The physiological renewal, repair, or replacement of tissue.
Renewal or physiological repair of damaged nerve tissue.
Repair or renewal of hepatic tissue.
Renewal or repair of lost bone tissue. It excludes BONY CALLUS formed after BONE FRACTURES but not yet replaced by hard bone.
Procedures for enhancing and directing tissue repair and renewal processes, such as BONE REGENERATION; NERVE REGENERATION; etc. They involve surgically implanting growth conducive tracks or conduits (TISSUE SCAFFOLDING) at the damaged site to stimulate and control the location of cell repopulation. The tracks or conduits are made from synthetic and/or natural materials and may include support cells and induction factors for CELL GROWTH PROCESSES; or CELL MIGRATION.
Nonparasitic free-living flatworms of the class Turbellaria. The most common genera are Dugesia, formerly Planaria, which lives in water, and Bipalium, which lives on land. Geoplana occurs in South America and California.
Excision of all or part of the liver. (Dorland, 28th ed)
Nerve fibers that are capable of rapidly conducting impulses away from the neuron cell body.
A family of Urodela consisting of 15 living genera and about 42 species and occurring in North America, Europe, Asia, and North Africa.
A salamander found in Mexican mountain lakes and accounting for about 30 percent of the urodeles used in research. The axolotl remains in larval form throughout its life, a phenomenon known as neoteny.
The farthest or outermost projections of the body, such as the HAND and FOOT.
Treatment of muscles and nerves under pressure as a result of crush injuries.
Relatively undifferentiated cells that retain the ability to divide and proliferate throughout postnatal life to provide progenitor cells that can differentiate into specialized cells.
A species of newt in the Salamandridae family in which the larvae transform into terrestrial eft stage and later into an aquatic adult. They occur from Canada to southern United States. Viridescens refers to the greenish color often found in this species.
Membranous appendage of fish and other aquatic organisms used for locomotion or balance.
Restoration of integrity to traumatized tissue.
Generating tissue in vitro for clinical applications, such as replacing wounded tissues or impaired organs. The use of TISSUE SCAFFOLDING enables the generation of complex multi-layered tissues and tissue structures.
Progressive restriction of the developmental potential and increasing specialization of function that leads to the formation of specialized cells, tissues, and organs.
Cell growth support structures composed of BIOCOMPATIBLE MATERIALS. They are specially designed solid support matrices for cell attachment in TISSUE ENGINEERING and GUIDED TISSUE REGENERATION uses.
Elongated, spindle-shaped, quiescent myoblasts lying in close contact with adult skeletal muscle. They are thought to play a role in muscle repair and regeneration.
All of the processes involved in increasing CELL NUMBER including CELL DIVISION.
In anatomical terms, "tail" is not used as a medical definition to describe any part of the human body; it is however used in veterinary medicine to refer to the distal portion of the spine in animals possessing tails.
Repair of the damaged neuron function after SPINAL CORD INJURY or SPINAL CORD DISEASES.
A nerve which originates in the lumbar and sacral spinal cord (L4 to S3) and supplies motor and sensory innervation to the lower extremity. The sciatic nerve, which is the main continuation of the sacral plexus, is the largest nerve in the body. It has two major branches, the TIBIAL NERVE and the PERONEAL NERVE.
Transection or severing of an axon. This type of denervation is used often in experimental studies on neuronal physiology and neuronal death or survival, toward an understanding of nervous system disease.
An exotic species of the family CYPRINIDAE, originally from Asia, that has been introduced in North America. They are used in embryological studies and to study the effects of certain chemicals on development.
The nerves outside of the brain and spinal cord, including the autonomic, cranial, and spinal nerves. Peripheral nerves contain non-neuronal cells and connective tissue as well as axons. The connective tissue layers include, from the outside to the inside, the epineurium, the perineurium, and the endoneurium.
Neuroglial cells of the peripheral nervous system which form the insulating myelin sheaths of peripheral axons.
A subtype of striated muscle, attached by TENDONS to the SKELETON. Skeletal muscles are innervated and their movement can be consciously controlled. They are also called voluntary muscles.
A field of medicine concerned with developing and using strategies aimed at repair or replacement of damaged, diseased, or metabolically deficient organs, tissues, and cells via TISSUE ENGINEERING; CELL TRANSPLANTATION; and ARTIFICIAL ORGANS and BIOARTIFICIAL ORGANS and tissues.
The main structural component of the LIVER. They are specialized EPITHELIAL CELLS that are organized into interconnected plates called lobules.
A class of free-living freshwater flatworms of North America.
A large lobed glandular organ in the abdomen of vertebrates that is responsible for detoxification, metabolism, synthesis and storage of various substances.
An order of the Amphibia class which includes salamanders and newts. They are characterized by usually having slim bodies and tails, four limbs of about equal size (except in Sirenidae), and a reduction in skull bones.
Inbred C57BL mice are a strain of laboratory mice that have been produced by many generations of brother-sister matings, resulting in a high degree of genetic uniformity and homozygosity, making them widely used for biomedical research, including studies on genetics, immunology, cancer, and neuroscience.
Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.
Injuries to the PERIPHERAL NERVES.
Most abundant proteins in COBRA venom; basic polypeptides of 57 to 62 amino acids with four disulfide bonds and a molecular weight of less than 7000; causes skeletal and cardiac muscle contraction, interferes with neuromuscular and ganglionic transmission, depolarizes nerve, muscle and blood cell membranes, thus causing hemolysis.
Synthetic or natural materials, other than DRUGS, that are used to replace or repair any body TISSUES or bodily function.
Cells propagated in vitro in special media conducive to their growth. Cultured cells are used to study developmental, morphologic, metabolic, physiologic, and genetic processes, among others.
In tissue culture, hairlike projections of neurons stimulated by growth factors and other molecules. These projections may go on to form a branched tree of dendrites or a single axon or they may be reabsorbed at a later stage of development. "Neurite" may refer to any filamentous or pointed outgrowth of an embryonal or tissue-culture neural cell.
The intracellular transfer of information (biological activation/inhibition) through a signal pathway. In each signal transduction system, an activation/inhibition signal from a biologically active molecule (hormone, neurotransmitter) is mediated via the coupling of a receptor/enzyme to a second messenger system or to an ion channel. Signal transduction plays an important role in activating cellular functions, cell differentiation, and cell proliferation. Examples of signal transduction systems are the GAMMA-AMINOBUTYRIC ACID-postsynaptic receptor-calcium ion channel system, the receptor-mediated T-cell activation pathway, and the receptor-mediated activation of phospholipases. Those coupled to membrane depolarization or intracellular release of calcium include the receptor-mediated activation of cytotoxic functions in granulocytes and the synaptic potentiation of protein kinase activation. Some signal transduction pathways may be part of larger signal transduction pathways; for example, protein kinase activation is part of the platelet activation signal pathway.
Penetrating and non-penetrating injuries to the spinal cord resulting from traumatic external forces (e.g., WOUNDS, GUNSHOT; WHIPLASH INJURIES; etc.).
Agents that have a damaging effect on the HEART. Such damage can occur from ALKYLATING AGENTS; FREE RADICALS; or metabolites from OXIDATIVE STRESS and in some cases is countered by CARDIOTONIC AGENTS. Induction of LONG QT SYNDROME or TORSADES DE POINTES has been the reason for viewing some drugs as cardiotoxins.
Embryonic (precursor) cells of the myogenic lineage that develop from the MESODERM. They undergo proliferation, migrate to their various sites, and then differentiate into the appropriate form of myocytes (MYOCYTES, SKELETAL; MYOCYTES, CARDIAC; MYOCYTES, SMOOTH MUSCLE).
Disease or damage involving the SCIATIC NERVE, which divides into the PERONEAL NERVE and TIBIAL NERVE (see also PERONEAL NEUROPATHIES and TIBIAL NEUROPATHY). Clinical manifestations may include SCIATICA or pain localized to the hip, PARESIS or PARALYSIS of posterior thigh muscles and muscles innervated by the peroneal and tibial nerves, and sensory loss involving the lateral and posterior thigh, posterior and lateral leg, and sole of the foot. The sciatic nerve may be affected by trauma; ISCHEMIA; COLLAGEN DISEASES; and other conditions. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p1363)
Histochemical localization of immunoreactive substances using labeled antibodies as reagents.
The 2nd cranial nerve which conveys visual information from the RETINA to the brain. The nerve carries the axons of the RETINAL GANGLION CELLS which sort at the OPTIC CHIASM and continue via the OPTIC TRACTS to the brain. The largest projection is to the lateral geniculate nuclei; other targets include the SUPERIOR COLLICULI and the SUPRACHIASMATIC NUCLEI. Though known as the second cranial nerve, it is considered part of the CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM.
A nervous tissue specific protein which is highly expressed in NEURONS during development and NERVE REGENERATION. It has been implicated in neurite outgrowth, long-term potentiation, SIGNAL TRANSDUCTION, and NEUROTRANSMITTER release. (From Neurotoxicology 1994;15(1):41-7) It is also a substrate of PROTEIN KINASE C.
The transfer of STEM CELLS from one individual to another within the same species (TRANSPLANTATION, HOMOLOGOUS) or between species (XENOTRANSPLANTATION), or transfer within the same individual (TRANSPLANTATION, AUTOLOGOUS). The source and location of the stem cells determines their potency or pluripotency to differentiate into various cell types.
A partial or complete return to the normal or proper physiologic activity of an organ or part following disease or trauma.
Non-human animals, selected because of specific characteristics, for use in experimental research, teaching, or testing.
Developmental events leading to the formation of adult muscular system, which includes differentiation of the various types of muscle cell precursors, migration of myoblasts, activation of myogenesis and development of muscle anchorage.
A genus of freshwater polyps in the family Hydridae, order Hydroida, class HYDROZOA. They are of special interest because of their complex organization and because their adult organization corresponds roughly to the gastrula of higher animals.
The lipid-rich sheath surrounding AXONS in both the CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEMS and PERIPHERAL NERVOUS SYSTEM. The myelin sheath is an electrical insulator and allows faster and more energetically efficient conduction of impulses. The sheath is formed by the cell membranes of glial cells (SCHWANN CELLS in the peripheral and OLIGODENDROGLIA in the central nervous system). Deterioration of the sheath in DEMYELINATING DISEASES is a serious clinical problem.
Naturally occurring or experimentally induced animal diseases with pathological processes sufficiently similar to those of human diseases. They are used as study models for human diseases.
A genus of large SEA CUCUMBERS in the family Holothuriidae possessing thick body walls, a warty body surface, and microscopic ossicles.
The fibrous CONNECTIVE TISSUE surrounding the TOOTH ROOT, separating it from and attaching it to the alveolar bone (ALVEOLAR PROCESS).
Bone-marrow-derived, non-hematopoietic cells that support HEMATOPOETIC STEM CELLS. They have also been isolated from other organs and tissues such as UMBILICAL CORD BLOOD, umbilical vein subendothelium, and WHARTON JELLY. These cells are considered to be a source of multipotent stem cells because they include subpopulations of mesenchymal stem cells.
The process of bone formation. Histogenesis of bone including ossification.
A strain of albino rat used widely for experimental purposes because of its calmness and ease of handling. It was developed by the Sprague-Dawley Animal Company.
ANIMALS whose GENOME has been altered by GENETIC ENGINEERING, or their offspring.
Any of the processes by which nuclear, cytoplasmic, or intercellular factors influence the differential control (induction or repression) of gene action at the level of transcription or translation.
Cells with high proliferative and self renewal capacities derived from adults.
A genus of the Ambystomatidae family. The best known species are the axolotl AMBYSTOMA MEXICANUM and the closely related tiger salamander Ambystoma tigrinum. They may retain gills and remain aquatic without developing all of the adult characteristics. However, under proper changes in the environment they metamorphose.
A paired box transcription factor that is involved in EMBRYONIC DEVELOPMENT of the CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM and SKELETAL MUSCLE.
Injuries to the optic nerve induced by a trauma to the face or head. These may occur with closed or penetrating injuries. Relatively minor compression of the superior aspect of orbit may also result in trauma to the optic nerve. Clinical manifestations may include visual loss, PAPILLEDEMA, and an afferent pupillary defect.
Proteins obtained from the ZEBRAFISH. Many of the proteins in this species have been the subject of studies involving basic embryological development (EMBRYOLOGY).
A technique that localizes specific nucleic acid sequences within intact chromosomes, eukaryotic cells, or bacterial cells through the use of specific nucleic acid-labeled probes.
Transference of cells within an individual, between individuals of the same species, or between individuals of different species.
A reverse developmental process in which terminally differentiated cells with specialized functions revert back to a less differentiated stage within their own CELL LINEAGE.
Precursor cells destined to differentiate into skeletal myocytes (MYOCYTES, SKELETAL).
MYELIN-specific proteins that play a structural or regulatory role in the genesis and maintenance of the lamellar MYELIN SHEATH structure.
A front limb of a quadruped. (The Random House College Dictionary, 1980)
Synthetic or natural materials for the replacement of bones or bone tissue. They include hard tissue replacement polymers, natural coral, hydroxyapatite, beta-tricalcium phosphate, and various other biomaterials. The bone substitutes as inert materials can be incorporated into surrounding tissue or gradually replaced by original tissue.
Sensory ganglia located on the dorsal spinal roots within the vertebral column. The spinal ganglion cells are pseudounipolar. The single primary branch bifurcates sending a peripheral process to carry sensory information from the periphery and a central branch which relays that information to the spinal cord or brain.
Strains of mice in which certain GENES of their GENOMES have been disrupted, or "knocked-out". To produce knockouts, using RECOMBINANT DNA technology, the normal DNA sequence of the gene being studied is altered to prevent synthesis of a normal gene product. Cloned cells in which this DNA alteration is successful are then injected into mouse EMBRYOS to produce chimeric mice. The chimeric mice are then bred to yield a strain in which all the cells of the mouse contain the disrupted gene. Knockout mice are used as EXPERIMENTAL ANIMAL MODELS for diseases (DISEASE MODELS, ANIMAL) and to clarify the functions of the genes.
Sensory cells in the organ of Corti, characterized by their apical stereocilia (hair-like projections). The inner and outer hair cells, as defined by their proximity to the core of spongy bone (the modiolus), change morphologically along the COCHLEA. Towards the cochlear apex, the length of hair cell bodies and their apical STEREOCILIA increase, allowing differential responses to various frequencies of sound.
A strain of albino rat developed at the Wistar Institute that has spread widely at other institutions. This has markedly diluted the original strain.
Any of the processes by which nuclear, cytoplasmic, or intercellular factors influence the differential control of gene action during the developmental stages of an organism.
Laboratory mice that have been produced from a genetically manipulated EGG or EMBRYO, MAMMALIAN.
The developmental history of specific differentiated cell types as traced back to the original STEM CELLS in the embryo.
An enzyme that catalyzes the eliminative degradation of polysaccharides containing 1,4-beta-D-hexosaminyl and 1,3-beta-D-glucuronosyl or 1,3-alpha-L-iduronosyl linkages to disaccharides containing 4-deoxy-beta-D-gluc-4-enuronosyl groups. (Enzyme Nomenclature, 1992)
Implants constructed of materials designed to be absorbed by the body without producing an immune response. They are usually composed of plastics and are frequently used in orthopedics and orthodontics.
RNA sequences that serve as templates for protein synthesis. Bacterial mRNAs are generally primary transcripts in that they do not require post-transcriptional processing. Eukaryotic mRNA is synthesized in the nucleus and must be exported to the cytoplasm for translation. Most eukaryotic mRNAs have a sequence of polyadenylic acid at the 3' end, referred to as the poly(A) tail. The function of this tail is not known for certain, but it may play a role in the export of mature mRNA from the nucleus as well as in helping stabilize some mRNA molecules by retarding their degradation in the cytoplasm.
The fission of a CELL. It includes CYTOKINESIS, when the CYTOPLASM of a cell is divided, and CELL NUCLEUS DIVISION.
The horn of an animal of the deer family, typically present only in the male. It differs from the HORNS of other animals in being a solid, generally branched bony outgrowth that is shed and renewed annually. The word antler comes from the Latin anteocularis, ante (before) + oculus (eye). (From Webster, 3d ed)
Transfer of MESENCHYMAL STEM CELLS between individuals within the same species (TRANSPLANTATION, HOMOLOGOUS) or transfer within the same individual (TRANSPLANTATION, AUTOLOGOUS).
A naturally occurring phenomenon where terminally differentiated cells dedifferentiate to the point where they can switch CELL LINEAGES. The cells then differentiate into other cell types.
Common name for Carassius auratus, a type of carp (CARPS).
Multifunctional growth factor which regulates both cell growth and cell motility. It exerts a strong mitogenic effect on hepatocytes and primary epithelial cells. Its receptor is PROTO-ONCOGENE PROTEINS C-MET.
The fibrous tissue that replaces normal tissue during the process of WOUND HEALING.
Large, multinucleate single cells, either cylindrical or prismatic in shape, that form the basic unit of SKELETAL MUSCLE. They consist of MYOFIBRILS enclosed within and attached to the SARCOLEMMA. They are derived from the fusion of skeletal myoblasts (MYOBLASTS, SKELETAL) into a syncytium, followed by differentiation.
A cylindrical column of tissue that lies within the vertebral canal. It is composed of WHITE MATTER and GRAY MATTER.
Bulbous enlargement of the growing tip of nerve axons and dendrites. They are crucial to neuronal development because of their pathfinding ability and their role in synaptogenesis.
The development of new BLOOD VESSELS during the restoration of BLOOD CIRCULATION during the healing process.
Transference of tissue within an individual, between individuals of the same species, or between individuals of different species.
A myogenic regulatory factor that controls myogenesis. Though it is not clear how its function differs from the other myogenic regulatory factors, MyoD appears to be related to fusion and terminal differentiation of the muscle cell.
A strain of mice arising from a spontaneous MUTATION (mdx) in inbred C57BL mice. This mutation is X chromosome-linked and produces viable homozygous animals that lack the muscle protein DYSTROPHIN, have high serum levels of muscle ENZYMES, and possess histological lesions similar to human MUSCULAR DYSTROPHY. The histological features, linkage, and map position of mdx make these mice a worthy animal model of DUCHENNE MUSCULAR DYSTROPHY.
Submicron-sized fibers with diameters typically between 50 and 500 nanometers. The very small dimension of these fibers can generate a high surface area to volume ratio, which makes them potential candidates for various biomedical and other applications.
F344 rats are an inbred strain of albino laboratory rats (Rattus norvegicus) that have been widely used in biomedical research due to their consistent and reliable genetic background, which facilitates the study of disease mechanisms and therapeutic interventions.
Wormlike or grublike stage, following the egg in the life cycle of insects, worms, and other metamorphosing animals.
A nucleoside that substitutes for thymidine in DNA and thus acts as an antimetabolite. It causes breaks in chromosomes and has been proposed as an antiviral and antineoplastic agent. It has been given orphan drug status for use in the treatment of primary brain tumors.
Theoretical representations that simulate the behavior or activity of biological processes or diseases. For disease models in living animals, DISEASE MODELS, ANIMAL is available. Biological models include the use of mathematical equations, computers, and other electronic equipment.
Degeneration of distal aspects of a nerve axon following injury to the cell body or proximal portion of the axon. The process is characterized by fragmentation of the axon and its MYELIN SHEATH.
The functions of the skin in the human and animal body. It includes the pigmentation of the skin.
A variation of the PCR technique in which cDNA is made from RNA via reverse transcription. The resultant cDNA is then amplified using standard PCR protocols.
Nuclear antigen with a role in DNA synthesis, DNA repair, and cell cycle progression. PCNA is required for the coordinated synthesis of both leading and lagging strands at the replication fork during DNA replication. PCNA expression correlates with the proliferation activity of several malignant and non-malignant cell types.
The bonelike rigid connective tissue covering the root of a tooth from the cementoenamel junction to the apex and lining the apex of the root canal, also assisting in tooth support by serving as attachment structures for the periodontal ligament. (Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992)
A potent osteoinductive protein that plays a critical role in the differentiation of osteoprogenitor cells into OSTEOBLASTS.
The basic cellular units of nervous tissue. Each neuron consists of a body, an axon, and dendrites. Their purpose is to receive, conduct, and transmit impulses in the NERVOUS SYSTEM.
The main information-processing organs of the nervous system, consisting of the brain, spinal cord, and meninges.
Calcium salts of phosphoric acid. These compounds are frequently used as calcium supplements.
A biocompatible polymer used as a surgical suture material.
The phenotypic manifestation of a gene or genes by the processes of GENETIC TRANSCRIPTION and GENETIC TRANSLATION.
Traumatic injuries to the facial nerve. This may result in FACIAL PARALYSIS, decreased lacrimation and salivation, and loss of taste sensation in the anterior tongue. The nerve may regenerate and reform its original pattern of innervation, or regenerate aberrantly, resulting in inappropriate lacrimation in response to gustatory stimuli (e.g., "crocodile tears") and other syndromes.
The number of CELLS of a specific kind, usually measured per unit volume or area of sample.
A tube-like invagination of the EPIDERMIS from which the hair shaft develops and into which SEBACEOUS GLANDS open. The hair follicle is lined by a cellular inner and outer root sheath of epidermal origin and is invested with a fibrous sheath derived from the dermis. (Stedman, 26th ed) Follicles of very long hairs extend into the subcutaneous layer of tissue under the SKIN.
The resection or removal of the nerve to an organ or part. (Dorland, 28th ed)
Wnt proteins are a large family of secreted glycoproteins that play essential roles in EMBRYONIC AND FETAL DEVELOPMENT, and tissue maintenance. They bind to FRIZZLED RECEPTORS and act as PARACRINE PROTEIN FACTORS to initiate a variety of SIGNAL TRANSDUCTION PATHWAYS. The canonical Wnt signaling pathway stabilizes the transcriptional coactivator BETA CATENIN.
The upper part of the human body, or the front or upper part of the body of an animal, typically separated from the rest of the body by a neck, and containing the brain, mouth, and sense organs.
Protein analogs and derivatives of the Aequorea victoria green fluorescent protein that emit light (FLUORESCENCE) when excited with ULTRAVIOLET RAYS. They are used in REPORTER GENES in doing GENETIC TECHNIQUES. Numerous mutants have been made to emit other colors or be sensitive to pH.
A genus of aquatic newts belonging to the family Salamandridae and sometimes referred to as "spiny" tritons. There are two species P. waltlii and P. poireti. P. waltlii is commonly used in the laboratory. Since this genus adapts to aquarium living, it is easy to maintain in laboratories.
The non-neuronal cells of the nervous system. They not only provide physical support, but also respond to injury, regulate the ionic and chemical composition of the extracellular milieu, participate in the BLOOD-BRAIN BARRIER and BLOOD-RETINAL BARRIER, form the myelin insulation of nervous pathways, guide neuronal migration during development, and exchange metabolites with neurons. Neuroglia have high-affinity transmitter uptake systems, voltage-dependent and transmitter-gated ion channels, and can release transmitters, but their role in signaling (as in many other functions) is unclear.
A technique for maintaining or growing TISSUE in vitro, usually by DIFFUSION, perifusion, or PERFUSION. The tissue is cultured directly after removal from the host without being dispersed for cell culture.
A meshwork-like substance found within the extracellular space and in association with the basement membrane of the cell surface. It promotes cellular proliferation and provides a supporting structure to which cells or cell lysates in culture dishes adhere.
The removal of a limb or other appendage or outgrowth of the body. (Dorland, 28th ed)
The structures surrounding and supporting the tooth. Periodontium includes the gum (GINGIVA), the alveolar bone (ALVEOLAR PROCESS), the DENTAL CEMENTUM, and the PERIODONTAL LIGAMENT.
A preparation consisting of PLATELETS concentrated in a limited volume of PLASMA. This is used in various surgical tissue regeneration procedures where the GROWTH FACTORS in the platelets enhance wound healing and regeneration.
The ten-layered nervous tissue membrane of the eye. It is continuous with the OPTIC NERVE and receives images of external objects and transmits visual impulses to the brain. Its outer surface is in contact with the CHOROID and the inner surface with the VITREOUS BODY. The outer-most layer is pigmented, whereas the inner nine layers are transparent.
Microscopy in which the object is examined directly by an electron beam scanning the specimen point-by-point. The image is constructed by detecting the products of specimen interactions that are projected above the plane of the sample, such as backscattered electrons. Although SCANNING TRANSMISSION ELECTRON MICROSCOPY also scans the specimen point by point with the electron beam, the image is constructed by detecting the electrons, or their interaction products that are transmitted through the sample plane, so that is a form of TRANSMISSION ELECTRON MICROSCOPY.
'Nerve tissue proteins' are specialized proteins found within the nervous system's biological tissue, including neurofilaments, neuronal cytoskeletal proteins, and neural cell adhesion molecules, which facilitate structural support, intracellular communication, and synaptic connectivity essential for proper neurological function.
Differentiated tissue of the central nervous system composed of NERVE CELLS, fibers, DENDRITES, and specialized supporting cells.
The movement of cells from one location to another. Distinguish from CYTOKINESIS which is the process of dividing the CYTOPLASM of a cell.
A class of Echinodermata characterized by long, slender bodies.
The span of viability of a cell characterized by the capacity to perform certain functions such as metabolism, growth, reproduction, some form of responsiveness, and adaptability.
Artificial substitutes for body parts and materials inserted into organisms during experimental studies.
A transparent, biconvex structure of the EYE, enclosed in a capsule and situated behind the IRIS and in front of the vitreous humor (VITREOUS BODY). It is slightly overlapped at its margin by the ciliary processes. Adaptation by the CILIARY BODY is crucial for OCULAR ACCOMMODATION.
Condition of having pores or open spaces. This often refers to bones, bone implants, or bone cements, but can refer to the porous state of any solid substance.
Either of two extremities of four-footed non-primate land animals. It usually consists of a FEMUR; TIBIA; and FIBULA; tarsals; METATARSALS; and TOES. (From Storer et al., General Zoology, 6th ed, p73)
Descriptions of specific amino acid, carbohydrate, or nucleotide sequences which have appeared in the published literature and/or are deposited in and maintained by databanks such as GENBANK, European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), National Biomedical Research Foundation (NBRF), or other sequence repositories.
Specialized stem cells that are committed to give rise to cells that have a particular function; examples are MYOBLASTS; MYELOID PROGENITOR CELLS; and skin stem cells. (Stem Cells: A Primer [Internet]. Bethesda (MD): National Institutes of Health (US); 2000 May [cited 2002 Apr 5]. Available from: http://www.nih.gov/news/stemcell/primer.htm)
Cells contained in the bone marrow including fat cells (see ADIPOCYTES); STROMAL CELLS; MEGAKARYOCYTES; and the immediate precursors of most blood cells.
X-RAY COMPUTERIZED TOMOGRAPHY with resolution in the micrometer range.
A class of annelid worms with few setae per segment. It includes the earthworms such as Lumbricus and Eisenia.
The nervous system outside of the brain and spinal cord. The peripheral nervous system has autonomic and somatic divisions. The autonomic nervous system includes the enteric, parasympathetic, and sympathetic subdivisions. The somatic nervous system includes the cranial and spinal nerves and their ganglia and the peripheral sensory receptors.
Neurons of the innermost layer of the retina, the internal plexiform layer. They are of variable sizes and shapes, and their axons project via the OPTIC NERVE to the brain. A small subset of these cells act as photoreceptors with projections to the SUPRACHIASMATIC NUCLEUS, the center for regulating CIRCADIAN RHYTHM.
A positive regulatory effect on physiological processes at the molecular, cellular, or systemic level. At the molecular level, the major regulatory sites include membrane receptors, genes (GENE EXPRESSION REGULATION), mRNAs (RNA, MESSENGER), and proteins.
A richly vascularized and innervated connective tissue of mesodermal origin, contained in the central cavity of a tooth and delimited by the dentin, and having formative, nutritive, sensory, and protective functions. (Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992)
Reconstitution of eroded or injured EPITHELIUM by proliferation and migration of EPITHELIAL CELLS from below or adjacent to the damaged site.
STILBENES with AMIDINES attached.
Polymers of organic acids and alcohols, with ester linkages--usually polyethylene terephthalate; can be cured into hard plastic, films or tapes, or fibers which can be woven into fabrics, meshes or velours.
A phylum of acoelomate, bilaterally symmetrical flatworms, without a definite anus. It includes three classes: Cestoda, Turbellaria, and Trematoda.
A solvent for oils, fats, lacquers, varnishes, rubber waxes, and resins, and a starting material in the manufacturing of organic compounds. Poisoning by inhalation, ingestion or skin absorption is possible and may be fatal. (Merck Index, 11th ed)
Water swollen, rigid, 3-dimensional network of cross-linked, hydrophilic macromolecules, 20-95% water. They are used in paints, printing inks, foodstuffs, pharmaceuticals, and cosmetics. (Grant & Hackh's Chemical Dictionary, 5th ed)
Two membranous sacs within the vestibular labyrinth of the INNER EAR. The saccule communicates with COCHLEAR DUCT through the ductus reuniens, and communicates with utricle through the utriculosaccular duct from which the ENDOLYMPHATIC DUCT arises. The utricle and saccule have sensory areas (acoustic maculae) which are innervated by the VESTIBULAR NERVE.
The formation of DENTAL CEMENTUM, a bone-like material that covers the root of the tooth.
The SKELETON of the HEAD including the FACIAL BONES and the bones enclosing the BRAIN.
Proteins encoded by homeobox genes (GENES, HOMEOBOX) that exhibit structural similarity to certain prokaryotic and eukaryotic DNA-binding proteins. Homeodomain proteins are involved in the control of gene expression during morphogenesis and development (GENE EXPRESSION REGULATION, DEVELOPMENTAL).
A myogenic regulatory factor that controls myogenesis. Myogenin is induced during differentiation of every skeletal muscle cell line that has been investigated, in contrast to the other myogenic regulatory factors that only appear in certain cell types.
The measurement of an organ in volume, mass, or heaviness.
The development of anatomical structures to create the form of a single- or multi-cell organism. Morphogenesis provides form changes of a part, parts, or the whole organism.
The determination of the pattern of genes expressed at the level of GENETIC TRANSCRIPTION, under specific circumstances or in a specific cell.
Regulatory proteins and peptides that are signaling molecules involved in the process of PARACRINE COMMUNICATION. They are generally considered factors that are expressed by one cell and are responded to by receptors on another nearby cell. They are distinguished from HORMONES in that their actions are local rather than distal.
The 7th cranial nerve. The facial nerve has two parts, the larger motor root which may be called the facial nerve proper, and the smaller intermediate or sensory root. Together they provide efferent innervation to the muscles of facial expression and to the lacrimal and SALIVARY GLANDS, and convey afferent information for TASTE from the anterior two-thirds of the TONGUE and for TOUCH from the EXTERNAL EAR.
One of the mechanisms by which CELL DEATH occurs (compare with NECROSIS and AUTOPHAGOCYTOSIS). Apoptosis is the mechanism responsible for the physiological deletion of cells and appears to be intrinsically programmed. It is characterized by distinctive morphologic changes in the nucleus and cytoplasm, chromatin cleavage at regularly spaced sites, and the endonucleolytic cleavage of genomic DNA; (DNA FRAGMENTATION); at internucleosomal sites. This mode of cell death serves as a balance to mitosis in regulating the size of animal tissues and in mediating pathologic processes associated with tumor growth.
The mineral component of bones and teeth; it has been used therapeutically as a prosthetic aid and in the prevention and treatment of osteoporosis.
The process of embryo initiation in culture from vegetative, non-gametic, sporophytic, or somatic plant cells.
Bone-growth regulatory factors that are members of the transforming growth factor-beta superfamily of proteins. They are synthesized as large precursor molecules which are cleaved by proteolytic enzymes. The active form can consist of a dimer of two identical proteins or a heterodimer of two related bone morphogenetic proteins.
The formation of cartilage. This process is directed by CHONDROCYTES which continually divide and lay down matrix during development. It is sometimes a precursor to OSTEOGENESIS.
The protoplasm and plasma membrane of plant, fungal, bacterial or archaeon cells without the CELL WALL.
A particular zone of tissue composed of a specialized microenvironment where stem cells are retained in a undifferentiated, self-renewable state.
A myelin protein found in the periaxonal membrane of both the central and peripheral nervous systems myelin sheaths. It binds to cells surface receptors found on AXONS and may regulate cellular interactions between MYELIN and AXONS.
Therapies that involve the TRANSPLANTATION of CELLS or TISSUES developed for the purpose of restoring the function of diseased or dysfunctional cells or tissues.
A phylum of the most familiar marine invertebrates. Its class Stelleroidea contains two subclasses, the Asteroidea (the STARFISH or sea stars) and the Ophiuroidea (the brittle stars, also called basket stars and serpent stars). There are 1500 described species of STARFISH found throughout the world. The second class, Echinoidea, contains about 950 species of SEA URCHINS, heart urchins, and sand dollars. A third class, Holothuroidea, comprises about 900 echinoderms known as SEA CUCUMBERS. Echinoderms are used extensively in biological research. (From Barnes, Invertebrate Zoology, 5th ed, pp773-826)
The processes occurring in early development that direct morphogenesis. They specify the body plan ensuring that cells will proceed to differentiate, grow, and diversify in size and shape at the correct relative positions. Included are axial patterning, segmentation, compartment specification, limb position, organ boundary patterning, blood vessel patterning, etc.
Methods for maintaining or growing CELLS in vitro.
A layer of vascularized connective tissue underneath the EPIDERMIS. The surface of the dermis contains innervated papillae. Embedded in or beneath the dermis are SWEAT GLANDS; HAIR FOLLICLES; and SEBACEOUS GLANDS.
The external, nonvascular layer of the skin. It is made up, from within outward, of five layers of EPITHELIUM: (1) basal layer (stratum basale epidermidis); (2) spinous layer (stratum spinosum epidermidis); (3) granular layer (stratum granulosum epidermidis); (4) clear layer (stratum lucidum epidermidis); and (5) horny layer (stratum corneum epidermidis).
A family of small polypeptide growth factors that share several common features including a strong affinity for HEPARIN, and a central barrel-shaped core region of 140 amino acids that is highly homologous between family members. Although originally studied as proteins that stimulate the growth of fibroblasts this distinction is no longer a requirement for membership in the fibroblast growth factor family.
The proteinaceous component of the pancreatic stone in patients with PANCREATITIS.
A signal transducer and activator of transcription that mediates cellular responses to INTERLEUKIN-6 family members. STAT3 is constitutively activated in a variety of TUMORS and is a major downstream transducer for the CYTOKINE RECEPTOR GP130.
Cells forming a framework supporting the sensory AUDITORY HAIR CELLS in the organ of Corti. Lateral to the medial inner hair cells, there are inner pillar cells, outer pillar cells, Deiters cells, Hensens cells, Claudius cells, Boettchers cells, and others.
Factors which enhance the growth potentialities of sensory and sympathetic nerve cells.
Striated muscle cells found in the heart. They are derived from cardiac myoblasts (MYOBLASTS, CARDIAC).
Contractile tissue that produces movement in animals.
Neurons which activate MUSCLE CELLS.
Photosensitive protein complexes of varied light absorption properties which are expressed in the PHOTORECEPTOR CELLS. They are OPSINS conjugated with VITAMIN A-based chromophores. Chromophores capture photons of light, leading to the activation of opsins and a biochemical cascade that ultimately excites the photoreceptor cells.
VERTEBRATES belonging to the class amphibia such as frogs, toads, newts and salamanders that live in a semiaquatic environment.
A complex signaling pathway whose name is derived from the DROSOPHILA Wg gene, which when mutated results in the wingless phenotype, and the vertebrate INT gene, which is located near integration sites of MOUSE MAMMARY TUMOR VIRUS. The signaling pathway is initiated by the binding of WNT PROTEINS to cells surface WNT RECEPTORS which interact with the AXIN SIGNALING COMPLEX and an array of second messengers that influence the actions of BETA CATENIN.
Muscular Dystrophy, Animal: A group of genetic disorders causing progressive skeletal muscle weakness and degeneration, characterized by the lack of or defective dystrophin protein, which can also affect other organ systems such as heart and brain, occurring in various forms with different degrees of severity and age of onset, like Duchenne, Becker, Myotonic, Limb-Girdle, and Facioscapulohumeral types, among others.
Specialized afferent neurons capable of transducing sensory stimuli into NERVE IMPULSES to be transmitted to the CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM. Sometimes sensory receptors for external stimuli are called exteroceptors; for internal stimuli are called interoceptors and proprioceptors.
Acquired, familial, and congenital disorders of SKELETAL MUSCLE and SMOOTH MUSCLE.
A purplish-red, light-sensitive pigment found in RETINAL ROD CELLS of most vertebrates. It is a complex consisting of a molecule of ROD OPSIN and a molecule of 11-cis retinal (RETINALDEHYDE). Rhodopsin exhibits peak absorption wavelength at about 500 nm.
A nodular organ in the ABDOMEN that contains a mixture of ENDOCRINE GLANDS and EXOCRINE GLANDS. The small endocrine portion consists of the ISLETS OF LANGERHANS secreting a number of hormones into the blood stream. The large exocrine portion (EXOCRINE PANCREAS) is a compound acinar gland that secretes several digestive enzymes into the pancreatic ductal system that empties into the DUODENUM.
Identification of proteins or peptides that have been electrophoretically separated by blot transferring from the electrophoresis gel to strips of nitrocellulose paper, followed by labeling with antibody probes.
The testing of materials and devices, especially those used for PROSTHESES AND IMPLANTS; SUTURES; TISSUE ADHESIVES; etc., for hardness, strength, durability, safety, efficacy, and biocompatibility.
An X-linked recessive muscle disease caused by an inability to synthesize DYSTROPHIN, which is involved with maintaining the integrity of the sarcolemma. Muscle fibers undergo a process that features degeneration and regeneration. Clinical manifestations include proximal weakness in the first few years of life, pseudohypertrophy, cardiomyopathy (see MYOCARDIAL DISEASES), and an increased incidence of impaired mentation. Becker muscular dystrophy is a closely related condition featuring a later onset of disease (usually adolescence) and a slowly progressive course. (Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p1415)
Endogenous substances, usually proteins, which are effective in the initiation, stimulation, or termination of the genetic transcription process.
Cells that line the inner and outer surfaces of the body by forming cellular layers (EPITHELIUM) or masses. Epithelial cells lining the SKIN; the MOUTH; the NOSE; and the ANAL CANAL derive from ectoderm; those lining the RESPIRATORY SYSTEM and the DIGESTIVE SYSTEM derive from endoderm; others (CARDIOVASCULAR SYSTEM and LYMPHATIC SYSTEM) derive from mesoderm. Epithelial cells can be classified mainly by cell shape and function into squamous, glandular and transitional epithelial cells.
A carotenoid constituent of visual pigments. It is the oxidized form of retinol which functions as the active component of the visual cycle. It is bound to the protein opsin forming the complex rhodopsin. When stimulated by visible light, the retinal component of the rhodopsin complex undergoes isomerization at the 11-position of the double bond to the cis-form; this is reversed in "dark" reactions to return to the native trans-configuration.
A specialized CONNECTIVE TISSUE that is the main constituent of the SKELETON. The principle cellular component of bone is comprised of OSTEOBLASTS; OSTEOCYTES; and OSTEOCLASTS, while FIBRILLAR COLLAGENS and hydroxyapatite crystals form the BONE MATRIX.

Reduced differentiation potential of primary MyoD-/- myogenic cells derived from adult skeletal muscle. (1/5339)

To gain insight into the regeneration deficit of MyoD-/- muscle, we investigated the growth and differentiation of cultured MyoD-/- myogenic cells. Primary MyoD-/- myogenic cells exhibited a stellate morphology distinct from the compact morphology of wild-type myoblasts, and expressed c-met, a receptor tyrosine kinase expressed in satellite cells. However, MyoD-/- myogenic cells did not express desmin, an intermediate filament protein typically expressed in cultured myoblasts in vitro and myogenic precursor cells in vivo. Northern analysis indicated that proliferating MyoD-/- myogenic cells expressed fourfold higher levels of Myf-5 and sixfold higher levels of PEA3, an ETS-domain transcription factor expressed in newly activated satellite cells. Under conditions that normally induce differentiation, MyoD-/- cells continued to proliferate and with delayed kinetics yielded reduced numbers of predominantly mononuclear myocytes. Northern analysis revealed delayed induction of myogenin, MRF4, and other differentiation-specific markers although p21 was upregulated normally. Expression of M-cadherin mRNA was severely decreased whereas expression of IGF-1 was markedly increased in MyoD-/- myogenic cells. Mixing of lacZ-labeled MyoD-/- cells and wild-type myoblasts revealed a strict autonomy in differentiation potential. Transfection of a MyoD-expression cassette restored cytomorphology and rescued the differentiation deficit. We interpret these data to suggest that MyoD-/- myogenic cells represent an intermediate stage between a quiescent satellite cell and a myogenic precursor cell.  (+info)

Lack of regulation in the heart forming region of avian embryos. (2/5339)

The ability to regenerate a heart after ablation of cardiogenic mesoderm has been demonstrated in early stage fish and amphibian embryos but this type of regulation of the heart field has not been seen in avians or mammals. The regulative potential of the cardiogenic mesoderm was examined in avian embryos and related to the spatial expression of genes implicated in early cardiogenesis. With the identification of early cardiac regulators such as bmp-2 and nkx-2.5, it is now possible to reconcile classical embryological studies with molecular mechanisms of cardiac lineage determination in vivo. The most anterior lateral embryonic cells were identified as the region that becomes the heart and removal of all or any subset of these cells resulted in the loss of corresponding cardiac structures. In addition, removal of the lateral heart forming mesoderm while leaving the lateral endoderm intact also results in loss of cardiac structures. Thus the medial anterior mesoderm cannot be recruited into the heart lineage in vivo even in the presence of potentially cardiac inducing endoderm. In situ analysis demonstrated that genes involved in early events of cardiogenesis such as bone morphogenetic protein 2 (bmp-2) and nkx-2.5 are expressed coincidentally with the mapped far lateral heart forming region. The activin type IIa receptor (actR-IIa) is a potential mediator of BMP signaling since it is expressed throughout the anterior mesoderm with the highest level of expression occurring in the lateral prospective heart cells. The posterior boundary of actR-IIa is consistent with the posterior boundary of nkx-2.5 expression, supporting a model whereby ActR-IIa is involved in restricting the heart forming region to an anterior subset of lateral cells exposed to BMP-2. Analysis of the cardiogenic potential of the lateral plate mesoderm posterior to nkx-2.5 and actR-IIa expression demonstrated that these cells are not cardiogenic in vitro and that removal of these cells from the embryo does not result in loss of heart tissue in vivo. Thus, the region of the avian embryo that will become the heart is defined medially, laterally, and posteriorly by nkx-2.5 gene expression. Removal of all or part of the nkx-2.5 expressing region results in the loss of corresponding heart structures, demonstrating the inability of the chick embryo to regenerate cardiac tissue in vivo at stages after nkx-2.5 expression is initiated.  (+info)

Expression and developmental regulation of the Hydra-RFamide and Hydra-LWamide preprohormone genes in Hydra: evidence for transient phases of head formation. (3/5339)

Hydra magnipapillata has three distinct genes coding for preprohormones A, B, and C, each yielding a characteristic set of Hydra-RFamide (Arg-Phe-NH2) neuropeptides, and a fourth gene coding for a preprohormone that yields various Hydra-LWamide (Leu-Trp-NH2) neuropeptides. Using a whole-mount double-labeling in situ hybridization technique, we found that each of the four genes is specifically expressed in a different subset of neurons in the ectoderm of adult Hydra. The preprohormone A gene is expressed in neurons of the tentacles, hypostome (a region between tentacles and mouth opening), upper gastric region, and peduncle (an area just above the foot). The preprohormone B gene is exclusively expressed in neurons of the hypostome, whereas the preprohormone C gene is exclusively expressed in neurons of the tentacles. The Hydra-LWamide preprohormone gene is expressed in neurons located in all parts of Hydra with maxima in tentacles, hypostome, and basal disk (foot). Studies on animals regenerating a head showed that the prepro-Hydra-LWamide gene is expressed first, followed by the preprohormone A and subsequently the preprohormone C and the preprohormone B genes. This sequence of events could be explained by a model based on positional values in a morphogen gradient. Our head-regeneration experiments also give support for transient phases of head formation: first tentacle-specific preprohormone C neurons (frequently associated with a small tentacle bud) appear at the center of the regenerating tip, which they are then replaced by hypostome-specific preprohormone B neurons. Thus, the regenerating tip first attains a tentacle-like appearance and only later this tip develops into a hypostome. In a developing bud of Hydra, tentacle-specific preprohormone C neurons and hypostome-specific preprohormone B neurons appear about simultaneously in their correct positions, but during a later phase of head development, additional tentacle-specific preprohormone C neurons appear as a ring at the center of the hypostome and then disappear again. Nerve-free Hydra consisting of only epithelial cells do not express the preprohormone A, B, or C or the LWamide preprohormone genes. These animals, however, have a normal phenotype, showing that the preprohormone A, B, and C and the LWamide genes are not essential for the basic pattern formation of Hydra.  (+info)

Immunocytochemical and morphological evidence for intracellular self-repair as an important contributor to mammalian hair cell recovery. (4/5339)

Although recent studies have provided evidence for hair cell regeneration in mammalian inner ears, the mechanism underlying this regenerative process is still under debate. Here we report immunocytochemical, histological, electron microscopic, and autoradiographic evidence that, in cultured postnatal rat utricles, a substantial number of hair cells can survive gentamicin insult even their stereocilia are lost. These partially damaged hair cells can survive for a prolonged time and regrow the stereocilia. Although the number of stereocilia-bearing hair cells increases over time after gentamicin insult, hair cell and supporting cell numbers remain essentially unchanged. Tritiated thymidine autoradiography and bromodeoxyuridine immunocytochemistry of the cultures demonstrate that cell proliferation in the sensory epithelium is very limited and is far below the number of recovered hair cells. Furthermore, terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated biotinylated UTP nick end labeling analysis indicates that gentamicin-induced apoptosis in the sensory epithelium occurs mainly during a 2 d treatment period, and additional cell death is minimal 2-11 d after treatment. Considered together, intracellular repair of partially damaged hair cells can be an important contributor to spontaneous hair cell recovery in mammalian inner ears.  (+info)

Alteration of endothelium-dependent hyperpolarizations in porcine coronary arteries with regenerated endothelium. (5/5339)

The present study was designed to test the ability of regenerated endothelium to evoke endothelium-dependent hyperpolarizations. Hyperpolarizations induced by serotonin and bradykinin were compared in isolated porcine coronary arteries with native or regenerated endothelium, 4 weeks after balloon endothelial denudation. The experiments were performed in the presence of inhibitors of nitric oxide synthase (Nomega-nitro-L-arginine) and cyclooxygenase (indomethacin). The transmembrane potential was measured using conventional glass microelectrodes. Smooth muscle cells from coronary arteries with regenerated endothelium were depolarized in comparison with control coronary arteries from the same hearts. Spontaneous membrane potential oscillations of small amplitude or spikes were observed in some of these arteries but never in arteries with native endothelium. In coronary arteries from control pigs, both serotonin and bradykinin induced concentration-dependent hyperpolarizations. In the presence of ketanserin, 10 micromol/L serotonin induced a transient hyperpolarization in control coronary arteries. Four weeks after balloon denudation, the response to serotonin was normal in arteries with native endothelium, but the hyperpolarization was significantly lower in coronary arteries with regenerated endothelium. In control arteries, the endothelium-dependent hyperpolarization obtained with bradykinin (30 nmol/L) was reproducible. Four weeks after balloon denudation, comparable hyperpolarizations were obtained in coronary arteries with native endothelium. By contrast, in arteries with regenerated endothelium, the hyperpolarization to bradykinin became voltage-dependent. In the most depolarized cells, the hyperpolarization to bradykinin was augmented. The changes in resting membrane potential and the alteration in endothelium-dependent hyperpolarizations observed in the coronary arteries with regenerated endothelium may contribute to the reduced response to serotonin and the unchanged relaxation to bradykinin described previously.  (+info)

The homeodomain protein IDX-1 increases after an early burst of proliferation during pancreatic regeneration. (6/5339)

Islet duodenal homeobox 1 (IDX-1/PF-1/STF-1/PDX-1), a homeodomain protein that transactivates the insulin promoter, has been shown by targeted gene ablation to be required for pancreatic development. After 90% pancreatectomy (Px), the adult pancreas regenerates in a process recapitulating embryonic development, starting with a burst of proliferation in the epithelium of the common pancreatic duct. In this model, IDX-1 mRNA was detected by semiquantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction in total RNA from isolated common pancreatic ducts at levels 10% of those of isolated islets. The IDX-1 mRNA levels were not significantly different for common pancreatic ducts of Px, sham Px, and unoperated rats and did not change with time after surgery. By immunoblot analysis, IDX-1 protein was only faintly detected in these ducts 1 and 7 days after Px or sham Px but was easily detected at 2 and 3 days after Px. Similarly, IDX-1 immunostaining was barely detectable in sham or unoperated ducts but was strong in ducts at 2-3 days after Px. The increase of IDX-1 immunostaining followed that of BrdU incorporation (proliferation). These results indicate a posttranscriptional regulation of the IDX-1 expression in ducts. In addition, islets isolated 3-7 d after Px showed higher IDX-1 protein expression than control islets. Thus, in pancreatic regeneration IDX-1 is upregulated in newly divided ductal cells as well as in islets. The timing of enhanced expression of IDX-1 implies that IDX-1 is not important in the initiation of regeneration but may be involved in the differentiation of ductal cells to beta-cells.  (+info)

Hedgehog is required for activation of engrailed during regeneration of fragmented Drosophila imaginal discs. (7/5339)

Surgically fragmented Drosophila appendage primordia (imaginal discs) engage in wound healing and pattern regulation during short periods of in vivo culture. Prothoracic leg disc fragments possess exceptional regulative capacity, highlighted by the ability of anterior cells to convert to posterior identity and establish a novel posterior compartment. This anterior/posterior conversion violates developmental lineage restrictions essential for normal growth and patterning of the disc, and thus provides an ideal model for understanding how cells change fate during epimorphic pattern regulation. Here we present evidence that the secreted signal encoded by hedgehog directs anterior/posterior conversion by activating the posterior-specific transcription factor engrailed in regulating anterior cells. In the absence of hedgehog activity, prothoracic leg disc fragments fail to undergo anterior/posterior conversion, but can still regenerate missing anterior pattern elements. We suggest that hedgehog-independent regeneration within the anterior compartment (termed integration) is mediated by the positional cues encoded by wingless and decapentaplegic. Taken together, our results provide a novel mechanistic interpretation of imaginal disc pattern regulation and permit speculation that similar mechanisms could govern appendage regeneration in other organisms.  (+info)

Transforming growth factor-beta-induced upregulation of transforming growth factor-beta receptor expression in pancreatic regeneration. (8/5339)

The transforming growth factor-beta (TGFbeta) signaling pathway is one important player in the regulation of extracellular matrix turnover and cell proliferation in epithelial regeneration. We used cerulein-induced pancreatitis in rats as a model to investigate the regulation of TGFbeta receptor type I and type II expression on protein and messenger RNA level during regeneration. In the regenerating pancreas, mRNA levels of TGFbeta receptor I and II were significantly increased with a maximum after 2 days. On protein level, expression of TGFbeta receptor II was significantly increased after three to 3-5 days. This elevated expression could be inhibited by neutralizing the endogenous biological activity of TGFbeta1 with a specific antibody. In cultured pancreatic epithelial cells, TGFbeta1 reduced cell proliferation as measured by [3H]thymidine incorporation. Furthermore the transcript levels of TGFbeta1 as well as mRNA and protein concentrations of type I and type II receptor increased during TGFbeta stimulation in vitro. These results indicate that epithelial pancreatic cells contribute to the enhanced TGFbeta1 synthesis during pancreatic regeneration by an autocrine mechanism. TGFbeta1, furthermore, upregulates the expression of its own receptors during the regenerative process, thereby contributing to the increase of the TGFbeta-induced cellular responses.  (+info)

Regeneration in a medical context refers to the process of renewal, restoration, and growth that replaces damaged or missing cells, tissues, organs, or even whole limbs in some organisms. This complex biological process involves various cellular and molecular mechanisms, such as cell proliferation, differentiation, and migration, which work together to restore the structural and functional integrity of the affected area.

In human medicine, regeneration has attracted significant interest due to its potential therapeutic applications in treating various conditions, including degenerative diseases, trauma, and congenital disorders. Researchers are actively studying the underlying mechanisms of regeneration in various model organisms to develop novel strategies for promoting tissue repair and regeneration in humans.

Examples of regeneration in human medicine include liver regeneration after partial hepatectomy, where the remaining liver lobes can grow back to their original size within weeks, and skin wound healing, where keratinocytes migrate and proliferate to close the wound and restore the epidermal layer. However, the regenerative capacity of humans is limited compared to some other organisms, such as planarians and axolotls, which can regenerate entire body parts or even their central nervous system.

Nerve regeneration is the process of regrowth and restoration of functional nerve connections following damage or injury to the nervous system. This complex process involves various cellular and molecular events, such as the activation of support cells called glia, the sprouting of surviving nerve fibers (axons), and the reformation of neural circuits. The goal of nerve regeneration is to enable the restoration of normal sensory, motor, and autonomic functions impaired due to nerve damage or injury.

Liver regeneration is the ability of the liver to restore its original mass and function after injury or surgical resection. This complex process involves the proliferation and differentiation of mature hepatocytes, as well as the activation and transdifferentiation of various types of stem and progenitor cells located in the liver. The mechanisms that regulate liver regeneration include a variety of growth factors, hormones, and cytokines, which act in a coordinated manner to ensure the restoration of normal liver architecture and function. Liver regeneration is essential for the survival of individuals who have undergone partial hepatectomy or who have suffered liver damage due to various causes, such as viral hepatitis, alcohol abuse, or drug-induced liver injury.

Bone regeneration is the biological process of new bone formation that occurs after an injury or removal of a portion of bone. This complex process involves several stages, including inflammation, migration and proliferation of cells, matrix deposition, and mineralization, leading to the restoration of the bone's structure and function.

The main cells involved in bone regeneration are osteoblasts, which produce new bone matrix, and osteoclasts, which resorb damaged or old bone tissue. The process is tightly regulated by various growth factors, hormones, and signaling molecules that promote the recruitment, differentiation, and activity of these cells.

Bone regeneration can occur naturally in response to injury or surgical intervention, such as fracture repair or dental implant placement. However, in some cases, bone regeneration may be impaired due to factors such as age, disease, or trauma, leading to delayed healing or non-union of the bone. In these situations, various strategies and techniques, including the use of bone grafts, scaffolds, and growth factors, can be employed to enhance and support the bone regeneration process.

Guided Tissue Regeneration (GTR) is a surgical procedure used in periodontics and implant dentistry that aims to regenerate lost periodontal tissues, such as the alveolar bone, cementum, and periodontal ligament, which have been destroyed due to periodontal disease or trauma. The goal of GTR is to restore the architectural and functional relationship between the teeth and their supporting structures.

The procedure involves placing a barrier membrane between the tooth root and the surrounding soft tissues, creating a protected space that allows the periodontal tissues to regenerate. The membrane acts as a physical barrier, preventing the rapid growth of epithelial cells and fibroblasts from the soft tissue into the defect area, while allowing the slower-growing cells derived from the periodontal ligament and bone to repopulate the space.

There are two main types of membranes used in GTR: resorbable and non-resorbable. Resorbable membranes are made of materials that degrade over time, eliminating the need for a second surgical procedure to remove them. Non-resorbable membranes, on the other hand, must be removed after a period of healing.

GTR has been shown to be effective in treating intrabony defects, furcation involvements, and ridge augmentations, among other applications. However, the success of GTR depends on various factors, including the patient's overall health, the size and location of the defect, and the surgeon's skill and experience.

Planarians are not a medical term, but rather a type of flatworms that belong to the phylum Platyhelminthes. They are known for their ability to regenerate and reproduce asexually. Planarians are often studied in the fields of biology and regenerative medicine due to their unique capacity to regrow lost body parts. However, some planarian species can also be parasitic and infect humans, causing diseases such as intestinal schistosomiasis or cercarial dermatitis. Therefore, while planarians themselves are not a medical term, they have relevance to certain medical fields.

Hepatectomy is a surgical procedure that involves the removal of part or all of the liver. This procedure can be performed for various reasons, such as removing cancerous or non-cancerous tumors, treating liver trauma, or donating a portion of the liver to another person in need of a transplant (live donor hepatectomy). The extent of the hepatectomy depends on the medical condition and overall health of the patient. It is a complex procedure that requires significant expertise and experience from the surgical team due to the liver's unique anatomy, blood supply, and regenerative capabilities.

An axon is a long, slender extension of a neuron (a type of nerve cell) that conducts electrical impulses (nerve impulses) away from the cell body to target cells, such as other neurons or muscle cells. Axons can vary in length from a few micrometers to over a meter long and are typically surrounded by a myelin sheath, which helps to insulate and protect the axon and allows for faster transmission of nerve impulses.

Axons play a critical role in the functioning of the nervous system, as they provide the means by which neurons communicate with one another and with other cells in the body. Damage to axons can result in serious neurological problems, such as those seen in spinal cord injuries or neurodegenerative diseases like multiple sclerosis.

Salamandridae is not a medical term, but a taxonomic designation in the field of biology. It refers to a family of amphibians commonly known as newts and salamanders. These creatures are characterized by their slender bodies, moist skin, and four legs. Some species have the ability to regenerate lost body parts, including limbs, spinal cord, heart, and more.

If you're looking for a medical term, please provide more context or check if you may have made a typo in your question.

Ambystoma mexicanum is the scientific name for the axolotl, a type of salamander that is native to Mexico. The axolotl is also known as the Mexican walking fish, although it is not actually a fish but an amphibian. It is unique because it exhibits neoteny, which means it can remain in its larval form throughout its entire life and never undergo complete metamorphosis into a terrestrial form.

The axolotl is a popular organism in scientific research due to its ability to regenerate lost body parts, including limbs, spinal cord, heart, and other organs. This has made it an important model organism for studying the mechanisms of regeneration and repair in mammals, including humans.

The term "extremities" in a medical context refers to the most distant parts of the body, including the hands and feet (both fingers and toes), as well as the arms and legs. These are the farthest parts from the torso and head. Medical professionals may examine a patient's extremities for various reasons, such as checking circulation, assessing nerve function, or looking for injuries or abnormalities.

A nerve crush injury is a type of peripheral nerve injury that occurs when there is excessive pressure or compression applied to a nerve, causing it to become damaged or dysfunctional. This can happen due to various reasons such as trauma from accidents, surgical errors, or prolonged pressure on the nerve from tight casts, clothing, or positions.

The compression disrupts the normal functioning of the nerve, leading to symptoms such as numbness, tingling, weakness, or pain in the affected area. In severe cases, a nerve crush injury can cause permanent damage to the nerve, leading to long-term disability or loss of function. Treatment for nerve crush injuries typically involves relieving the pressure on the nerve, providing supportive care, and in some cases, surgical intervention may be necessary to repair the damaged nerve.

According to the National Institutes of Health (NIH), stem cells are "initial cells" or "precursor cells" that have the ability to differentiate into many different cell types in the body. They can also divide without limit to replenish other cells for as long as the person or animal is still alive.

There are two main types of stem cells: embryonic stem cells, which come from human embryos, and adult stem cells, which are found in various tissues throughout the body. Embryonic stem cells have the ability to differentiate into all cell types in the body, while adult stem cells have more limited differentiation potential.

Stem cells play an essential role in the development and repair of various tissues and organs in the body. They are currently being studied for their potential use in the treatment of a wide range of diseases and conditions, including cancer, diabetes, heart disease, and neurological disorders. However, more research is needed to fully understand the properties and capabilities of these cells before they can be used safely and effectively in clinical settings.

"Notophthalmus viridescens" is the scientific name for a species of salamander, commonly known as the Eastern Newt or the Red-spotted Newt. It is not a medical term. The Eastern Newt is found in the eastern parts of North America and undergoes three distinct life stages: aquatic larva, terrestrial juvenile (known as an "ef," short for "effluent"), and fully aquatic adult. They are known for their distinctive coloration and toxic skin secretions, which serve as a defense against predators.

I could not find a medical definition for "animal fins" as a single concept. However, in the field of comparative anatomy and evolutionary biology, fins are specialized limbs that some aquatic animals use for movement, stability, or sensory purposes. Fins can be found in various forms among different animal groups, including fish, amphibians, reptiles, and even mammals like whales and dolphins.

Fins consist of either bony or cartilaginous structures that support webs of skin or connective tissue. They may contain muscles, blood vessels, nerves, and sensory organs, which help animals navigate their underwater environment efficiently. The specific structure and function of fins can vary greatly depending on the animal's taxonomic group and lifestyle adaptations.

In a medical context, studying animal fins could provide insights into the evolution of limbs in vertebrates or contribute to the development of biomimetic technologies inspired by nature. However, there is no standalone medical definition for 'animal fins.'

Wound healing is a complex and dynamic process that occurs after tissue injury, aiming to restore the integrity and functionality of the damaged tissue. It involves a series of overlapping phases: hemostasis, inflammation, proliferation, and remodeling.

1. Hemostasis: This initial phase begins immediately after injury and involves the activation of the coagulation cascade to form a clot, which stabilizes the wound and prevents excessive blood loss.
2. Inflammation: Activated inflammatory cells, such as neutrophils and monocytes/macrophages, infiltrate the wound site to eliminate pathogens, remove debris, and release growth factors that promote healing. This phase typically lasts for 2-5 days post-injury.
3. Proliferation: In this phase, various cell types, including fibroblasts, endothelial cells, and keratinocytes, proliferate and migrate to the wound site to synthesize extracellular matrix (ECM) components, form new blood vessels (angiogenesis), and re-epithelialize the wounded area. This phase can last up to several weeks depending on the size and severity of the wound.
4. Remodeling: The final phase of wound healing involves the maturation and realignment of collagen fibers, leading to the restoration of tensile strength in the healed tissue. This process can continue for months to years after injury, although the tissue may never fully regain its original structure and function.

It is important to note that wound healing can be compromised by several factors, including age, nutrition, comorbidities (e.g., diabetes, vascular disease), and infection, which can result in delayed healing or non-healing chronic wounds.

Tissue engineering is a branch of biomedical engineering that combines the principles of engineering, materials science, and biological sciences to develop functional substitutes for damaged or diseased tissues and organs. It involves the creation of living, three-dimensional structures that can restore, maintain, or improve tissue function. This is typically accomplished through the use of cells, scaffolds (biodegradable matrices), and biologically active molecules. The goal of tissue engineering is to develop biological substitutes that can ultimately restore normal function and structure in damaged tissues or organs.

Cell differentiation is the process by which a less specialized cell, or stem cell, becomes a more specialized cell type with specific functions and structures. This process involves changes in gene expression, which are regulated by various intracellular signaling pathways and transcription factors. Differentiation results in the development of distinct cell types that make up tissues and organs in multicellular organisms. It is a crucial aspect of embryonic development, tissue repair, and maintenance of homeostasis in the body.

Tissue scaffolds, also known as bioactive scaffolds or synthetic extracellular matrices, refer to three-dimensional structures that serve as templates for the growth and organization of cells in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. These scaffolds are designed to mimic the natural extracellular matrix (ECM) found in biological tissues, providing a supportive environment for cell attachment, proliferation, differentiation, and migration.

Tissue scaffolds can be made from various materials, including naturally derived biopolymers (e.g., collagen, alginate, chitosan, hyaluronic acid), synthetic polymers (e.g., polycaprolactone, polylactic acid, poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid)), or a combination of both. The choice of material depends on the specific application and desired properties, such as biocompatibility, biodegradability, mechanical strength, and porosity.

The primary functions of tissue scaffolds include:

1. Cell attachment: Providing surfaces for cells to adhere, spread, and form stable focal adhesions.
2. Mechanical support: Offering a structural framework that maintains the desired shape and mechanical properties of the engineered tissue.
3. Nutrient diffusion: Ensuring adequate transport of nutrients, oxygen, and waste products throughout the scaffold to support cell survival and function.
4. Guided tissue growth: Directing the organization and differentiation of cells through spatial cues and biochemical signals.
5. Biodegradation: Gradually degrading at a rate that matches tissue regeneration, allowing for the replacement of the scaffold with native ECM produced by the cells.

Tissue scaffolds have been used in various applications, such as wound healing, bone and cartilage repair, cardiovascular tissue engineering, and neural tissue regeneration. The design and fabrication of tissue scaffolds are critical aspects of tissue engineering, aiming to create functional substitutes for damaged or diseased tissues and organs.

Satellite cells in skeletal muscle are undifferentiated stem cells that are crucial for postnatal growth, maintenance, and repair of skeletal muscle. They are located between the basal lamina and plasma membrane of myofibers. In response to muscle damage or injury, satellite cells become activated, proliferate, differentiate into myoblasts, fuse with existing muscle fibers, and contribute to muscle regeneration. Satellite cells also play a role in maintaining muscle homeostasis by fusing with mature muscle fibers to replace damaged proteins and organelles. They are essential for the adaptation of skeletal muscle to various stimuli such as exercise or mechanical load.

Cell proliferation is the process by which cells increase in number, typically through the process of cell division. In the context of biology and medicine, it refers to the reproduction of cells that makes up living tissue, allowing growth, maintenance, and repair. It involves several stages including the transition from a phase of quiescence (G0 phase) to an active phase (G1 phase), DNA replication in the S phase, and mitosis or M phase, where the cell divides into two daughter cells.

Abnormal or uncontrolled cell proliferation is a characteristic feature of many diseases, including cancer, where deregulated cell cycle control leads to excessive and unregulated growth of cells, forming tumors that can invade surrounding tissues and metastasize to distant sites in the body.

In the context of human anatomy, the term "tail" is not used to describe any part of the body. Humans are considered tailless primates, and there is no structure or feature that corresponds directly to the tails found in many other animals.

However, there are some medical terms related to the lower end of the spine that might be confused with a tail:

1. Coccyx (Tailbone): The coccyx is a small triangular bone at the very bottom of the spinal column, formed by the fusion of several rudimentary vertebrae. It's also known as the tailbone because it resembles the end of an animal's tail in its location and appearance.
2. Cauda Equina (Horse's Tail): The cauda equina is a bundle of nerve roots at the lower end of the spinal cord, just above the coccyx. It got its name because it looks like a horse's tail due to the numerous rootlets radiating from the conus medullaris (the tapering end of the spinal cord).

These two structures are not tails in the traditional sense but rather medical terms related to the lower end of the human spine.

Spinal cord regeneration is the process of regrowth or repair of damaged or severed nerves and neural connections within the spinal cord. This complex process involves various biological mechanisms, including the activation of stem cells, the promotion of axonal growth, and the remodeling of neural circuits. The ultimate goal of spinal cord regeneration research is to develop effective therapies for individuals with spinal cord injuries, enabling them to regain sensory and motor functions and improve their quality of life.

The sciatic nerve is the largest and longest nerve in the human body, running from the lower back through the buttocks and down the legs to the feet. It is formed by the union of the ventral rami (branches) of the L4 to S3 spinal nerves. The sciatic nerve provides motor and sensory innervation to various muscles and skin areas in the lower limbs, including the hamstrings, calf muscles, and the sole of the foot. Sciatic nerve disorders or injuries can result in symptoms such as pain, numbness, tingling, or weakness in the lower back, hips, legs, and feet, known as sciatica.

Axotomy is a medical term that refers to the surgical cutting or severing of an axon, which is the long, slender projection of a neuron (nerve cell) that conducts electrical impulses away from the cell body and toward other cells. Axons are a critical component of the nervous system, allowing for communication between different parts of the body.

Axotomy is often used in research settings to study the effects of axonal injury on neuronal function and regeneration. This procedure can provide valuable insights into the mechanisms underlying neurodegenerative disorders and potential therapies for nerve injuries. However, it is important to note that axotomy can also have significant consequences for the affected neuron, including changes in gene expression, metabolism, and overall survival.

A zebrafish is a freshwater fish species belonging to the family Cyprinidae and the genus Danio. Its name is derived from its distinctive striped pattern that resembles a zebra's. Zebrafish are often used as model organisms in scientific research, particularly in developmental biology, genetics, and toxicology studies. They have a high fecundity rate, transparent embryos, and a rapid development process, making them an ideal choice for researchers. However, it is important to note that providing a medical definition for zebrafish may not be entirely accurate or relevant since they are primarily used in biological research rather than clinical medicine.

Peripheral nerves are nerve fibers that transmit signals between the central nervous system (CNS, consisting of the brain and spinal cord) and the rest of the body. These nerves convey motor, sensory, and autonomic information, enabling us to move, feel, and respond to changes in our environment. They form a complex network that extends from the CNS to muscles, glands, skin, and internal organs, allowing for coordinated responses and functions throughout the body. Damage or injury to peripheral nerves can result in various neurological symptoms, such as numbness, weakness, or pain, depending on the type and severity of the damage.

Schwann cells, also known as neurolemmocytes, are a type of glial cell that form the myelin sheath around peripheral nervous system (PNS) axons, allowing for the rapid and efficient transmission of nerve impulses. These cells play a crucial role in the maintenance and function of the PNS.

Schwann cells originate from the neural crest during embryonic development and migrate to the developing nerves. They wrap around the axons in a spiral fashion, forming multiple layers of myelin, which insulates the nerve fibers and increases the speed of electrical impulse transmission. Each Schwann cell is responsible for myelinating a single segment of an axon, with the gaps between these segments called nodes of Ranvier.

Schwann cells also provide structural support to the neurons and contribute to the regeneration of injured peripheral nerves by helping to guide the regrowth of axons to their targets. Additionally, Schwann cells can participate in immune responses within the PNS, such as releasing cytokines and chemokines to recruit immune cells during injury or infection.

Skeletal muscle, also known as striated or voluntary muscle, is a type of muscle that is attached to bones by tendons or aponeuroses and functions to produce movements and support the posture of the body. It is composed of long, multinucleated fibers that are arranged in parallel bundles and are characterized by alternating light and dark bands, giving them a striped appearance under a microscope. Skeletal muscle is under voluntary control, meaning that it is consciously activated through signals from the nervous system. It is responsible for activities such as walking, running, jumping, and lifting objects.

Regenerative medicine is a branch of medicine that deals with the repair or replacement of damaged or diseased cells, tissues, and organs using various strategies, including the use of stem cells, tissue engineering, gene therapy, and biomaterials. The goal of regenerative medicine is to restore normal function and structure to tissues and organs, thereby improving the patient's quality of life and potentially curing diseases that were previously considered incurable.

Regenerative medicine has shown promise in a variety of clinical applications, such as the treatment of degenerative diseases like osteoarthritis, spinal cord injuries, heart disease, diabetes, and liver failure. It also holds great potential for use in regenerative therapies for wound healing, tissue reconstruction, and cosmetic surgery.

The field of regenerative medicine is rapidly evolving, with new discoveries and advances being made regularly. As our understanding of the underlying biological mechanisms that drive tissue repair and regeneration continues to grow, so too will the potential clinical applications of this exciting and promising field.

Hepatocytes are the predominant type of cells in the liver, accounting for about 80% of its cytoplasmic mass. They play a key role in protein synthesis, protein storage, transformation of carbohydrates, synthesis of cholesterol, bile salts and phospholipids, detoxification, modification, and excretion of exogenous and endogenous substances, initiation of formation and secretion of bile, and enzyme production. Hepatocytes are essential for the maintenance of homeostasis in the body.

I apologize for any confusion, but "Turbellaria" is not a medical term. It is a taxonomic category in biology, specifically a class within the phylum Platyhelminthes (flatworms). Turbellarians are free-living, flatworms that are typically characterized by their unsegmented body and the presence of cilia for locomotion. They include freshwater, marine, and terrestrial species. If you have a medical term or concept in mind, I would be happy to help define it for you.

The liver is a large, solid organ located in the upper right portion of the abdomen, beneath the diaphragm and above the stomach. It plays a vital role in several bodily functions, including:

1. Metabolism: The liver helps to metabolize carbohydrates, fats, and proteins from the food we eat into energy and nutrients that our bodies can use.
2. Detoxification: The liver detoxifies harmful substances in the body by breaking them down into less toxic forms or excreting them through bile.
3. Synthesis: The liver synthesizes important proteins, such as albumin and clotting factors, that are necessary for proper bodily function.
4. Storage: The liver stores glucose, vitamins, and minerals that can be released when the body needs them.
5. Bile production: The liver produces bile, a digestive juice that helps to break down fats in the small intestine.
6. Immune function: The liver plays a role in the immune system by filtering out bacteria and other harmful substances from the blood.

Overall, the liver is an essential organ that plays a critical role in maintaining overall health and well-being.

Urodela is not a medical term, but a taxonomic category in the field of biology. It refers to a group of amphibians commonly known as newts and salamanders. These creatures are characterized by their slender bodies, moist skin, and four legs. They undergo a process of metamorphosis during their development, transitioning from an aquatic larval stage to a terrestrial adult stage.

While not a medical term itself, understanding the biology and ecology of Urodela can be relevant in fields such as environmental health and toxicology, where these animals may serve as indicators of ecosystem health or potential subjects for studying the effects of pollutants on living organisms.

C57BL/6 (C57 Black 6) is an inbred strain of laboratory mouse that is widely used in biomedical research. The term "inbred" refers to a strain of animals where matings have been carried out between siblings or other closely related individuals for many generations, resulting in a population that is highly homozygous at most genetic loci.

The C57BL/6 strain was established in 1920 by crossing a female mouse from the dilute brown (DBA) strain with a male mouse from the black strain. The resulting offspring were then interbred for many generations to create the inbred C57BL/6 strain.

C57BL/6 mice are known for their robust health, longevity, and ease of handling, making them a popular choice for researchers. They have been used in a wide range of biomedical research areas, including studies of cancer, immunology, neuroscience, cardiovascular disease, and metabolism.

One of the most notable features of the C57BL/6 strain is its sensitivity to certain genetic modifications, such as the introduction of mutations that lead to obesity or impaired glucose tolerance. This has made it a valuable tool for studying the genetic basis of complex diseases and traits.

Overall, the C57BL/6 inbred mouse strain is an important model organism in biomedical research, providing a valuable resource for understanding the genetic and molecular mechanisms underlying human health and disease.

In the field of medicine, "time factors" refer to the duration of symptoms or time elapsed since the onset of a medical condition, which can have significant implications for diagnosis and treatment. Understanding time factors is crucial in determining the progression of a disease, evaluating the effectiveness of treatments, and making critical decisions regarding patient care.

For example, in stroke management, "time is brain," meaning that rapid intervention within a specific time frame (usually within 4.5 hours) is essential to administering tissue plasminogen activator (tPA), a clot-busting drug that can minimize brain damage and improve patient outcomes. Similarly, in trauma care, the "golden hour" concept emphasizes the importance of providing definitive care within the first 60 minutes after injury to increase survival rates and reduce morbidity.

Time factors also play a role in monitoring the progression of chronic conditions like diabetes or heart disease, where regular follow-ups and assessments help determine appropriate treatment adjustments and prevent complications. In infectious diseases, time factors are crucial for initiating antibiotic therapy and identifying potential outbreaks to control their spread.

Overall, "time factors" encompass the significance of recognizing and acting promptly in various medical scenarios to optimize patient outcomes and provide effective care.

Peripheral nerve injuries refer to damage or trauma to the peripheral nerves, which are the nerves outside the brain and spinal cord. These nerves transmit information between the central nervous system (CNS) and the rest of the body, including sensory, motor, and autonomic functions. Peripheral nerve injuries can result in various symptoms, depending on the type and severity of the injury, such as numbness, tingling, weakness, or paralysis in the affected area.

Peripheral nerve injuries are classified into three main categories based on the degree of damage:

1. Neuropraxia: This is the mildest form of nerve injury, where the nerve remains intact but its function is disrupted due to a local conduction block. The nerve fiber is damaged, but the supporting structures remain intact. Recovery usually occurs within 6-12 weeks without any residual deficits.
2. Axonotmesis: In this type of injury, there is damage to both the axons and the supporting structures (endoneurium, perineurium). The nerve fibers are disrupted, but the connective tissue sheaths remain intact. Recovery can take several months or even up to a year, and it may be incomplete, with some residual deficits possible.
3. Neurotmesis: This is the most severe form of nerve injury, where there is complete disruption of the nerve fibers and supporting structures (endoneurium, perineurium, epineurium). Recovery is unlikely without surgical intervention, which may involve nerve grafting or repair.

Peripheral nerve injuries can be caused by various factors, including trauma, compression, stretching, lacerations, or chemical exposure. Treatment options depend on the type and severity of the injury and may include conservative management, such as physical therapy and pain management, or surgical intervention for more severe cases.

Cobra cardiotoxin proteins are a type of toxin found in the venom of some cobra snakes. These toxins belong to a larger group of proteins known as three-finger toxins, due to their distinctive three-dimensional shape. Cardiotoxins are so named because they specifically target and disrupt the function of heart muscle cells, leading to serious cardiovascular symptoms such as abnormal heart rhythms, low blood pressure, and even heart failure in severe cases.

Cardiotoxins work by binding to and inserting themselves into the membrane of heart muscle cells, where they form pores that disrupt the electrical activity of the cells. This can lead to arrhythmias, or abnormal heart rhythms, which can be life-threatening in severe cases. Cardiotoxins can also cause direct damage to heart muscle cells, leading to decreased contractility and reduced pumping efficiency of the heart.

Cobra cardiotoxin proteins are being studied for their potential therapeutic uses, particularly in the development of new drugs for the treatment of heart disease. However, they are also a significant medical concern in areas where cobra snakes are common, as their venom can cause serious and potentially fatal symptoms in humans and animals.

Biocompatible materials are non-toxic and non-reacting substances that can be used in medical devices, tissue engineering, and drug delivery systems without causing harm or adverse reactions to living tissues or organs. These materials are designed to mimic the properties of natural tissues and are able to integrate with biological systems without being rejected by the body's immune system.

Biocompatible materials can be made from a variety of substances, including metals, ceramics, polymers, and composites. The specific properties of these materials, such as their mechanical strength, flexibility, and biodegradability, are carefully selected to meet the requirements of their intended medical application.

Examples of biocompatible materials include titanium used in dental implants and joint replacements, polyethylene used in artificial hips, and hydrogels used in contact lenses and drug delivery systems. The use of biocompatible materials has revolutionized modern medicine by enabling the development of advanced medical technologies that can improve patient outcomes and quality of life.

"Cells, cultured" is a medical term that refers to cells that have been removed from an organism and grown in controlled laboratory conditions outside of the body. This process is called cell culture and it allows scientists to study cells in a more controlled and accessible environment than they would have inside the body. Cultured cells can be derived from a variety of sources, including tissues, organs, or fluids from humans, animals, or cell lines that have been previously established in the laboratory.

Cell culture involves several steps, including isolation of the cells from the tissue, purification and characterization of the cells, and maintenance of the cells in appropriate growth conditions. The cells are typically grown in specialized media that contain nutrients, growth factors, and other components necessary for their survival and proliferation. Cultured cells can be used for a variety of purposes, including basic research, drug development and testing, and production of biological products such as vaccines and gene therapies.

It is important to note that cultured cells may behave differently than they do in the body, and results obtained from cell culture studies may not always translate directly to human physiology or disease. Therefore, it is essential to validate findings from cell culture experiments using additional models and ultimately in clinical trials involving human subjects.

Neurites are extensions of a neuron (a type of cell in the nervous system) that can be either an axon or a dendrite. An axon is a thin, cable-like extension that carries signals away from the cell body, while a dendrite is a branching extension that receives signals from other neurons. Neurites play a crucial role in the communication between neurons and the formation of neural networks. They are involved in the transmission of electrical and chemical signals, as well as in the growth and development of the nervous system.

Signal transduction is the process by which a cell converts an extracellular signal, such as a hormone or neurotransmitter, into an intracellular response. This involves a series of molecular events that transmit the signal from the cell surface to the interior of the cell, ultimately resulting in changes in gene expression, protein activity, or metabolism.

The process typically begins with the binding of the extracellular signal to a receptor located on the cell membrane. This binding event activates the receptor, which then triggers a cascade of intracellular signaling molecules, such as second messengers, protein kinases, and ion channels. These molecules amplify and propagate the signal, ultimately leading to the activation or inhibition of specific cellular responses.

Signal transduction pathways are highly regulated and can be modulated by various factors, including other signaling molecules, post-translational modifications, and feedback mechanisms. Dysregulation of these pathways has been implicated in a variety of diseases, including cancer, diabetes, and neurological disorders.

Spinal cord injuries (SCI) refer to damage to the spinal cord that results in a loss of function, such as mobility or feeling. This injury can be caused by direct trauma to the spine or by indirect damage resulting from disease or degeneration of surrounding bones, tissues, or blood vessels. The location and severity of the injury on the spinal cord will determine which parts of the body are affected and to what extent.

The effects of SCI can range from mild sensory changes to severe paralysis, including loss of motor function, autonomic dysfunction, and possible changes in sensation, strength, and reflexes below the level of injury. These injuries are typically classified as complete or incomplete, depending on whether there is any remaining function below the level of injury.

Immediate medical attention is crucial for spinal cord injuries to prevent further damage and improve the chances of recovery. Treatment usually involves immobilization of the spine, medications to reduce swelling and pressure, surgery to stabilize the spine, and rehabilitation to help regain lost function. Despite advances in treatment, SCI can have a significant impact on a person's quality of life and ability to perform daily activities.

Cardiotoxins are substances or drugs that have a toxic effect on the heart muscle (myocardium), leading to impaired cardiac function and potentially causing serious complications such as arrhythmias, reduced contractility, and decreased cardiac output. Cardiotoxins can be found in certain animals, plants, and medications.

Animal-derived cardiotoxins include some venoms from snakes, spiders, and scorpions. For example, the venom of the Australian taipan snake contains a powerful cardiotoxin that can cause rapid heart rate, low blood pressure, and even cardiac arrest in severe cases.

Plant-derived cardiotoxins are found in some species of digitalis (foxglove), which have been used traditionally to treat heart conditions but can also be toxic if not administered correctly. The active compounds in digitalis, such as digoxin and digitoxin, affect the electrical activity of the heart by inhibiting the sodium-potassium pump in cardiac muscle cells, leading to increased contractility and potentially causing arrhythmias.

Medications can also have cardiotoxic effects when used inappropriately or at high doses. Certain chemotherapeutic agents, such as doxorubicin and daunorubicin, are known to cause cardiac damage and dysfunction, particularly with long-term use or when administered in high cumulative doses. These drugs can lead to a condition called "chemotherapy-induced cardiomyopathy," which is characterized by reduced heart function and increased risk of congestive heart failure.

Other medications that may have cardiotoxic effects include certain antibiotics (such as erythromycin, clarithromycin, and azithromycin), antifungal agents (such as amphotericin B), and illicit drugs (such as cocaine and methamphetamine).

It is essential to use cardiotoxic substances with caution and under the supervision of a healthcare professional, as improper use or overexposure can lead to severe heart complications.

Myoblasts are types of cells that are responsible for the development and growth of muscle tissue in the body. They are undifferentiated cells, meaning they have not yet developed into their final form or function. Myoblasts fuse together to form myotubes, which then develop into muscle fibers, also known as myofibers. This process is called myogenesis and it plays a crucial role in the growth, repair, and maintenance of skeletal muscle tissue throughout an individual's life.

Myoblasts can be derived from various sources, including embryonic stem cells, induced pluripotent stem cells, or satellite cells, which are adult stem cells found within mature muscle tissue. Satellite cells are typically quiescent but can be activated in response to muscle damage or injury, proliferate and differentiate into myoblasts, and fuse together to repair and replace damaged muscle fibers.

Dysregulation of myogenesis and impaired myoblast function have been implicated in various muscle-related disorders, including muscular dystrophies, sarcopenia, and cachexia. Therefore, understanding the biology of myoblasts and their role in muscle development and regeneration is an important area of research with potential therapeutic implications for muscle-related diseases.

Sciatic neuropathy is a condition that results from damage or injury to the sciatic nerve, which is the largest nerve in the human body. The sciatic nerve originates from the lower spine (lumbar and sacral regions) and travels down through the buttocks, hips, and legs to the feet.

Sciatic neuropathy can cause various symptoms, including pain, numbness, tingling, weakness, or difficulty moving the affected leg or foot. The pain associated with sciatic neuropathy is often described as sharp, shooting, or burning and may worsen with movement, coughing, or sneezing.

The causes of sciatic neuropathy include compression or irritation of the nerve due to conditions such as herniated discs, spinal stenosis, bone spurs, tumors, or piriformis syndrome. Trauma or injury to the lower back, hip, or buttocks can also cause sciatic neuropathy.

Diagnosing sciatic neuropathy typically involves a physical examination and medical history, as well as imaging tests such as X-rays, MRI, or CT scans to visualize the spine and surrounding structures. Treatment options may include pain management, physical therapy, steroid injections, or surgery, depending on the severity and underlying cause of the condition.

Immunohistochemistry (IHC) is a technique used in pathology and laboratory medicine to identify specific proteins or antigens in tissue sections. It combines the principles of immunology and histology to detect the presence and location of these target molecules within cells and tissues. This technique utilizes antibodies that are specific to the protein or antigen of interest, which are then tagged with a detection system such as a chromogen or fluorophore. The stained tissue sections can be examined under a microscope, allowing for the visualization and analysis of the distribution and expression patterns of the target molecule in the context of the tissue architecture. Immunohistochemistry is widely used in diagnostic pathology to help identify various diseases, including cancer, infectious diseases, and immune-mediated disorders.

The optic nerve, also known as the second cranial nerve, is the nerve that transmits visual information from the retina to the brain. It is composed of approximately one million nerve fibers that carry signals related to vision, such as light intensity and color, from the eye's photoreceptor cells (rods and cones) to the visual cortex in the brain. The optic nerve is responsible for carrying this visual information so that it can be processed and interpreted by the brain, allowing us to see and perceive our surroundings. Damage to the optic nerve can result in vision loss or impairment.

GAP-43 protein, also known as growth-associated protein 43 or B-50, is a neuronal protein that is highly expressed during development and axonal regeneration. It is involved in the regulation of synaptic plasticity, nerve impulse transmission, and neurite outgrowth. GAP-43 is localized to the growth cones of growing axons and is thought to play a role in the guidance and navigation of axonal growth during development and regeneration. It is a member of the calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase substrate family and undergoes phosphorylation by several protein kinases, including PKC (protein kinase C), which regulates its function. GAP-43 has been implicated in various neurological disorders, such as Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, and schizophrenia.

Stem cell transplantation is a medical procedure where stem cells, which are immature and unspecialized cells with the ability to differentiate into various specialized cell types, are introduced into a patient. The main purpose of this procedure is to restore the function of damaged or destroyed tissues or organs, particularly in conditions that affect the blood and immune systems, such as leukemia, lymphoma, aplastic anemia, and inherited metabolic disorders.

There are two primary types of stem cell transplantation: autologous and allogeneic. In autologous transplantation, the patient's own stem cells are collected, stored, and then reinfused back into their body after high-dose chemotherapy or radiation therapy to destroy the diseased cells. In allogeneic transplantation, stem cells are obtained from a donor (related or unrelated) whose human leukocyte antigen (HLA) type closely matches that of the recipient.

The process involves several steps: first, the patient undergoes conditioning therapy to suppress their immune system and make space for the new stem cells. Then, the harvested stem cells are infused into the patient's bloodstream, where they migrate to the bone marrow and begin to differentiate and produce new blood cells. This procedure requires close monitoring and supportive care to manage potential complications such as infections, graft-versus-host disease, and organ damage.

"Recovery of function" is a term used in medical rehabilitation to describe the process in which an individual regains the ability to perform activities or tasks that were previously difficult or impossible due to injury, illness, or disability. This can involve both physical and cognitive functions. The goal of recovery of function is to help the person return to their prior level of independence and participation in daily activities, work, and social roles as much as possible.

Recovery of function may be achieved through various interventions such as physical therapy, occupational therapy, speech-language therapy, and other rehabilitation strategies. The specific approach used will depend on the individual's needs and the nature of their impairment. Recovery of function can occur spontaneously as the body heals, or it may require targeted interventions to help facilitate the process.

It is important to note that recovery of function does not always mean a full return to pre-injury or pre-illness levels of ability. Instead, it often refers to the person's ability to adapt and compensate for any remaining impairments, allowing them to achieve their maximum level of functional independence and quality of life.

An animal model in medicine refers to the use of non-human animals in experiments to understand, predict, and test responses and effects of various biological and chemical interactions that may also occur in humans. These models are used when studying complex systems or processes that cannot be easily replicated or studied in human subjects, such as genetic manipulation or exposure to harmful substances. The choice of animal model depends on the specific research question being asked and the similarities between the animal's and human's biological and physiological responses. Examples of commonly used animal models include mice, rats, rabbits, guinea pigs, and non-human primates.

Muscle development, also known as muscle hypertrophy, refers to the increase in size and mass of the muscles through a process called myofiber growth. This is primarily achieved through resistance or strength training exercises that cause micro-tears in the muscle fibers, leading to an inflammatory response and the release of hormones that promote muscle growth. As the muscles repair themselves, they become larger and stronger than before. Proper nutrition, including adequate protein intake, and rest are also essential components of muscle development.

It is important to note that while muscle development can lead to an increase in strength and muscular endurance, it does not necessarily result in improved athletic performance or overall fitness. A well-rounded exercise program that includes cardiovascular activity, flexibility training, and resistance exercises is recommended for optimal health and fitness outcomes.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Hydra" is not a term commonly used in medical definitions. Hydra is a genus of small, simple aquatic animals, belonging to the class Hydrozoa in the phylum Cnidaria. They are named after the multi-headed creature from Greek mythology due to their ability to regenerate lost body parts.

If you're looking for a medical term related to hydra, one possibility could be "Hydralazine," which is a medication used to treat high blood pressure. It works by relaxing the muscle in the walls of blood vessels, causing them to widen and the blood to flow more easily.

I hope this information is helpful! If you have any other questions or need clarification on a different topic, please let me know.

The myelin sheath is a multilayered, fatty substance that surrounds and insulates many nerve fibers in the nervous system. It is essential for the rapid transmission of electrical signals, or nerve impulses, along these nerve fibers, allowing for efficient communication between different parts of the body. The myelin sheath is produced by specialized cells called oligodendrocytes in the central nervous system (CNS) and Schwann cells in the peripheral nervous system (PNS). Damage to the myelin sheath, as seen in conditions like multiple sclerosis, can significantly impair nerve function and result in various neurological symptoms.

Animal disease models are specialized animals, typically rodents such as mice or rats, that have been genetically engineered or exposed to certain conditions to develop symptoms and physiological changes similar to those seen in human diseases. These models are used in medical research to study the pathophysiology of diseases, identify potential therapeutic targets, test drug efficacy and safety, and understand disease mechanisms.

The genetic modifications can include knockout or knock-in mutations, transgenic expression of specific genes, or RNA interference techniques. The animals may also be exposed to environmental factors such as chemicals, radiation, or infectious agents to induce the disease state.

Examples of animal disease models include:

1. Mouse models of cancer: Genetically engineered mice that develop various types of tumors, allowing researchers to study cancer initiation, progression, and metastasis.
2. Alzheimer's disease models: Transgenic mice expressing mutant human genes associated with Alzheimer's disease, which exhibit amyloid plaque formation and cognitive decline.
3. Diabetes models: Obese and diabetic mouse strains like the NOD (non-obese diabetic) or db/db mice, used to study the development of type 1 and type 2 diabetes, respectively.
4. Cardiovascular disease models: Atherosclerosis-prone mice, such as ApoE-deficient or LDLR-deficient mice, that develop plaque buildup in their arteries when fed a high-fat diet.
5. Inflammatory bowel disease models: Mice with genetic mutations affecting intestinal barrier function and immune response, such as IL-10 knockout or SAMP1/YitFc mice, which develop colitis.

Animal disease models are essential tools in preclinical research, but it is important to recognize their limitations. Differences between species can affect the translatability of results from animal studies to human patients. Therefore, researchers must carefully consider the choice of model and interpret findings cautiously when applying them to human diseases.

"Holothuria" is a genus of marine invertebrate animals, also known as sea cucumbers. They belong to the class Holothuroidea and the phylum Echinodermata. Sea cucumbers are characterized by their elongated, cylindrical body shape and leathery skin. They have a simple, tube-like gut and a set of complex internal organs used for feeding and respiration.

Holothuria species are found in oceans worldwide, inhabiting various depths from shallow waters to the deep sea. They play an important role in marine ecosystems by helping to recycle nutrients and maintain sediment stability. Some Holothuria species have commercial value as food in certain cultures, while others are harvested for their medicinal properties.

The periodontal ligament, also known as the "PDL," is the soft tissue that connects the tooth root to the alveolar bone within the dental alveolus (socket). It consists of collagen fibers organized into groups called principal fibers and accessory fibers. These fibers are embedded into both the cementum of the tooth root and the alveolar bone, providing shock absorption during biting and chewing forces, allowing for slight tooth movement, and maintaining the tooth in its position within the socket.

The periodontal ligament plays a crucial role in the health and maintenance of the periodontium, which includes the gingiva (gums), cementum, alveolar bone, and the periodontal ligament itself. Inflammation or infection of the periodontal ligament can lead to periodontal disease, potentially causing tooth loss if not treated promptly and appropriately.

Mesenchymal Stromal Cells (MSCs) are a type of adult stem cells found in various tissues, including bone marrow, adipose tissue, and umbilical cord blood. They have the ability to differentiate into multiple cell types, such as osteoblasts, chondrocytes, and adipocytes, under specific conditions. MSCs also possess immunomodulatory properties, making them a promising tool in regenerative medicine and therapeutic strategies for various diseases, including autoimmune disorders and tissue injuries. It is important to note that the term "Mesenchymal Stem Cells" has been replaced by "Mesenchymal Stromal Cells" in the scientific community to better reflect their biological characteristics and potential functions.

Osteogenesis is the process of bone formation or development. It involves the differentiation and maturation of osteoblasts, which are bone-forming cells that synthesize and deposit the organic matrix of bone tissue, composed mainly of type I collagen. This organic matrix later mineralizes to form the inorganic crystalline component of bone, primarily hydroxyapatite.

There are two primary types of osteogenesis: intramembranous and endochondral. Intramembranous osteogenesis occurs directly within connective tissue, where mesenchymal stem cells differentiate into osteoblasts and form bone tissue without an intervening cartilage template. This process is responsible for the formation of flat bones like the skull and clavicles.

Endochondral osteogenesis, on the other hand, involves the initial development of a cartilaginous model or template, which is later replaced by bone tissue. This process forms long bones, such as those in the limbs, and occurs through several stages involving chondrocyte proliferation, hypertrophy, and calcification, followed by invasion of blood vessels and osteoblasts to replace the cartilage with bone tissue.

Abnormalities in osteogenesis can lead to various skeletal disorders and diseases, such as osteogenesis imperfecta (brittle bone disease), achondroplasia (a form of dwarfism), and cleidocranial dysplasia (a disorder affecting skull and collarbone development).

Sprague-Dawley rats are a strain of albino laboratory rats that are widely used in scientific research. They were first developed by researchers H.H. Sprague and R.C. Dawley in the early 20th century, and have since become one of the most commonly used rat strains in biomedical research due to their relatively large size, ease of handling, and consistent genetic background.

Sprague-Dawley rats are outbred, which means that they are genetically diverse and do not suffer from the same limitations as inbred strains, which can have reduced fertility and increased susceptibility to certain diseases. They are also characterized by their docile nature and low levels of aggression, making them easier to handle and study than some other rat strains.

These rats are used in a wide variety of research areas, including toxicology, pharmacology, nutrition, cancer, and behavioral studies. Because they are genetically diverse, Sprague-Dawley rats can be used to model a range of human diseases and conditions, making them an important tool in the development of new drugs and therapies.

Genetically modified animals (GMAs) are those whose genetic makeup has been altered using biotechnological techniques. This is typically done by introducing one or more genes from another species into the animal's genome, resulting in a new trait or characteristic that does not naturally occur in that species. The introduced gene is often referred to as a transgene.

The process of creating GMAs involves several steps:

1. Isolation: The desired gene is isolated from the DNA of another organism.
2. Transfer: The isolated gene is transferred into the target animal's cells, usually using a vector such as a virus or bacterium.
3. Integration: The transgene integrates into the animal's chromosome, becoming a permanent part of its genetic makeup.
4. Selection: The modified cells are allowed to multiply, and those that contain the transgene are selected for further growth and development.
5. Breeding: The genetically modified individuals are bred to produce offspring that carry the desired trait.

GMAs have various applications in research, agriculture, and medicine. In research, they can serve as models for studying human diseases or testing new therapies. In agriculture, GMAs can be developed to exhibit enhanced growth rates, improved disease resistance, or increased nutritional value. In medicine, GMAs may be used to produce pharmaceuticals or other therapeutic agents within their bodies.

Examples of genetically modified animals include mice with added genes for specific proteins that make them useful models for studying human diseases, goats that produce a human protein in their milk to treat hemophilia, and pigs with enhanced resistance to certain viruses that could potentially be used as organ donors for humans.

It is important to note that the use of genetically modified animals raises ethical concerns related to animal welfare, environmental impact, and potential risks to human health. These issues must be carefully considered and addressed when developing and implementing GMA technologies.

'Gene expression regulation' refers to the processes that control whether, when, and where a particular gene is expressed, meaning the production of a specific protein or functional RNA encoded by that gene. This complex mechanism can be influenced by various factors such as transcription factors, chromatin remodeling, DNA methylation, non-coding RNAs, and post-transcriptional modifications, among others. Proper regulation of gene expression is crucial for normal cellular function, development, and maintaining homeostasis in living organisms. Dysregulation of gene expression can lead to various diseases, including cancer and genetic disorders.

Adult stem cells, also known as somatic stem cells, are undifferentiated cells found in specialized tissues or organs throughout the body of a developed organism. Unlike embryonic stem cells, which are derived from blastocysts and have the ability to differentiate into any cell type in the body (pluripotency), adult stem cells are typically more limited in their differentiation potential, meaning they can only give rise to specific types of cells within the tissue or organ where they reside.

Adult stem cells serve to maintain and repair tissues by replenishing dying or damaged cells. They can divide and self-renew over time, producing one daughter cell that remains a stem cell and another that differentiates into a mature, functional cell type. The most well-known adult stem cells are hematopoietic stem cells, which give rise to all types of blood cells, and mesenchymal stem cells, which can differentiate into various connective tissue cells such as bone, cartilage, fat, and muscle.

The potential therapeutic use of adult stem cells has been explored in various medical fields, including regenerative medicine and cancer therapy. However, their limited differentiation capacity and the challenges associated with isolating and expanding them in culture have hindered their widespread application. Recent advances in stem cell research, such as the development of techniques to reprogram adult cells into induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), have opened new avenues for studying and harnessing the therapeutic potential of these cells.

"Ambystoma" is a genus of salamanders, also known as the mole salamanders. These amphibians are characterized by their fossorial (burrowing) habits and typically have four limbs, a tail, and moist skin. They are found primarily in North America, with a few species in Asia and Europe. Some well-known members of this genus include the axolotl (A. mexicanum), which is famous for its ability to regenerate lost body parts, and the spotted salamander (A. maculatum). The name "Ambystoma" comes from the Greek words "amblys," meaning blunt, and "stoma," meaning mouth, in reference to the wide, blunt snout of these animals.

PAX7 is a transcription factor that belongs to the PAX (paired box) family of proteins, which are characterized by the presence of a paired domain that binds to DNA. Specifically, PAX7 contains two DNA-binding domains: a paired domain and a homeodomain.

PAX7 is primarily expressed in satellite cells, which are muscle stem cells responsible for postnatal muscle growth, maintenance, and regeneration. PAX7 plays a critical role in the self-renewal and survival of satellite cells, and its expression is required for their activation and differentiation into mature muscle fibers.

As a transcription factor, PAX7 binds to specific DNA sequences in the regulatory regions of target genes and regulates their expression. This regulation can either activate or repress gene transcription, depending on the context and other factors that interact with PAX7.

PAX7 has been implicated in various muscle-related diseases, including muscular dystrophies and muscle wasting disorders. Its expression is often downregulated in these conditions, leading to a decrease in satellite cell function and muscle regeneration capacity. Therefore, understanding the role of PAX7 in muscle biology and disease has important implications for developing new therapies for muscle-related diseases.

Optic nerve injuries refer to damages or trauma inflicted on the optic nerve, which is a crucial component of the visual system. The optic nerve transmits visual information from the retina to the brain, enabling us to see. Injuries to the optic nerve can result in various visual impairments, including partial or complete vision loss, decreased visual acuity, changes in color perception, and reduced field of view.

These injuries may occur due to several reasons, such as:

1. Direct trauma to the eye or head
2. Increased pressure inside the eye (glaucoma)
3. Optic neuritis, an inflammation of the optic nerve
4. Ischemia, or insufficient blood supply to the optic nerve
5. Compression from tumors or other space-occupying lesions
6. Intrinsic degenerative conditions affecting the optic nerve
7. Toxic exposure to certain chemicals or medications

Optic nerve injuries are diagnosed through a comprehensive eye examination, including visual acuity testing, slit-lamp examination, dilated fundus exam, and additional diagnostic tests like optical coherence tomography (OCT) and visual field testing. Treatment options vary depending on the cause and severity of the injury but may include medications, surgery, or vision rehabilitation.

Zebrafish proteins refer to the diverse range of protein molecules that are produced by the organism Danio rerio, commonly known as the zebrafish. These proteins play crucial roles in various biological processes such as growth, development, reproduction, and response to environmental stimuli. They are involved in cellular functions like enzymatic reactions, signal transduction, structural support, and regulation of gene expression.

Zebrafish is a popular model organism in biomedical research due to its genetic similarity with humans, rapid development, and transparent embryos that allow for easy observation of biological processes. As a result, the study of zebrafish proteins has contributed significantly to our understanding of protein function, structure, and interaction in both zebrafish and human systems.

Some examples of zebrafish proteins include:

* Transcription factors that regulate gene expression during development
* Enzymes involved in metabolic pathways
* Structural proteins that provide support to cells and tissues
* Receptors and signaling molecules that mediate communication between cells
* Heat shock proteins that assist in protein folding and protect against stress

The analysis of zebrafish proteins can be performed using various techniques, including biochemical assays, mass spectrometry, protein crystallography, and computational modeling. These methods help researchers to identify, characterize, and understand the functions of individual proteins and their interactions within complex networks.

In situ hybridization (ISH) is a molecular biology technique used to detect and localize specific nucleic acid sequences, such as DNA or RNA, within cells or tissues. This technique involves the use of a labeled probe that is complementary to the target nucleic acid sequence. The probe can be labeled with various types of markers, including radioisotopes, fluorescent dyes, or enzymes.

During the ISH procedure, the labeled probe is hybridized to the target nucleic acid sequence in situ, meaning that the hybridization occurs within the intact cells or tissues. After washing away unbound probe, the location of the labeled probe can be visualized using various methods depending on the type of label used.

In situ hybridization has a wide range of applications in both research and diagnostic settings, including the detection of gene expression patterns, identification of viral infections, and diagnosis of genetic disorders.

Cell transplantation is the process of transferring living cells from one part of the body to another or from one individual to another. In medicine, cell transplantation is often used as a treatment for various diseases and conditions, including neurodegenerative disorders, diabetes, and certain types of cancer. The goal of cell transplantation is to replace damaged or dysfunctional cells with healthy ones, thereby restoring normal function to the affected area.

In the context of medical research, cell transplantation may involve the use of stem cells, which are immature cells that have the ability to develop into many different types of specialized cells. Stem cell transplantation has shown promise in the treatment of a variety of conditions, including spinal cord injuries, stroke, and heart disease.

It is important to note that cell transplantation carries certain risks, such as immune rejection and infection. As such, it is typically reserved for cases where other treatments have failed or are unlikely to be effective.

Cell dedifferentiation is a process by which a mature, specialized cell reverts back to an earlier stage in its developmental lineage, regaining the ability to divide and differentiate into various cell types. This phenomenon is typically observed in cells that have been damaged or injured, as well as during embryonic development and certain disease states like cancer. In the context of tissue repair and regeneration, dedifferentiation allows for the generation of new cells with the potential to replace lost or damaged tissues. However, uncontrolled dedifferentiation can also contribute to tumor formation and progression.

Skeletal myoblasts are the precursor cells responsible for the formation and repair of skeletal muscle fibers. They are also known as satellite cells, located in a quiescent state between the basal lamina and sarcolemma of mature muscle fibers. Upon muscle injury or damage, these cells become activated, proliferate, differentiate into myocytes, align with existing muscle fibers, and fuse to form new muscle fibers or repair damaged ones. This process is crucial for postnatal growth, maintenance, and regeneration of skeletal muscles.

Myelin proteins are proteins that are found in the myelin sheath, which is a fatty (lipid-rich) substance that surrounds and insulates nerve fibers (axons) in the nervous system. The myelin sheath enables the rapid transmission of electrical signals (nerve impulses) along the axons, allowing for efficient communication between different parts of the nervous system.

There are several types of myelin proteins, including:

1. Proteolipid protein (PLP): This is the most abundant protein in the myelin sheath and plays a crucial role in maintaining the structure and function of the myelin sheath.
2. Myelin basic protein (MBP): This protein is also found in the myelin sheath and helps to stabilize the compact structure of the myelin sheath.
3. Myelin-associated glycoprotein (MAG): This protein is involved in the adhesion of the myelin sheath to the axon and helps to maintain the integrity of the myelin sheath.
4. 2'3'-cyclic nucleotide 3' phosphodiesterase (CNP): This protein is found in oligodendrocytes, which are the cells that produce the myelin sheath in the central nervous system. CNP plays a role in maintaining the structure and function of the oligodendrocytes.

Damage to myelin proteins can lead to demyelination, which is a characteristic feature of several neurological disorders, including multiple sclerosis (MS), Guillain-Barré syndrome, and Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease.

A forelimb is a term used in animal anatomy to refer to the upper limbs located in the front of the body, primarily involved in movement and manipulation of the environment. In humans, this would be equivalent to the arms, while in quadrupedal animals (those that move on four legs), it includes the structures that are comparable to both the arms and legs of humans, such as the front legs of dogs or the forepaws of cats. The bones that make up a typical forelimb include the humerus, radius, ulna, carpals, metacarpals, and phalanges.

Bone substitutes are materials that are used to replace missing or damaged bone in the body. They can be made from a variety of materials, including natural bone from other parts of the body or from animals, synthetic materials, or a combination of both. The goal of using bone substitutes is to provide structural support and promote the growth of new bone tissue.

Bone substitutes are often used in dental, orthopedic, and craniofacial surgery to help repair defects caused by trauma, tumors, or congenital abnormalities. They can also be used to augment bone volume in procedures such as spinal fusion or joint replacement.

There are several types of bone substitutes available, including:

1. Autografts: Bone taken from another part of the patient's body, such as the hip or pelvis.
2. Allografts: Bone taken from a deceased donor and processed to remove any cells and infectious materials.
3. Xenografts: Bone from an animal source, typically bovine or porcine, that has been processed to remove any cells and infectious materials.
4. Synthetic bone substitutes: Materials such as calcium phosphate ceramics, bioactive glass, and polymer-based materials that are designed to mimic the properties of natural bone.

The choice of bone substitute material depends on several factors, including the size and location of the defect, the patient's medical history, and the surgeon's preference. It is important to note that while bone substitutes can provide structural support and promote new bone growth, they may not have the same strength or durability as natural bone. Therefore, they may not be suitable for all applications, particularly those that require high load-bearing capacity.

Spinal ganglia, also known as dorsal root ganglia, are clusters of nerve cell bodies located in the peripheral nervous system. They are situated along the length of the spinal cord and are responsible for transmitting sensory information from the body to the brain. Each spinal ganglion contains numerous neurons, or nerve cells, with long processes called axons that extend into the periphery and innervate various tissues and organs. The cell bodies within the spinal ganglia receive sensory input from these axons and transmit this information to the central nervous system via the dorsal roots of the spinal nerves. This allows the brain to interpret and respond to a wide range of sensory stimuli, including touch, temperature, pain, and proprioception (the sense of the position and movement of one's body).

A "knockout" mouse is a genetically engineered mouse in which one or more genes have been deleted or "knocked out" using molecular biology techniques. This allows researchers to study the function of specific genes and their role in various biological processes, as well as potential associations with human diseases. The mice are generated by introducing targeted DNA modifications into embryonic stem cells, which are then used to create a live animal. Knockout mice have been widely used in biomedical research to investigate gene function, disease mechanisms, and potential therapeutic targets.

Auditory hair cells are specialized sensory receptor cells located in the inner ear, more specifically in the organ of Corti within the cochlea. They play a crucial role in hearing by converting sound vibrations into electrical signals that can be interpreted by the brain.

These hair cells have hair-like projections called stereocilia on their apical surface, which are embedded in a gelatinous matrix. When sound waves reach the inner ear, they cause the fluid within the cochlea to move, which in turn causes the stereocilia to bend. This bending motion opens ion channels at the tips of the stereocilia, allowing positively charged ions (such as potassium) to flow into the hair cells and trigger a receptor potential.

The receptor potential then leads to the release of neurotransmitters at the base of the hair cells, which activate afferent nerve fibers that synapse with these cells. The electrical signals generated by this process are transmitted to the brain via the auditory nerve, where they are interpreted as sound.

There are two types of auditory hair cells: inner hair cells and outer hair cells. Inner hair cells are the primary sensory receptors responsible for transmitting information about sound to the brain. They make direct contact with afferent nerve fibers and are more sensitive to mechanical stimulation than outer hair cells.

Outer hair cells, on the other hand, are involved in amplifying and fine-tuning the mechanical response of the inner ear to sound. They have a unique ability to contract and relax in response to electrical signals, which allows them to adjust the stiffness of their stereocilia and enhance the sensitivity of the cochlea to different frequencies.

Damage or loss of auditory hair cells can lead to hearing impairment or deafness, as these cells cannot regenerate spontaneously in mammals. Therefore, understanding the structure and function of hair cells is essential for developing therapies aimed at treating hearing disorders.

"Wistar rats" are a strain of albino rats that are widely used in laboratory research. They were developed at the Wistar Institute in Philadelphia, USA, and were first introduced in 1906. Wistar rats are outbred, which means that they are genetically diverse and do not have a fixed set of genetic characteristics like inbred strains.

Wistar rats are commonly used as animal models in biomedical research because of their size, ease of handling, and relatively low cost. They are used in a wide range of research areas, including toxicology, pharmacology, nutrition, cancer, cardiovascular disease, and behavioral studies. Wistar rats are also used in safety testing of drugs, medical devices, and other products.

Wistar rats are typically larger than many other rat strains, with males weighing between 500-700 grams and females weighing between 250-350 grams. They have a lifespan of approximately 2-3 years. Wistar rats are also known for their docile and friendly nature, making them easy to handle and work with in the laboratory setting.

Developmental gene expression regulation refers to the processes that control the activation or repression of specific genes during embryonic and fetal development. These regulatory mechanisms ensure that genes are expressed at the right time, in the right cells, and at appropriate levels to guide proper growth, differentiation, and morphogenesis of an organism.

Developmental gene expression regulation is a complex and dynamic process involving various molecular players, such as transcription factors, chromatin modifiers, non-coding RNAs, and signaling molecules. These regulators can interact with cis-regulatory elements, like enhancers and promoters, to fine-tune the spatiotemporal patterns of gene expression during development.

Dysregulation of developmental gene expression can lead to various congenital disorders and developmental abnormalities. Therefore, understanding the principles and mechanisms governing developmental gene expression regulation is crucial for uncovering the etiology of developmental diseases and devising potential therapeutic strategies.

Transgenic mice are genetically modified rodents that have incorporated foreign DNA (exogenous DNA) into their own genome. This is typically done through the use of recombinant DNA technology, where a specific gene or genetic sequence of interest is isolated and then introduced into the mouse embryo. The resulting transgenic mice can then express the protein encoded by the foreign gene, allowing researchers to study its function in a living organism.

The process of creating transgenic mice usually involves microinjecting the exogenous DNA into the pronucleus of a fertilized egg, which is then implanted into a surrogate mother. The offspring that result from this procedure are screened for the presence of the foreign DNA, and those that carry the desired genetic modification are used to establish a transgenic mouse line.

Transgenic mice have been widely used in biomedical research to model human diseases, study gene function, and test new therapies. They provide a valuable tool for understanding complex biological processes and developing new treatments for a variety of medical conditions.

'Cell lineage' is a term used in biology and medicine to describe the developmental history or relationship of a cell or group of cells to other cells, tracing back to the original progenitor or stem cell. It refers to the series of cell divisions and differentiation events that give rise to specific types of cells in an organism over time.

In simpler terms, cell lineage is like a family tree for cells, showing how they are related to each other through a chain of cell division and specialization events. This concept is important in understanding the development, growth, and maintenance of tissues and organs in living beings.

Chondroitin ABC lyase, also known as chondroitinase ABC or chondroitin sulfate eliminase, is an enzyme that breaks down chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans (CSPGs), which are major components of the extracellular matrix in various tissues including cartilage. CSPGs contain chondroitin sulfate chains, which are long, negatively charged polysaccharides composed of alternating sugars (N-acetylgalactosamine and glucuronic acid) with sulfate groups attached at specific positions.

Chondroitin ABC lyase cleaves chondroitin sulfate chains by removing a disaccharide unit from the polymer, resulting in the formation of unsaturated bonds between the remaining sugars. This enzymatic activity has been used in research to study the structure and function of CSPGs and their role in various biological processes, such as cell migration, tissue repair, and neural plasticity. Additionally, chondroitin ABC lyase has potential therapeutic applications for treating conditions associated with excessive accumulation of CSPGs, such as fibrosis and some neurological disorders.

Absorbable implants are medical devices that are designed to be placed inside the body during a surgical procedure, where they provide support, stabilization, or other functions, and then gradually break down and are absorbed by the body over time. These implants are typically made from materials such as polymers, proteins, or ceramics that have been engineered to degrade at a controlled rate, allowing them to be resorbed and eliminated from the body without the need for a second surgical procedure to remove them.

Absorbable implants are often used in orthopedic, dental, and plastic surgery applications, where they can help promote healing and support tissue regeneration. For example, absorbable screws or pins may be used to stabilize fractured bones during the healing process, after which they will gradually dissolve and be absorbed by the body. Similarly, absorbable membranes may be used in dental surgery to help guide the growth of new bone and gum tissue around an implant, and then be resorbed over time.

It's important to note that while absorbable implants offer several advantages over non-absorbable materials, such as reduced risk of infection and improved patient comfort, they may also have some limitations. For example, the mechanical properties of absorbable materials may not be as strong as those of non-absorbable materials, which could affect their performance in certain applications. Additionally, the degradation products of absorbable implants may cause local inflammation or other adverse reactions in some patients. As with any medical device, the use of absorbable implants should be carefully considered and discussed with a qualified healthcare professional.

Messenger RNA (mRNA) is a type of RNA (ribonucleic acid) that carries genetic information copied from DNA in the form of a series of three-base code "words," each of which specifies a particular amino acid. This information is used by the cell's machinery to construct proteins, a process known as translation. After being transcribed from DNA, mRNA travels out of the nucleus to the ribosomes in the cytoplasm where protein synthesis occurs. Once the protein has been synthesized, the mRNA may be degraded and recycled. Post-transcriptional modifications can also occur to mRNA, such as alternative splicing and addition of a 5' cap and a poly(A) tail, which can affect its stability, localization, and translation efficiency.

Cell division is the process by which a single eukaryotic cell (a cell with a true nucleus) divides into two identical daughter cells. This complex process involves several stages, including replication of DNA, separation of chromosomes, and division of the cytoplasm. There are two main types of cell division: mitosis and meiosis.

Mitosis is the type of cell division that results in two genetically identical daughter cells. It is a fundamental process for growth, development, and tissue repair in multicellular organisms. The stages of mitosis include prophase, prometaphase, metaphase, anaphase, and telophase, followed by cytokinesis, which divides the cytoplasm.

Meiosis, on the other hand, is a type of cell division that occurs in the gonads (ovaries and testes) during the production of gametes (sex cells). Meiosis results in four genetically unique daughter cells, each with half the number of chromosomes as the parent cell. This process is essential for sexual reproduction and genetic diversity. The stages of meiosis include meiosis I and meiosis II, which are further divided into prophase, prometaphase, metaphase, anaphase, and telophase.

In summary, cell division is the process by which a single cell divides into two daughter cells, either through mitosis or meiosis. This process is critical for growth, development, tissue repair, and sexual reproduction in multicellular organisms.

Antlers are defined in medical terminology as the continuously growing, branched bony appendages that arise from the skull of members of the Cervidae family, which includes deer, elk, and moose. Antler growth and development are unique to this group of animals and are under the control of hormones and genetics. They serve as a means of defense, dominance display, and sexual selection.

During the growth phase, antlers are covered with highly vascular skin called "velvet," which provides nutrients for the rapid growth of bone. Once growth is complete, typically in late summer, the velvet is shed, revealing the hard, bony antler structure. The antlers are then used by males during the mating season as a tool to compete for females and establish dominance hierarchies.

In some species, only males grow antlers, while in others, both males and females develop them. After the mating season, the animals shed their antlers, which regenerate the following year. The study of antlers is known as palynology.

Mesenchymal Stem Cell Transplantation (MSCT) is a medical procedure that involves the transplantation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), which are multipotent stromal cells that can differentiate into a variety of cell types, including bone, cartilage, fat, and muscle. These cells can be obtained from various sources, such as bone marrow, adipose tissue, umbilical cord blood, or dental pulp.

In MSCT, MSCs are typically harvested from the patient themselves (autologous transplantation) or from a donor (allogeneic transplantation). The cells are then processed and expanded in a laboratory setting before being injected into the patient's body, usually through an intravenous infusion.

MSCT is being investigated as a potential treatment for a wide range of medical conditions, including degenerative diseases, autoimmune disorders, and tissue injuries. The rationale behind this approach is that MSCs have the ability to migrate to sites of injury or inflammation, where they can help to modulate the immune response, reduce inflammation, and promote tissue repair and regeneration.

However, it's important to note that while MSCT holds promise as a therapeutic option, more research is needed to establish its safety and efficacy for specific medical conditions.

Cell transdifferentiation is a process in which one type of differentiated cell transforms into another type of differentiated cell, without going through the stage of pluripotent stem cells. This process involves a series of genetic and epigenetic changes that result in the activation of new genetic programs and repression of old ones, leading to the acquisition of a new cell identity.

Transdifferentiation is a rare event in nature, but it has been induced in the laboratory through various methods such as gene transfer, chemical treatment, or nuclear transplantation. This process has potential applications in regenerative medicine, tissue engineering, and disease modeling. However, it also raises ethical concerns related to the generation of chimeric organisms and the possibility of uncontrolled cell growth.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Goldfish" is not a term used in medical definitions. Goldfish are small domesticated fish that are often kept as pets. They belong to the family Cyprinidae and the genus Carassius. The most common species of goldfish is Carassius auratus. If you have any questions about goldfish or their care, I might be able to help with some general information, but for specific medical concerns, it would be best to consult a veterinarian.

Hepatocyte Growth Factor (HGF) is a paracrine growth factor that plays a crucial role in various biological processes, including embryonic development, tissue repair, and organ regeneration. It is primarily produced by mesenchymal cells and exerts its effects on epithelial cells, endothelial cells, and hepatocytes (liver parenchymal cells).

HGF has mitogenic, motogenic, and morphogenic properties, promoting cell proliferation, migration, and differentiation. It is particularly important in liver biology, where it stimulates the growth and regeneration of hepatocytes following injury or disease. HGF also exhibits anti-apoptotic effects, protecting cells from programmed cell death.

The receptor for HGF is a transmembrane tyrosine kinase called c-Met, which is expressed on the surface of various cell types, including hepatocytes and epithelial cells. Upon binding to its receptor, HGF activates several intracellular signaling pathways, such as the Ras/MAPK, PI3K/Akt, and JAK/STAT pathways, which ultimately regulate gene expression, cell survival, and cell cycle progression.

Dysregulation of HGF and c-Met signaling has been implicated in various pathological conditions, including cancer, fibrosis, and inflammatory diseases. Therefore, targeting this signaling axis represents a potential therapeutic strategy for these disorders.

A cicatrix is a medical term that refers to a scar or the process of scar formation. It is the result of the healing process following damage to body tissues, such as from an injury, wound, or surgery. During the healing process, specialized cells called fibroblasts produce collagen, which helps to reconnect and strengthen the damaged tissue. The resulting scar tissue may have a different texture, color, or appearance compared to the surrounding healthy tissue.

Cicatrix formation is a natural part of the body's healing response, but excessive scarring can sometimes cause functional impairment, pain, or cosmetic concerns. In such cases, various treatments may be used to minimize or improve the appearance of scars, including topical creams, steroid injections, laser therapy, and surgical revision.

Skeletal muscle fibers, also known as striated muscle fibers, are the type of muscle cells that make up skeletal muscles, which are responsible for voluntary movements of the body. These muscle fibers are long, cylindrical, and multinucleated, meaning they contain multiple nuclei. They are surrounded by a connective tissue layer called the endomysium, and many fibers are bundled together into fascicles, which are then surrounded by another layer of connective tissue called the perimysium.

Skeletal muscle fibers are composed of myofibrils, which are long, thread-like structures that run the length of the fiber. Myofibrils contain repeating units called sarcomeres, which are responsible for the striated appearance of skeletal muscle fibers. Sarcomeres are composed of thick and thin filaments, which slide past each other during muscle contraction to shorten the sarcomere and generate force.

Skeletal muscle fibers can be further classified into two main types based on their contractile properties: slow-twitch (type I) and fast-twitch (type II). Slow-twitch fibers have a high endurance capacity and are used for sustained, low-intensity activities such as maintaining posture. Fast-twitch fibers, on the other hand, have a higher contractile speed and force generation capacity but fatigue more quickly and are used for powerful, explosive movements.

The spinal cord is a major part of the nervous system, extending from the brainstem and continuing down to the lower back. It is a slender, tubular bundle of nerve fibers (axons) and support cells (glial cells) that carries signals between the brain and the rest of the body. The spinal cord primarily serves as a conduit for motor information, which travels from the brain to the muscles, and sensory information, which travels from the body to the brain. It also contains neurons that can independently process and respond to information within the spinal cord without direct input from the brain.

The spinal cord is protected by the bony vertebral column (spine) and is divided into 31 segments: 8 cervical, 12 thoracic, 5 lumbar, 5 sacral, and 1 coccygeal. Each segment corresponds to a specific region of the body and gives rise to pairs of spinal nerves that exit through the intervertebral foramina at each level.

The spinal cord is responsible for several vital functions, including:

1. Reflexes: Simple reflex actions, such as the withdrawal reflex when touching a hot surface, are mediated by the spinal cord without involving the brain.
2. Muscle control: The spinal cord carries motor signals from the brain to the muscles, enabling voluntary movement and muscle tone regulation.
3. Sensory perception: The spinal cord transmits sensory information, such as touch, temperature, pain, and vibration, from the body to the brain for processing and awareness.
4. Autonomic functions: The sympathetic and parasympathetic divisions of the autonomic nervous system originate in the thoracolumbar and sacral regions of the spinal cord, respectively, controlling involuntary physiological responses like heart rate, blood pressure, digestion, and respiration.

Damage to the spinal cord can result in various degrees of paralysis or loss of sensation below the level of injury, depending on the severity and location of the damage.

Growth cones are specialized structures found at the tips of growing neurites (axons and dendrites) during the development and regeneration of the nervous system. They were first described by Santiago Ramón y Cajal in the late 19th century. Growth cones play a crucial role in the process of neurogenesis, guiding the extension and pathfinding of axons to their appropriate targets through a dynamic interplay with environmental cues. These cues include various guidance molecules, such as netrins, semaphorins, ephrins, and slits, which bind to receptors on the growth cone membrane and trigger intracellular signaling cascades that ultimately determine the direction of axonal outgrowth.

Morphologically, a growth cone consists of three main parts: the central domain (or "C-domain"), the peripheral domain (or "P-domain"), and the transition zone connecting them. The C-domain contains microtubules and neurofilaments, which provide structural support and transport materials to the growing neurite. The P-domain is rich in actin filaments and contains numerous membrane protrusions called filopodia and lamellipodia, which explore the environment for guidance cues and facilitate motility.

The dynamic behavior of growth cones allows them to navigate complex environments, make decisions at choice points, and ultimately form precise neural circuits during development. Understanding the mechanisms that regulate growth cone function is essential for developing strategies to promote neural repair and regeneration in various neurological disorders and injuries.

Physiologic neovascularization is the natural and controlled formation of new blood vessels in the body, which occurs as a part of normal growth and development, as well as in response to tissue repair and wound healing. This process involves the activation of endothelial cells, which line the interior surface of blood vessels, and their migration, proliferation, and tube formation to create new capillaries. Physiologic neovascularization is tightly regulated by a balance of pro-angiogenic and anti-angiogenic factors, ensuring that it occurs only when and where it is needed. It plays crucial roles in various physiological processes, such as embryonic development, tissue regeneration, and wound healing.

Tissue transplantation is a medical procedure where tissues from one part of the body or from another individual's body are removed and implanted in a recipient to replace damaged, diseased, or missing tissues. The tissues may include skin, bone, tendons, ligaments, heart valves, corneas, or even entire organs such as hearts, lungs, livers, and kidneys.

The donor tissue must be compatible with the recipient's body to reduce the risk of rejection, which is the immune system attacking and destroying the transplanted tissue. This often requires matching certain proteins called human leukocyte antigens (HLAs) found on the surface of most cells in the body.

Tissue transplantation can significantly improve a patient's quality of life or, in some cases, save their life. However, it does carry risks such as infection, bleeding, and rejection, which require careful monitoring and management.

MyoD protein is a member of the family of muscle regulatory factors (MRFs) that play crucial roles in the development and regulation of skeletal muscle. MyoD is a transcription factor, which means it binds to specific DNA sequences and helps control the transcription of nearby genes into messenger RNA (mRNA).

MyoD protein is encoded by the MYOD1 gene and is primarily expressed in skeletal muscle cells, where it functions as a master regulator of muscle differentiation. During myogenesis, MyoD is activated and initiates the expression of various genes involved in muscle-specific functions, such as contractile proteins and ion channels.

MyoD protein can also induce cell cycle arrest and promote the differentiation of non-muscle cells into muscle cells, a process known as transdifferentiation. This property has been explored in regenerative medicine for potential therapeutic applications.

In summary, MyoD protein is a key regulator of skeletal muscle development, differentiation, and maintenance, and it plays essential roles in the regulation of gene expression during myogenesis.

'Mice, Inbred mdx' is a genetic strain of laboratory mice that are widely used as a model to study Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), a severe and progressive muscle-wasting disorder in humans. The 'mdx' designation refers to the specific genetic mutation present in these mice, which is a point mutation in the gene encoding for dystrophin, a crucial protein involved in maintaining the structural integrity of muscle fibers.

Inbred mdx mice carry a spontaneous mutation in exon 23 of the dystrophin gene, resulting in the production of a truncated and nonfunctional form of the protein. This leads to a phenotype that closely resembles DMD in humans, including muscle weakness, degeneration, and fibrosis. The inbred nature of these mice ensures consistent genetic backgrounds and disease manifestations, making them valuable tools for studying the pathophysiology of DMD and testing potential therapies.

It is important to note that while the inbred mdx mouse model has been instrumental in advancing our understanding of DMD, it does not fully recapitulate all aspects of the human disease. Therefore, findings from these mice should be carefully interpreted and validated in more complex models or human studies before translating them into clinical applications.

Nanofibers are defined in the medical field as fibrous structures with extremely small diameters, typically measuring between 100 nanometers to 1 micrometer. They can be made from various materials such as polymers, ceramics, or composites and have a high surface area-to-volume ratio, which makes them useful in a variety of biomedical applications. These include tissue engineering, drug delivery, wound healing, and filtration. Nanofibers can be produced using different techniques such as electrospinning, self-assembly, and phase separation.

F344 is a strain code used to designate an outbred stock of rats that has been inbreeded for over 100 generations. The F344 rats, also known as Fischer 344 rats, were originally developed at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) and are now widely used in biomedical research due to their consistent and reliable genetic background.

Inbred strains, like the F344, are created by mating genetically identical individuals (siblings or parents and offspring) for many generations until a state of complete homozygosity is reached, meaning that all members of the strain have identical genomes. This genetic uniformity makes inbred strains ideal for use in studies where consistent and reproducible results are important.

F344 rats are known for their longevity, with a median lifespan of around 27-31 months, making them useful for aging research. They also have a relatively low incidence of spontaneous tumors compared to other rat strains. However, they may be more susceptible to certain types of cancer and other diseases due to their inbred status.

It's important to note that while F344 rats are often used as a standard laboratory rat strain, there can still be some genetic variation between individual animals within the same strain, particularly if they come from different suppliers or breeding colonies. Therefore, it's always important to consider the source and history of any animal model when designing experiments and interpreting results.

A larva is a distinct stage in the life cycle of various insects, mites, and other arthropods during which they undergo significant metamorphosis before becoming adults. In a medical context, larvae are known for their role in certain parasitic infections. Specifically, some helminth (parasitic worm) species use larval forms to infect human hosts. These invasions may lead to conditions such as cutaneous larva migrans, visceral larva migrans, or gnathostomiasis, depending on the specific parasite involved and the location of the infection within the body.

The larval stage is characterized by its markedly different morphology and behavior compared to the adult form. Larvae often have a distinct appearance, featuring unsegmented bodies, simple sense organs, and undeveloped digestive systems. They are typically adapted for a specific mode of life, such as free-living or parasitic existence, and rely on external sources of nutrition for their development.

In the context of helminth infections, larvae may be transmitted to humans through various routes, including ingestion of contaminated food or water, direct skin contact with infective stages, or transmission via an intermediate host (such as a vector). Once inside the human body, these parasitic larvae can cause tissue damage and provoke immune responses, leading to the clinical manifestations of disease.

It is essential to distinguish between the medical definition of 'larva' and its broader usage in biology and zoology. In those fields, 'larva' refers to any juvenile form that undergoes metamorphosis before reaching adulthood, regardless of whether it is parasitic or not.

Bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) is a synthetic thymidine analog that can be incorporated into DNA during cell replication. It is often used in research and medical settings as a marker for cell proliferation or as a tool to investigate DNA synthesis and repair. When cells are labeled with BrdU and then examined using immunofluorescence or other detection techniques, the presence of BrdU can indicate which cells have recently divided or are actively synthesizing DNA.

In medical contexts, BrdU has been used in cancer research to study tumor growth and response to treatment. It has also been explored as a potential therapeutic agent for certain conditions, such as neurodegenerative diseases, where promoting cell proliferation and replacement of damaged cells may be beneficial. However, its use as a therapeutic agent is still experimental and requires further investigation.

Biological models, also known as physiological models or organismal models, are simplified representations of biological systems, processes, or mechanisms that are used to understand and explain the underlying principles and relationships. These models can be theoretical (conceptual or mathematical) or physical (such as anatomical models, cell cultures, or animal models). They are widely used in biomedical research to study various phenomena, including disease pathophysiology, drug action, and therapeutic interventions.

Examples of biological models include:

1. Mathematical models: These use mathematical equations and formulas to describe complex biological systems or processes, such as population dynamics, metabolic pathways, or gene regulation networks. They can help predict the behavior of these systems under different conditions and test hypotheses about their underlying mechanisms.
2. Cell cultures: These are collections of cells grown in a controlled environment, typically in a laboratory dish or flask. They can be used to study cellular processes, such as signal transduction, gene expression, or metabolism, and to test the effects of drugs or other treatments on these processes.
3. Animal models: These are living organisms, usually vertebrates like mice, rats, or non-human primates, that are used to study various aspects of human biology and disease. They can provide valuable insights into the pathophysiology of diseases, the mechanisms of drug action, and the safety and efficacy of new therapies.
4. Anatomical models: These are physical representations of biological structures or systems, such as plastic models of organs or tissues, that can be used for educational purposes or to plan surgical procedures. They can also serve as a basis for developing more sophisticated models, such as computer simulations or 3D-printed replicas.

Overall, biological models play a crucial role in advancing our understanding of biology and medicine, helping to identify new targets for therapeutic intervention, develop novel drugs and treatments, and improve human health.

Wallerian degeneration is a process that occurs following damage to the axons of neurons (nerve cells). After an axon is severed or traumatically injured, it undergoes a series of changes including fragmentation and removal of the distal segment of the axon, which is the part that is separated from the cell body. This process is named after Augustus Waller, who first described it in 1850.

The degenerative changes in the distal axon are characterized by the breakdown of the axonal cytoskeleton, the loss of myelin sheath (the fatty insulating material that surrounds and protects the axon), and the infiltration of macrophages to clear away the debris. These events lead to the degeneration of the distal axon segment, which is necessary for successful regeneration of the injured nerve.

Wallerian degeneration is a crucial process in the nervous system's response to injury, as it enables the regrowth of axons and the reestablishment of connections between neurons. However, if the regenerative capacity of the neuron is insufficient or the environment is not conducive to growth, functional recovery may be impaired, leading to long-term neurological deficits.

"Skin physiological phenomena" is not a standard medical term with a specific definition. However, I can provide some information about the general concepts that might be encompassed by this term.

Physiological phenomena refer to the functions and processes that occur in living organisms. When it comes to the skin, there are many different physiological phenomena that take place, including:

1. Barrier function: The skin acts as a barrier to protect the body from external elements such as bacteria, viruses, chemicals, and UV radiation.
2. Temperature regulation: The skin helps regulate body temperature through sweat production and blood flow.
3. Sensation: The skin contains nerve endings that allow us to feel touch, pressure, pain, and temperature.
4. Vitamin D synthesis: The skin can produce vitamin D when exposed to sunlight.
5. Moisture regulation: The skin helps maintain the body's moisture balance by producing sweat and preventing water loss.
6. Immunological function: The skin plays a role in the immune system by providing a physical barrier and containing immune cells that help fight off infections.
7. Excretion: The skin eliminates waste products through sweat.
8. Wound healing: The skin has the ability to repair itself after injury, through a complex process involving inflammation, tissue regeneration, and remodeling.

Therefore, "skin physiological phenomena" could refer to any or all of these functions and processes that take place in the skin.

Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction (RT-PCR) is a laboratory technique used in molecular biology to amplify and detect specific DNA sequences. This technique is particularly useful for the detection and quantification of RNA viruses, as well as for the analysis of gene expression.

The process involves two main steps: reverse transcription and polymerase chain reaction (PCR). In the first step, reverse transcriptase enzyme is used to convert RNA into complementary DNA (cDNA) by reading the template provided by the RNA molecule. This cDNA then serves as a template for the PCR amplification step.

In the second step, the PCR reaction uses two primers that flank the target DNA sequence and a thermostable polymerase enzyme to repeatedly copy the targeted cDNA sequence. The reaction mixture is heated and cooled in cycles, allowing the primers to anneal to the template, and the polymerase to extend the new strand. This results in exponential amplification of the target DNA sequence, making it possible to detect even small amounts of RNA or cDNA.

RT-PCR is a sensitive and specific technique that has many applications in medical research and diagnostics, including the detection of viruses such as HIV, hepatitis C virus, and SARS-CoV-2 (the virus that causes COVID-19). It can also be used to study gene expression, identify genetic mutations, and diagnose genetic disorders.

Proliferating Cell Nuclear Antigen (PCNA) is a protein that plays an essential role in the process of DNA replication and repair in eukaryotic cells. It functions as a cofactor for DNA polymerase delta, enhancing its activity during DNA synthesis. PCNA forms a sliding clamp around DNA, allowing it to move along the template and coordinate the actions of various enzymes involved in DNA metabolism.

PCNA is often used as a marker for cell proliferation because its levels increase in cells that are actively dividing or have been stimulated to enter the cell cycle. Immunostaining techniques can be used to detect PCNA and determine the proliferative status of tissues or cultures. In this context, 'proliferating' refers to the rapid multiplication of cells through cell division.

Dental cementum is a type of hard connective tissue that covers the root of a tooth. It is primarily composed of calcium salts and collagen fibers, and it serves to attach the periodontal ligaments (the fibers that help secure the tooth in its socket) to the tooth's root. Cementum also helps protect the root of the tooth and contributes to the maintenance of tooth stability. It continues to grow and deposit new layers throughout an individual's life, which can be seen as incremental lines called "cementum annulations."

Bone Morphogenetic Protein 2 (BMP-2) is a growth factor that belongs to the transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β) superfamily. It plays a crucial role in bone and cartilage formation, as well as in the regulation of wound healing and embryonic development. BMP-2 stimulates the differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells into osteoblasts, which are cells responsible for bone formation.

BMP-2 has been approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) as a medical device to promote bone growth in certain spinal fusion surgeries and in the treatment of open fractures that have not healed properly. It is usually administered in the form of a collagen sponge soaked with recombinant human BMP-2 protein, which is a laboratory-produced version of the natural protein.

While BMP-2 has shown promising results in some clinical applications, its use is not without risks and controversies. Some studies have reported adverse effects such as inflammation, ectopic bone formation, and increased rates of cancer, which have raised concerns about its safety and efficacy. Therefore, it is essential to weigh the benefits and risks of BMP-2 therapy on a case-by-case basis and under the guidance of a qualified healthcare professional.

Neurons, also known as nerve cells or neurocytes, are specialized cells that constitute the basic unit of the nervous system. They are responsible for receiving, processing, and transmitting information and signals within the body. Neurons have three main parts: the dendrites, the cell body (soma), and the axon. The dendrites receive signals from other neurons or sensory receptors, while the axon transmits these signals to other neurons, muscles, or glands. The junction between two neurons is called a synapse, where neurotransmitters are released to transmit the signal across the gap (synaptic cleft) to the next neuron. Neurons vary in size, shape, and structure depending on their function and location within the nervous system.

The Central Nervous System (CNS) is the part of the nervous system that consists of the brain and spinal cord. It is called the "central" system because it receives information from, and sends information to, the rest of the body through peripheral nerves, which make up the Peripheral Nervous System (PNS).

The CNS is responsible for processing sensory information, controlling motor functions, and regulating various autonomic processes like heart rate, respiration, and digestion. The brain, as the command center of the CNS, interprets sensory stimuli, formulates thoughts, and initiates actions. The spinal cord serves as a conduit for nerve impulses traveling to and from the brain and the rest of the body.

The CNS is protected by several structures, including the skull (which houses the brain) and the vertebral column (which surrounds and protects the spinal cord). Despite these protective measures, the CNS remains vulnerable to injury and disease, which can have severe consequences due to its crucial role in controlling essential bodily functions.

Calcium phosphates are a group of minerals that are important components of bones and teeth. They are also found in some foods and are used in dietary supplements and medical applications. Chemically, calcium phosphates are salts of calcium and phosphoric acid, and they exist in various forms, including hydroxyapatite, which is the primary mineral component of bone tissue. Other forms of calcium phosphates include monocalcium phosphate, dicalcium phosphate, and tricalcium phosphate, which are used as food additives and dietary supplements. Calcium phosphates are important for maintaining strong bones and teeth, and they also play a role in various physiological processes, such as nerve impulse transmission and muscle contraction.

Polyglycolic acid (PGA) is a synthetic polymer of glycolic acid, which is commonly used in surgical sutures. It is a biodegradable material that degrades in the body through hydrolysis into glycolic acid, which can be metabolized and eliminated from the body. PGA sutures are often used for approximating tissue during surgical procedures due to their strength, handling properties, and predictable rate of absorption. The degradation time of PGA sutures is typically around 60-90 days, depending on factors such as the size and location of the suture.

Gene expression is the process by which the information encoded in a gene is used to synthesize a functional gene product, such as a protein or RNA molecule. This process involves several steps: transcription, RNA processing, and translation. During transcription, the genetic information in DNA is copied into a complementary RNA molecule, known as messenger RNA (mRNA). The mRNA then undergoes RNA processing, which includes adding a cap and tail to the mRNA and splicing out non-coding regions called introns. The resulting mature mRNA is then translated into a protein on ribosomes in the cytoplasm through the process of translation.

The regulation of gene expression is a complex and highly controlled process that allows cells to respond to changes in their environment, such as growth factors, hormones, and stress signals. This regulation can occur at various stages of gene expression, including transcriptional activation or repression, RNA processing, mRNA stability, and translation. Dysregulation of gene expression has been implicated in many diseases, including cancer, genetic disorders, and neurological conditions.

Facial nerve injuries refer to damages or trauma inflicted on the facial nerve, also known as the seventh cranial nerve (CN VII). This nerve is responsible for controlling the muscles involved in facial expressions, eyelid movement, and taste sensation in the front two-thirds of the tongue.

There are two main types of facial nerve injuries:

1. Peripheral facial nerve injury: This type of injury occurs when damage affects the facial nerve outside the skull base, usually due to trauma from cuts, blunt force, or surgical procedures in the parotid gland or neck region. The injury may result in weakness or paralysis on one side of the face, known as Bell's palsy, and may also impact taste sensation and salivary function.

2. Central facial nerve injury: This type of injury occurs when damage affects the facial nerve within the skull base, often due to stroke, brain tumors, or traumatic brain injuries. Central facial nerve injuries typically result in weakness or paralysis only on the lower half of the face, as the upper motor neurons responsible for controlling the upper face receive innervation from both sides of the brain.

Treatment for facial nerve injuries depends on the severity and location of the damage. For mild to moderate injuries, physical therapy, protective eyewear, and medications like corticosteroids and antivirals may be prescribed. Severe cases might require surgical intervention, such as nerve grafts or muscle transfers, to restore function. In some instances, facial nerve injuries may heal on their own over time, particularly when the injury is mild and there is no ongoing compression or tension on the nerve.

"Cell count" is a medical term that refers to the process of determining the number of cells present in a given volume or sample of fluid or tissue. This can be done through various laboratory methods, such as counting individual cells under a microscope using a specialized grid called a hemocytometer, or using automated cell counters that use light scattering and electrical impedance techniques to count and classify different types of cells.

Cell counts are used in a variety of medical contexts, including hematology (the study of blood and blood-forming tissues), microbiology (the study of microscopic organisms), and pathology (the study of diseases and their causes). For example, a complete blood count (CBC) is a routine laboratory test that includes a white blood cell (WBC) count, red blood cell (RBC) count, hemoglobin level, hematocrit value, and platelet count. Abnormal cell counts can indicate the presence of various medical conditions, such as infections, anemia, or leukemia.

A hair follicle is a part of the human skin from which hair grows. It is a complex organ that consists of several layers, including an outer root sheath, inner root sheath, and matrix. The hair follicle is located in the dermis, the second layer of the skin, and is surrounded by sebaceous glands and erector pili muscles.

The hair growth cycle includes three phases: anagen (growth phase), catagen (transitional phase), and telogen (resting phase). During the anagen phase, cells in the matrix divide rapidly to produce new hair fibers that grow out of the follicle. The hair fiber is made up of a protein called keratin, which also makes up the outer layers of the skin and nails.

Hair follicles are important for various biological functions, including thermoregulation, sensory perception, and social communication. They also play a role in wound healing and can serve as a source of stem cells that can differentiate into other cell types.

Denervation is a medical term that refers to the loss or removal of nerve supply to an organ or body part. This can occur as a result of surgical intervention, injury, or disease processes that damage the nerves leading to the affected area. The consequences of denervation depend on the specific organ or tissue involved, but generally, it can lead to changes in function, sensation, and muscle tone. For example, denervation of a skeletal muscle can cause weakness, atrophy, and altered reflexes. Similarly, denervation of an organ such as the heart can lead to abnormalities in heart rate and rhythm. In some cases, denervation may be intentional, such as during surgical procedures aimed at treating chronic pain or spasticity.

Wnt proteins are a family of secreted signaling molecules that play crucial roles in the regulation of fundamental biological processes, including cell proliferation, differentiation, migration, and survival. They were first discovered in 1982 through genetic studies in Drosophila melanogaster (fruit flies) and have since been found to be highly conserved across various species, from invertebrates to humans.

Wnt proteins exert their effects by binding to specific receptors on the target cell surface, leading to the activation of several intracellular signaling pathways:

1. Canonical Wnt/β-catenin pathway: In the absence of Wnt ligands, β-catenin is continuously degraded by a destruction complex consisting of Axin, APC (Adenomatous polyposis coli), and GSK3β (Glycogen synthase kinase 3 beta). When Wnt proteins bind to their receptors Frizzled and LRP5/6, the formation of a "signalosome" complex leads to the inhibition of the destruction complex, allowing β-catenin to accumulate in the cytoplasm and translocate into the nucleus. Here, it interacts with TCF/LEF (T-cell factor/lymphoid enhancer-binding factor) transcription factors to regulate the expression of target genes involved in cell proliferation, differentiation, and survival.
2. Non-canonical Wnt pathways: These include the Wnt/Ca^2+^ pathway and the planar cell polarity (PCP) pathway. In the Wnt/Ca^2+^ pathway, Wnt ligands bind to Frizzled receptors and activate heterotrimeric G proteins, leading to an increase in intracellular Ca^2+^ levels and activation of downstream targets such as protein kinase C (PKC) and calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CAMKII). These signaling events ultimately regulate cell movement, adhesion, and gene expression. In the PCP pathway, Wnt ligands bind to Frizzled receptors and coreceptor complexes containing Ror2 or Ryk, leading to activation of small GTPases such as RhoA and Rac1, which control cytoskeletal organization and cell polarity.

Dysregulation of Wnt signaling has been implicated in various human diseases, including cancer, developmental disorders, and degenerative conditions. In cancer, aberrant activation of the canonical Wnt/β-catenin pathway contributes to tumor initiation, progression, and metastasis by promoting cell proliferation, survival, and epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT). Inhibitors targeting different components of the Wnt signaling pathway are currently being developed as potential therapeutic strategies for cancer treatment.

In medical terms, the "head" is the uppermost part of the human body that contains the brain, skull, face, eyes, nose, mouth, and ears. It is connected to the rest of the body by the neck and is responsible for many vital functions such as sight, hearing, smell, taste, touch, and thought processing. The head also plays a crucial role in maintaining balance, speech, and eating.

Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP) is not a medical term per se, but a scientific term used in the field of molecular biology. GFP is a protein that exhibits bright green fluorescence when exposed to light, particularly blue or ultraviolet light. It was originally discovered in the jellyfish Aequorea victoria.

In medical and biological research, scientists often use recombinant DNA technology to introduce the gene for GFP into other organisms, including bacteria, plants, and animals, including humans. This allows them to track the expression and localization of specific genes or proteins of interest in living cells, tissues, or even whole organisms.

The ability to visualize specific cellular structures or processes in real-time has proven invaluable for a wide range of research areas, from studying the development and function of organs and organ systems to understanding the mechanisms of diseases and the effects of therapeutic interventions.

"Pleurodeles" is not a medical term. It is the genus name for a group of fire-bellied newts, also known as Iberian ribbed newts, that are native to southwestern Europe. They belong to the family Salamandridae and are known for their distinctive orange or red belly with black spots. If you have any questions about biology or zoology, I would be happy to help answer those!

Neuroglia, also known as glial cells or simply glia, are non-neuronal cells that provide support and protection for neurons in the nervous system. They maintain homeostasis, form myelin sheaths around nerve fibers, and provide structural support. They also play a role in the immune response of the central nervous system. Some types of neuroglia include astrocytes, oligodendrocytes, microglia, and ependymal cells.

Tissue culture techniques refer to the methods used to maintain and grow cells, tissues or organs from multicellular organisms in an artificial environment outside of the living body, called an in vitro culture. These techniques are widely used in various fields such as biology, medicine, and agriculture for research, diagnostics, and therapeutic purposes.

The basic components of tissue culture include a sterile growth medium that contains nutrients, growth factors, and other essential components to support the growth of cells or tissues. The growth medium is often supplemented with antibiotics to prevent contamination by microorganisms. The cells or tissues are cultured in specialized containers called culture vessels, which can be plates, flasks, or dishes, depending on the type and scale of the culture.

There are several types of tissue culture techniques, including:

1. Monolayer Culture: In this technique, cells are grown as a single layer on a flat surface, allowing for easy observation and manipulation of individual cells.
2. Organoid Culture: This method involves growing three-dimensional structures that resemble the organization and function of an organ in vivo.
3. Co-culture: In co-culture, two or more cell types are grown together to study their interactions and communication.
4. Explant Culture: In this technique, small pieces of tissue are cultured to maintain the original structure and organization of the cells within the tissue.
5. Primary Culture: This refers to the initial culture of cells directly isolated from a living organism. These cells can be further subcultured to generate immortalized cell lines.

Tissue culture techniques have numerous applications, such as studying cell behavior, drug development and testing, gene therapy, tissue engineering, and regenerative medicine.

The extracellular matrix (ECM) is a complex network of biomolecules that provides structural and biochemical support to cells in tissues and organs. It is composed of various proteins, glycoproteins, and polysaccharides, such as collagens, elastin, fibronectin, laminin, and proteoglycans. The ECM plays crucial roles in maintaining tissue architecture, regulating cell behavior, and facilitating communication between cells. It provides a scaffold for cell attachment, migration, and differentiation, and helps to maintain the structural integrity of tissues by resisting mechanical stresses. Additionally, the ECM contains various growth factors, cytokines, and chemokines that can influence cellular processes such as proliferation, survival, and differentiation. Overall, the extracellular matrix is essential for the normal functioning of tissues and organs, and its dysregulation can contribute to various pathological conditions, including fibrosis, cancer, and degenerative diseases.

Amputation is defined as the surgical removal of all or part of a limb or extremity such as an arm, leg, foot, hand, toe, or finger. This procedure is typically performed to remove damaged or dead tissue due to various reasons like severe injury, infection, tumors, or chronic conditions that impair circulation, such as diabetes or peripheral arterial disease. The goal of amputation is to alleviate pain, prevent further complications, and improve the patient's quality of life. Following the surgery, patients may require rehabilitation and prosthetic devices to help them adapt to their new physical condition.

The periodontium is a complex structure in the oral cavity that surrounds and supports the teeth. It consists of four main components:
1. Gingiva (gums): The pink, soft tissue that covers the crown of the tooth and extends down to the neck of the tooth, where it meets the cementum.
2. Cementum: A specialized, calcified tissue that covers the root of the tooth and provides a surface for the periodontal ligament fibers to attach.
3. Periodontal ligament (PDL): A highly vascular and cell-rich connective tissue that attaches the cementum of the tooth root to the alveolar bone, allowing for tooth mobility and absorption of forces during chewing.
4. Alveolar bone: The portion of the jawbone that contains the sockets (alveoli) for the teeth. It is a spongy bone with a rich blood supply that responds to mechanical stresses from biting and chewing, undergoing remodeling throughout life.

Periodontal diseases, such as gingivitis and periodontitis, affect the health and integrity of the periodontium, leading to inflammation, bleeding, pocket formation, bone loss, and ultimately tooth loss if left untreated.

Platelet-Rich Plasma (PRP) is a portion of the plasma fraction of autologous blood that has a platelet concentration above baseline. It is often used in the medical field for its growth factor content, which can help to stimulate healing and tissue regeneration in various types of injuries and degenerative conditions. The preparation process involves drawing a patient's own blood, centrifuging it to separate the platelets and plasma from the red and white blood cells, and then extracting the platelet-rich portion of the plasma. This concentrated solution is then injected back into the site of injury or damage to promote healing.

The retina is the innermost, light-sensitive layer of tissue in the eye of many vertebrates and some cephalopods. It receives light that has been focused by the cornea and lens, converts it into neural signals, and sends these to the brain via the optic nerve. The retina contains several types of photoreceptor cells including rods (which handle vision in low light) and cones (which are active in bright light and are capable of color vision).

In medical terms, any pathological changes or diseases affecting the retinal structure and function can lead to visual impairment or blindness. Examples include age-related macular degeneration, diabetic retinopathy, retinal detachment, and retinitis pigmentosa among others.

Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) is a type of electron microscopy that uses a focused beam of electrons to scan the surface of a sample and produce a high-resolution image. In SEM, a beam of electrons is scanned across the surface of a specimen, and secondary electrons are emitted from the sample due to interactions between the electrons and the atoms in the sample. These secondary electrons are then detected by a detector and used to create an image of the sample's surface topography. SEM can provide detailed images of the surface of a wide range of materials, including metals, polymers, ceramics, and biological samples. It is commonly used in materials science, biology, and electronics for the examination and analysis of surfaces at the micro- and nanoscale.

Nerve tissue proteins are specialized proteins found in the nervous system that provide structural and functional support to nerve cells, also known as neurons. These proteins include:

1. Neurofilaments: These are type IV intermediate filaments that provide structural support to neurons and help maintain their shape and size. They are composed of three subunits - NFL (light), NFM (medium), and NFH (heavy).

2. Neuronal Cytoskeletal Proteins: These include tubulins, actins, and spectrins that provide structural support to the neuronal cytoskeleton and help maintain its integrity.

3. Neurotransmitter Receptors: These are specialized proteins located on the postsynaptic membrane of neurons that bind neurotransmitters released by presynaptic neurons, triggering a response in the target cell.

4. Ion Channels: These are transmembrane proteins that regulate the flow of ions across the neuronal membrane and play a crucial role in generating and transmitting electrical signals in neurons.

5. Signaling Proteins: These include enzymes, receptors, and adaptor proteins that mediate intracellular signaling pathways involved in neuronal development, differentiation, survival, and death.

6. Adhesion Proteins: These are cell surface proteins that mediate cell-cell and cell-matrix interactions, playing a crucial role in the formation and maintenance of neural circuits.

7. Extracellular Matrix Proteins: These include proteoglycans, laminins, and collagens that provide structural support to nerve tissue and regulate neuronal migration, differentiation, and survival.

Nerve tissue, also known as neural tissue, is a type of specialized tissue that is responsible for the transmission of electrical signals and the processing of information in the body. It is a key component of the nervous system, which includes the brain, spinal cord, and peripheral nerves. Nerve tissue is composed of two main types of cells: neurons and glial cells.

Neurons are the primary functional units of nerve tissue. They are specialized cells that are capable of generating and transmitting electrical signals, known as action potentials. Neurons have a unique structure, with a cell body (also called the soma) that contains the nucleus and other organelles, and processes (dendrites and axons) that extend from the cell body and are used to receive and transmit signals.

Glial cells, also known as neuroglia or glia, are non-neuronal cells that provide support and protection for neurons. There are several different types of glial cells, including astrocytes, oligodendrocytes, microglia, and Schwann cells. These cells play a variety of roles in the nervous system, such as providing structural support, maintaining the proper environment for neurons, and helping to repair and regenerate nerve tissue after injury.

Nerve tissue is found throughout the body, but it is most highly concentrated in the brain and spinal cord, which make up the central nervous system (CNS). The peripheral nerves, which are the nerves that extend from the CNS to the rest of the body, also contain nerve tissue. Nerve tissue is responsible for transmitting sensory information from the body to the brain, controlling muscle movements, and regulating various bodily functions such as heart rate, digestion, and respiration.

Cell movement, also known as cell motility, refers to the ability of cells to move independently and change their location within tissue or inside the body. This process is essential for various biological functions, including embryonic development, wound healing, immune responses, and cancer metastasis.

There are several types of cell movement, including:

1. **Crawling or mesenchymal migration:** Cells move by extending and retracting protrusions called pseudopodia or filopodia, which contain actin filaments. This type of movement is common in fibroblasts, immune cells, and cancer cells during tissue invasion and metastasis.
2. **Amoeboid migration:** Cells move by changing their shape and squeezing through tight spaces without forming protrusions. This type of movement is often observed in white blood cells (leukocytes) as they migrate through the body to fight infections.
3. **Pseudopodial extension:** Cells extend pseudopodia, which are temporary cytoplasmic projections containing actin filaments. These protrusions help the cell explore its environment and move forward.
4. **Bacterial flagellar motion:** Bacteria use a whip-like structure called a flagellum to propel themselves through their environment. The rotation of the flagellum is driven by a molecular motor in the bacterial cell membrane.
5. **Ciliary and ependymal movement:** Ciliated cells, such as those lining the respiratory tract and fallopian tubes, have hair-like structures called cilia that beat in coordinated waves to move fluids or mucus across the cell surface.

Cell movement is regulated by a complex interplay of signaling pathways, cytoskeletal rearrangements, and adhesion molecules, which enable cells to respond to environmental cues and navigate through tissues.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but the term "Sea Cucumbers" is not typically used in medical definitions. It is a common name given to marine animals belonging to the class Holothuroidea in the phylum Echinodermata. These are sausage-shaped, bottom-dwelling creatures found on the sea floor worldwide. They have a leathery skin and a set of tube feet used for locomotion. While they have some cultural and commercial importance in parts of the world, they do not have direct relevance to medical definitions.

Cell survival refers to the ability of a cell to continue living and functioning normally, despite being exposed to potentially harmful conditions or treatments. This can include exposure to toxins, radiation, chemotherapeutic drugs, or other stressors that can damage cells or interfere with their normal processes.

In scientific research, measures of cell survival are often used to evaluate the effectiveness of various therapies or treatments. For example, researchers may expose cells to a particular drug or treatment and then measure the percentage of cells that survive to assess its potential therapeutic value. Similarly, in toxicology studies, measures of cell survival can help to determine the safety of various chemicals or substances.

It's important to note that cell survival is not the same as cell proliferation, which refers to the ability of cells to divide and multiply. While some treatments may promote cell survival, they may also inhibit cell proliferation, making them useful for treating diseases such as cancer. Conversely, other treatments may be designed to specifically target and kill cancer cells, even if it means sacrificing some healthy cells in the process.

Experimental implants refer to medical devices that are not yet approved by regulatory authorities for general use in medical practice. These are typically being tested in clinical trials to evaluate their safety and efficacy. The purpose of experimental implants is to determine whether they can be used as a viable treatment option for various medical conditions. They may include, but are not limited to, devices such as artificial joints, heart valves, or spinal cord stimulators that are still in the developmental or testing stage. Participation in clinical trials involving experimental implants is voluntary and usually requires informed consent from the patient.

The crystalline lens is a biconvex transparent structure in the eye that helps to refract (bend) light rays and focus them onto the retina. It is located behind the iris and pupil and is suspended by small fibers called zonules that connect it to the ciliary body. The lens can change its shape to accommodate and focus on objects at different distances, a process known as accommodation. With age, the lens may become cloudy or opaque, leading to cataracts.

In the context of medical terminology, "porosity" is not a term that is frequently used to describe human tissues or organs. However, in dermatology and cosmetics, porosity refers to the ability of the skin to absorb and retain moisture or topical treatments.

A skin with high porosity has larger pores and can absorb more products, while a skin with low porosity has smaller pores and may have difficulty absorbing products. It is important to note that this definition of porosity is not a medical one but is instead used in the beauty industry.

A hindlimb, also known as a posterior limb, is one of the pair of extremities that are located distally to the trunk in tetrapods (four-legged vertebrates) and include mammals, birds, reptiles, and amphibians. In humans and other primates, hindlimbs are equivalent to the lower limbs, which consist of the thigh, leg, foot, and toes.

The primary function of hindlimbs is locomotion, allowing animals to move from one place to another. However, they also play a role in other activities such as balance, support, and communication. In humans, the hindlimbs are responsible for weight-bearing, standing, walking, running, and jumping.

In medical terminology, the term "hindlimb" is not commonly used to describe human anatomy. Instead, healthcare professionals use terms like lower limbs or lower extremities to refer to the same region of the body. However, in comparative anatomy and veterinary medicine, the term hindlimb is still widely used to describe the corresponding structures in non-human animals.

Molecular sequence data refers to the specific arrangement of molecules, most commonly nucleotides in DNA or RNA, or amino acids in proteins, that make up a biological macromolecule. This data is generated through laboratory techniques such as sequencing, and provides information about the exact order of the constituent molecules. This data is crucial in various fields of biology, including genetics, evolution, and molecular biology, allowing for comparisons between different organisms, identification of genetic variations, and studies of gene function and regulation.

Multipotent stem cells are a type of stem cell that have the ability to differentiate into multiple cell types, but are more limited than pluripotent stem cells. These stem cells are found in various tissues and organs throughout the body, including bone marrow, adipose tissue, and dental pulp. They can give rise to a number of different cell types within their own germ layer (endoderm, mesoderm, or ectoderm), but cannot cross germ layer boundaries. For example, multipotent stem cells found in bone marrow can differentiate into various blood cells such as red and white blood cells, but they cannot differentiate into nerve cells or liver cells. These stem cells play important roles in tissue repair and regeneration, and have potential therapeutic applications in regenerative medicine.

Bone marrow cells are the types of cells found within the bone marrow, which is the spongy tissue inside certain bones in the body. The main function of bone marrow is to produce blood cells. There are two types of bone marrow: red and yellow. Red bone marrow is where most blood cell production takes place, while yellow bone marrow serves as a fat storage site.

The three main types of bone marrow cells are:

1. Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs): These are immature cells that can differentiate into any type of blood cell, including red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets. They have the ability to self-renew, meaning they can divide and create more hematopoietic stem cells.
2. Red blood cell progenitors: These are immature cells that will develop into mature red blood cells, also known as erythrocytes. Red blood cells carry oxygen from the lungs to the body's tissues and carbon dioxide back to the lungs.
3. Myeloid and lymphoid white blood cell progenitors: These are immature cells that will develop into various types of white blood cells, which play a crucial role in the body's immune system by fighting infections and diseases. Myeloid progenitors give rise to granulocytes (neutrophils, eosinophils, and basophils), monocytes, and megakaryocytes (which eventually become platelets). Lymphoid progenitors differentiate into B cells, T cells, and natural killer (NK) cells.

Bone marrow cells are essential for maintaining a healthy blood cell count and immune system function. Abnormalities in bone marrow cells can lead to various medical conditions, such as anemia, leukopenia, leukocytosis, thrombocytopenia, or thrombocytosis, depending on the specific type of blood cell affected. Additionally, bone marrow cells are often used in transplantation procedures to treat patients with certain types of cancer, such as leukemia and lymphoma, or other hematologic disorders.

X-ray microtomography, often referred to as micro-CT, is a non-destructive imaging technique used to visualize and analyze the internal structure of objects with high spatial resolution. It is based on the principles of computed tomography (CT), where multiple X-ray images are acquired at different angles and then reconstructed into cross-sectional slices using specialized software. These slices can be further processed to create 3D visualizations, allowing researchers and clinicians to examine the internal structure and composition of samples in great detail. Micro-CT is widely used in materials science, biology, medicine, and engineering for various applications such as material characterization, bone analysis, and defect inspection.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Oligochaeta" is not a medical term. It is a taxonomic category in biology, specifically referring to a class of segmented worms, including earthworms and related species. They are characterized by having a simple circulatory system, and most have separate sexes. They are not directly relevant to human medical definition or healthcare context.

The Peripheral Nervous System (PNS) is that part of the nervous system which lies outside of the brain and spinal cord. It includes all the nerves and ganglia ( clusters of neurons) outside of the central nervous system (CNS). The PNS is divided into two components: the somatic nervous system and the autonomic nervous system.

The somatic nervous system is responsible for transmitting sensory information from the skin, muscles, and joints to the CNS, and for controlling voluntary movements of the skeletal muscles.

The autonomic nervous system, on the other hand, controls involuntary actions, such as heart rate, digestion, respiratory rate, salivation, perspiration, pupillary dilation, and sexual arousal. It is further divided into the sympathetic and parasympathetic systems, which generally have opposing effects and maintain homeostasis in the body.

Damage to the peripheral nervous system can result in various medical conditions such as neuropathies, neuritis, plexopathies, and radiculopathies, leading to symptoms like numbness, tingling, pain, weakness, or loss of reflexes in the affected area.

Retinal Ganglion Cells (RGCs) are a type of neuron located in the innermost layer of the retina, the light-sensitive tissue at the back of the eye. These cells receive visual information from photoreceptors (rods and cones) via intermediate cells called bipolar cells. RGCs then send this visual information through their long axons to form the optic nerve, which transmits the signals to the brain for processing and interpretation as vision.

There are several types of RGCs, each with distinct morphological and functional characteristics. Some RGCs are specialized in detecting specific features of the visual scene, such as motion, contrast, color, or brightness. The diversity of RGCs allows for a rich and complex representation of the visual world in the brain.

Damage to RGCs can lead to various visual impairments, including loss of vision, reduced visual acuity, and altered visual fields. Conditions associated with RGC damage or degeneration include glaucoma, optic neuritis, ischemic optic neuropathy, and some inherited retinal diseases.

Up-regulation is a term used in molecular biology and medicine to describe an increase in the expression or activity of a gene, protein, or receptor in response to a stimulus. This can occur through various mechanisms such as increased transcription, translation, or reduced degradation of the molecule. Up-regulation can have important functional consequences, for example, enhancing the sensitivity or response of a cell to a hormone, neurotransmitter, or drug. It is a normal physiological process that can also be induced by disease or pharmacological interventions.

Dental pulp is the soft tissue located in the center of a tooth, surrounded by the dentin. It contains nerves, blood vessels, and connective tissue, and plays a vital role in the development and health of the tooth. The dental pulp helps to form dentin during tooth development and continues to provide nourishment to the tooth throughout its life. It also serves as a sensory organ, allowing the tooth to detect hot and cold temperatures and transmit pain signals to the brain. Injury or infection of the dental pulp can lead to serious dental problems, such as tooth decay or abscesses, and may require root canal treatment to remove the damaged tissue and save the tooth.

Re-epithelialization is a medical term that refers to the process of healing and restoration of the epithelium, which is the tissue that lines the outer surface of the body and the inner surfaces of organs and cavities. This tissue is made up of cells called epithelial cells, which form a protective barrier against the external environment.

Re-epithelialization occurs when the epithelium is damaged or injured, such as during wound healing. During this process, specialized epithelial cells called keratinocytes migrate to the site of injury and proliferate, eventually covering the wounded area and forming a new layer of epithelium. This helps to restore the protective barrier and prevent infection and other complications.

Re-epithelialization is an important part of the healing process and is necessary for the proper functioning of many organs and systems in the body. It is a complex process that involves the coordinated interaction of various cells, signaling molecules, and other factors.

Stilbamidines are a class of chemical compounds that are primarily used as veterinary medicines, specifically as parasiticides for the treatment and prevention of ectoparasites such as ticks and lice in livestock animals. Stilbamidines belong to the family of chemicals known as formamidines, which are known to have insecticidal and acaricidal properties.

The most common stilbamidine compound is chlorphentermine, which has been used as an appetite suppressant in human medicine. However, its use as a weight loss drug was discontinued due to its addictive properties and potential for serious side effects.

It's important to note that Stilbamidines are not approved for use in humans and should only be used under the supervision of a veterinarian for the intended purpose of treating and preventing ectoparasites in animals.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Polyesters" is not a medical term. It is a term used in materials science and textile industry to describe a type of synthetic fiber made from polymers characterized by the presence of ester groups in their main chain. If you have any questions related to medical terminology or concepts, I'd be happy to help with those instead!

Platyhelminths, also known as flatworms, are a phylum of invertebrate animals that includes free-living and parasitic forms. They are characterized by their soft, flat bodies, which lack a body cavity or circulatory system. The phylum Platyhelminthes is divided into several classes, including Turbellaria (free-living flatworms), Monogenea (ectoparasites on fish gills and skin), Trematoda (flukes, parasites in mollusks and vertebrates), and Cestoda (tapeworms, intestinal parasites of vertebrates). Platyhelminths are bilaterally symmetrical, triploblastic, and unsegmented. They have a simple digestive system that consists of a mouth and a gut, but no anus. The nervous system is characterized by a brain and a ladder-like series of nerve cords running along the length of the body. Reproduction in platyhelminths can be either sexual or asexual, depending on the species.

Carbon tetrachloride is a colorless, heavy, and nonflammable liquid with a mild ether-like odor. Its chemical formula is CCl4. It was previously used as a solvent and refrigerant, but its use has been largely phased out due to its toxicity and ozone-depleting properties.

Inhalation, ingestion, or skin contact with carbon tetrachloride can cause harmful health effects. Short-term exposure can lead to symptoms such as dizziness, headache, nausea, and vomiting. Long-term exposure has been linked to liver and kidney damage, as well as an increased risk of cancer.

Carbon tetrachloride is also a potent greenhouse gas and contributes to climate change. Its production and use are regulated by international agreements aimed at protecting human health and the environment.

Hydrogels are defined in the medical and biomedical fields as cross-linked, hydrophilic polymer networks that have the ability to swell and retain a significant amount of water or biological fluids while maintaining their structure. They can be synthesized from natural, synthetic, or hybrid polymers.

Hydrogels are known for their biocompatibility, high water content, and soft consistency, which resemble natural tissues, making them suitable for various medical applications such as contact lenses, drug delivery systems, tissue engineering, wound dressing, and biosensors. The physical and chemical properties of hydrogels can be tailored to specific uses by adjusting the polymer composition, cross-linking density, and network structure.

The saccule and utricle are components of the vestibular system, which is responsible for maintaining balance and spatial orientation within the inner ear. Here are the medical definitions:

1. Saccule: A small sac-like structure located in the vestibular labyrinth of the inner ear. It is one of the two otolith organs (the other being the utricle) that detect linear acceleration and gravity. The saccule contains hair cells with stereocilia, which are embedded in a gelatinous matrix containing calcium carbonate crystals called otoconia. When the head changes position or moves linearly, the movement of these otoconia stimulates the hair cells, sending signals to the brain about the direction and speed of the motion.

2. Utricle: Another sac-like structure in the vestibular labyrinth, similar to the saccule but slightly larger. The utricle is also an otolith organ that detects linear acceleration and head tilts. It contains hair cells with stereocilia embedded in a gelatinous matrix filled with otoconia. When the head tilts or moves linearly, the movement of the otoconia stimulates the hair cells, providing information about the position and motion of the head to the brain.

In summary, both the saccule and utricle are essential for maintaining balance and spatial orientation by detecting linear acceleration and gravity through the movement of otoconia on their hair cell receptors.

Cementogenesis is the biological process of cementum formation, which is a hard connective tissue that covers the root surface of teeth. Cementum helps to attach the periodontal ligaments, providing stability and support to the teeth within the jawbone. This process involves the differentiation and activity of cementoblasts, which are the cells responsible for producing and mineralizing the cementum matrix.

The medical definition of 'cementogenesis' is:

1. The formation and development of cementum on the roots of teeth.
2. The biological process in which cementoblasts secrete and mineralize the extracellular matrix, leading to the growth and maturation of cementum.
3. A critical component of tooth development and maintenance, ensuring proper attachment and function of the teeth within the oral cavity.

The skull is the bony structure that encloses and protects the brain, the eyes, and the ears. It is composed of two main parts: the cranium, which contains the brain, and the facial bones. The cranium is made up of several fused flat bones, while the facial bones include the upper jaw (maxilla), lower jaw (mandible), cheekbones, nose bones, and eye sockets (orbits).

The skull also provides attachment points for various muscles that control chewing, moving the head, and facial expressions. Additionally, it contains openings for blood vessels, nerves, and the spinal cord to pass through. The skull's primary function is to protect the delicate and vital structures within it from injury and trauma.

Homeodomain proteins are a group of transcription factors that play crucial roles in the development and differentiation of cells in animals and plants. They are characterized by the presence of a highly conserved DNA-binding domain called the homeodomain, which is typically about 60 amino acids long. The homeodomain consists of three helices, with the third helix responsible for recognizing and binding to specific DNA sequences.

Homeodomain proteins are involved in regulating gene expression during embryonic development, tissue maintenance, and organismal growth. They can act as activators or repressors of transcription, depending on the context and the presence of cofactors. Mutations in homeodomain proteins have been associated with various human diseases, including cancer, congenital abnormalities, and neurological disorders.

Some examples of homeodomain proteins include PAX6, which is essential for eye development, HOX genes, which are involved in body patterning, and NANOG, which plays a role in maintaining pluripotency in stem cells.

Myogenin is defined as a protein that belongs to the family of myogenic regulatory factors (MRFs). These proteins play crucial roles in the development, growth, and repair of skeletal muscle cells. Myogenin is specifically involved in the differentiation and fusion of myoblasts to form multinucleated myotubes, which are essential for the formation of mature skeletal muscle fibers. It functions as a transcription factor that binds to specific DNA sequences, thereby regulating the expression of genes required for muscle cell differentiation. Myogenin also plays a role in maintaining muscle homeostasis and may contribute to muscle regeneration following injury or disease.

Organ size refers to the volume or physical measurement of an organ in the body of an individual. It can be described in terms of length, width, and height or by using specialized techniques such as imaging studies (like CT scans or MRIs) to determine the volume. The size of an organ can vary depending on factors such as age, sex, body size, and overall health status. Changes in organ size may indicate various medical conditions, including growths, inflammation, or atrophy.

Morphogenesis is a term used in developmental biology and refers to the process by which cells give rise to tissues and organs with specific shapes, structures, and patterns during embryonic development. This process involves complex interactions between genes, cells, and the extracellular environment that result in the coordinated movement and differentiation of cells into specialized functional units.

Morphogenesis is a dynamic and highly regulated process that involves several mechanisms, including cell proliferation, death, migration, adhesion, and differentiation. These processes are controlled by genetic programs and signaling pathways that respond to environmental cues and regulate the behavior of individual cells within a developing tissue or organ.

The study of morphogenesis is important for understanding how complex biological structures form during development and how these processes can go awry in disease states such as cancer, birth defects, and degenerative disorders.

Gene expression profiling is a laboratory technique used to measure the activity (expression) of thousands of genes at once. This technique allows researchers and clinicians to identify which genes are turned on or off in a particular cell, tissue, or organism under specific conditions, such as during health, disease, development, or in response to various treatments.

The process typically involves isolating RNA from the cells or tissues of interest, converting it into complementary DNA (cDNA), and then using microarray or high-throughput sequencing technologies to determine which genes are expressed and at what levels. The resulting data can be used to identify patterns of gene expression that are associated with specific biological states or processes, providing valuable insights into the underlying molecular mechanisms of diseases and potential targets for therapeutic intervention.

In recent years, gene expression profiling has become an essential tool in various fields, including cancer research, drug discovery, and personalized medicine, where it is used to identify biomarkers of disease, predict patient outcomes, and guide treatment decisions.

Intercellular signaling peptides and proteins are molecules that mediate communication and interaction between different cells in living organisms. They play crucial roles in various biological processes, including cell growth, differentiation, migration, and apoptosis (programmed cell death). These signals can be released into the extracellular space, where they bind to specific receptors on the target cell's surface, triggering intracellular signaling cascades that ultimately lead to a response.

Peptides are short chains of amino acids, while proteins are larger molecules made up of one or more polypeptide chains. Both can function as intercellular signaling molecules by acting as ligands for cell surface receptors or by being cleaved from larger precursor proteins and released into the extracellular space. Examples of intercellular signaling peptides and proteins include growth factors, cytokines, chemokines, hormones, neurotransmitters, and their respective receptors.

These molecules contribute to maintaining homeostasis within an organism by coordinating cellular activities across tissues and organs. Dysregulation of intercellular signaling pathways has been implicated in various diseases, such as cancer, autoimmune disorders, and neurodegenerative conditions. Therefore, understanding the mechanisms underlying intercellular signaling is essential for developing targeted therapies to treat these disorders.

The facial nerve, also known as the seventh cranial nerve (CN VII), is a mixed nerve that carries both sensory and motor fibers. Its functions include controlling the muscles involved in facial expressions, taste sensation from the anterior two-thirds of the tongue, and secretomotor function to the lacrimal and salivary glands.

The facial nerve originates from the brainstem and exits the skull through the internal acoustic meatus. It then passes through the facial canal in the temporal bone before branching out to innervate various structures of the face. The main branches of the facial nerve include:

1. Temporal branch: Innervates the frontalis, corrugator supercilii, and orbicularis oculi muscles responsible for eyebrow movements and eyelid closure.
2. Zygomatic branch: Supplies the muscles that elevate the upper lip and wrinkle the nose.
3. Buccal branch: Innervates the muscles of the cheek and lips, allowing for facial expressions such as smiling and puckering.
4. Mandibular branch: Controls the muscles responsible for lower lip movement and depressing the angle of the mouth.
5. Cervical branch: Innervates the platysma muscle in the neck, which helps to depress the lower jaw and wrinkle the skin of the neck.

Damage to the facial nerve can result in various symptoms, such as facial weakness or paralysis, loss of taste sensation, and dry eyes or mouth due to impaired secretion.

Apoptosis is a programmed and controlled cell death process that occurs in multicellular organisms. It is a natural process that helps maintain tissue homeostasis by eliminating damaged, infected, or unwanted cells. During apoptosis, the cell undergoes a series of morphological changes, including cell shrinkage, chromatin condensation, and fragmentation into membrane-bound vesicles called apoptotic bodies. These bodies are then recognized and engulfed by neighboring cells or phagocytic cells, preventing an inflammatory response. Apoptosis is regulated by a complex network of intracellular signaling pathways that involve proteins such as caspases, Bcl-2 family members, and inhibitors of apoptosis (IAPs).

Dura Mater: The tough, outer membrane that covers the brain and spinal cord.

Hydroxyapatite: A naturally occurring mineral form of calcium apatite, also known as dahllite, with the formula Ca5(PO4)3(OH), is the primary mineral component of biological apatites found in bones and teeth.

Therefore, "Durapatite" isn't a recognized medical term, but it seems like it might be a combination of "dura mater" and "hydroxyapatite." If you meant to ask about a material used in medical or dental applications that combines properties of both dura mater and hydroxyapatite, please provide more context.

Plant somatic embryogenesis techniques refer to the scientific methods used to induce and produce embryos from plant somatic cells, which are not involved in sexual reproduction. These techniques involve the culture of isolated plant cells or tissues on nutrient-rich media under controlled conditions that promote embryo development. The resulting embryos can be germinated into plants, which are genetically identical to the parent plant, a process known as clonal propagation.

Somatic embryogenesis techniques have various applications in plant biotechnology, including large-scale propagation of elite varieties, genetic transformation, and cryopreservation of plant genetic resources. The ability to produce embryos from somatic cells also has potential implications for understanding the fundamental mechanisms of plant development and evolution.

Bone Morphogenetic Proteins (BMPs) are a group of growth factors that play crucial roles in the development, growth, and repair of bones and other tissues. They belong to the Transforming Growth Factor-β (TGF-β) superfamily and were first discovered when researchers found that certain proteins extracted from demineralized bone matrix had the ability to induce new bone formation.

BMPs stimulate the differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells into osteoblasts, which are the cells responsible for bone formation. They also promote the recruitment and proliferation of these cells, enhancing the overall process of bone regeneration. In addition to their role in bone biology, BMPs have been implicated in various other biological processes, including embryonic development, wound healing, and the regulation of fat metabolism.

There are several types of BMPs (BMP-2, BMP-4, BMP-7, etc.) that exhibit distinct functions and expression patterns. Due to their ability to stimulate bone formation, recombinant human BMPs have been used in clinical applications, such as spinal fusion surgery and non-healing fracture treatment. However, the use of BMPs in medicine has been associated with certain risks and complications, including uncontrolled bone growth, inflammation, and cancer development, which necessitates further research to optimize their therapeutic potential.

Chondrogenesis is the process of cartilage formation during embryonic development and in the healing of certain types of injuries. It involves the differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells into chondrocytes, which are the specialized cells that produce and maintain the extracellular matrix of cartilage.

During chondrogenesis, the mesenchymal stem cells condense and form a template for the future cartilaginous tissue. These cells then differentiate into chondrocytes, which begin to produce and deposit collagen type II, proteoglycans, and other extracellular matrix components that give cartilage its unique biochemical and mechanical properties.

Chondrogenesis is a critical process for the development of various structures in the body, including the skeletal system, where it plays a role in the formation of articular cartilage, growth plates, and other types of cartilage. Understanding the molecular mechanisms that regulate chondrogenesis is important for developing therapies to treat cartilage injuries and degenerative diseases such as osteoarthritis.

A protoplast is not a term that is typically used in medical definitions, but rather it is a term commonly used in cell biology and botany. A protoplast refers to a plant or bacterial cell that has had its cell wall removed, leaving only the plasma membrane and the cytoplasmic contents, including organelles such as mitochondria, chloroplasts, ribosomes, and other cellular structures.

Protoplasts can be created through enzymatic or mechanical means to isolate the intracellular components for various research purposes, such as studying membrane transport, gene transfer, or cell fusion. In some cases, protoplasts may be used in medical research, particularly in areas related to plant pathology and genetic engineering of plants for medical applications.

A stem cell niche is a specific microenvironment in which stem cells reside, interact with surrounding cells and receive molecular signals that regulate their self-renewal, proliferation, differentiation, and survival. This specialized niche provides the necessary conditions for maintaining the undifferentiated state of stem cells and controlling their fate decisions. The components of a stem cell niche typically include various cell types (such as supporting cells, immune cells, and blood vessels), extracellular matrix proteins, signaling molecules, and physical factors like oxygen tension and mechanical stress. Together, these elements create a unique microenvironment that helps to preserve the functional integrity and potential of stem cells for tissue repair, regeneration, and homeostasis.

Myelin-Associated Glycoprotein (MAG) is a glycoprotein found on the surface of myelin sheaths, which are the protective insulating layers around nerve fibers in the nervous system. MAG plays a role in the adhesion and interaction between the myelin sheath and the axon it surrounds. It's particularly important during the development and maintenance of the nervous system. Additionally, MAG has been implicated in the regulation of neuronal growth and signal transmission. In certain autoimmune diseases like Guillain-Barré syndrome, the immune system may mistakenly attack MAG, leading to damage of the myelin sheath and associated neurological symptoms.

Cell-and tissue-based therapy is a type of medical treatment that involves the use of living cells or tissues to repair, replace, or regenerate damaged or diseased cells or tissues in the body. This can include the transplantation of stem cells, which are immature cells that have the ability to develop into different types of cells, as well as the use of fully differentiated cells or tissues that have specific functions in the body.

Cell-and tissue-based therapies may be used to treat a wide variety of medical conditions, including degenerative diseases, injuries, and congenital defects. Some examples of cell-and tissue-based therapies include:

* Bone marrow transplantation: This involves the transplantation of blood-forming stem cells from the bone marrow of a healthy donor to a patient in need of new blood cells due to disease or treatment with chemotherapy or radiation.
* Corneal transplantation: This involves the transplantation of healthy corneal tissue from a deceased donor to a patient with damaged or diseased corneas.
* Articular cartilage repair: This involves the use of cells or tissues to repair damaged articular cartilage, which is the smooth, white tissue that covers the ends of bones where they come together to form joints.

Cell-and tissue-based therapies are a rapidly evolving field of medicine, and researchers are continually exploring new ways to use these treatments to improve patient outcomes. However, it is important to note that cell-and tissue-based therapies also carry some risks, including the possibility of rejection or infection, and they should only be performed by qualified medical professionals in appropriate settings.

Echinodermata is a phylum in the animal kingdom that includes various marine organisms such as sea stars, sea urchins, sand dollars, brittle stars, and sea cucumbers. The name Echinodermata comes from the Greek words "echinos," meaning spiny, and "derma," meaning skin, which refers to the characteristic spiny skin of many echinoderms.

Echinoderms are bilaterally symmetrical as larvae but become radially symmetrical as adults, with their bodies organized around a central axis. They have a unique water vascular system that helps them move and respire, and most species have specialized structures called pedicellariae that help them clean and defend themselves.

Echinoderms are also known for their ability to regenerate lost body parts, and some species can even undergo asexual reproduction through fragmentation. They play important ecological roles in marine ecosystems, including grazing on algae and other organisms, breaking down organic matter, and serving as prey for larger animals.

"Body patterning" is a general term that refers to the process of forming and organizing various tissues and structures into specific patterns during embryonic development. This complex process involves a variety of molecular mechanisms, including gene expression, cell signaling, and cell-cell interactions. It results in the creation of distinct body regions, such as the head, trunk, and limbs, as well as the organization of internal organs and systems.

In medical terminology, "body patterning" may refer to specific developmental processes or abnormalities related to embryonic development. For example, in genetic disorders such as Poland syndrome or Holt-Oram syndrome, mutations in certain genes can lead to abnormal body patterning, resulting in the absence or underdevelopment of certain muscles, bones, or other structures.

It's important to note that "body patterning" is not a formal medical term with a specific definition, but rather a general concept used in developmental biology and genetics.

Cell culture is a technique used in scientific research to grow and maintain cells from plants, animals, or humans in a controlled environment outside of their original organism. This environment typically consists of a sterile container called a cell culture flask or plate, and a nutrient-rich liquid medium that provides the necessary components for the cells' growth and survival, such as amino acids, vitamins, minerals, and hormones.

There are several different types of cell culture techniques used in research, including:

1. Adherent cell culture: In this technique, cells are grown on a flat surface, such as the bottom of a tissue culture dish or flask. The cells attach to the surface and spread out, forming a monolayer that can be observed and manipulated under a microscope.
2. Suspension cell culture: In suspension culture, cells are grown in liquid medium without any attachment to a solid surface. These cells remain suspended in the medium and can be agitated or mixed to ensure even distribution of nutrients.
3. Organoid culture: Organoids are three-dimensional structures that resemble miniature organs and are grown from stem cells or other progenitor cells. They can be used to study organ development, disease processes, and drug responses.
4. Co-culture: In co-culture, two or more different types of cells are grown together in the same culture dish or flask. This technique is used to study cell-cell interactions and communication.
5. Conditioned medium culture: In this technique, cells are grown in a medium that has been conditioned by previous cultures of other cells. The conditioned medium contains factors secreted by the previous cells that can influence the growth and behavior of the new cells.

Cell culture techniques are widely used in biomedical research to study cellular processes, develop drugs, test toxicity, and investigate disease mechanisms. However, it is important to note that cell cultures may not always accurately represent the behavior of cells in a living organism, and results from cell culture experiments should be validated using other methods.

The dermis is the layer of skin located beneath the epidermis, which is the outermost layer of the skin. It is composed of connective tissue and provides structure and support to the skin. The dermis contains blood vessels, nerves, hair follicles, sweat glands, and oil glands. It is also responsible for the production of collagen and elastin, which give the skin its strength and flexibility. The dermis can be further divided into two layers: the papillary dermis, which is the upper layer and contains finger-like projections called papillae that extend upwards into the epidermis, and the reticular dermis, which is the lower layer and contains thicker collagen bundles. Together, the epidermis and dermis make up the true skin.

The epidermis is the outermost layer of the skin, composed mainly of stratified squamous epithelium. It forms a protective barrier that prevents water loss and inhibits the entry of microorganisms. The epidermis contains no blood vessels, and its cells are nourished by diffusion from the underlying dermis. The bottom-most layer of the epidermis, called the stratum basale, is responsible for generating new skin cells that eventually move up to replace dead cells on the surface. This process of cell turnover takes about 28 days in adults.

The most superficial part of the epidermis consists of dead cells called squames, which are constantly shed and replaced. The exact rate at which this happens varies depending on location; for example, it's faster on the palms and soles than elsewhere. Melanocytes, the pigment-producing cells, are also located in the epidermis, specifically within the stratum basale layer.

In summary, the epidermis is a vital part of our integumentary system, providing not only physical protection but also playing a crucial role in immunity and sensory perception through touch receptors called Pacinian corpuscles.

Fibroblast Growth Factors (FGFs) are a family of growth factors that play crucial roles in various biological processes, including cell survival, proliferation, migration, and differentiation. They bind to specific tyrosine kinase receptors (FGFRs) on the cell surface, leading to intracellular signaling cascades that regulate gene expression and downstream cellular responses. FGFs are involved in embryonic development, tissue repair, and angiogenesis (the formation of new blood vessels). There are at least 22 distinct FGFs identified in humans, each with unique functions and patterns of expression. Some FGFs, like FGF1 and FGF2, have mitogenic effects on fibroblasts and other cell types, while others, such as FGF7 and FGF10, are essential for epithelial-mesenchymal interactions during organ development. Dysregulation of FGF signaling has been implicated in various pathological conditions, including cancer, fibrosis, and developmental disorders.

Lithostathine is a protein that is primarily produced in the pancreas. It is a component of pancreatic stones or calculi, also known as pancreatic lithiasis. These stones can cause blockages in the pancreatic ducts, leading to inflammation (pancreatitis) and damage to the pancreas. Lithostathine is believed to play a role in the formation of these stones, although the exact mechanisms are not fully understood. It's worth noting that the medical literature might use the term "lithostathine" or "pancreatic lithostathine" to refer to this protein.

STAT3 (Signal Transducer and Activator of Transcription 3) is a transcription factor protein that plays a crucial role in signal transduction and gene regulation. It is activated through phosphorylation by various cytokines and growth factors, which leads to its dimerization, nuclear translocation, and binding to specific DNA sequences. Once bound to the DNA, STAT3 regulates the expression of target genes involved in various cellular processes such as proliferation, differentiation, survival, and angiogenesis. Dysregulation of STAT3 has been implicated in several diseases, including cancer, autoimmune disorders, and inflammatory conditions.

Labyrinth supporting cells are specialized cells that are located in the inner ear and provide structural and functional support to the sensory hair cells within the labyrinth, which is the complex system of tubes and sacs responsible for maintaining balance and hearing. These supporting cells form a crucial part of the architecture of the inner ear and help to maintain the proper functioning of the sensory hair cells by providing mechanical support, contributing to the development and maintenance of the extracellular matrix, and playing a role in the recycling of neurotransmitters. Additionally, labyrinth supporting cells can also transform into new hair cells in certain circumstances, which has implications for potential regenerative therapies aimed at treating hearing loss and balance disorders.

Nerve Growth Factors (NGFs) are a family of proteins that play an essential role in the growth, maintenance, and survival of certain neurons (nerve cells). They were first discovered by Rita Levi-Montalcini and Stanley Cohen in 1956. NGF is particularly crucial for the development and function of the peripheral nervous system, which connects the central nervous system to various organs and tissues throughout the body.

NGF supports the differentiation and survival of sympathetic and sensory neurons during embryonic development. In adults, NGF continues to regulate the maintenance and repair of these neurons, contributing to neuroplasticity – the brain's ability to adapt and change over time. Additionally, NGF has been implicated in pain transmission and modulation, as well as inflammatory responses.

Abnormal levels or dysfunctional NGF signaling have been associated with various medical conditions, including neurodegenerative diseases (e.g., Alzheimer's and Parkinson's), chronic pain disorders, and certain cancers (e.g., small cell lung cancer). Therefore, understanding the role of NGF in physiological and pathological processes may provide valuable insights into developing novel therapeutic strategies for these conditions.

Cardiac myocytes are the muscle cells that make up the heart muscle, also known as the myocardium. These specialized cells are responsible for contracting and relaxing in a coordinated manner to pump blood throughout the body. They differ from skeletal muscle cells in several ways, including their ability to generate their own electrical impulses, which allows the heart to function as an independent rhythmical pump. Cardiac myocytes contain sarcomeres, the contractile units of the muscle, and are connected to each other by intercalated discs that help coordinate contraction and ensure the synchronous beating of the heart.

A muscle is a soft tissue in our body that contracts to produce force and motion. It is composed mainly of specialized cells called muscle fibers, which are bound together by connective tissue. There are three types of muscles: skeletal (voluntary), smooth (involuntary), and cardiac. Skeletal muscles attach to bones and help in movement, while smooth muscles are found within the walls of organs and blood vessels, helping with functions like digestion and circulation. Cardiac muscle is the specific type that makes up the heart, allowing it to pump blood throughout the body.

Motor neurons are specialized nerve cells in the brain and spinal cord that play a crucial role in controlling voluntary muscle movements. They transmit electrical signals from the brain to the muscles, enabling us to perform actions such as walking, talking, and swallowing. There are two types of motor neurons: upper motor neurons, which originate in the brain's motor cortex and travel down to the brainstem and spinal cord; and lower motor neurons, which extend from the brainstem and spinal cord to the muscles. Damage or degeneration of these motor neurons can lead to various neurological disorders, such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and spinal muscular atrophy (SMA).

Retinal pigments refer to the light-sensitive chemicals found in the retina, specifically within the photoreceptor cells called rods and cones. The main types of retinal pigments are rhodopsin (also known as visual purple) in rods and iodopsins in cones. These pigments play a crucial role in the process of vision by absorbing light and initiating a series of chemical reactions that ultimately trigger nerve impulses, which are then transmitted to the brain and interpreted as visual images. Rhodopsin is more sensitive to lower light levels and is responsible for night vision, while iodopsins are sensitive to specific wavelengths of light and contribute to color vision.

Amphibians are a class of cold-blooded vertebrates that include frogs, toads, salamanders, newts, and caecilians. They are characterized by their four-limbed body structure, moist skin, and double circulation system with three-chambered hearts. Amphibians are unique because they have a life cycle that involves two distinct stages: an aquatic larval stage (usually as a tadpole or larva) and a terrestrial adult stage. They typically start their lives in water, undergoing metamorphosis to develop lungs and legs for a land-dwelling existence. Many amphibians are also known for their complex reproductive behaviors and vocalizations.

The Wnt signaling pathway is a complex cell communication system that plays a critical role in embryonic development, tissue regeneration, and cancer. It is named after the Wingless (Wg) gene in Drosophila melanogaster and the Int-1 gene in mice, both of which were found to be involved in this pathway.

In essence, the Wnt signaling pathway involves the binding of Wnt proteins to Frizzled receptors on the cell surface, leading to the activation of intracellular signaling cascades. There are three main branches of the Wnt signaling pathway: the canonical (or Wnt/β-catenin) pathway, the noncanonical planar cell polarity (PCP) pathway, and the noncanonical Wnt/calcium pathway.

The canonical Wnt/β-catenin pathway is the most well-studied branch. In the absence of Wnt signaling, cytoplasmic β-catenin is constantly phosphorylated by a destruction complex consisting of Axin, APC, GSK3β, and CK1, leading to its ubiquitination and degradation in the proteasome. When Wnt ligands bind to Frizzled receptors and their coreceptor LRP5/6, Dishevelled is recruited and inhibits the destruction complex, allowing β-catenin to accumulate in the cytoplasm and translocate into the nucleus. In the nucleus, β-catenin interacts with TCF/LEF transcription factors to regulate the expression of target genes involved in cell proliferation, differentiation, and survival.

Dysregulation of the Wnt signaling pathway has been implicated in various human diseases, including cancer, developmental disorders, and degenerative conditions. For example, mutations in components of the canonical Wnt/β-catenin pathway can lead to the accumulation of β-catenin and subsequent activation of oncogenic target genes, contributing to tumorigenesis in various types of cancer.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Muscular Dystrophy, Animal" is not a standard medical term. Muscular Dystrophy is a group of genetic disorders that cause progressive weakness and loss of muscle mass. They are primarily human diseases and there are no known animal models of muscular dystrophy that directly correspond to any type of muscular dystrophy in humans.

However, scientists often use animals (like mice, dogs, and cats) as models for human diseases, including various types of muscular dystrophies. These animal models are used to study the disease process and to test potential treatments. For example, the mdx mouse is a well-known model of Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD), which is caused by a mutation in the dystrophin gene. This mouse lacks the muscle protein dystrophin, similar to humans with DMD, and shows many of the same symptoms, making it a valuable tool for research.

Sensory receptor cells are specialized structures that convert physical stimuli from our environment into electrical signals, which are then transmitted to the brain for interpretation. These receptors can be found in various tissues throughout the body and are responsible for detecting sensations such as touch, pressure, temperature, taste, and smell. They can be classified into two main types: exteroceptors, which respond to stimuli from the external environment, and interoceptors, which react to internal conditions within the body. Examples of sensory receptor cells include hair cells in the inner ear, photoreceptors in the eye, and taste buds on the tongue.

Muscular diseases, also known as myopathies, refer to a group of conditions that affect the functionality and health of muscle tissue. These diseases can be inherited or acquired and may result from inflammation, infection, injury, or degenerative processes. They can cause symptoms such as weakness, stiffness, cramping, spasms, wasting, and loss of muscle function.

Examples of muscular diseases include:

1. Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD): A genetic disorder that results in progressive muscle weakness and degeneration due to a lack of dystrophin protein.
2. Myasthenia Gravis: An autoimmune disease that causes muscle weakness and fatigue, typically affecting the eyes and face, throat, and limbs.
3. Inclusion Body Myositis (IBM): A progressive muscle disorder characterized by muscle inflammation and wasting, typically affecting older adults.
4. Polymyositis: An inflammatory myopathy that causes muscle weakness and inflammation throughout the body.
5. Metabolic Myopathies: A group of inherited disorders that affect muscle metabolism, leading to exercise intolerance, muscle weakness, and other symptoms.
6. Muscular Dystonias: Involuntary muscle contractions and spasms that can cause abnormal postures or movements.

It is important to note that muscular diseases can have a significant impact on an individual's quality of life, mobility, and overall health. Proper diagnosis and treatment are crucial for managing symptoms and improving outcomes.

Rhodopsin, also known as visual purple, is a light-sensitive pigment found in the rods of the vertebrate retina. It is a complex protein molecule made up of two major components: an opsin protein and retinal, a form of vitamin A. When light hits the retinal in rhodopsin, it changes shape, which initiates a series of chemical reactions leading to the activation of the visual pathway and ultimately results in vision. This process is known as phototransduction. Rhodopsin plays a crucial role in low-light vision or scotopic vision.

The pancreas is a glandular organ located in the abdomen, posterior to the stomach. It has both exocrine and endocrine functions. The exocrine portion of the pancreas consists of acinar cells that produce and secrete digestive enzymes into the duodenum via the pancreatic duct. These enzymes help in the breakdown of proteins, carbohydrates, and fats in food.

The endocrine portion of the pancreas consists of clusters of cells called islets of Langerhans, which include alpha, beta, delta, and F cells. These cells produce and secrete hormones directly into the bloodstream, including insulin, glucagon, somatostatin, and pancreatic polypeptide. Insulin and glucagon are critical regulators of blood sugar levels, with insulin promoting glucose uptake and storage in tissues and glucagon stimulating glycogenolysis and gluconeogenesis to raise blood glucose when it is low.

Western blotting is a laboratory technique used in molecular biology to detect and quantify specific proteins in a mixture of many different proteins. This technique is commonly used to confirm the expression of a protein of interest, determine its size, and investigate its post-translational modifications. The name "Western" blotting distinguishes this technique from Southern blotting (for DNA) and Northern blotting (for RNA).

The Western blotting procedure involves several steps:

1. Protein extraction: The sample containing the proteins of interest is first extracted, often by breaking open cells or tissues and using a buffer to extract the proteins.
2. Separation of proteins by electrophoresis: The extracted proteins are then separated based on their size by loading them onto a polyacrylamide gel and running an electric current through the gel (a process called sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis or SDS-PAGE). This separates the proteins according to their molecular weight, with smaller proteins migrating faster than larger ones.
3. Transfer of proteins to a membrane: After separation, the proteins are transferred from the gel onto a nitrocellulose or polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) membrane using an electric current in a process called blotting. This creates a replica of the protein pattern on the gel but now immobilized on the membrane for further analysis.
4. Blocking: The membrane is then blocked with a blocking agent, such as non-fat dry milk or bovine serum albumin (BSA), to prevent non-specific binding of antibodies in subsequent steps.
5. Primary antibody incubation: A primary antibody that specifically recognizes the protein of interest is added and allowed to bind to its target protein on the membrane. This step may be performed at room temperature or 4°C overnight, depending on the antibody's properties.
6. Washing: The membrane is washed with a buffer to remove unbound primary antibodies.
7. Secondary antibody incubation: A secondary antibody that recognizes the primary antibody (often coupled to an enzyme or fluorophore) is added and allowed to bind to the primary antibody. This step may involve using a horseradish peroxidase (HRP)-conjugated or alkaline phosphatase (AP)-conjugated secondary antibody, depending on the detection method used later.
8. Washing: The membrane is washed again to remove unbound secondary antibodies.
9. Detection: A detection reagent is added to visualize the protein of interest by detecting the signal generated from the enzyme-conjugated or fluorophore-conjugated secondary antibody. This can be done using chemiluminescent, colorimetric, or fluorescent methods.
10. Analysis: The resulting image is analyzed to determine the presence and quantity of the protein of interest in the sample.

Western blotting is a powerful technique for identifying and quantifying specific proteins within complex mixtures. It can be used to study protein expression, post-translational modifications, protein-protein interactions, and more. However, it requires careful optimization and validation to ensure accurate and reproducible results.

I'm happy to help! However, I must clarify that "materials testing" is not a medical term per se. It is a term used in various fields, including engineering and materials science, to describe the process of subjecting materials to different tests to evaluate their properties and performance under various conditions.

In the context of medical devices or implants, materials testing may refer to the evaluation of the physical and mechanical properties of materials used in their construction. These tests can include assessments of strength, durability, biocompatibility, and other factors that are critical to ensuring the safety and efficacy of medical devices.

Medical device manufacturers must comply with regulatory standards for materials testing to ensure that their products meet specific requirements for performance, safety, and quality. These standards may vary depending on the type of device, its intended use, and the country or region in which it will be marketed and sold.

Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD) is a genetic disorder characterized by progressive muscle weakness and degeneration. It is caused by the absence of dystrophin, a protein that helps keep muscle cells intact. Without dystrophin, the muscle cells break down and are replaced with scar tissue, leading to loss of muscle function over time.

DMD primarily affects boys, as it is inherited in an X-linked recessive pattern, meaning that females who carry one affected X chromosome typically do not show symptoms but can pass the gene on to their offspring. Symptoms usually begin in early childhood and include difficulty with motor skills such as walking, running, and climbing stairs. Over time, the muscle weakness progresses and can lead to loss of ambulation, respiratory and cardiac complications, and ultimately, premature death.

Currently, there is no cure for DMD, but various treatments such as corticosteroids, physical therapy, and assisted ventilation can help manage symptoms and improve quality of life. Gene therapy approaches are also being investigated as potential treatments for this disorder.

Transcription factors are proteins that play a crucial role in regulating gene expression by controlling the transcription of DNA to messenger RNA (mRNA). They function by binding to specific DNA sequences, known as response elements, located in the promoter region or enhancer regions of target genes. This binding can either activate or repress the initiation of transcription, depending on the properties and interactions of the particular transcription factor. Transcription factors often act as part of a complex network of regulatory proteins that determine the precise spatiotemporal patterns of gene expression during development, differentiation, and homeostasis in an organism.

Epithelial cells are types of cells that cover the outer surfaces of the body, line the inner surfaces of organs and glands, and form the lining of blood vessels and body cavities. They provide a protective barrier against the external environment, regulate the movement of materials between the internal and external environments, and are involved in the sense of touch, temperature, and pain. Epithelial cells can be squamous (flat and thin), cuboidal (square-shaped and of equal height), or columnar (tall and narrow) in shape and are classified based on their location and function.

Retinaldehyde, also known as retinal, is a form of vitamin A that is essential for vision. It is the aldehyde form of retinol (vitamin A alcohol) and is involved in the visual cycle, where it plays a crucial role in the process of converting light into electrical signals that are sent to the brain.

When light hits the retina, it activates a protein called rhodopsin, which contains retinaldehyde as one of its components. This activation causes a chemical change in retinaldehyde, leading to the generation of an electrical signal that is transmitted to the brain via the optic nerve.

Retinaldehyde is also involved in other physiological processes, including the regulation of gene expression and cell growth and differentiation. It can be synthesized in the body from beta-carotene, a pigment found in fruits and vegetables, or obtained directly from animal sources such as liver, fish liver oil, and dairy products.

"Bone" is the hard, dense connective tissue that makes up the skeleton of vertebrate animals. It provides support and protection for the body's internal organs, and serves as a attachment site for muscles, tendons, and ligaments. Bone is composed of cells called osteoblasts and osteoclasts, which are responsible for bone formation and resorption, respectively, and an extracellular matrix made up of collagen fibers and mineral crystals.

Bones can be classified into two main types: compact bone and spongy bone. Compact bone is dense and hard, and makes up the outer layer of all bones and the shafts of long bones. Spongy bone is less dense and contains large spaces, and makes up the ends of long bones and the interior of flat and irregular bones.

The human body has 206 bones in total. They can be further classified into five categories based on their shape: long bones, short bones, flat bones, irregular bones, and sesamoid bones.

A hydrogel is a biomaterial that is composed of a three-dimensional network of crosslinked polymers, which are able to absorb and retain a significant amount of water or biological fluids while maintaining their structure. Hydrogels are similar to natural tissues in their water content, making them suitable for various medical applications such as contact lenses, wound dressings, drug delivery systems, tissue engineering, and regenerative medicine.

Hydrogels can be synthesized from a variety of materials, including synthetic polymers like polyethylene glycol (PEG) or natural polymers like collagen, hyaluronic acid, or chitosan. The properties of hydrogels, such as their mechanical strength, degradation rate, and biocompatibility, can be tailored to specific applications by adjusting the type and degree of crosslinking, the molecular weight of the polymers, and the addition of functional groups or drugs.

Hydrogels have shown great potential in medical research and clinical practice due to their ability to mimic the natural environment of cells and tissues, provide sustained drug release, and promote tissue regeneration.

Beta-catenin is a protein that plays a crucial role in gene transcription and cell-cell adhesion. It is a key component of the Wnt signaling pathway, which regulates various processes such as cell proliferation, differentiation, and migration during embryonic development and tissue homeostasis in adults.

In the absence of Wnt signals, beta-catenin forms a complex with other proteins, including adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) and axin, which targets it for degradation by the proteasome. When Wnt ligands bind to their receptors, this complex is disrupted, allowing beta-catenin to accumulate in the cytoplasm and translocate to the nucleus. In the nucleus, beta-catenin interacts with T cell factor/lymphoid enhancer-binding factor (TCF/LEF) transcription factors to activate the transcription of target genes involved in cell fate determination, survival, and proliferation.

Mutations in the genes encoding components of the Wnt signaling pathway, including beta-catenin, have been implicated in various human diseases, such as cancer, developmental disorders, and degenerative conditions.

Cartilage is a type of connective tissue that is found throughout the body in various forms. It is made up of specialized cells called chondrocytes, which are embedded in a firm, flexible matrix composed of collagen fibers and proteoglycans. This unique structure gives cartilage its characteristic properties of being both strong and flexible.

There are three main types of cartilage in the human body: hyaline cartilage, elastic cartilage, and fibrocartilage.

1. Hyaline cartilage is the most common type and is found in areas such as the articular surfaces of bones (where they meet to form joints), the nose, trachea, and larynx. It has a smooth, glassy appearance and provides a smooth, lubricated surface for joint movement.
2. Elastic cartilage contains more elastin fibers than hyaline cartilage, which gives it greater flexibility and resilience. It is found in structures such as the external ear and parts of the larynx and epiglottis.
3. Fibrocartilage has a higher proportion of collagen fibers and fewer chondrocytes than hyaline or elastic cartilage. It is found in areas that require high tensile strength, such as the intervertebral discs, menisci (found in joints like the knee), and the pubic symphysis.

Cartilage plays a crucial role in supporting and protecting various structures within the body, allowing for smooth movement and providing a cushion between bones to absorb shock and prevent wear and tear. However, cartilage has limited capacity for self-repair and regeneration, making damage or degeneration of cartilage tissue a significant concern in conditions such as osteoarthritis.

Aging is a complex, progressive and inevitable process of bodily changes over time, characterized by the accumulation of cellular damage and degenerative changes that eventually lead to increased vulnerability to disease and death. It involves various biological, genetic, environmental, and lifestyle factors that contribute to the decline in physical and mental functions. The medical field studies aging through the discipline of gerontology, which aims to understand the underlying mechanisms of aging and develop interventions to promote healthy aging and extend the human healthspan.

Epithelium is the tissue that covers the outer surface of the body, lines the internal cavities and organs, and forms various glands. It is composed of one or more layers of tightly packed cells that have a uniform shape and size, and rest on a basement membrane. Epithelial tissues are avascular, meaning they do not contain blood vessels, and are supplied with nutrients by diffusion from the underlying connective tissue.

Epithelial cells perform a variety of functions, including protection, secretion, absorption, excretion, and sensation. They can be classified based on their shape and the number of cell layers they contain. The main types of epithelium are:

1. Squamous epithelium: composed of flat, scalelike cells that fit together like tiles on a roof. It forms the lining of blood vessels, air sacs in the lungs, and the outermost layer of the skin.
2. Cuboidal epithelium: composed of cube-shaped cells with equal height and width. It is found in glands, tubules, and ducts.
3. Columnar epithelium: composed of tall, rectangular cells that are taller than they are wide. It lines the respiratory, digestive, and reproductive tracts.
4. Pseudostratified epithelium: appears stratified or layered but is actually made up of a single layer of cells that vary in height. The nuclei of these cells appear at different levels, giving the tissue a stratified appearance. It lines the respiratory and reproductive tracts.
5. Transitional epithelium: composed of several layers of cells that can stretch and change shape to accommodate changes in volume. It is found in the urinary bladder and ureters.

Epithelial tissue provides a barrier between the internal and external environments, protecting the body from physical, chemical, and biological damage. It also plays a crucial role in maintaining homeostasis by regulating the exchange of substances between the body and its environment.

Collagen is the most abundant protein in the human body, and it is a major component of connective tissues such as tendons, ligaments, skin, and bones. Collagen provides structure and strength to these tissues and helps them to withstand stretching and tension. It is made up of long chains of amino acids, primarily glycine, proline, and hydroxyproline, which are arranged in a triple helix structure. There are at least 16 different types of collagen found in the body, each with slightly different structures and functions. Collagen is important for maintaining the integrity and health of tissues throughout the body, and it has been studied for its potential therapeutic uses in various medical conditions.

Electron microscopy (EM) is a type of microscopy that uses a beam of electrons to create an image of the sample being examined, resulting in much higher magnification and resolution than light microscopy. There are several types of electron microscopy, including transmission electron microscopy (TEM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and reflection electron microscopy (REM).

In TEM, a beam of electrons is transmitted through a thin slice of the sample, and the electrons that pass through the sample are focused to form an image. This technique can provide detailed information about the internal structure of cells, viruses, and other biological specimens, as well as the composition and structure of materials at the atomic level.

In SEM, a beam of electrons is scanned across the surface of the sample, and the electrons that are scattered back from the surface are detected to create an image. This technique can provide information about the topography and composition of surfaces, as well as the structure of materials at the microscopic level.

REM is a variation of SEM in which the beam of electrons is reflected off the surface of the sample, rather than scattered back from it. This technique can provide information about the surface chemistry and composition of materials.

Electron microscopy has a wide range of applications in biology, medicine, and materials science, including the study of cellular structure and function, disease diagnosis, and the development of new materials and technologies.

Vestibular hair cells are specialized sensory receptor cells located in the vestibular system of the inner ear. They play a crucial role in detecting and mediating our sense of balance and spatial orientation by converting mechanical stimuli, such as head movements and gravity, into electrical signals that are sent to the brain.

The hair cells are shaped like a tuft of hair, with stereocilia projecting from their tops. These stereocilia are arranged in rows of graded height, and they are embedded in a gel-like structure within the vestibular organ. When the head moves or changes position, the movement causes deflection of the stereocilia, which opens ion channels at their tips and triggers nerve impulses that are sent to the brain via the vestibular nerve.

There are two types of vestibular hair cells: type I and type II. Type I hair cells have a large, spherical shape and are more sensitive to changes in head position, while type II hair cells are more cylindrical in shape and respond to both linear and angular acceleration. Together, these hair cells help us maintain our balance, coordinate our movements, and keep our eyes focused during head movements.

The lateral line system is a sensory organ found in aquatic animals, such as fish and some aquatic amphibians. It is a series of fluid-filled canals and sensory cells that run along the sides of the body, head, and fins. These sensory cells are called neuromasts and contain hair cells that respond to vibrations and water movements. The lateral line system helps these animals detect movement, pressure changes, and vibrations in their aquatic environment, which aids in schooling behavior, prey detection, and avoiding predators.

The cellular microenvironment refers to the sum of all physical and biochemical factors in the immediate vicinity of a cell that influence its behavior and function. This includes elements such as:

1. Extracellular matrix (ECM): The non-cellular component that provides structural support, anchorage, and biochemical cues to cells through various molecules like collagens, fibronectin, and laminins.
2. Soluble factors: These include growth factors, hormones, cytokines, and chemokines that bind to cell surface receptors and modulate cellular responses.
3. Neighboring cells: The types and states of nearby cells can significantly impact a cell's behavior through direct contact, paracrine signaling, or competition for resources.
4. Physical conditions: Variables such as temperature, pH, oxygen tension, and mechanical stresses (e.g., stiffness, strain) also contribute to the cellular microenvironment.
5. Biochemical gradients: Concentration gradients of molecules within the ECM or surrounding fluid can guide cell migration, differentiation, and other responses.

Collectively, these factors interact to create a complex and dynamic milieu that regulates various aspects of cellular physiology, including proliferation, differentiation, survival, and motility. Understanding the cellular microenvironment is crucial for developing effective therapies and tissue engineering strategies in regenerative medicine and cancer treatment.

The Tibial nerve is a major branch of the sciatic nerve that originates in the lower back and runs through the buttock and leg. It provides motor (nerve impulses that control muscle movement) and sensory (nerve impulses that convey information about touch, temperature, and pain) innervation to several muscles and skin regions in the lower limb.

More specifically, the Tibial nerve supplies the following structures:

1. Motor Innervation: The Tibial nerve provides motor innervation to the muscles in the back of the leg (posterior compartment), including the calf muscles (gastrocnemius and soleus) and the small muscles in the foot (intrinsic muscles). These muscles are responsible for plantarflexion (pointing the foot downward) and inversion (turning the foot inward) of the foot.
2. Sensory Innervation: The Tibial nerve provides sensory innervation to the skin on the sole of the foot, as well as the heel and some parts of the lower leg.

The Tibial nerve travels down the leg, passing behind the knee and through the calf, where it eventually joins with the common fibular (peroneal) nerve to form the tibial-fibular trunk. This trunk then divides into several smaller nerves that innervate the foot's intrinsic muscles and skin.

Damage or injury to the Tibial nerve can result in various symptoms, such as weakness or paralysis of the calf and foot muscles, numbness or tingling sensations in the sole of the foot, and difficulty walking or standing on tiptoes.

Organogenesis is the process of formation and development of organs during embryonic growth. It involves the complex interactions of cells, tissues, and signaling molecules that lead to the creation of specialized structures in the body. This process begins in the early stages of embryonic development, around week 4-8, and continues until birth. During organogenesis, the three primary germ layers (ectoderm, mesoderm, and endoderm) differentiate into various cell types and organize themselves into specific structures that will eventually form the functional organs of the body. Abnormalities in organogenesis can result in congenital disorders or birth defects.

Osteoblasts are specialized bone-forming cells that are derived from mesenchymal stem cells. They play a crucial role in the process of bone formation and remodeling. Osteoblasts synthesize, secrete, and mineralize the organic matrix of bones, which is mainly composed of type I collagen.

These cells have receptors for various hormones and growth factors that regulate their activity, such as parathyroid hormone, vitamin D, and transforming growth factor-beta. When osteoblasts are not actively producing bone matrix, they can become trapped within the matrix they produce, where they differentiate into osteocytes, which are mature bone cells that play a role in maintaining bone structure and responding to mechanical stress.

Abnormalities in osteoblast function can lead to various bone diseases, such as osteoporosis, osteogenesis imperfecta, and Paget's disease of bone.

In medical terms, the skin is the largest organ of the human body. It consists of two main layers: the epidermis (outer layer) and dermis (inner layer), as well as accessory structures like hair follicles, sweat glands, and oil glands. The skin plays a crucial role in protecting us from external factors such as bacteria, viruses, and environmental hazards, while also regulating body temperature and enabling the sense of touch.

A medical definition for "plant shoots" may not be readily available, as the term is primarily used in botany and horticulture. However, I can provide you with a general definition:

Plant shoots refer to the above-ground portion of a plant, which typically includes structures like stems, leaves, flowers, and buds. Shoots originate from the seed or the growing tip of the plant and are responsible for photosynthesis, nutrient absorption, and reproduction. In some contexts, "plant shoots" might also refer to new growth that emerges from an existing plant, such as when a leaf or stem sprouts a new branch or flower.

Dental enamel is the hard, outermost layer of a tooth that protects the dentin and pulp inside. It is primarily made up of minerals, mainly hydroxyapatite, and contains very little organic material. However, during the formation of dental enamel, proteins are synthesized and secreted by ameloblast cells, which help in the development and mineralization of the enamel. These proteins play a crucial role in the proper formation and structure of the enamel.

Some of the main dental enamel proteins include:

1. Amelogenin: This is the most abundant protein found in developing enamel, accounting for about 90% of the organic matrix. Amelogenin helps regulate the growth and organization of hydroxyapatite crystals during mineralization. It also plays a role in determining the final hardness and structure of the enamel.

2. Enamelin: This protein is the second most abundant protein in developing enamel, accounting for about 5-10% of the organic matrix. Enamelin is involved in the elongation and thickening of hydroxyapatite crystals during mineralization. It also helps maintain the stability of the enamel structure.

3. Ameloblastin: This protein is produced by ameloblast cells and is essential for proper enamel formation. Ameloblastin plays a role in regulating crystal growth, promoting adhesion between crystals, and maintaining the structural integrity of the enamel.

4. Tuftelin: This protein is found in both dentin and enamel but is more abundant in enamel. Tuftelin is involved in the initiation of mineralization and helps regulate crystal growth during this process.

5. Dentin sialophosphoprotein (DSPP): Although primarily associated with dentin formation, DSPP is also found in developing enamel. It plays a role in regulating crystal growth and promoting adhesion between crystals during mineralization.

After the formation of dental enamel is complete, these proteins are largely degraded and removed, leaving behind the highly mineralized and hard tissue that characterizes mature enamel. However, traces of these proteins may still be present in the enamel and could potentially play a role in its structure and properties.

Alveolar bone loss refers to the breakdown and resorption of the alveolar process of the jawbone, which is the part of the jaw that contains the sockets of the teeth. This type of bone loss is often caused by periodontal disease, a chronic inflammation of the gums and surrounding tissues that can lead to the destruction of the structures that support the teeth.

In advanced stages of periodontal disease, the alveolar bone can become severely damaged or destroyed, leading to tooth loss. Alveolar bone loss can also occur as a result of other conditions, such as osteoporosis, trauma, or tumors. Dental X-rays and other imaging techniques are often used to diagnose and monitor alveolar bone loss. Treatment may include deep cleaning of the teeth and gums, medications, surgery, or tooth extraction in severe cases.

Afferent neurons, also known as sensory neurons, are a type of nerve cell that conducts impulses or signals from peripheral receptors towards the central nervous system (CNS), which includes the brain and spinal cord. These neurons are responsible for transmitting sensory information such as touch, temperature, pain, sound, and light to the CNS for processing and interpretation. Afferent neurons have specialized receptor endings that detect changes in the environment and convert them into electrical signals, which are then transmitted to the CNS via synapses with other neurons. Once the signals reach the CNS, they are processed and integrated with other information to produce a response or reaction to the stimulus.

I'm happy to help! "Rats, Inbred Lew" is a specific strain of laboratory rats that have been inbred for research purposes. The "Lew" part of the name refers to the location where they were first developed, the Lewis Institute in Lake Bluff, Illinois, USA.

Inbreeding is a process of mating closely related individuals over many generations to create a genetically homogeneous population. This results in a high degree of genetic similarity among members of the strain, making them ideal for use as experimental models because any differences observed between individuals are more likely to be due to the experimental manipulation rather than genetic variation.

Inbred Lew rats have been widely used in biomedical research, particularly in studies related to hypertension and cardiovascular disease. They exhibit a number of unique characteristics that make them useful for these types of studies, including their susceptibility to developing high blood pressure when fed a high-salt diet or given certain drugs.

It's important to note that while inbred strains like Lew rats can be very useful tools for researchers, they are not perfect models for human disease. Because they have been bred in a controlled environment and selected for specific traits, they may not respond to experimental manipulations in the same way that humans or other animals would. Therefore, it's important to interpret findings from these studies with caution and consider multiple lines of evidence before drawing any firm conclusions.

A biological marker, often referred to as a biomarker, is a measurable indicator that reflects the presence or severity of a disease state, or a response to a therapeutic intervention. Biomarkers can be found in various materials such as blood, tissues, or bodily fluids, and they can take many forms, including molecular, histologic, radiographic, or physiological measurements.

In the context of medical research and clinical practice, biomarkers are used for a variety of purposes, such as:

1. Diagnosis: Biomarkers can help diagnose a disease by indicating the presence or absence of a particular condition. For example, prostate-specific antigen (PSA) is a biomarker used to detect prostate cancer.
2. Monitoring: Biomarkers can be used to monitor the progression or regression of a disease over time. For instance, hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) levels are monitored in diabetes patients to assess long-term blood glucose control.
3. Predicting: Biomarkers can help predict the likelihood of developing a particular disease or the risk of a negative outcome. For example, the presence of certain genetic mutations can indicate an increased risk for breast cancer.
4. Response to treatment: Biomarkers can be used to evaluate the effectiveness of a specific treatment by measuring changes in the biomarker levels before and after the intervention. This is particularly useful in personalized medicine, where treatments are tailored to individual patients based on their unique biomarker profiles.

It's important to note that for a biomarker to be considered clinically valid and useful, it must undergo rigorous validation through well-designed studies, including demonstrating sensitivity, specificity, reproducibility, and clinical relevance.

Chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans (CSPGs) are complex molecules found in the extracellular matrix of various connective tissues, including cartilage. They are composed of a core protein covalently linked to one or more glycosaminoglycan (GAG) chains, such as chondroitin sulfate and dermatan sulfate.

CSPGs play important roles in the structure and function of tissues, including:

1. Regulating water content and providing resilience to tissues due to their high negative charge, which attracts cations and bound water molecules.
2. Interacting with other matrix components, such as collagen and elastin, to form a highly organized network that provides tensile strength and elasticity.
3. Modulating cell behavior by interacting with various growth factors, cytokines, and cell surface receptors, thereby influencing processes like cell adhesion, proliferation, differentiation, and migration.
4. Contributing to the maintenance of the extracellular matrix homeostasis through their involvement in matrix turnover and remodeling.

In articular cartilage, CSPGs are particularly abundant and contribute significantly to its load-bearing capacity and overall health. Dysregulation of CSPGs has been implicated in various pathological conditions, such as osteoarthritis, where altered proteoglycan composition and content can lead to cartilage degradation and joint dysfunction.

Heart injuries, also known as cardiac injuries, refer to any damage or harm caused to the heart muscle, valves, or surrounding structures. This can result from various causes such as blunt trauma (e.g., car accidents, falls), penetrating trauma (e.g., gunshot wounds, stabbing), or medical conditions like heart attacks (myocardial infarction) and infections (e.g., myocarditis, endocarditis).

Some common types of heart injuries include:

1. Contusions: Bruising of the heart muscle due to blunt trauma.
2. Myocardial infarctions: Damage to the heart muscle caused by insufficient blood supply, often due to blocked coronary arteries.
3. Cardiac rupture: A rare but life-threatening condition where the heart muscle tears or breaks open, usually resulting from severe trauma or complications from a myocardial infarction.
4. Valvular damage: Disruption of the heart valves' function due to injury or infection, leading to leakage (regurgitation) or narrowing (stenosis).
5. Pericardial injuries: Damage to the pericardium, the sac surrounding the heart, which can result in fluid accumulation (pericardial effusion), inflammation (pericarditis), or tamponade (compression of the heart by excess fluid).
6. Arrhythmias: Irregular heart rhythms caused by damage to the heart's electrical conduction system.

Timely diagnosis and appropriate treatment are crucial for managing heart injuries, as they can lead to severe complications or even be fatal if left untreated.

Gelatin is not strictly a medical term, but it is often used in medical contexts. Medically, gelatin is recognized as a protein-rich substance that is derived from collagen, which is found in the skin, bones, and connective tissue of animals. It is commonly used in the production of various medical and pharmaceutical products such as capsules, wound dressings, and drug delivery systems due to its biocompatibility and ability to form gels.

In a broader sense, gelatin is a translucent, colorless, flavorless food ingredient that is derived from collagen through a process called hydrolysis. It is widely used in the food industry as a gelling agent, thickener, stabilizer, and texturizer in various foods such as candies, desserts, marshmallows, and yogurts.

It's worth noting that while gelatin has many uses, it may not be suitable for vegetarians or those with dietary restrictions since it is derived from animal products.

Annelida is a phylum of bilaterally symmetrical, segmented animals that includes earthworms, leeches, and marine polychaetes (bristle worms). The name "Annelida" comes from the Latin word "annellus," meaning "little ring," which refers to the distinct segments found in these animals.

Each segment in annelids contains a pair of bundled nerves called the ventral nerve cord, and many also contain circular and longitudinal muscles that enable the animal to move by contracting and relaxing these muscles in a wave-like motion. Some annelids have specialized segments for functions such as reproduction or respiration.

Annelids are primarily aquatic animals, although some terrestrial species like earthworms have evolved to live on land. They vary in size from tiny marine worms that are only a few millimeters long to large marine polychaetes that can reach over a meter in length.

Annelids are important decomposers and help break down dead organic matter, returning nutrients to the soil or water. Some species of annelids are also parasitic, feeding on the blood or tissues of other animals. Overall, annelids play a crucial role in many aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems.

Necrosis is the premature death of cells or tissues due to damage or injury, such as from infection, trauma, infarction (lack of blood supply), or toxic substances. It's a pathological process that results in the uncontrolled and passive degradation of cellular components, ultimately leading to the release of intracellular contents into the extracellular space. This can cause local inflammation and may lead to further tissue damage if not treated promptly.

There are different types of necrosis, including coagulative, liquefactive, caseous, fat, fibrinoid, and gangrenous necrosis, each with distinct histological features depending on the underlying cause and the affected tissues or organs.

"Newborn animals" refers to the very young offspring of animals that have recently been born. In medical terminology, newborns are often referred to as "neonates," and they are classified as such from birth until about 28 days of age. During this time period, newborn animals are particularly vulnerable and require close monitoring and care to ensure their survival and healthy development.

The specific needs of newborn animals can vary widely depending on the species, but generally, they require warmth, nutrition, hydration, and protection from harm. In many cases, newborns are unable to regulate their own body temperature or feed themselves, so they rely heavily on their mothers for care and support.

In medical settings, newborn animals may be examined and treated by veterinarians to ensure that they are healthy and receiving the care they need. This can include providing medical interventions such as feeding tubes, antibiotics, or other treatments as needed to address any health issues that arise. Overall, the care and support of newborn animals is an important aspect of animal medicine and conservation efforts.

Embryonic stem cells are a type of pluripotent stem cell that are derived from the inner cell mass of a blastocyst, which is a very early-stage embryo. These cells have the ability to differentiate into any cell type in the body, making them a promising area of research for regenerative medicine and the study of human development and disease. Embryonic stem cells are typically obtained from surplus embryos created during in vitro fertilization (IVF) procedures, with the consent of the donors. The use of embryonic stem cells is a controversial issue due to ethical concerns surrounding the destruction of human embryos.

A nonmammalian embryo refers to the developing organism in animals other than mammals, from the fertilized egg (zygote) stage until hatching or birth. In nonmammalian species, the developmental stages and terminology differ from those used in mammals. The term "embryo" is generally applied to the developing organism up until a specific stage of development that is characterized by the formation of major organs and structures. After this point, the developing organism is referred to as a "larva," "juvenile," or other species-specific terminology.

The study of nonmammalian embryos has played an important role in our understanding of developmental biology and evolutionary developmental biology (evo-devo). By comparing the developmental processes across different animal groups, researchers can gain insights into the evolutionary origins and diversification of body plans and structures. Additionally, nonmammalian embryos are often used as model systems for studying basic biological processes, such as cell division, gene regulation, and pattern formation.

In medical terms, the heart is a muscular organ located in the thoracic cavity that functions as a pump to circulate blood throughout the body. It's responsible for delivering oxygen and nutrients to the tissues and removing carbon dioxide and other wastes. The human heart is divided into four chambers: two atria on the top and two ventricles on the bottom. The right side of the heart receives deoxygenated blood from the body and pumps it to the lungs, while the left side receives oxygenated blood from the lungs and pumps it out to the rest of the body. The heart's rhythmic contractions and relaxations are regulated by a complex electrical conduction system.

Look up regeneration, regenerate, or regenerative in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. Regeneration may refer to: Regeneration ( ... Rider Haggard Regeneration (novel), a novel by Pat Barker Regeneration, a book by Thomas Hunt Morgan Regeneration (sculpture), ... Regeneration (1915 film), a film starring John McCann Regeneration (1923 film), a Norman Studios production Regeneration (1997 ... Regeneration), a political party in Iceland founded in 2016 Regeneration (Stanley Cowell album) (1976) Regeneration (Roy ...
The Regeneration was characterized by attempts to develop the country economically and modernize it, and the associated ... Although it cannot be delimited definitely in the time, the period of the Regeneration endured for about 17 years, ending with ... Despite the ministry that resulted from the strike, presided over by marshal Saldanha, the main person of the Regeneration was ... In the history of Portugal, the Regeneration (Portuguese: Regeneração) is the name given to the period of the Portuguese ...
... in the brain is the ability of cells to engage in the repair and regeneration process. While the brain ... Brain damage itself can induce endogenous regeneration. Many studies have proven endogenous regeneration as a possible ... Although endogenous regeneration methods are showing some promising evidence in treating brain ischemia, the current body of ... In the study of the endogenous regeneration of the brain done by Scharff and co-researchers, damaged neurons in a songbird ...
... is a stem cell based regenerative medicine procedure in the field of tissue engineering and stem cell ... "Stem cell sources for tooth regeneration: current status and future prospects". Frontiers in Physiology. 5: 36. doi:10.3389/ ...
The Regeneration Trilogy is a series of three novels by Pat Barker on the subject of the First World War. In 2012, The Observer ... named it as one of "The 10 best historical novels". Regeneration (1991) The Eye in the Door (1993) The Ghost Road (1995) ...
This regeneration is not to be confused with tooth regeneration. Craniofacial regrowth is broadly related to the mechanisms of ... Following facial tissue injury, craniofacial regeneration occurs in a sequence of steps. The process of regeneration is ... are important in inducing the differentiation of MSCs during bone regeneration. Bone regeneration in adults appears to mimic ... Craniofacial regeneration refers to the biological process by which the skull and face regrow to heal an injury. This page ...
Regeneration is a historical and anti-war novel by Pat Barker, first published in 1991. The novel was a Booker Prize nominee ... Because Regeneration is a novel that focuses on the First World War, it explores many of the themes common to literature ... It is the first of three novels in the Regeneration Trilogy of novels on the First World War, the other two being The Eye in ... W.H.R. Rivers and his experiments with nerve regeneration. In a 2004 interview with literary critic Rob Nixon in the journal ...
... at silentera.com Wikimedia Commons has media related to His Regeneration. His Regeneration at IMDb v t e ( ... His Regeneration is a 1915 American silent comedy film made by Essanay Studios. It featured Charlie Chaplin in an uncredited ...
... may refer to: Environmental remediation (through active intervention) autonomous regeneration ( ... ecology) This disambiguation page lists articles associated with the title Environmental regeneration. If an internal link led ...
The term "regeneration" is also affected by subtle shifts in meaning. John Calvin considered regeneration to represent the ... Presumptive regeneration (also presupposed regeneration) is the idea often associated with Abraham Kuyper that parents should ... Spindleworks.com article opposing presumptive regeneration Apuritansmind.com article in support of presumptive regeneration ( ... on John 3 and many of his defenses of infant baptism in the Institutes show this interest not to consider regeneration only as ...
Regeneration refers to ecosystems replenishing what is being eaten, disturbed, or harvested. Regeneration's biggest force is ... For regeneration to occur, active restoration must be attempted. Bush regeneration Biocapacity Ecological stability Ecoscaping ... In ecology regeneration is the ability of an ecosystem - specifically, the environment and its living population - to renew and ... The new growth of seedlings and community assembly process is known as regeneration in ecology. As ecological succession sets ...
The motto of Regeneration was "one nation, one goal, one God" (una nación, un lema, un Dios). The movement was mainly ... The Regeneration (Spanish: La Regeneración) was a political movement that emerged in Colombia in the late second half of the ... Regeneration established the basis for the return of a protectionist state, in which the central government, was again endowed ... Regeneration is the ideologic definition of the contentious dispute between the two main parties to dispute power Centralists ...
Vaginal Tissue Regeneration Device and Method for Regeneration of Vaginal Lining using Vibration Therapy". May 2012 Barnard, E ... "Bone regeneration and stem cells." 2011 Arvidson, K. et al. Journal of Cellular and Molecular Medicine 15, No 4, pp. 718-746. " ... Genital regeneration encompasses various forms of treatment for genital anomalies. The goal of these treatments is to restore ... As is the case in most scientific pursuits, these accomplishments might be applied to other forms of regeneration and vice ...
"My Regeneration - Joe Elliott". Allmusic. Retrieved 29 March 2013. "My Regeneration Vol. 1". Rolling Stone. Retrieved 29 March ... My ReGeneration is the debut album by Joe Elliott's Down 'n' Outz, the band featuring members of Def Leppard, The Quireboys and ...
"Regeneration". www.biblebb.com. "Regeneration". Real Bible Believers. 3 April 2020. Retrieved 8 May 2021. "Matthew 19:28 Jesus ... Reformed theology teaches that regeneration precedes faith through the doctrine of Total depravity. Before regeneration a ... and that we have an earnest of this regeneration in baptism." Regeneration is further described as the "secret operation of the ... ISBN 0830828419 Wikiquote has quotations related to Regeneration (theology). "Regeneration" . Encyclopedia Americana. 1920. ( ...
The following describes regeneration following a partial hepatectomy. Following partial hepatectomy, regeneration occurs in ... However, the speed of liver regeneration depends on whether Interleukin 6 is overexpressed. Liver regeneration is also critical ... Tanaka M, Miyajima A (2016-10-18). "Liver regeneration and fibrosis after inflammation". Inflammation and Regeneration. 36 (1 ... Liver regeneration is the process by which the liver is able to replace lost liver tissue. The liver is the only visceral organ ...
345 - 351 An Environmental Review of Waste Oils Regeneration. Why the Regeneration of Waste Oils Must Remain an EU Policy ... Regeneration by physical methods include: sedimentation. This method is often used as the first stage in regeneration. The ... Oil regeneration - is extraction of contaminants from oil in order to restore its original properties to be used equally with ... Isah, A. G., Abdulkadir, M., Onifade, K. R., Musa, U., Garba, M. U., Bawa, A. A and Sani, Y. (3-5 July 2013). Regeneration of ...
The two most well-studied mechanisms of retinal regeneration are cell-mediated regeneration and cellular transplantation. ... Retinal regeneration in zebrafish is mediated by Muller glia, which dedifferentiate into stem-like cells and proliferate into ... Retinal regeneration refers to the restoration of vision in vertebrates that have suffered retinal lesions or retinal ... While Muller glia division is responsible for the regeneration of the retina in all cases of retinal damage, the case of ...
Thermal regeneration is the most prolific regeneration technique but has drawbacks in terms of high energy and commercial costs ... Studies on cathodic regeneration have shown regeneration efficiencies for adsorbed organic pollutants such as phenols of the ... Electrochemical regeneration represents an alternative to thermal regeneration commonly used in waste water treatment ... The performance of different regeneration methods can be directly compared using the regeneration efficiency. This is defined ...
... refers to people of all ages who share a common interest in renewable resources, recycling and other means of ... The concepts of circular design and systems thinking, commonly used by people in the Regeneration, stem from a long line of ... Social networks are enabling members of the Regeneration to interact and share ideas, tools, and resources with each other, ... GreenBiz Why you need to understand Ecological Design The Regeneration (Articles about possible neologisms from August 2021, ...
Regeneration is an outdoor 1975 concrete sculpture designed by Alan Collins, located on the Andrews University campus in ... Regeneration was designed by Alan Collins in 1971, specifically for the patio of Andrews University's Science Complex. Andrews ...
... , as a particular form of ecological regeneration within the field of restoration ecology, is creating new ...
... was an Urban Regeneration Company (URC) set up to help redevelop Camborne, Pool and Redruth in Cornwall, ... Cornwall portal CPR Regeneration website Cornwall "down under" by L. J. Bullen Pool Centre Starts Work v t e (Articles lacking ... Urban Regeneration Companies, All stub articles, Cornwall organisation stubs). ...
... , a form of natural area restoration, is the term used in Australia for the ecological restoration of remnant ... Bush regeneration attempts to protect and enhance the floral biodiversity in an area by providing conditions conducive to the ... The balance is tipped back towards regeneration. Keep it that way, by always working where the strongest area of bush meets the ... "The Regeneration of Wingham Brush, NSW". Pywell, Richard (2003). "Plant traits as predictors of performance in ecological ...
Regeneration among hydra occurs as foot regeneration arising from the basal part of the body, and head regeneration, arising ... While reparative regeneration is a rare phenomenon in mammals, it does occur. A well-documented example is regeneration of the ... Limited regeneration of limbs occurs in most fishes and salamanders, and tail regeneration takes place in larval frogs and ... Segmental regeneration has been gained and lost during annelid evolution, as seen in oligochaetes, where head regeneration has ...
... and this form of regeneration is now called Wolffian regeneration. The priority issue between Colucci and Wolff is examined in ... The regeneration of the lens of the eye has been studied, mostly in amphibians and rabbits, from the 18th century. In the 21st ... The regeneration of the lens has been studied in several vertebrate species, especially the newt, which is able to repeatedly ... A lens regeneration technique was trialled in a collaboration between Sun Yat-sen University and University of California, San ...
The former signifies regeneration; the latter, redemption." "If by baptismal regeneration the accusers mean that the act of ... If God takes the first step in dying for us, He also takes the first step in saving through the free gift of regeneration ... It is done entirely by God's deed, by the one act of the washing and the activity of the Spirit through which regeneration and ... To not think baptism is the cause of regeneration, it doesn't mean you think "it's just a symbol." And it doesn't mean you ...
Fiber-optic communication#Regeneration "signal regeneration". Federal Standard 1037. Retrieved Nov 21, 2008. v t e (Articles ... In telecommunications, signal regeneration is signal processing that restores a signal, recovering its original characteristics ...
... unidirectional regeneration, disk-dependent bidirectional regeneration, and disk-independent bidirectional regeneration. In ... and escape predators during the regeneration period. Unidirectional regeneration is also the most common form of regeneration ... Bidirectional regeneration is a robust form of regeneration defined by the ability to regrow the main body axis after whole ... Unidirectional regeneration is the simplest form of regeneration as the majority of the disk is intact, allowing the starfish ...
Regeneration essay [1] by Marilyn Ann Moss at National Film Registry Regeneration at AllMovie Regeneration at IMDb Regeneration ... Regeneration (alternately called The Regeneration) is a 1915 American silent biographical crime drama co-written and directed ... Regeneration was previously thought to be lost but was rediscovered in the 1970s. A copy of the film is preserved and held by ... Regeneration was originally released on September 13, 1915, to critical acclaim and was a box office hit. It was re-released to ...
Look up regeneration, regenerate, or regenerative in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. Regeneration may refer to: Regeneration ( ... Rider Haggard Regeneration (novel), a novel by Pat Barker Regeneration, a book by Thomas Hunt Morgan Regeneration (sculpture), ... Regeneration (1915 film), a film starring John McCann Regeneration (1923 film), a Norman Studios production Regeneration (1997 ... Regeneration), a political party in Iceland founded in 2016 Regeneration (Stanley Cowell album) (1976) Regeneration (Roy ...
by Corinne Heline. Wherever the name of man is spoken the doctrine of imortality is announced. There are two heavens in men;. the one the Luna Cebrum, but in the heart of man is the true microcosmic heaven. Yea, the heart of man is the true heaven of an immortal being,. out of which the soul has never yet come,. which new Olympus and Heaven,. Christ Jesus has chosen for His dwelling place in man.. -Paracelsus THE SEVEN JEWELS AND THE SEVEN STAGES OF INITIATION. These portals, says the Book of the Golden Precepts, lead the aspirant across the waters on the other shore. Each Portal hath a golden key that openeth its gate: these keys are: 1. The key of Charity and Love immortal. 2. The key of Harmony in word and act, the key that counterbalances cause and effect and leaves no further room for Karmic action.. 3. Patience sweet, that naught can ruffle. 4. Indifference to pleasure and pain, illusion conquered, Truth alone perceived.. 5. Dauntless energy that fights its way to supernal Truth out of ...
Regeneration is licensed under a Creative Commons CC BY-SA - Attribution, Share alike 4.0 International License.. Based on a ... 2018) Regeneration. FEMC. Available online at: https://www.uvm.edu/femc/data/archive/project/long-term-soil-monitoring/dataset/ ... work at https://www.uvm.edu/femc/data/archive/project/long-term-soil-monitoring/dataset/regeneration/overview ...
Copyright 2023 Earth Media Partners. All Rights Reserved ...
... plays an integral role in the regeneration of liver tissue. ... Bile plays an integral role in the regeneration of damaged ...
It has long been known that some primitive animals, such as salamanders and starfish, can regrow lost limbs and organs. Somewhere along the evolutionary path, mammals lost that ability, but experiments show that it may be possible to regain it. At the University of Pittsburgh, tiny zebrafish are helping scientists regenerate severely damaged mouse hearts. VOAs George Putic reports.
With increased life of batteries by means of regeneration, use of new batteries will be reduced, thus resulting in lesser ...
Synthesis/Regeneration home page , List of authors , List of issues , Announcement of S/R 25 Tables of contents: 9 10 11 12 13 ... 25 Synthesis/Regeneration Summer 2001. ELECTORAL ALTERNATIVES. Electoral Alternatives. On Historical Moments Ted Glick believes ...
We welcome you to join us in our work to equip and encourage local churches. You can join the F.A.M. or make a one-time gift ...
Regeneration Fight others and stay alive to regain health. Objective Regeneration is a Deathmatch that is also available as a ...
Take a quiz about the important details and events in of Regeneration. ... Regeneration (SparkNotes Literature Guide) Ace your assignments with our guide to Regeneration! ...
... the experience and understanding of the regeneration management process that is neither UK centric nor centr ... 4. Regeneration Opportunities and Challenges: Greece. Joyce Liddle and Ioannis Oikonomopoulos. 5. Regeneration or Redevelopment ... Social Movements and Regeneration. Graeme Chesters. 11. International Perspectives on Regeneration Management: Common Themes ... 7. Local Economic Development, Urban Change and Regeneration in Turkey. Huseyin Gul and Murat Dulupen. 8. Urban Regeneration ...
Accumulating evidence has demonstrated that mitochondria play a key role in axon degeneration and regeneration under physiolog ... Mitochondrial Behavior in Axon Degeneration and Regeneration Front Aging Neurosci. 2021 Mar 8;13:650038. doi: 10.3389/fnagi. ... Accumulating evidence has demonstrated that mitochondria play a key role in axon degeneration and regeneration under ... Keywords: Alzheimers disease; Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis; Parkinsons disease; aging; axon regeneration; mitochondria; ...
Groundbreaking skin regeneration startup helps patients. SkinTE developed new technology helps burn patients regenerate their ...
This joint research model was established in 2006, when DARPA funded the first phase of the tissue regeneration program. In ... CellThera and WPI Advance in Regeneration Study. Company Receives Federal Contract for Restoration of Damaged Muscle ... to extend its research program in tissue regeneration. Under the terms of the contract, CellThera, which is part of WPIs ... company focused on inducing somatic cells to revert to multi-potent states to facilitate wound-healing and tissue regeneration ...
We had already used these two factors to improve bone regeneration in mice in a previous study. But we injected DNA, which can ... In a study just published in Inflammation and Regeneration, Japanese researchers have developed a technique for improving bone ... Zhang, M., et al. (2023) Enhancement of bone regeneration by coadministration of angiogenic and osteogenic factors using ... which improves regeneration of the blood circulatory system, and Runt-related transcription factor 2 (Runx2), which is ...
The mechanism by which agrin can promote heart function and regeneration may be multi-faceted, but the authors also show that ... In vivo, a single administration of agrin promotes cardiac regeneration in adult mice after myocardial infarction, although the ... Together, our results uncover a new inducer of mammalian heart regeneration and highlight fundamental roles of the ... The extracellular matrix protein agrin promotes cardiac regeneration in adult mice after myocardial infarction; it modulates ...
Find out more about our current heritage regeneration projects. ...
This year, the Hilton Budapest enters its fourth phase of regeneration, during which time, the 93 rooms in the south wing will ... After six billion forints worth of renovation works, the Danubius Hotels regeneration project continues. 2018-02-09 ...
Housing regeneration is an essential part of our plans for housing ... View the regeneration timelapse video by Plymouth Community Homes.. Work on the final phase of the regeneration is now underway ... The overall regeneration will be completed in 2025.. Benefits of the regeneration have been visible since as early as 2013/14. ... North Prospect Regeneration. The North Prospect regeneration project led by Plymouth Community Homes (PCH) and supported by ...
Regeneration. Council counts the £15m cost of sterilised city centre.... Plans have been mothballed after it was dramatically ... Green light for regeneration of former industrial site. 29/09/2023 Rachel Covill ...
... ​​Go everywhere in full safety with IVECO BUS.. AVOID ALL THE RISKS OF FORCED HIGH-HEAT REGENERATION ...
Looking at three different forests in the Colombian Andes-natural regeneration, […] ... the open-access journal Tropical Conservation Science compares the impacts on bess beetles of different method to regeneration ... Looking at three different forests in the Colombian Andes-natural regeneration, monoculture reforestation, and an old-growth ... the open-access journal Tropical Conservation Science compares the impacts on bess beetles of different method to regeneration ...
Imaginal Disc Regeneration: Something Old, Something New. Melanie I. Worley and Iswar K. Hariharan. Insect Gut Regeneration. ... Download a Free Excerpt from Regeneration:. Preface. Regeneration, Rejuvenation, and Replacement: Turning Back the Clock on ... Regeneration. Book Series: A Cold Spring Harbor Perspectives in Biology Collection. Subject Area(s): Developmental Biology; ... Regeneration, Rejuvenation, and Replacement: Turning Back the Clock on Tissue Aging. Thomas A. Rando and D. Leanne Jones. Index ...
Imaginal Disc Regeneration: Something Old, Something New. Melanie I. Worley and Iswar K. Hariharan. Insect Gut Regeneration. ... Download a Free Excerpt from Regeneration:. Preface. Regeneration, Rejuvenation, and Replacement: Turning Back the Clock on ... Regeneration. Book Series: A Cold Spring Harbor Perspectives in Biology Collection. Subject Area(s): Developmental Biology; ... Regeneration, Rejuvenation, and Replacement: Turning Back the Clock on Tissue Aging. Thomas A. Rando and D. Leanne Jones. Index ...
Use Leica Geosystems dozer automation solutions to increase the efficiency when disposing of gas utility infrastructure.
The relevant study has been published in the Neural Regeneration Research (Vol. 9, No. 3, 2014).. ... Functional Electrical Stimulation Improves Neuronal Regeneration Personalised Printable Document (PDF). Please complete this ... Functional Electrical Stimulation Improves Neuronal Regeneration: Study. Proliferation of endogenous neural precursor cells ...
"The title Regeneration is not just from a race movie, but its about the successive waves of Black filmmakers," Stewart says.) ... Regeneration: Black Cinema 1898-1971. Book Design. Design of the companion book for the landmark exhibition presented by the ... Regeneration is helping to write history, the book is intended to serve as a valuable reference beyond the exhibition. The ... Co-curated by Doris Berger and Rhea L. Combs, Regeneration seeks to revive lost or forgotten films, filmmakers and performers ...
... Thursday, 27 February 2020, 14:25. Comhairle nan Eilean Siar welcomes the successful ... The Stornoway Regeneration Programme - Phase 2 (Newton Gateway) will provide enabling works to transform vacant and derelict ... applications to the Scottish Governments Regeneration Capital Grant Fund (RCGF). Four major infrastructure projects have been ...
Buy from our Regeneration Range range at Zavvi ⭐ The Home of Pop Culture ✓ Officially Licensed ✓ Films, Merch, Clothing & More ...
  • WORCESTER, Mass. - CellThera, a biotechnology company located in Worcester Polytechnic Institute's Life Sciences and Bioengineering Center at Gateway Park, has received a contract from the U.S. Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) to extend its research program in tissue regeneration. (wpi.edu)
  • This joint research model was established in 2006, when DARPA funded the first phase of the tissue regeneration program. (wpi.edu)
  • CellThera is an early-stage biotechnology company focused on inducing somatic cells to revert to multi-potent states to facilitate wound-healing and tissue regeneration. (wpi.edu)
  • Submit your Twitter account related to Tissue Regeneration to be featured! (novusbio.com)
  • Submit your blog on Tissue Regeneration to be featured! (novusbio.com)
  • Disease and disorder research has been conducted in relation to the Tissue Regeneration Pathway and Alveolar Bone Loss, Tissue Adhesions, Inflammation, Periodontal Diseases, Neoplasms. (novusbio.com)
  • The study of the Tissue Regeneration Pathway has been mentioned in research publications which can be found using our bioinformatics tool below. (novusbio.com)
  • The Tissue Regeneration Pathway has been researched in relation to Regeneration, Wound Healing, Cell Proliferation, Angiogenesis, Cell Adhesion. (novusbio.com)
  • The Tissue Regeneration Pathway complements our catalog of research reagents including antibodies and ELISA kits against VEGFA, FGF2, MSC, HGF, IL6. (novusbio.com)
  • Explore more on Tissue Regeneration below! (novusbio.com)
  • We have 3567 products for the study of the Tissue Regeneration Pathway that can be applied to Flow Cytometry, Immunocytochemistry/Immunofluorescence, Immunohistochemistry, Western Blot from our catalog of antibodies and ELISA kits. (novusbio.com)
  • Victoria Ptasinski defended her Ph.D. thesis 'Alveolar Progenitor Cells in Lung Damage and Regeneration in Pulmonary Fibrosis' on Monday, November 27, 2023. (lu.se)
  • The restoration of these defective mitochondria by enhancing mitochondrial transport, clearance of reactive oxidative species (ROS), and improving bioenergetic can greatly contribute to axon regeneration. (nih.gov)
  • Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, ALS) and consider the role of mitochondria in axon regeneration. (nih.gov)
  • The contributors discuss the dramatic molecular and cellular changes that occur when a regeneration program is initiated, the progenitor cells and morphogenic signals involved, the formation of a blastema, the roles of reprogramming and polyploidy, the diversity of cell fates, the integration of new structures with existing body parts, and our current understanding of why some structures are more resistant to regeneration than others. (cshlpress.com)
  • Looking at three different forests in the Colombian Andes-natural regeneration, monoculture reforestation, and an old-growth forest as a baseline-researchers found that old-growth and natural regeneration had the highest diversity of bess beetles, while old-growth sported the greatest abundance of beetles. (mongabay.com)
  • Assisted natural regeneration is a blend of active planting and passive restoration. (greenbiz.com)
  • Between those two extremes lies a particularly promising and viable approach: assisted natural regeneration, or ANR. (greenbiz.com)
  • What is assisted natural regeneration? (greenbiz.com)
  • Assisted natural regeneration is a blend of active planting and passive restoration, where local people intervene to help trees and native vegetation naturally recover by eliminating barriers and threats to their growth, leaning on their knowledge of the land and on ancestral traditions. (greenbiz.com)
  • And, if natural regeneration on its own does not increase tree cover quickly enough or the targeted species fail to pop up on their own, people can selectively plant trees to fill the gaps. (greenbiz.com)
  • Assisted natural regeneration can play a critical role in achieving global targets on climate and biodiversity, including the Paris Climate Agreement, the Trillion Trees initiative and ambitious targets set by the Bonn Challenge - which aims to restore 865 million acres of degraded and deforested lands by 2030. (greenbiz.com)
  • Assisted natural regeneration in the Atlantic forest, Brazil. (greenbiz.com)
  • In a study just published in Inflammation and Regeneration , Japanese researchers have developed a technique for improving bone regeneration over large areas in rats-;and their findings may translate well to clinical settings. (news-medical.net)
  • A research team from Tokyo Medical and Dental University (TMDU) decided to tackle this challenge using vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), which improves regeneration of the blood circulatory system, and Runt-related transcription factor 2 (Runx2), which is important for bone regeneration. (news-medical.net)
  • We had already used these two factors to improve bone regeneration in mice in a previous study. (news-medical.net)
  • This Special Issue will focus on the new techniques and advances in guided bone regeneration. (mdpi.com)
  • Bone Regeneration in an Extreme Dental Clinical Condition. (bvsalud.org)
  • After atraumatic dental extraction and bone regeneration with the use of platelet-rich fibrin and bone graft , the area showed excellent bone regeneration with adequate stability of the soft tissue , even 4 months after the surgery . (bvsalud.org)
  • Together, our results uncover a new inducer of mammalian heart regeneration and highlight fundamental roles of the extracellular matrix in cardiac repair. (nature.com)
  • We also compare the behavior of mitochondria in different diseases and outline novel therapeutic strategies for addressing abnormal mitochondrial biological behavior to promote axonal regeneration in neurological diseases and injuries. (nih.gov)
  • Although microglia have been increasingly implicated in contributing to the pathology that underpins neurological dysfunction and disease, they also have crucial roles in neurological homeostasis and regeneration. (nature.com)
  • This volume is therefore essential reading for molecular, cell, and developmental biologists studying regeneration in animals, as well as for all interested in the development of regenerative therapies for clinical application. (cshlpress.com)
  • In this Review, we discuss recent work that reveals the changes in white matter with ageing and neurodegenerative disease, how this relates to microglia dynamics during myelin damage and regeneration, and factors that influence the regenerative functions of microglia. (nature.com)
  • 5. Regeneration or Redevelopment? (routledge.com)
  • Sanctuary Housing are hoping that the redevelopment of the Talbot Gardens area will expand and complement the regeneration of the adjacent Clarion housing scheme. (plymouth.gov.uk)
  • By the end of the redevelopment process, PCC will have supported the public infrastructure development in the North Prospect Regeneration area. (plymouth.gov.uk)
  • 10m of external cladding had been fitted to the tower block last year as part of a regeneration scheme for the estate. (libcom.org)
  • Analysis of the fire spread and the design for the regeneration scheme suggests the cladding may have accelerated the spread of the fire by allowing it to travel around the outside of the block between sections that were supposed to be isolated for fire safety before the cladding was fitted. (libcom.org)
  • In vivo , a single administration of agrin promotes cardiac regeneration in adult mice after myocardial infarction, although the degree of cardiomyocyte proliferation observed in this model suggests that there are additional therapeutic mechanisms. (nature.com)
  • In this review, we describe the major mechanisms of damage, regeneration, and repair within the alveolar niche where gas exchange occurs. (mendeley.com)
  • Given the lack of approved therapies targeting myelin maintenance or regeneration, it is imperative to understand the mechanisms by which microglia support and restore myelin health to identify potential therapeutic approaches. (nature.com)
  • Fig. 3: Mechanisms regulating microglial function during myelin regeneration: intrinsic versus extrinsic influences. (nature.com)
  • 11. International Perspectives on Regeneration Management: Common Themes and the Making of Value. (routledge.com)
  • Written and edited by experts in the field, this collection from Cold Spring Harbor Perspectives in Biology explores the biological basis of regeneration in diverse animal species and how this knowledge can be applied therapeutically in humans. (cshlpress.com)
  • Objective: the present study reviewed the scientific literature searching for perspectives and main challenges faced by joint disc regeneration therapies. (bvsalud.org)
  • Plymouth City Council will help support and shape this important regeneration work. (plymouth.gov.uk)
  • The North Prospect regeneration project led by Plymouth Community Homes (PCH) and supported by Plymouth City Council (PCC). (plymouth.gov.uk)
  • Residents had fought the council, TMO and contractor Rydon's over the implementation of the regeneration project, raising concerns both in advance of the project and while it was completed. (libcom.org)
  • Figure 3: Agrin induces cardiac regeneration in adult mice. (nature.com)
  • To date, numerous stem cells and biomaterials have been explored for a variety of tissue and organ regeneration. (routledge.com)
  • Dr. Rudnicki's team found that the Wnt7a protein, when introduced into mouse muscle tissue, significantly increased the population of these satellite stem cells and fueled the regeneration process, creating bigger and stronger muscles. (disabled-world.com)
  • and stem cell regeneration. (lu.se)
  • This year, the Hilton Budapest enters its fourth phase of regeneration, during which time, the 93 rooms in the south wing will have a new interior design to match those rooms already renovated. (danubiushotels.com)
  • Work on the final phase of the regeneration is now underway. (plymouth.gov.uk)
  • The 'Stornoway Regeneration Programme - Phase 2 (Newton Gateway)' will provide enabling works to transform vacant and derelict land in the Newton Industrial area of Stornoway, facilitating further private sector investment and small and medium business growth, and delivering on a 'Commercial Corridor' in the Town. (cne-siar.gov.uk)
  • 78.5% of residents voted in favour of the regeneration in December 2021. (enfield.gov.uk)
  • The regeneration of the Becketwell area of the city is expected to bring numerous benefits to the city, including a repopulation of both office workers and residents to the city centre which will help boost activity outside of traditional retail hours. (derby.gov.uk)
  • Studies have pointed out that these cells may present better regeneration than cells removed from the injured TMJ itself, which presents lower deposition of extracellular matrix. (bvsalud.org)
  • Within this project the student will integrate scRNAseq datasets across species, working to identify how cells of the salamander compare to cells from various regeneration-component and regeneration-incompetent species. (lu.se)
  • Measuring particulate matter emissions during parked active diesel particulate filter regeneration of heavy-duty diesel trucks. (cdc.gov)
  • This study was conducted to evaluate the effects of a diesel particulate filter (DPF) regeneration process on the concentrations and size distributions of aerosols in an underground mine. (cdc.gov)
  • Diesel particulate filters relying on this off-line regeneration have not been shown to cause an increase in NO 2 tailpipe emissions. (cdc.gov)
  • Housing regeneration is an essential part of our plans for housing . (plymouth.gov.uk)
  • Our teams are working with the Housing Associations to help with regeneration projects. (plymouth.gov.uk)
  • For example, as a result of the Coalfields Regeneration Trust purchasing two dilapidated buildings in Goldthorpe, which had been empty for many years, we were able to secure planning for 10 new homes to provide new social housing, which will be let by our partner Bernslai Homes. (coalfields-regen.org.uk)
  • But in mammals, including humans, some tissues (e.g., heart muscle) are more resistant to regeneration. (cshlpress.com)
  • Presented by the Academy Museum of Motion Pictures in Los Angeles, Regeneration: Black Cinema 1898-1971 explores the rich history of Black participation in American cinema from its beginnings to just beyond the civil rights movement. (pentagram.com)
  • Thus, applying knowledge and principles of tissue engineering for the development of therapies that seek joint disc regeneration may be an option for future treatment. (bvsalud.org)
  • Comhairle nan Eilean Siar welcomes the successful applications to the Scottish Government's Regeneration Capital Grant Fund (RCGF). (cne-siar.gov.uk)
  • The Neighbourhood Regeneration Fund will help groups deliver capital projects in their communities which help develop neighbourhood tourism, improve environmental sustainability and support the city's social economy. (belfastcity.gov.uk)
  • At the passive end, there is spontaneous regeneration, where trees and other native vegetation regrow naturally on the land. (greenbiz.com)
  • A second regeneration process is termed passive regeneration. (cdc.gov)
  • Bile plays an integral role in the regeneration of damaged liver tissue, a study finds. (sciencenews.org)
  • As conservationists attempt to find the best way to re-establish forests in abandoned areas, a new study in the open-access journal Tropical Conservation Science compares the impacts on bess beetles of different method to regeneration forest. (mongabay.com)
  • The relevant study has been published in the Neural Regeneration Research (Vol. 9, No. 3, 2014). (medindia.net)
  • Taken together, our study provides a detailed functional and molecular characterization of HSCs at different phases of regeneration and identifies a gene set associated with the transition from proliferation to quiescence. (lu.se)
  • Final considerations: although tissue joint disc regeneration presents itself as a potential treatment option for the different types of TMD, the literature is still in an early stage of investigation with predominantly in vitro and in vivo studies. (bvsalud.org)
  • A comprehensive awareness of fingernail anatomy, the dynamics of nail regeneration and adhesive properties, and the sequelae of inadequate initial management sets the stage for the appropriate treatment of nail-bed injuries. (medscape.com)
  • This book will be of great interest to students, researchers and practitioners engaged in regeneration management, providing a thematic exploration and examination of the 'global' regeneration experience. (routledge.com)
  • This work specifically evaluated PM mass emissions during regeneration by measurements from the following instruments: TSI DustTrak DRX 8533, TSI Engine Exhaust Particle Sizer 3090 (EEPS) and TSI Scanning Mobility Particle Sizer 3936L88 (SMPS), filters by gravimetric analysis, and for one test a Dekati Mass Monitor 230-A (DMM). (cdc.gov)
  • Written by experts working in the USA, Holland, Greece, Jamaica, Turkey, Spain, Trinidad and the Czech Republic, this book seeks to locate the issue of regeneration in a context which will enable the reader to reflect upon practices which are 'local' but are shaped by international processes. (routledge.com)
  • Co-curated by Doris Berger and Rhea L. Combs, Regeneration seeks to revive lost or forgotten films, filmmakers and performers for a contemporary audience, focusing on the foundational period that led to the explosion of mainstream and independent Black cinema that followed. (pentagram.com)
  • This type of regeneration occurs as the engine is operating and typically uses the heat generated by the engine to complete the regeneration. (cdc.gov)
  • Tzahor, E. & Poss, K. D. Cardiac regeneration strategies: staying young at heart. (nature.com)
  • Often, this type of regeneration uses an oxidation catalyst, such as platinum, vanadium or similar compound, to reduce the temperature necessary to begin regeneration. (cdc.gov)
  • 4. Regeneration Opportunities and Challenges: Greece. (routledge.com)
  • As well as proving an accessible review of the theoretical literature on globalisation and its impact upon managing regeneration initiatives, this book also illustrates these theoretical debates with specific examples which provide insight to both urban and rural developments. (routledge.com)
  • The Barne Barton regeneration is a significant boost to the Plymouth economy. (plymouth.gov.uk)
  • The Infrastructure Minister hopes the regeneration of Douglas' shopping streets will provide a boost to the retail sector. (manxradio.com)
  • Although the presence of a catalyst, in either form, will increase the feasibility of the filter by allowing regeneration at lower exhaust temperatures, it may also result in an increase in the concentration of NO 2 in the exhaust. (cdc.gov)
  • This book was born out of the need to 'capture' the experience and understanding of the regeneration management process that is neither UK centric nor centred exclusively on urban areas. (routledge.com)
  • However, nondisposable filters must have a way of removing the DPM that has accumulated on the filter, a process called regeneration. (cdc.gov)
  • Particulate matter (PM) emissions were measured from nine parked active DPF regenerations of two HDDTs, a 2007 and 2010 MY, using a novel ambient-dilution wind tunnel. (cdc.gov)
  • Active regeneration by fuel injection upstream of the DPF began with the Soot Combustion Regime, where PM emissions had a count median diameter (CMD) of >30 nm and some faint gray smoke was observed flowing from the tunnel. (cdc.gov)
  • Active regeneration uses an external heat source to burn off accumulated DPM. (cdc.gov)
  • 7. Local Economic Development, Urban Change and Regeneration in Turkey. (routledge.com)
  • They include the regeneration of a long-term derelict site that currently has a negative impact on the economy and townscape of the city centre, acting as a catalyst to wider improvement of the area. (derby.gov.uk)
  • Accumulating evidence has demonstrated that mitochondria play a key role in axon degeneration and regeneration under physiological and pathological conditions. (nih.gov)
  • View the regeneration timelapse video by Plymouth Community Homes. (plymouth.gov.uk)
  • Scientists at the Ottawa Hospital Research Institute (OHRI) and the University of Ottawa have discovered a powerful new way to stimulate muscle regeneration, paving the way for new treatments for debilitating conditions such as muscular dystrophy . (disabled-world.com)
  • Regeneration is helping to write history, the book is intended to serve as a valuable reference beyond the exhibition. (pentagram.com)
  • Community consultation has been at the heart of the new designs for regeneration. (plymouth.gov.uk)
  • Several chapters are also devoted to regeneration in specific human organs-the skin, retina, heart, lung, pancreas, liver, skeletal muscle, and intestine-and examine possibilities for therapeutically replacing injured or diseased structures and for managing age-related declines in function. (cshlpress.com)