Registries: The systems and processes involved in the establishment, support, management, and operation of registers, e.g., disease registers.Incidence: The number of new cases of a given disease during a given period in a specified population. It also is used for the rate at which new events occur in a defined population. It is differentiated from PREVALENCE, which refers to all cases, new or old, in the population at a given time.Risk Factors: An aspect of personal behavior or lifestyle, environmental exposure, or inborn or inherited characteristic, which, on the basis of epidemiologic evidence, is known to be associated with a health-related condition considered important to prevent.Treatment Outcome: Evaluation undertaken to assess the results or consequences of management and procedures used in combating disease in order to determine the efficacy, effectiveness, safety, and practicability of these interventions in individual cases or series.United StatesRetrospective Studies: Studies used to test etiologic hypotheses in which inferences about an exposure to putative causal factors are derived from data relating to characteristics of persons under study or to events or experiences in their past. The essential feature is that some of the persons under study have the disease or outcome of interest and their characteristics are compared with those of unaffected persons.DenmarkTime Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Cohort Studies: Studies in which subsets of a defined population are identified. These groups may or may not be exposed to factors hypothesized to influence the probability of the occurrence of a particular disease or other outcome. Cohorts are defined populations which, as a whole, are followed in an attempt to determine distinguishing subgroup characteristics.Follow-Up Studies: Studies in which individuals or populations are followed to assess the outcome of exposures, procedures, or effects of a characteristic, e.g., occurrence of disease.Prospective Studies: Observation of a population for a sufficient number of persons over a sufficient number of years to generate incidence or mortality rates subsequent to the selection of the study group.Neoplasms: New abnormal growth of tissue. Malignant neoplasms show a greater degree of anaplasia and have the properties of invasion and metastasis, compared to benign neoplasms.SEER Program: A cancer registry mandated under the National Cancer Act of 1971 to operate and maintain a population-based cancer reporting system, reporting periodically estimates of cancer incidence and mortality in the United States. The Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) Program is a continuing project of the National Cancer Institute of the National Institutes of Health. Among its goals, in addition to assembling and reporting cancer statistics, are the monitoring of annual cancer incident trends and the promoting of studies designed to identify factors amenable to cancer control interventions. (From National Cancer Institute, NIH Publication No. 91-3074, October 1990)Risk Assessment: The qualitative or quantitative estimation of the likelihood of adverse effects that may result from exposure to specified health hazards or from the absence of beneficial influences. (Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 1988)Age Factors: Age as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or the effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from AGING, a physiological process, and TIME FACTORS which refers only to the passage of time.Survival Rate: The proportion of survivors in a group, e.g., of patients, studied and followed over a period, or the proportion of persons in a specified group alive at the beginning of a time interval who survive to the end of the interval. It is often studied using life table methods.Age Distribution: The frequency of different ages or age groups in a given population. The distribution may refer to either how many or what proportion of the group. The population is usually patients with a specific disease but the concept is not restricted to humans and is not restricted to medicine.Hospital Mortality: A vital statistic measuring or recording the rate of death from any cause in hospitalized populations.EuropeInfant, Newborn: An infant during the first month after birth.Rare Diseases: A large group of diseases which are characterized by a low prevalence in the population. They frequently are associated with problems in diagnosis and treatment.Survival Analysis: A class of statistical procedures for estimating the survival function (function of time, starting with a population 100% well at a given time and providing the percentage of the population still well at later times). The survival analysis is then used for making inferences about the effects of treatments, prognostic factors, exposures, and other covariates on the function.NorwayDatabases, Factual: Extensive collections, reputedly complete, of facts and data garnered from material of a specialized subject area and made available for analysis and application. The collection can be automated by various contemporary methods for retrieval. The concept should be differentiated from DATABASES, BIBLIOGRAPHIC which is restricted to collections of bibliographic references.SwedenAngioplasty, Balloon, Coronary: Dilation of an occluded coronary artery (or arteries) by means of a balloon catheter to restore myocardial blood supply.Myocardial Infarction: NECROSIS of the MYOCARDIUM caused by an obstruction of the blood supply to the heart (CORONARY CIRCULATION).Prognosis: A prediction of the probable outcome of a disease based on a individual's condition and the usual course of the disease as seen in similar situations.Proportional Hazards Models: Statistical models used in survival analysis that assert that the effect of the study factors on the hazard rate in the study population is multiplicative and does not change over time.Population Surveillance: Ongoing scrutiny of a population (general population, study population, target population, etc.), generally using methods distinguished by their practicability, uniformity, and frequently their rapidity, rather than by complete accuracy.Logistic Models: Statistical models which describe the relationship between a qualitative dependent variable (that is, one which can take only certain discrete values, such as the presence or absence of a disease) and an independent variable. A common application is in epidemiology for estimating an individual's risk (probability of a disease) as a function of a given risk factor.Medical Record Linkage: The creation and maintenance of medical and vital records in multiple institutions in a manner that will facilitate the combined use of the records of identified individuals.Multivariate Analysis: A set of techniques used when variation in several variables has to be studied simultaneously. In statistics, multivariate analysis is interpreted as any analytic method that allows simultaneous study of two or more dependent variables.Drug-Eluting Stents: Stents that are covered with materials that are embedded with chemicals that are gradually released into the surrounding milieu.Sex Factors: Maleness or femaleness as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from SEX CHARACTERISTICS, anatomical or physiological manifestations of sex, and from SEX DISTRIBUTION, the number of males and females in given circumstances.Kaplan-Meier Estimate: A nonparametric method of compiling LIFE TABLES or survival tables. It combines calculated probabilities of survival and estimates to allow for observations occurring beyond a measurement threshold, which are assumed to occur randomly. Time intervals are defined as ending each time an event occurs and are therefore unequal. (From Last, A Dictionary of Epidemiology, 1995)Sex Distribution: The number of males and females in a given population. The distribution may refer to how many men or women or what proportion of either in the group. The population is usually patients with a specific disease but the concept is not restricted to humans and is not restricted to medicine.Patient Selection: Criteria and standards used for the determination of the appropriateness of the inclusion of patients with specific conditions in proposed treatment plans and the criteria used for the inclusion of subjects in various clinical trials and other research protocols.GermanyHospital Records: Compilations of data on hospital activities and programs; excludes patient medical records.Odds Ratio: The ratio of two odds. The exposure-odds ratio for case control data is the ratio of the odds in favor of exposure among cases to the odds in favor of exposure among noncases. The disease-odds ratio for a cohort or cross section is the ratio of the odds in favor of disease among the exposed to the odds in favor of disease among the unexposed. The prevalence-odds ratio refers to an odds ratio derived cross-sectionally from studies of prevalent cases.France: A country in western Europe bordered by the Atlantic Ocean, the English Channel, the Mediterranean Sea, and the countries of Belgium, Germany, Italy, Spain, Switzerland, the principalities of Andorra and Monaco, and by the duchy of Luxembourg. Its capital is Paris.Breast Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the human BREAST.Diseases in Twins: Disorders affecting TWINS, one or both, at any age.ItalyStroke: A group of pathological conditions characterized by sudden, non-convulsive loss of neurological function due to BRAIN ISCHEMIA or INTRACRANIAL HEMORRHAGES. Stroke is classified by the type of tissue NECROSIS, such as the anatomic location, vasculature involved, etiology, age of the affected individual, and hemorrhagic vs. non-hemorrhagic nature. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, pp777-810)Cause of Death: Factors which produce cessation of all vital bodily functions. They can be analyzed from an epidemiologic viewpoint.Risk: The probability that an event will occur. It encompasses a variety of measures of the probability of a generally unfavorable outcome.Chi-Square Distribution: A distribution in which a variable is distributed like the sum of the squares of any given independent random variable, each of which has a normal distribution with mean of zero and variance of one. The chi-square test is a statistical test based on comparison of a test statistic to a chi-square distribution. The oldest of these tests are used to detect whether two or more population distributions differ from one another.Spain: Parliamentary democracy located between France on the northeast and Portugual on the west and bordered by the Atlantic Ocean and the Mediterranean Sea.Stents: Devices that provide support for tubular structures that are being anastomosed or for body cavities during skin grafting.JapanAustralia: The smallest continent and an independent country, comprising six states and two territories. Its capital is Canberra.Hospitalization: The confinement of a patient in a hospital.Data Collection: Systematic gathering of data for a particular purpose from various sources, including questionnaires, interviews, observation, existing records, and electronic devices. The process is usually preliminary to statistical analysis of the data.Medical Records: Recording of pertinent information concerning patient's illness or illnesses.Prevalence: The total number of cases of a given disease in a specified population at a designated time. It is differentiated from INCIDENCE, which refers to the number of new cases in the population at a given time.Twins, Dizygotic: Two offspring from the same PREGNANCY. They are from two OVA, fertilized at about the same time by two SPERMATOZOA. Such twins are genetically distinct and can be of different sexes.CaliforniaComorbidity: The presence of co-existing or additional diseases with reference to an initial diagnosis or with reference to the index condition that is the subject of study. Comorbidity may affect the ability of affected individuals to function and also their survival; it may be used as a prognostic indicator for length of hospital stay, cost factors, and outcome or survival.Research Design: A plan for collecting and utilizing data so that desired information can be obtained with sufficient precision or so that an hypothesis can be tested properly.Twins, Monozygotic: Two off-spring from the same PREGNANCY. They are from a single fertilized OVUM that split into two EMBRYOS. Such twins are usually genetically identical and of the same sex.Congenital Abnormalities: Malformations of organs or body parts during development in utero.Case-Control Studies: Studies which start with the identification of persons with a disease of interest and a control (comparison, referent) group without the disease. The relationship of an attribute to the disease is examined by comparing diseased and non-diseased persons with regard to the frequency or levels of the attribute in each group.Outcome Assessment (Health Care): Research aimed at assessing the quality and effectiveness of health care as measured by the attainment of a specified end result or outcome. Measures include parameters such as improved health, lowered morbidity or mortality, and improvement of abnormal states (such as elevated blood pressure).Percutaneous Coronary Intervention: A family of percutaneous techniques that are used to manage CORONARY OCCLUSION, including standard balloon angioplasty (PERCUTANEOUS TRANSLUMINAL CORONARY ANGIOPLASTY), the placement of intracoronary STENTS, and atheroablative technologies (e.g., ATHERECTOMY; ENDARTERECTOMY; THROMBECTOMY; PERCUTANEOUS TRANSLUMINAL LASER ANGIOPLASTY). PTCA was the dominant form of PCI, before the widespread use of stenting.Death Certificates: Official records of individual deaths including the cause of death certified by a physician, and any other required identifying information.Canada: The largest country in North America, comprising 10 provinces and three territories. Its capital is Ottawa.Survivors: Persons who have experienced a prolonged survival after serious disease or who continue to live with a usually life-threatening condition as well as family members, significant others, or individuals surviving traumatic life events.Questionnaires: Predetermined sets of questions used to collect data - clinical data, social status, occupational group, etc. The term is often applied to a self-completed survey instrument.FinlandSeverity of Illness Index: Levels within a diagnostic group which are established by various measurement criteria applied to the seriousness of a patient's disorder.Cardiovascular Agents: Agents that affect the rate or intensity of cardiac contraction, blood vessel diameter, or blood volume.Product Surveillance, Postmarketing: Surveillance of drugs, devices, appliances, etc., for efficacy or adverse effects, after they have been released for general sale.International Cooperation: The interaction of persons or groups of persons representing various nations in the pursuit of a common goal or interest.Acute Coronary Syndrome: An episode of MYOCARDIAL ISCHEMIA that generally lasts longer than a transient anginal episode that ultimately may lead to MYOCARDIAL INFARCTION.North AmericaNetherlands: Country located in EUROPE. It is bordered by the NORTH SEA, BELGIUM, and GERMANY. Constituent areas are Aruba, Curacao, Sint Maarten, formerly included in the NETHERLANDS ANTILLES.Clinical Coding: Process of substituting a symbol or code for a term such as a diagnosis or procedure. (from Slee's Health Care Terms, 3d ed.)Pregnancy: The status during which female mammals carry their developing young (EMBRYOS or FETUSES) in utero before birth, beginning from FERTILIZATION to BIRTH.Confidence Intervals: A range of values for a variable of interest, e.g., a rate, constructed so that this range has a specified probability of including the true value of the variable.Neoplasm Staging: Methods which attempt to express in replicable terms the extent of the neoplasm in the patient.SwitzerlandCoronary Artery Disease: Pathological processes of CORONARY ARTERIES that may derive from a congenital abnormality, atherosclerotic, or non-atherosclerotic cause.Propensity Score: Conditional probability of exposure to a treatment given observed covariates.Postoperative Complications: Pathologic processes that affect patients after a surgical procedure. They may or may not be related to the disease for which the surgery was done, and they may or may not be direct results of the surgery.Platelet Aggregation Inhibitors: Drugs or agents which antagonize or impair any mechanism leading to blood platelet aggregation, whether during the phases of activation and shape change or following the dense-granule release reaction and stimulation of the prostaglandin-thromboxane system.Epidemiologic Methods: Research techniques that focus on study designs and data gathering methods in human and animal populations.MichiganProsthesis Design: The plan and delineation of prostheses in general or a specific prosthesis.Coronary Restenosis: Recurrent narrowing or constriction of a coronary artery following surgical procedures performed to alleviate a prior obstruction.Renal Replacement Therapy: Procedures which temporarily or permanently remedy insufficient cleansing of body fluids by the kidneys.New Zealand: A group of islands in the southwest Pacific. Its capital is Wellington. It was discovered by the Dutch explorer Abel Tasman in 1642 and circumnavigated by Cook in 1769. Colonized in 1840 by the New Zealand Company, it became a British crown colony in 1840 until 1907 when colonial status was terminated. New Zealand is a partly anglicized form of the original Dutch name Nieuw Zeeland, new sea land, possibly with reference to the Dutch province of Zeeland. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p842 & Room, Brewer's Dictionary of Names, 1992, p378)Recurrence: The return of a sign, symptom, or disease after a remission.Tissue Donors: Individuals supplying living tissue, organs, cells, blood or blood components for transfer or transplantation to histocompatible recipients.Trauma Centers: Specialized hospital facilities which provide diagnostic and therapeutic services for trauma patients.Tissue and Organ Procurement: The administrative procedures involved with acquiring TISSUES or organs for TRANSPLANTATION through various programs, systems, or organizations. These procedures include obtaining consent from TISSUE DONORS and arranging for transportation of donated tissues and organs, after TISSUE HARVESTING, to HOSPITALS for processing and transplantation.Guideline Adherence: Conformity in fulfilling or following official, recognized, or institutional requirements, guidelines, recommendations, protocols, pathways, or other standards.Predictive Value of Tests: In screening and diagnostic tests, the probability that a person with a positive test is a true positive (i.e., has the disease), is referred to as the predictive value of a positive test; whereas, the predictive value of a negative test is the probability that the person with a negative test does not have the disease. Predictive value is related to the sensitivity and specificity of the test.Regression Analysis: Procedures for finding the mathematical function which best describes the relationship between a dependent variable and one or more independent variables. In linear regression (see LINEAR MODELS) the relationship is constrained to be a straight line and LEAST-SQUARES ANALYSIS is used to determine the best fit. In logistic regression (see LOGISTIC MODELS) the dependent variable is qualitative rather than continuously variable and LIKELIHOOD FUNCTIONS are used to find the best relationship. In multiple regression, the dependent variable is considered to depend on more than a single independent variable.Wounds and Injuries: Damage inflicted on the body as the direct or indirect result of an external force, with or without disruption of structural continuity.Poisson Distribution: A distribution function used to describe the occurrence of rare events or to describe the sampling distribution of isolated counts in a continuum of time or space.Sirolimus: A macrolide compound obtained from Streptomyces hygroscopicus that acts by selectively blocking the transcriptional activation of cytokines thereby inhibiting cytokine production. It is bioactive only when bound to IMMUNOPHILINS. Sirolimus is a potent immunosuppressant and possesses both antifungal and antineoplastic properties.Colorectal Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the COLON or the RECTUM or both. Risk factors for colorectal cancer include chronic ULCERATIVE COLITIS; FAMILIAL POLYPOSIS COLI; exposure to ASBESTOS; and irradiation of the CERVIX UTERI.Ontario: A province of Canada lying between the provinces of Manitoba and Quebec. Its capital is Toronto. It takes its name from Lake Ontario which is said to represent the Iroquois oniatariio, beautiful lake. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p892 & Room, Brewer's Dictionary of Names, 1992, p391)Israel

Respiratory symptoms and long-term risk of death from cardiovascular disease, cancer and other causes in Swedish men. (1/10952)

BACKGROUND: Depressed respiratory function and respiratory symptoms are associated with impaired survival. The present study was undertaken to assess the relation between respiratory symptoms and mortality from cardiovascular causes, cancer and all causes in a large population of middle-aged men. METHODS: Prospective population study of 6442 men aged 51-59 at baseline, free of clinical angina pectoris and prior myocardial infarction. RESULTS: During 16 years there were 1804 deaths (786 from cardiovascular disease, 608 from cancer, 103 from pulmonary disease and 307 from any other cause). Men with effort-related breathlessness had increased risk of dying from all of the examined diseases. After adjustment for age, smoking habit and other risk factors, the relative risk (RR) associated with breathlessness of dying from coronary disease was 1.43 (95% CI : 1.16-1.77), from stroke 1.77 (95% CI: 1.07-2.93), from any cardiovascular disease 1.48 (95% CI : 1.24-1.76), cancer 1.36 (95% CI : 1.11-1.67) and from any cause 1.62 (95% CI: 1.44-1.81). An independent effect of breathlessness on cardiovascular death, cancer death and mortality from all causes was found in life-time non-smokers, and also if men with chest pain not considered to be angina were excluded. An independent effect was also found if all deaths during the first half of the follow-up were excluded. Men with cough and phlegm, without breathlessness, also had an elevated risk of dying from cardiovascular disease and cancer, but after adjustment for smoking and other risk factors this was no longer significant. However, a slightly elevated independent risk of dying from any cause was found (RR = 1.18 [95% CI: 1.02-1.36]). CONCLUSION: A positive response to a simple question about effort related breathlessness predicted subsequent mortality from several causes during a follow-up period of 16 years, independently of smoking and other risk factors.  (+info)

A review of statistical methods for estimating the risk of vertical human immunodeficiency virus transmission. (2/10952)

BACKGROUND: Estimation of the risk of vertical transmission of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) has been complicated by the lack of a reliable diagnostic test for paediatric HIV infection. METHODS: A literature search was conducted to identify all statistical methods that have been used to estimate HIV vertical transmission risk. Although the focus of this article is the analysis of birth cohort studies, ad hoc studies are also reviewed. CONCLUSIONS: The standard method for estimating HIV vertical transmission risk is biased and inefficient. Various alternative analytical approaches have been proposed but all involve simplifying assumptions and some are difficult to implement. However, early diagnosis/exclusion of infection is now possible because of improvements in polymerase chain reaction technology and complex estimation methods should no longer be required. The best way to analyse studies conducted in breastfeeding populations is still unclear and deserves attention in view of the many intervention studies being planned or conducted in developing countries.  (+info)

Hygiene behaviour in rural Nicaragua in relation to diarrhoea. (3/10952)

BACKGROUND: Childhood diarrhoea is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in Nicaragua. Amongst the risk factors for its transmission are 'poor' hygiene practices. We investigated the effect of a large number of hygiene practices on diarrhoeal disease in children aged <2 years and validated the technique of direct observation of hygiene behaviour. METHODS: A prospective follow-up study was carried out in a rural zone of Nicaragua. From the database of a previously conducted case-control study on water and sanitation 172 families were recruited, half of which had experienced a higher than expected rate of diarrhoea in their children and the other half a lower rate. Hygiene behaviour was observed over two mornings and diarrhoea incidence was recorded with a calendar, filled out by the mother, and collected every week for 5 months. RESULTS: Of 46 'good' practices studied, 39 were associated with a lower risk of diarrhoea, five were unrelated and only for two a higher risk was observed. Washing of hands, domestic cleanliness (kitchen, living room, yard) and the use of a diaper/underclothes by the child had the strongest protective effect. Schooling (>3 years of primary school) and better economic position (possession of a radio) had a positive influence on general hygiene behaviour, education having a slightly stronger effect when a radio was present. Individual hygiene behaviour appeared to be highly variable in contrast with the consistent behaviour of the community as a whole. Feasible and appropriate indicators of hygiene behaviour were found to be domestic cleanliness and the use of a diaper or underclothes by the child. CONCLUSION: A consistent relationship between almost all hygiene practices and diarrhoea was detected, more schooling producing better hygiene behaviour. The high variability of hygiene behaviour at the individual level requires repeated observations (at least two) before and after the hygiene education in the event one wants to measure the impact of the campaign on the individual.  (+info)

Comparison of active and cancer registry-based follow-up for breast cancer in a prospective cohort study. (4/10952)

The authors compared the relative effectiveness of two distinct follow-up designs in prospective cohort studies--the active approach, based on direct contact with study subjects, and the passive approach, based on record linkages with population-based cancer registries--utilizing available information from the New York University Women's Health Study (WHS) and the New York State Cancer Registry (NYSCR). The analyses were limited to breast cancer cases identified during the period 1985-1992, for which follow-up was considered reasonably complete by both the WHS and the NYSCR. Among 12,947 cohort members who reported a New York State address, 303 pathologically confirmed cases were identified through active follow-up and 284 through record linkage. Sixty-three percent of cancers were identified by both sources, 21% by the WHS only, and 16% by the NYSCR only. The agreement was appreciably better for invasive cancers. The percentage of cases identified only by the NYSCR was increased among subjects whose active follow-up was incomplete, as well as among nonwhites, obese patients, and parous patients. This suggests that relying on either type of follow-up alone may introduce certain biases in evaluating risk factors for breast cancer. Combining both approaches appears to be a better strategy in prospective cohort studies.  (+info)

Capture-recapture models including covariate effects. (5/10952)

Capture-recapture methods are used to estimate the incidence of a disease, using a multiple-source registry. Usually, log-linear methods are used to estimate population size, assuming that not all sources of notification are dependent. Where there are categorical covariates, a stratified analysis can be performed. The multinomial logit model has occasionally been used. In this paper, the authors compare log-linear and logit models with and without covariates, and use simulated data to compare estimates from different models. The crude estimate of population size is biased when the sources are not independent. Analyses adjusting for covariates produce less biased estimates. In the absence of covariates, or where all covariates are categorical, the log-linear model and the logit model are equivalent. The log-linear model cannot include continuous variables. To minimize potential bias in estimating incidence, covariates should be included in the design and analysis of multiple-source disease registries.  (+info)

Premature morbidity from cardiovascular and cerebrovascular diseases in women with systemic lupus erythematosus. (6/10952)

OBJECTIVE: To determine rates of morbidity due to cardiovascular and cerebrovascular diseases among women with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). METHODS: I used the California Hospital Discharge Database, which contains information on all discharges from acute care hospitals in California, to identify women with SLE who had been hospitalized for treatment of either acute myocardial infarction (AMI), congestive heart failure (CHF), or cerebrovascular accident (CVA) from 1991 to 1994. I compared the proportions of hospitalizations for each cause among women with SLE with those in a group of women without SLE, for 3 age strata (18-44 years, 45-64 years, and > or =65 years). RESULTS: Compared with young women without SLE, young women with SLE were 2.27 times more likely to be hospitalized because of AMI (95% confidence interval [95% CI] 1.08-3.46), 3.80 times more likely to be hospitalized because of CHF (95% CI 2.41-5.19), and 2.05 times more likely to be hospitalized because of CVA (95% CI 1.17-2.93). Among middle-aged women with SLE, the frequencies of hospitalization for AMI and CVA did not differ from those of the comparison group, but the risk of hospitalization for CHF was higher (odds ratio [OR] 1.39, 95% CI 1.05-1.73). Among elderly women with SLE, the risk of hospitalization for AMI was significantly lower (OR 0.70, 95% CI 0.51-0.89), the risk of hospitalization for CHF was higher (OR 1.25, 95% CI 1.01-1.49), and the risk of hospitalization for CVA was not significantly different from those in the comparison group. CONCLUSION: Young women with SLE are at substantially increased risk of AMI, CHF, and CVA. The relative odds of these conditions decrease with age among women with SLE.  (+info)

Gallstones, cholecystectomy and risk of cancers of the liver, biliary tract and pancreas. (7/10952)

To examine the association between gallstones and cholecystectomy, we conducted a nationwide population-based cohort study in Denmark. Patients with a discharge diagnosis of gallstones from 1977 to 1989 were identified from the Danish National Registry of Patients and followed up for cancer occurrence until death or the end of 1993 by record linkage to the Danish Cancer Registry. Included in the cohort were 60 176 patients, with 471 450 person-years of follow-up. Cancer risks were estimated by standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) stratified by years of follow-up and by cholecystectomy status. Among patients without cholecystectomy, the risks at 5 or more years of follow-up were significantly elevated for cancers of liver (SIR = 2.0, CI = 1.2-3.1) and gallbladder (SIR = 2.7, CI = 1.5-4.4) and near unity for cancers of extrahepatic bile duct (SIR = 1.1), ampulla of Vater (SIR = 1.0) and pancreas (SIR = 1.1). The excess risk of liver cancer was seen only among patients with a history of hepatic disease. Among cholecystectomy patients, the risks at 5 or more years of follow-up declined for cancers of liver (SIR = 1.1) and extrahepatic bile duct (SIR = 0.7), but were elevated for cancers of ampulla of Vater (SIR = 2.0, CI = 1.0-3.7) and pancreas (SIR = 1.3, CI = 1.1-1.6). These findings confirm that gallstone disease increases the risk of gallbladder cancer, whereas cholecystectomy appears to increase the risk of cancers of ampulla of Vater and pancreas. Further research is needed to clarify the carcinogenic risks associated with gallstones and cholecystectomy and to define the mechanisms involved.  (+info)

Cancer incidence in the south Asian population of England (1990-92). (8/10952)

Cancer incidence among English south Asians (residents in England with ethnic origins in India, Pakistan or Bangladesh) is described and compared with non-south Asian and Indian subcontinent rates. The setting for the study was areas covered by Thames, Trent, West Midlands and Yorkshire cancer registries. The study identified 356 555 cases of incident cancer (ICD9:140-208) registered between 1990 and 1992, including 3845 classified as English south Asian. The main outcome measures were age specific and directly standardized incidence rates for all cancer sites (ICD9:140-208). English south Asian incidence rates for all sites combined were significantly lower than non-south Asian rates but higher than Indian subcontinent rates. English south Asian rates were substantially higher than Indian subcontinent rates for a number of common sites including lung cancer in males, breast cancer in females and lymphoma in both sexes. English south Asian rates for childhood and early adult cancer (0-29 years) were similar or higher than non-south Asian rates. English south Asian rates were significantly higher than non-south Asian rates for Hodgkin's disease in males, cancer of the tongue, mouth, oesophagus, thyroid gland and myeloid leukaemia in females, and cancer of the hypopharynx, liver and gall bladder in both sexes. The results are consistent with a transition from the lower cancer risk of the country of ethnic origin to that of the country of residence. They suggest that detrimental changes in lifestyle and other exposures have occurred in the migrant south Asian population.  (+info)

  • For example, a 32-bit OLE server that can serve requests from both 32-bit and 64-bit clients could make its 32-bit registry data available to the 64-bit view of the system registry. (microsoft.com)
  • When a component writes data in the system registry, WOW64 analyzes the information and makes a copy of the data in the alternate view of the registry when appropriate. (microsoft.com)
  • Note: the syntax of the registry data file is very strict. (novell.com)
  • Before making changes to the registry, you should back up any valued data. (microsoft.com)
  • The Windows-based version (Scanregw.exe) scans the registry for damage and empty data structures (keys marked as deleted), and backs up configuration files at startup once each day. (microsoft.com)
  • If the registry contains more than 500 KB of empty data structures, the optimization flag is set in the registry and the real-mode tool is invoked the next time the computer starts to optimize the registry. (microsoft.com)
  • If no backups remain, Scanreg.exe attempts to fix the damage by rebuilding the registry without errors or empty data structures. (microsoft.com)
  • registry operator and ICANN agree to engage in good faith negotiations, at least once every eighteen months, regarding possible implementation of new RFCs related to Data Escrow, Whois, and other Technical and Functional Specifications. (webpronews.com)
  • clarified that the use of traffic data would be limited to "thin" registry model data even if registry were to follow the "thick" registry model. (webpronews.com)
  • The METRIQ data management system makes it all easier by coordinating the entire registry process, from data collection and follow-up through reporting and analysis. (elekta.com)
  • Spire Manchester Hospital is celebrating after being named as a National Joint Registry (NJR) Quality Data Provider after successfully completing a national programme of local data audits. (spirehealthcare.com)
  • The registry collects high quality orthopaedic data in order to provide evidence to support patient safety, standards in quality of care, and overall cost effectiveness in joint replacement surgery. (spirehealthcare.com)
  • This monitoring can be effectively performed through the analysis of registry data and radiostereometric analysis studies. (coxa.fi)
  • Evaluation of data from multiple national joint registries demonstrated the revision rate for this contemporary knee system to be comparable to other TKA systems at latest follow-up. (coxa.fi)
  • The most successful outcomes-oriented patient registries incorporate direct utilization of the data within the day-to-day operations of the clinical setting. (studytrax.com)
  • For this article, it is important to note that irrespective of what's captured in the database (i.e., the content), accurate and complete data capture is critical to ALL patient registries. (studytrax.com)
  • Indeed, the most successful patient registries implement data utilization directly into day-to-day operations. (studytrax.com)
  • Leveraging data by designing a clinical report is a common way to utilize patient registry data. (studytrax.com)
  • Demographics, Medical History) are some the most common techniques, but how best to organize the report can vary considerably based on the clinical setting, disease population, and the data content of the registry. (studytrax.com)
  • PREFER in VTE is the first patient registry to gather comprehensive data on the quality of life and treatment satisfaction of patients with venous thromboembolism (VTE). (venousnews.com)
  • By collecting key data from different geographies, the registry will highlight important risk factors, as well as demonstrate diagnosis pathways and treatment modalities in this patient population. (venousnews.com)
  • The PERForm Registry comprises data elements describing the practice of CPB. (edu.au)
  • Simplify the cancer registry process, from case finding and abstracting to outcomes analysis. (elekta.com)
  • Registries help researchers increase the knowledge of a certain disease, ultimately leading to further improvement in health outcomes. (fheurope.org)
  • The global FH registry run by the EAS-FH Studies Collaboration (FHSC) is a source of invaluable information on FH prevalence, geographical distribution, genetic variants associated with disease, clinical features, clinical management and patient outcomes. (fheurope.org)
  • We developed and implemented a cardiovascular perfusion registry (Perfusion Measures and outcomes [PERForm] Registry) within the structure of the Michigan Society of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgeons (MSTCVS) to improve our understanding of the practice of CPB. (edu.au)
  • Parent proxies of youth enrolled in the Childhood Arthritis and Rheumatology Research Alliance (CARRA) Registry shared patient-reported outcomes about their child's HRQOL and experiences of disease and treatment burden (pain interference, morning stiffness, history of medication side effects and methotrexate intolerance). (springeropen.com)
  • The PREFER in VTE registry plans to enrol more than 4,000 patients with venous thromboembolism (deep vein thrombosis and/or pulmonary embolism) across approximately 400 recruiting hospitals and specialised centres, in seven European countries (Austria, France, Germany, Italy, Spain, Switzerland and the UK). (venousnews.com)
  • In 2012, Daiichi Sankyo Europe started another large registry, focussing on patients suffering from atrial fibrillation (AF) - the Prevention of thromboembolic events - European registry in atrial fibrillation (PREFER in AF). (venousnews.com)
  • For HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\Software\Classes\Appid and HKEY_CURRENT_USER\Software\Classes\Appid , the DllSurrogate and DllSurrogateExecutable registry values are not reflected if their value is an empty string. (microsoft.com)
  • A review of the literature was performed to identify comparative studies and registry databases reporting the revision rates of a specific contemporary knee design between 2013 and 2018. (coxa.fi)
  • Configuration information for the Microsoft Distributed Transaction Coordinator service (MSDTC) is stored in a system-defined database called the registry. (microsoft.com)
  • Incorrectly editing the registry might severely damage your system. (microsoft.com)
  • registry operator will accept IPv6 addresses as glue where applicable, and will offer IPv6 access to the Shared Registration System (e.g. (webpronews.com)
  • allows ICANN to implement a new Service Level Agreement monitoring system (also to be used for new gTLDs) to monitor DNS service from registry operator. (webpronews.com)
  • This study examined the revision rates of a contemporary knee system for total knee arthroplasty (TKA) using National Joint Replacement Registries. (coxa.fi)
  • There were 4 registry databases and 1 comparative study reporting the revision rates of the contemporary knee system. (coxa.fi)
  • added a provision requiring the registry operator to implement ICANN ordered registrar suspensions to facilitate ICANN's contractual compliance efforts. (webpronews.com)
  • Note that running the real-mode version of Registry Checker (Scanreg.exe) at a command prompt does not detect registry damage, and Windows Millennium Edition (Me) does support real mode Scanreg.exe. (microsoft.com)
  • registry operator will provide its accurate contact details including a valid email and mailing address as well as a primary contact for handling inquiries related to malicious conduct in the TLD. (webpronews.com)
  • PREFER in VTE is the first registry of its kind that will provide detailed insight into the patient's perspective. (venousnews.com)
  • Although regional and national registries exist to measure and report performance of cardiac surgical programs, few registries exist dedicated to the practice of cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB). (edu.au)
  • In contrast to other registries in this setting, PREFER in VTE is the first of its kind to also analyse the relationship between venous thromboembolism treatment, a patient's quality of life and treatment satisfaction. (venousnews.com)
  • Daiichi Sankyo Europe announced the enrolment of the first patient into the PREFER in VTE (Prevention of thromboembolic events - European registry in venous thromboembolism) study on 6 February 2013. (venousnews.com)
  • A registry operator is given authority for a domain through ICANN. (google.com)
  • Registrars working directly with gTLD Registries need to be ICANN accredited to guarantee a defined level of stability and security. (slideshare.net)
  • On 14 January 2016, ICANN and Oriental Trading Company, entered into a Registry Agreement under which Oriental Trading Company, operated the .fun top-level domain. (icann.org)
  • European country code top-level domain (ccTLD) registries could stop payments to the Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers (ICANN) if it does not commit to a service agreement. (computerweekly.com)
  • The agreement between a ccTLD registry and ICANN must contain a section about the security and stability of the root, according to Renard. (computerweekly.com)
  • ICANN relies on funding from the European registries that handle top level domains (such as .uk and .de), many of whom are members of Centr. (computerweekly.com)
  • ICANN and the European registries have been working to formalise their relationships. (computerweekly.com)
  • The system of voluntary contributions from the European registries to ICANN is set to be converted to set payments. (computerweekly.com)
  • This is a legal matter that will have to be worked out and it will take time," he said, adding that ICANN has to come to an agreement with each individual ccTLD registry because Centr cannot sign agreements on behalf of its members. (computerweekly.com)
  • People over 18 from around the world can enroll in this registry, which launched in 2014 and had 30,000 members as of January 2016. (alzforum.org)
  • The Michael J. Fox Foundation established this registry in 2012, and it had 52,000 registered potential volunteers in Jan 2016. (alzforum.org)
  • Cancer registries analyze the data collected and share the answers to these questions with other groups, like state comprehensive cancer control coalitions, which work to prevent cancer. (cdc.gov)
  • The federal Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR) established the National ALS Registry in 2010 to collect and analyze data about people living with ALS in the U.S. (cdc.gov)
  • Registry participants can measure, benchmark, and analyze cardiovascular imaging performance to achieve quality improvement at the provider and laboratory levels, while driving broader adherence to best practices. (prweb.com)
  • Why is my registry & repository solution not enough? (ibm.com)
  • Such is the norm for modern-day application development, which is part writing your own code and part reusing code pulled from a registry or repository somewhere. (eclipse.org)
  • As part of the Oracle SOA Governance solution , Oracle Service Registry bridges the gap between the design time and runtime environments through automated synchronization with Oracle Enterprise Repository, Oracle Service Bus and Oracle SOA Suite. (oracle.com)
  • In this blog entry let's explore working with private NPM registries and private Maven repositories in Codewind. (eclipse.org)
  • Registries that collect blood and tissue samples are also called repositories. (ohsu.edu)
  • Cancer registries endeavor to use every available source of information to establish and confirm cancer diagnoses. (encyclopedia.com)
  • Attempts to establish registries for persons with substance abuse and for sex offenders have not been successful because such persons are often elusive and evade contacts with authorities and relevant specialists. (encyclopedia.com)
  • The Rapid Response Registry helps local, state, and federal public health and disaster response agencies rapidly establish registries of persons who are exposed or potentially exposed to chemicals or other harmful agents during catastrophic events. (cdc.gov)
  • Several proposed animal abuse registries were dropped following assessments of the costs to establish, update and provide access to the registry information. (aspca.org)
  • For mass casualty events, ATSDR identified four critical fields that would be sufficient to establish an official registry record and require only about 90 seconds to complete for each registrant. (cdc.gov)
  • Each registry has requirements for participants, such as a certain health history or a minimum age. (ohsu.edu)
  • To expose participants to diverse registry strategies and to brainstorm how these strategies might lead to synergistic relationships and collaborative efforts to accelerate science and improve health outcomes for people with arthritis and related diseases. (arthritis.org)
  • Registry participants can feel good knowing they are contributing to a lifetime of research opportunities that seek to shed light on the causes of pancreatic disease, and will subsequently be used to develop new treatments and ultimately discover a cure for these diseases. (ohsu.edu)
  • Please note that participants in this Registry will not receive medical information or advice from BCCPC. (ohsu.edu)
  • Participants will receive additional technical details on plugfest activities and the Learning Registry prior to the event. (google.com)
  • This guidance is intended to help Offset Project Registries and other offset program participants understand the role of the Offset Project Registries and how they interact with ARB and Offset Project Operators. (ca.gov)
  • The shared goal of these registries is to build a large pool of potential participants for therapeutic prevention trials. (alzforum.org)
  • This registry partners with the cognitive-assessment company CogState and the brain-gaming program Lumosity by Lumos Labs, Inc. Participants whose questionnaire and testing data indicate they may be candidates for research are notified and invited to participate in studies and clinical trials. (alzforum.org)
  • You can also search registry websites maintained by individual jurisdictions by following the links below. (fbi.gov)
  • the national registry simply enables a search across multiple jurisdictions. (fbi.gov)
  • 2. Once logged-in, under the APPS tab, search for and download the AAAAI Clinical Data Registry App or AAAAI QCDR app (choose between the individual reporting app or the group reporting app). (aaaai.org)
  • Couples select one organization or multiple causes for their charity registry, which is immediately available to guests on separate couple wedding websites. (courant.com)
  • A local Internet registry ( LIR ) is an organization that has been allocated a block of IP addresses by a regional Internet registry (RIR), and that assigns most parts of this block to its own customers. (wikipedia.org)
  • The Cap-and-Trade Regulation allows ARB to approve Offset Project Registries to help administer parts of the Compliance Offset Program. (ca.gov)
  • Emissions registries administer carbon permits called EU allowances (EUAS) under the EU's Emissions Trading Scheme. (ibtimes.com)
  • *The Indiana Trauma Registry follows the National Trauma Data Standards (NTDS) set by the American College of Surgeons and the Committee on Trauma on a yearly basis https://www.facs.org/quality-programs/trauma/tqp/center-programs/ntdb/ntds . (in.gov)
  • The OHSU Pancreas Community Registry (OHSUPancreas) is a private library of data collected from individuals with an interest in pancreatic diseases including pancreatic cancer and pancreatitis. (ohsu.edu)
  • Data collected for registries are generally maintained over time and can be useful for learning about environmental exposures, disease characteristics, and risk factors. (cdc.gov)
  • The data collected for registries can be helpful to registrants, health professionals, and the scientific community. (cdc.gov)
  • Although we appreciate that animal abuser registry proposals derive from a genuine motivation to take animal cruelty seriously, the ASPCA believes that this approach does little to protect animals or people and can have unintended consequences. (aspca.org)
  • Many jurisdictions (counties, states, and even nations) established cancer registries, some of which were population-based (covering the entire population of a defined political jurisdiction). (encyclopedia.com)
  • Given the typically low number of individuals that are required to register in jurisdictions with registries, these fees are insufficient to cover the enormous cost of the registries themselves, thereby requiring the diversion of critical resources away from other, more productive means of protecting animals from cruelty. (aspca.org)
  • A breed registry , also known as a herdbook , studbook or register , in animal husbandry and the hobby of animal fancy , is an official list of animals within a specific breed whose parents are known. (wikipedia.org)
  • For a list of registry keys that are redirected, shared, or reflected, see Registry Keys Affected by WOW64 . (microsoft.com)
  • The following page contains a list of key resources which Student and Registry Services provide for current students at UCL. (ucl.ac.uk)
  • A list of approved Offset Project Registries can be found below. (ca.gov)
  • The registration process described in the IANA Considerations section allows this list to be extended as needed, while aiming to prevent an unnecessary explosion in the registry. (ietf.org)
  • The registry is just a place for you to list and keep track of what you have. (beckett.com)
  • But perhaps a "Muslim registry" - or list of deportation targets, for that matter - would not necessarily have to involve registration at all. (amnesty.org)
  • The list includes the website and phone number for you to contact each registry. (fda.gov)
  • Our Crimes Against Children Unit at FBI Headquarters coordinated the development of the National Sex Offenders Registry (NSOR), which is currently managed by the FBI's Criminal Justice Information Services Division. (fbi.gov)
  • To register and verify the addresses of sex offenders who reside in states without a "minimally sufficient" sex offender registry (SOR) program. (fbi.gov)
  • Animal abuser registries are intended to alert the public to the presence of animal cruelty offenders in the community and to provide heightened scrutiny of individuals perceived to be at high risk of re-offense to animals or people beyond any period of incarceration, probation, or parole. (aspca.org)
  • Animal abuser registries, which are modeled on registries kept for convicted sex offenders, have gained popularity across the country. (thepetitionsite.com)
  • Yes, for years users could download content to extend GIMP in various ways (plugins, scripts, brushes, etc.) from registry.gimp.org. (gimp.org)
  • Links to a range of ATSDR documents related to health registries, including the National ALS Registry, the Rapid Response Registry, and the World Trade Center Health Registry. (cdc.gov)
  • The Sex Offender Registry Board promotes public safety by educating and informing the public to prevent further victimization. (mass.gov)
  • Other "registries" are marketing attempts to create new horse breeds, usually by breeders using crossbreeding to create a new type, but the animals are not yet breeding true . (wikipedia.org)
  • If no backups remain, Scanreg.exe attempts to fix the damage by rebuilding the registry without errors or empty data structures. (microsoft.com)
  • CarbonCover Registry is the first offering in Lexington's new CarbonCover suite of products designed for companies operating in the developing climate change and greenhouse gas emissions sector. (insurancejournal.com)
  • BERKELEY - The University of California, Berkeley, has joined the California Climate Action Registry, pledging to measure, report and reduce greenhouse gas emissions as a means of mitigating climate change. (berkeley.edu)
  • The campus joins more than 75 major companies, cities, government and non-governmental agencies that have committed to tracking and making public their greenhouse gas emissions through the registry. (berkeley.edu)
  • California Assembly Bill 32 (AB-32) became the first law to comprehensively limit greenhouse gas emissions at the state level and recognizes organizations like UC Berkeley that take early action in reporting their greenhouse gas emissions with the registry. (berkeley.edu)
  • It further calls for registry members to "receive appropriate credit for early voluntary reductions" in their greenhouse gas emissions. (berkeley.edu)
  • MyRegistry.com is the premier destination for Universal Gift Registry services. (prweb.com)
  • The company currently provides hundreds of thousands of users with the ability to create one centralized online gift registry for any gift-giving occasion, including Weddings, Baby Showers, Birthdays, Graduations, Housewarmings, Holidays and more. (prweb.com)
  • Along with offering online gift registry services to individuals, many organizations and nonprofits use MyRegistry.com as a valuable fundraising tool and convenient resource for requesting supplies and other items for donation. (prweb.com)
  • Cost estimates for establishing and running an animal abuse registry vary widely. (aspca.org)
  • Please sign and show support for Oregon to follow the lead of Tennessee and implement an animal abuse registry. (thepetitionsite.com)
  • As the first national registry for non-invasive cardiac imaging, the ImageGuide Registry provides nuclear cardiologists the opportunity to elevate laboratory performance and advance patient care by assessing overall practice and patient safety. (prweb.com)
  • In many countries, tuberculosis was the first condition for which registries were established, as many people who suffered from this contagious disease were living in their community. (encyclopedia.com)
  • Hatch My House One of many home repair/upkeep registries, Hatch My House allows people to do just that -- pay for window repairs, stairs, upper siding, etc. (courant.com)
  • The Esophageal Cancer and Related Diseases registry, begun in 2004, contains information and blood and tissue samples from people across the country. (ohsu.edu)
  • Whenever I talk or write about using registry changes to troubleshoot problems, people ask the same question: "How do I make a registry change on multiple computers without traveling to each machine? (microsoft.com)
  • 2 The Registry offers the opportunity for people living with ALS to complete risk factor surveys. (cdc.gov)
  • As more people with ALS complete these surveys, the Registry has more data. (cdc.gov)
  • Explaining the value of registries, Miller observes: "People are much happier if you show you listen to them, and give them what they want, versus what you think they want. (aarp.org)
  • Online registries that allow people to be contacted about trial opportunities in their area have sprung up to speed recruitment. (alzforum.org)
  • Most registries include people with or without a diagnosis. (alzforum.org)
  • Several registries invite enrollment by cognitively healthy people who are concerned about their dementia risk. (alzforum.org)
  • There are breed registries and breed clubs for several species of animal, such as dogs , horses , cows and cats . (wikipedia.org)
  • An unscrupulous registry for dogs or horses is often spotted by a policy to not require any proof of pedigree at all. (wikipedia.org)
  • The volume begins with several black and white photos of some of the horses that have been registered in the Pinto Horse Registry. (google.com)
  • Starred links are articles on this site, the rest are offsite links to registries and breed organizations. (bellaonline.com)
  • An open registry that allows infusion of certain other breeds, their web site contains breeder links, magazines specific to the QH and more. (bellaonline.com)
  • The one and only Jehan is currently working on integrating the functionality of the old registry site with a new approach by bringing it into GIMP properly. (gimp.org)
  • Welcome to ATSDR's Rapid Response Registry (RRR) Web site. (cdc.gov)
  • If cancer registration is prompt and complete, cancer registries are a valuable epidemiological resource that can be used to calculate incidence rates and risks, as well as to maintain surveillance and monitor trends in cancer incidence and mortality. (encyclopedia.com)
  • Polyposis registries have been used in numerous academic studies to assess morbidity and mortality of colorectal cancer related to FAP, and use of registry data has resulted in improved treatment and reduced mortality from polyposis-related colorectal cancer. (wikipedia.org)
  • Offset Project Registries must meet specific regulatory criteria to be approved under the Regulation. (ca.gov)
  • To become approved, potential Offset Project Registries must submit an application and meet the requirements for education and experience as defined in section 95986 of the Regulation. (ca.gov)
  • The registry sends three hospitals the names of their patients who may benefit from genetic services to encourage hospitals to offer genetic counseling. (cdc.gov)
  • Oracle Service Registry provides a 'DNS'-like reference for SOA runtime infrastructure to dynamically discover and bind to deployed services and end points. (oracle.com)
  • Student Registry deliver a variety of predominantly student focused services. (dur.ac.uk)
  • If the Student Services desk is closed, please contact our Student Registry team on the details provided here . (dur.ac.uk)
  • Do you want to build value-added services on top of the Learning Registry? (google.com)
  • Offset Project Registries must be approved by ARB to perform registry services under ARB's Compliance Offset Program. (ca.gov)
  • Michigan Child Protection Law (MCL 722.625 & 722.627-722.627j for release of information) also allows specific entities and individuals to obtain Children's Protective Services (CPS) case record information, including Central Registry information. (michigan.gov)
  • Published services also have service properties associated with them in the registry. (eclipse.org)
  • Gemini Blueprint integrates tightly with the service registry, allowing clients to publish, find and bind services in a POJO-friendly manner, without coupling themselves to the OSGi API. (eclipse.org)
  • The Metabolic and Bariatric Surgery Quality Improvement Program (MBSAQIP) Data Registry is a qualified clinical data registry (QCDR) for the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) Merit-based Incentive Payment System (MIPS). (facs.org)
  • Participation in the ImageGuide Registry also helps providers fulfil reporting requirements under regulatory programs such as the Physician Quality Reporting System (PQRS), helping eligible providers avoid substantial negative payment adjustments - up to 9% by 2022 with the implementation of MIPS - on services billed under Medicare Part B (FFS). (prweb.com)
  • In bolstering staff in DMV offices, Rell said she is addressing issues associated with an increased need for registry and licensing services and additional security measures to protect against fraud. (insurancejournal.com)
  • Our decision to join the climate registry is an important early milestone in our longer-term effort to address the effects our campus has on climate change," said Edward Denton, UC Berkeley vice chancellor for facilities services. (berkeley.edu)
  • In addition, the registry will be used to raise the visibility of the unique value clinical exercise professionals provide to health care teams and increase the exposure to professional opportunities. (acsm.org)
  • The Centers for Disease Control of the United States provides, royalty-free, Registry Plus software for collecting and processing cancer registry data compliant with national standards established by health professionals and regulators to understand and address the burden of cancer more effectively. (wikipedia.org)
  • Some registries have specific Terms of Service documents for the domains they sell. (google.com)
  • We have established an internet based registry for filing complaints about accredited or approved adoption service providers. (state.gov)
  • How do you return a localized message from a modifier, such that clients like the Service Registry Dashboard will display an error message in the language of the user? (ibm.com)
  • Replication Guide (PDF) Overview for selective one-way replication of businessEntity records across one or more service registry instances. (oracle.com)
  • The registries provide a service to doctors for identification, surveillance and management of families and individuals with high colorectal cancer risk from Familial Adenomatous Polyposis (FAP) and Hereditary Non-Polyposis Colorectal Cancer (HNPCC). (wikipedia.org)
  • Sue Miller, 64, a senior vice president, says its service lets consumers sync gift registries set up at multiple stores, and lets anybody with a smartphone turn it into a bar code scanner to add new items, from virtually any store. (aarp.org)
  • Configuration information for the Microsoft Distributed Transaction Coordinator service (MSDTC) is stored in a system-defined database called the registry. (microsoft.com)
  • Use Registry Editor on the server to confirm that the Microsoft Distributed Transaction Coordinator service (MSDTC) has access to the OLETransactionManagers registry key. (microsoft.com)
  • Use Registry Editor on the server to verify that the Microsoft Distributed Transaction Coordinator service (MSDTC) registry settings are appropriate. (microsoft.com)
  • The OSGi service registry enables a bundle to publish objects to a shared registry, advertised via a given set of Java interfaces. (eclipse.org)
  • The registry is a crucial feature of OSGi, facilitating decoupling between bundles by promoting a dynamic collaborative model based on a service-oriented paradigm (publish/find/bind). (eclipse.org)
  • The European registries do not oppose a formal relationship but expect to get an agreed level of service for their money. (computerweekly.com)
  • After reviewing hundreds of compelling stories, the selected finalists will now work with MyRegistry.com's Personal Registry Concierge Service to create baby registries filled with items necessary to welcome their newborns. (prweb.com)
  • FCA's Research Registry offers a professional listing of publically and privately supported surveys, studies and clinical trials of interest to caregiving families dealing with chronic disabling health conditions, and health and service providers. (caregiver.org)