including humanity and human industries with reference to the mutual relations of these elements. (From Webster, 3d ed)New York CityCanada: The largest country in North America, comprising 10 provinces and three territories. Its capital is Ottawa.Hispanic Americans: Persons living in the United States of Mexican (MEXICAN AMERICANS), Puerto Rican, Cuban, Central or South American, or other Spanish culture or origin. The concept does not include Brazilian Americans or Portuguese Americans.Physician's Practice Patterns: Patterns of practice related to diagnosis and treatment as especially influenced by cost of the service requested and provided.Anti-Bacterial Agents: Substances that reduce the growth or reproduction of BACTERIA.China: A country spanning from central Asia to the Pacific Ocean.Data Collection: Systematic gathering of data for a particular purpose from various sources, including questionnaires, interviews, observation, existing records, and electronic devices. The process is usually preliminary to statistical analysis of the data.Attitude of Health Personnel: Attitudes of personnel toward their patients, other professionals, toward the medical care system, etc.Disease Models, Animal: Naturally occurring or experimentally induced animal diseases with pathological processes sufficiently similar to those of human diseases. They are used as study models for human diseases.Malaria: A protozoan disease caused in humans by four species of the PLASMODIUM genus: PLASMODIUM FALCIPARUM; PLASMODIUM VIVAX; PLASMODIUM OVALE; and PLASMODIUM MALARIAE; and transmitted by the bite of an infected female mosquito of the genus ANOPHELES. Malaria is endemic in parts of Asia, Africa, Central and South America, Oceania, and certain Caribbean islands. It is characterized by extreme exhaustion associated with paroxysms of high FEVER; SWEATING; shaking CHILLS; and ANEMIA. Malaria in ANIMALS is caused by other species of plasmodia.Neoplasms: New abnormal growth of tissue. Malignant neoplasms show a greater degree of anaplasia and have the properties of invasion and metastasis, compared to benign neoplasms.Wound Healing: Restoration of integrity to traumatized tissue.Prevalence: The total number of cases of a given disease in a specified population at a designated time. It is differentiated from INCIDENCE, which refers to the number of new cases in the population at a given time.Asthma: A form of bronchial disorder with three distinct components: airway hyper-responsiveness (RESPIRATORY HYPERSENSITIVITY), airway INFLAMMATION, and intermittent AIRWAY OBSTRUCTION. It is characterized by spasmodic contraction of airway smooth muscle, WHEEZING, and dyspnea (DYSPNEA, PAROXYSMAL).Health Services Accessibility: The degree to which individuals are inhibited or facilitated in their ability to gain entry to and to receive care and services from the health care system. Factors influencing this ability include geographic, architectural, transportational, and financial considerations, among others.Molecular Structure: The location of the atoms, groups or ions relative to one another in a molecule, as well as the number, type and location of covalent bonds.Australia: The smallest continent and an independent country, comprising six states and two territories. Its capital is Canberra.Pilot Projects: Small-scale tests of methods and procedures to be used on a larger scale if the pilot study demonstrates that these methods and procedures can work.Health Care Surveys: Statistical measures of utilization and other aspects of the provision of health care services including hospitalization and ambulatory care.Flavonoids: A group of phenyl benzopyrans named for having structures like FLAVONES.Water: A clear, odorless, tasteless liquid that is essential for most animal and plant life and is an excellent solvent for many substances. The chemical formula is hydrogen oxide (H2O). (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)African Americans: Persons living in the United States having origins in any of the black groups of Africa.Patient Education as Topic: The teaching or training of patients concerning their own health needs.Drug Delivery Systems: Systems for the delivery of drugs to target sites of pharmacological actions. Technologies employed include those concerning drug preparation, route of administration, site targeting, metabolism, and toxicity.Ethanol: A clear, colorless liquid rapidly absorbed from the gastrointestinal tract and distributed throughout the body. It has bactericidal activity and is used often as a topical disinfectant. It is widely used as a solvent and preservative in pharmaceutical preparations as well as serving as the primary ingredient in ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGES.Rats, Wistar: A strain of albino rat developed at the Wistar Institute that has spread widely at other institutions. This has markedly diluted the original strain.Quality of Life: A generic concept reflecting concern with the modification and enhancement of life attributes, e.g., physical, political, moral and social environment; the overall condition of a human life.Models, Statistical: Statistical formulations or analyses which, when applied to data and found to fit the data, are then used to verify the assumptions and parameters used in the analysis. Examples of statistical models are the linear model, binomial model, polynomial model, two-parameter model, etc.Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic: Works about clinical trials that involve at least one test treatment and one control treatment, concurrent enrollment and follow-up of the test- and control-treated groups, and in which the treatments to be administered are selected by a random process, such as the use of a random-numbers table.Follow-Up Studies: Studies in which individuals or populations are followed to assess the outcome of exposures, procedures, or effects of a characteristic, e.g., occurrence of disease.Liver: A large lobed glandular organ in the abdomen of vertebrates that is responsible for detoxification, metabolism, synthesis and storage of various substances.Bacteria: One of the three domains of life (the others being Eukarya and ARCHAEA), also called Eubacteria. They are unicellular prokaryotic microorganisms which generally possess rigid cell walls, multiply by cell division, and exhibit three principal forms: round or coccal, rodlike or bacillary, and spiral or spirochetal. Bacteria can be classified by their response to OXYGEN: aerobic, anaerobic, or facultatively anaerobic; by the mode by which they obtain their energy: chemotrophy (via chemical reaction) or PHOTOTROPHY (via light reaction); for chemotrophs by their source of chemical energy: CHEMOLITHOTROPHY (from inorganic compounds) or chemoorganotrophy (from organic compounds); and by their source for CARBON; NITROGEN; etc.; HETEROTROPHY (from organic sources) or AUTOTROPHY (from CARBON DIOXIDE). They can also be classified by whether or not they stain (based on the structure of their CELL WALLS) with CRYSTAL VIOLET dye: gram-negative or gram-positive.Rats, Sprague-Dawley: A strain of albino rat used widely for experimental purposes because of its calmness and ease of handling. It was developed by the Sprague-Dawley Animal Company.Pregnancy: The status during which female mammals carry their developing young (EMBRYOS or FETUSES) in utero before birth, beginning from FERTILIZATION to BIRTH.Cell Survival: The span of viability of a cell characterized by the capacity to perform certain functions such as metabolism, growth, reproduction, some form of responsiveness, and adaptability.Computer Simulation: Computer-based representation of physical systems and phenomena such as chemical processes.Reproducibility of Results: The statistical reproducibility of measurements (often in a clinical context), including the testing of instrumentation or techniques to obtain reproducible results. The concept includes reproducibility of physiological measurements, which may be used to develop rules to assess probability or prognosis, or response to a stimulus; reproducibility of occurrence of a condition; and reproducibility of experimental results.Antineoplastic Agents: Substances that inhibit or prevent the proliferation of NEOPLASMS.Electroencephalography: Recording of electric currents developed in the brain by means of electrodes applied to the scalp, to the surface of the brain, or placed within the substance of the brain.Mice, Inbred C57BLCells, Cultured: Cells propagated in vitro in special media conducive to their growth. Cultured cells are used to study developmental, morphologic, metabolic, physiologic, and genetic processes, among others.Risk Assessment: The qualitative or quantitative estimation of the likelihood of adverse effects that may result from exposure to specified health hazards or from the absence of beneficial influences. (Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 1988)
Proposed Remedies". Street Railway Journal. McGraw Publishing Company. 29 (1): 8-13. January 5, 1907. Retrieved 10 December ...
... has been listed as one of the 38 substances used to prepare Bach flower remedies, a kind of alternative medicine promoted ... "Flower remedies". Cancer Research UK. Archived from the original on 11 September 2013. Retrieved September 2013. Check date ... However, according to Cancer Research UK, "there is no scientific evidence to prove that flower remedies can control, cure or ... Vohra, D. S. (2004). Bach Flower Remedies: A Comprehensive Study. B. Jain Publishers. p. 3. ISBN 978-81-7021-271-3. Archived ...
"Rumex Crispus." - Homeopathic Remedies. N.p., n.d. Web. 3 Mar. 2014 Camazine, Scott and Robert A. Bye 1980 A Study Of The ...
Bray, Samuel L. (2012). "Announcing Remedies". Cornell Law Review. 97. SSRN 1967184 . Fatemeh Baratian-Ghorghi; Huaguo Zhou; ...
Under the name Holmes, the artist illustrated the book "Early prairie remedies" (the book was printed in two editions; the ... Kerr, Sheila (1981). Early Prairie Remedies (Illustrated by Sharon Holmes). Barker Gifts Ltd, Calgary. ISBN 0889252688. Kerr, ... Sheila (1986). Pioneer Remedies. Barker Publishing, Calgary. ISBN 978-0889252684. Cherry, Zena. "McTeer forms company to ... second reprinting was titled "The Pioneer Remedies"). Christian's 1992 exhibition at the Ferry Building Art Gallery in West ...
Other potential remedies suggested by NHS Choices include pulling your knees up to your chest and leaning forward, sipping ice- ... Numerous medical remedies exist but no particular treatment is known to be especially effective, generally because of a paucity ... A bout of hiccups, in general, resolves itself without intervention, although many home remedies are often used to attempt to ... There are many superstitious and folk remedies for hiccups, including headstanding, drinking a glass of water upside-down, ...
The cherry plum has been listed as one of the 38 plants that are used to prepare Bach flower remedies, a kind of alternative ... "Flower remedies". Cancer Research UK. Retrieved 2 September 2013. Prunus cerasifera in the CalPhotos Photo Database, University ... However, according to Cancer Research UK, "there is no scientific evidence to prove that flower remedies can control, cure or ... Thundercloud Fact Sheet D. S. Vohra (1 June 2004). Bach Flower Remedies: A Comprehensive Study. B. Jain Publishers. p. 3. ISBN ...
Wong, Cathy (September 15, 2012). "Heartburn Remedies". About.com. "Aloe IBS study". Cosmetic Ingredient Review Expert, Panel ( ...
"Flower remedies". Cancer Research UK. Archived from the original on 2013-09-11. Retrieved September 2013. Check date values in ... However, according to Cancer Research UK, "there is no scientific evidence to prove that flower remedies can control, cure or ... D. S. Vohra (1 June 2004). Bach Flower Remedies: A Comprehensive Study. B. Jain Publishers. p. 3. ISBN 978-81-7021-271-3. ... Pine has been listed as one of the 38 substances used to prepare Bach flower remedies, a kind of alternative medicine promoted[ ...
Home Remedies. Sanjay & Co. p. 31. ISBN 9788186469736. "How to make Sai bhaji - fresh green leafy vegetables, chana dal and ...
"Flower remedies". Cancer Research UK. Retrieved 4 February 2017. "Mimulus (Blood-drop-emlets)". Bach Flower Remedies. Retrieved ... Erythranthe has been listed as one of the 38 plants that are used to prepare Bach flower remedies, a kind of alternative ... However, according to Cancer Research UK, "there is no scientific evidence to prove that flower remedies can control, cure or ... D. S. Vohra (1 June 2004). Bach Flower Remedies: A Comprehensive Study. B. Jain Publishers. p. 3. ISBN 978-81-7021-271-3. ...
Gramm-Leach-Bliley Act (GLBA) Privacy laws of the United States Bray, Samuel L. (forthcoming 2012). "Announcing Remedies". ...
Chaga has been used as a folk remedy in Russia and Siberia since the 16th century. According to the Memorial Sloan-Kettering ... "Flower remedies". Cancer Research UK. Arney, Kat (25 July 2012). "Cannabis, cannabinoids and cancer - the evidence so far". ... According to Cancer Research UK, "there is currently no strong evidence from studies in people that herbal remedies can treat, ... The regime was based on the belief that disease was caused by "parasites", and included herbal remedies, chelation therapy, and ...
In England, it fell out of use in favor of less expensive remedies, and was ultimately abolished in 1875. In Canada, the writ ... The writ is distinguished from other remedies primarily in terms of the timing of the grounds for objecting to the judgment, ... In this sense, audita querela, along with other common law remedies, serves to fill gaps in the system of postconviction ... Nolan, Joseph R.; Sartorio, Laurie J. "Jurisdiction in General". Equitable Remedies. Massachusetts Practice Series. 31 (3rd ed ...
Two remedies. Pliny the Elder. Naturalis Historia. Book 37. Chap. 76. The methods of testing precious stones. Hardness. Non- ...
"Flower remedies". Cancer Research UK. Retrieved September 2013. Check date values in: ,access-date= (help). ... However, according to Cancer Research UK, "there is no scientific evidence to prove that flower remedies can control, cure or ... D. S. Vohra (1 June 2004). Bach Flower Remedies: A Comprehensive Study. B. Jain Publishers. p. 3. ISBN 978-81-7021-271-3. ... Ceratostigma has been listed as one of the 38 plants that are used to prepare Bach flower remedies, a kind of alternative ...
If the fine is lower than €70, or the appellant's appeal is rejected in Leeuwarden, there will be no legal remedies anymore and ... "Announcing Remedies". Cornell Law Review. 97. SSRN 1967184 . The Magistrates' Courts Act 1980, section 150(1) The Magistrates' ...
"Flower remedies". Cancer Research UK. Retrieved September 2013. Check date values in: ,access-date= (help) Hamel, Paul B. and ... Chicory has been listed as one of the 38 plants that are used to prepare Bach flower remedies, a kind of alternative medicine. ... However, according to Cancer Research UK, "there is no scientific evidence to prove that flower remedies can control, cure or ... Traditional Folk Remedies (Century, 1987), p.120. "chicory, Cichorium intybus". invasive.org. Retrieved 26 May 2016. ITIS 36762 ...
It is included in the "Rescue Remedy" or "Five Flower Remedy", a potion touted as a treatment for acute anxiety and which is ... Impatiens glandulifera is one of the Bach flower remedies, flower extracts used as herbal remedies for physical and emotional ... Impatiens has been listed as one of the 38 plants that are used to prepare Bach flower remedies, a kind of alternative medicine ... "Flower remedies". Cancer Research UK. Retrieved September 2013. Check date values in: ,access-date= (help) Ombrello, T. ...
1959, retrieved 2009-02-02 Bray, Samuel L. (2012). "Announcing Remedies". Cornell Law Review. 97. SSRN 1967184 . FAIR AND ... with respect to the procedures for remedying the effects of fraud or identity theft...". Beginning sixty days after the summary ...
Fischer, Wilhelm (1883). "On Kairine and Kairoline". New Remedies. 12 (2): 41. Fruitnight, J. Henry (1886). "Kairine and ...
Samuel L. Bray, Announcing Remedies, 97 Cornell Law Review 753 (2012). Sheila B. Scheuerman, Due Process Forgotten: The Problem ... Statutory damages for copyright infringement Bray, Samuel L. (2012). "Announcing Remedies". Cornell Law Review. 97: 753. SSRN ...
"Flower remedies". Cancer Research UK. Retrieved 12 September 2013. Clapham, A.R., Tutin, T.G. and Warburg, E.F. Flora of the ... Hottonia palustris has been listed as one of the 38 plants used to prepare Bach flower remedies, a kind of alternative medicine ... However, according to Cancer Research UK, "there is no scientific evidence to prove that flower remedies can control, cure or ... Bach Flower Remedies: A Comprehensive Study. B. Jain Publishers. p. 3. ISBN 978-81-7021-271-3. Retrieved 2 September 2013. " ...
... has been listed as one of the 38 plants used to prepare Bach flower remedies, a kind of alternative medicine promoted ... "Flower remedies". Cancer Research UK. Retrieved September 2013. Check date values in: ,access-date= (help) Howells, J., ... However, according to Cancer Research UK, "there is no scientific evidence to prove that flower remedies can control, cure or ... Clematis is also a constituent of Bach's Rescue Remedy. Leaf extracts from two Ethiopian species (Clematis longicauda steud ex ...
"Flower remedies". Cancer Research UK. Retrieved September 2, 2013. An easy way of peeling the pellicle, or pithy skin Lori ... Leaf infusions are used in respiratory diseases and are a popular remedy for whooping cough. A hair shampoo can be made from ... Sweet chestnut has been listed as one of the 38 substances used to prepare Bach flower remedies, a kind of alternative medicine ... However, according to Cancer Research UK, "there is no scientific evidence to prove that flower remedies can control, cure or ...
Phone O Clinic, Ayurvedic Medicines, Ayurvedic Products, Ayurvedic Consultation, Herbal Remedies, Herbal Medicines, Nature Care ...
Cough prevention and treatment can be done with prescription medications from your doctor and also with cough home remedies. ... 15 Home Remedies for Allergies. Learn about natural and home remedies for allergies. Discover over fifteen ways you can relieve ... While the remedy may seem relatively simple, a salt and water gargle can help soothe a scratchy throat that causes you to cough ... The Best Natural Cough Remedies. Medically reviewed by Alan Carter, PharmD on April 12, 2016. - Written by Zohra Ashpari and ...
... Many people feel comfortable using more natural methods by which to treat the nausea and vomiting of h.g ...
Getting started with home remedies & natural treatments is simple enough… in fact, youll probably find everything you need ... Home Remedies Play all Home remedies are those treatments that can be done at home, usually with common household items and ... Diet Tips And Remedies For Permanent Weight loss - Duration: 5 minutes, 25 seconds.. Home Remedies ... Easy Home Remedies To Reduce Vaginal Itching - Duration: 4 minutes, 4 seconds.. Home Remedies ...
Fever blisters can be effectively reduced by using home made remedies. The article comes up with some valuable natural ... It is advisable to exercise all precautions while using any of these homemade remedies. Avoid using remedies you are allergic ... Home Remedies , Ayurveda , Vastu , Yoga , Feng Shui , Tattoos , Fitness , Garden , Nutrition , Parenting , Bikes , Cars , Baby ... There is no cure or vaccine for a fever blister, but there are many effective home remedies that can lessen their severity and ...
Rescue Remedy is a trademark and other companies produce the same formula under other names, such as Five Flower Remedy.[12] ... "Flower remedies". Cancer Research UK. Retrieved 2 September 2013.. *^ Candee, Andrea (2003). Gentle Healing for Baby and Child ... Bach flower remedies (BFRs) are solutions of brandy and water-the water containing extreme dilutions of flower material ... Edward Bach Centre (1997). The Bach flower remedies. Los Angeles: Keats Pub. ISBN 978-0-87983-869-0. OCLC 37322293.. ...
Remedies for cold headache. Thyroid is a small gland situated at the front of your neck, just below the larynx about the size ... Herbal remedy jock itch naturally. Jock Itch creates burning in the groin region of the humans that can be extremely annoying. ... Luckily, natural remedies can rapidly alleviate and get rid of the itching and put off potential discomfiture. Dettol is the ... Chinese pharmacy minneapolis 2014 Tcm newsroom Home remedies for runny nose and cough for toddlers Treatment for stomach pain ...
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cough and phlegm remedies. A bad cough can lead to many different problems. In order to make up for the lack of moisture, the ...
... Daniel L. McFadden, Carlos E. Noton, Pau Olivella. NBER Working Paper No. 17938. Issued in March ... as remedies for selection-related market damage. An overall conclusion of the paper is that the design and management of ...
Dry skin: Seven home remedies. One common cause of an itchy beard is dry skin. Learn more about home remedies that can help ... Here, learn about the many home remedies and medical treatments that can help. We also describe when to see a doctor. Read now ... 7 itchy beard remedies. Gently cleansing and avoiding harsh chemicals may help an itchy beard. ... We take a look at some of the most common causes and discuss treatment options, including home remedies. Read now ...
When it comes to home hangover remedies, reaching for a humble banana or two is one of the most effective ways to combat a case ... there are also numerous natural remedies. Weve listed five of the best that will help get hangover sufferers back in tip-top ...
People can often treat a cough at home with remedies that include ginger, thyme, and slippery elm. Other natural treatments ... Here, learn more about the natural remedies for a cough and how to prevent them in the first place. ... Here, we look at 12 of these remedies in more detail.. 1. Honey tea. Share on Pinterest. A popular home remedy for coughs is ... Twelve natural cough remedies. People use a range of natural remedies to try to treat a persistent cough. ...
... here are several natural arthritis remedies to help heal joint pain and inflammation. ... What other natural arthritis remedies can I try?. Holistic options such as acupuncture, chiropractic medicine and ... Do you have arthritis? Care to suggest any other natural remedies below? ... there are several natural arthritis remedies to help heal joint pain and inflammation. ...
I have compiled this list of home tips remedies that I have found to be some of the best as well as the cheapest remedies ... Home Remedies gives plenty of ideas how to Heal yourself, your family and your loved ones with Natural Remedies. ... Sarah Collingwood and I have been running a popular website about home remedies and natural remedies for a couple of years now ... Sarah Collingwood and I have been running a popular website about home remedies and natural remedies for a couple of years now ...
Can natural sleep remedies offer you a drug-free nights sleep? WebMD examines some common natural sleep aids, including their ... Is kava a safe natural sleep remedy?. Kava, also known as kava kava, is an herbal remedy thats used for stress and anxiety ... Is chamomile a safe sleep remedy?. Chamomile is a popular herbal sleep remedy thats been used for centuries. This herb also ... Are natural sleep aids and remedies safe?. Like all drugs, natural sleep remedies can have side effects and risks. Pre-market ...
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If you still wind up with a hangover, you may be inclined to try one of the many supposedly tried-and-true remedies that have ... Traditional hangover remedies are often ineffective, and some of them may actually make you feel worse. ... A 2005 review article in the journal BMJ identified eight peer-reviewed, placebo-controlled studies of hangover remedies, and ...
Learn home remedies for boils on the skin, how to get rid of boils, as well as the causes, symptoms, including furuncles and ...
Diaper Rash - Home Remedies Do you know of any home remedies for a diaper rash? ...
Sinus problems - congestion, pain, headaches -- are one of the most common complaints people have. This WebMD slideshow shows people what they can do at home to help prevent and treat sinus problems.
Get the best deal for Herbal Remedies & Resins from the largest online selection at eBay.com. Browse your favorite brands ✅ ... Save on Herbal Remedies & Resins. Trending price is based on prices over last 90 days. ...
... items to cure your ailments with the helpful advice from an expert herbalist in this free video series on herbal home remedies. ... items to cure your ailments with the helpful advice from an expert herbalist in this free video series on herbal home remedies. ...
If these remedies dont bring you relief, or if you think you have a more serious condition causing your dry eyes, its time to ... Home Remedies for Dry Eyes. Medically reviewed by University of Illinois-Chicago, College of Medicine on June 8, 2016. - ...
Walgreens return policy. ‡ We disclaim all liability for these telemedicine services, which are provided solely by DermatologistOnCall in accordance with DermatologistOnCall policies and terms. DermatologistOnCall and its healthcare providers are not agents, employees or affiliates of Walgreens. For non-emergency conditions. ...
  • Six cough remedies aimed at very young children have been removed from shelves due to worries about accidental overdose, it has emerged. (netdoctor.co.uk)
  • And while we all have our own tried-and-true hangover cures - ranging from greasy pizza with an Alka-Seltzer chaser to 'the hair of the dog' in Bloody Mary form to sleep (and lots of it) - there are also numerous natural remedies. (treehugger.com)
  • Home Remedies that cures common ailments faced by people in daily life. (lulu.com)
  • The Big Book of Home Remedies is the ultimate resource for natural cures and home remedies for over one hundred different common health conditions. (lulu.com)
  • Though you may not find a remedy that completely cures your morning sickness, even the slightest bit of relief is worth it. (bellaonline.com)
  • And as you accumulate various remedies and tonics in your natural medicine cabinet, you need to keep your ingredients and cures organized so you can easily find what you need when you need it. (naturalnews.com)
  • Natural News) As a prepper, it's important to know how to treat minor health complaints with home remedies and natural cures that you can find in your homestead. (naturalnews.com)
  • Natural News) Home remedies are popular among those who prefer natural cures for common ailments, especially since this means you can avoid the harmful side effects often linked to over-the-counter (OTC) medicines. (naturalnews.com)
  • And now many folk are foresaking the modern antacids and retreating into the old fashioned pantry to try some of the ancient remedies for heartburn and indigestion. (streetdirectory.com)
  • The anti-itch medicine causes a soothing cooling feeling as it evaporates from your skin, making it a good remedy for allergic skin rashes. (rd.com)
  • With all the remedies enumerated above, changing your outlook in life is still a vital facet to the improvement of your social anxiety. (tgdaily.com)
  • Apple cider vinegar , with its alkaline nature, keeps away fungi that may breed on your scalp and cause dandruff, making it a wonderful home remedy to curb dandruff naturally. (medindia.net)
  • Experts say at-home remedies such as coconut oil and crushed aspirin can go a long way towards easing the itch and fighting dandruff-causing yeast. (foxnews.com)
  • As this self development article shows, you can get things moving again by eating more fibrous fruit and vegetables, exercising, drinking more of the right fluids as well as trying some of the more unusual home remedies. (bellaonline.com)
  • 25. To Read the Full Article on "Loose Motion" Please Visit the Following Link: http://www.hoorainnazakat.com/home-remedies-for-loose-motion/ Subscribe and Follow My Website for More Stuff! (slideshare.net)
  • The reader of this article should exercise all precautionary measures while following instructions on the home remedies from this article. (home-remedies-for-you.com)
  • While I won't list them all, I've included the remedies that are most popular because of their effectiveness and that I have found most helpful during my own pregnancies. (bellaonline.com)
  • But the remarkable effectiveness of many of those remedies has been confirmed by new research. (newsmax.com)
  • Calendula (made from marigolds) is a centuries-old remedy for any skin itch or ouch, from bee stings to sunburn to eczema. (care2.com)