Microscopy, Interference: The science and application of a double-beam transmission interference microscope in which the illuminating light beam is split into two paths. One beam passes through the specimen while the other beam reflects off a reference mirror before joining and interfering with the other. The observed optical path difference between the two beams can be measured and used to discriminate minute differences in thickness and refraction of non-stained transparent specimens, such as living cells in culture.Photometry: Measurement of the various properties of light.Color: The visually perceived property of objects created by absorption or reflection of specific wavelengths of light.Optical Phenomena: LIGHT, it's processes and properties, and the characteristics of materials interacting with it.Optics and Photonics: A specialized field of physics and engineering involved in studying the behavior and properties of light and the technology of analyzing, generating, transmitting, and manipulating ELECTROMAGNETIC RADIATION in the visible, infrared, and ultraviolet range.Spectrum Analysis: The measurement of the amplitude of the components of a complex waveform throughout the frequency range of the waveform. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)Spectroscopy, Fourier Transform Infrared: A spectroscopic technique in which a range of wavelengths is presented simultaneously with an interferometer and the spectrum is mathematically derived from the pattern thus obtained.X-Ray Diffraction: The scattering of x-rays by matter, especially crystals, with accompanying variation in intensity due to interference effects. Analysis of the crystal structure of materials is performed by passing x-rays through them and registering the diffraction image of the rays (CRYSTALLOGRAPHY, X-RAY). (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)Scattering, Radiation: The diversion of RADIATION (thermal, electromagnetic, or nuclear) from its original path as a result of interactions or collisions with atoms, molecules, or larger particles in the atmosphere or other media. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)Refractometry: Measurement of the index of refraction (the ratio of the velocity of light or other radiation in the first of two media to its velocity in the second as it passes from one into the other).Pulsatile Flow: Rhythmic, intermittent propagation of a fluid through a BLOOD VESSEL or piping system, in contrast to constant, smooth propagation, which produces laminar flow.Optical Fibers: Thin strands of transparent material, usually glass, that are used for transmitting light waves over long distances.Lighting: The illumination of an environment and the arrangement of lights to achieve an effect or optimal visibility. Its application is in domestic or in public settings and in medical and non-medical environments.Ear Canal: The narrow passage way that conducts the sound collected by the EAR AURICLE to the TYMPANIC MEMBRANE.Microscopy, Fluorescence: Microscopy of specimens stained with fluorescent dye (usually fluorescein isothiocyanate) or of naturally fluorescent materials, which emit light when exposed to ultraviolet or blue light. Immunofluorescence microscopy utilizes antibodies that are labeled with fluorescent dye.Light: That portion of the electromagnetic spectrum in the visible, ultraviolet, and infrared range.Spectrophotometry, Infrared: Spectrophotometry in the infrared region, usually for the purpose of chemical analysis through measurement of absorption spectra associated with rotational and vibrational energy levels of molecules. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)Fiber Optic Technology: The technology of transmitting light over long distances through strands of glass or other transparent material.Acoustic Impedance Tests: Objective tests of middle ear function based on the difficulty (impedance) or ease (admittance) of sound flow through the middle ear. These include static impedance and dynamic impedance (i.e., tympanometry and impedance tests in conjunction with intra-aural muscle reflex elicitation). This term is used also for various components of impedance and admittance (e.g., compliance, conductance, reactance, resistance, susceptance).Spectroscopy, Near-Infrared: A noninvasive technique that uses the differential absorption properties of hemoglobin and myoglobin to evaluate tissue oxygenation and indirectly can measure regional hemodynamics and blood flow. Near-infrared light (NIR) can propagate through tissues and at particular wavelengths is differentially absorbed by oxygenated vs. deoxygenated forms of hemoglobin and myoglobin. Illumination of intact tissue with NIR allows qualitative assessment of changes in the tissue concentration of these molecules. The analysis is also used to determine body composition.Infrared Rays: That portion of the electromagnetic spectrum usually sensed as heat. Infrared wavelengths are longer than those of visible light, extending into the microwave frequencies. They are used therapeutically as heat, and also to warm food in restaurants.Thinking: Mental activity, not predominantly perceptual, by which one apprehends some aspect of an object or situation based on past learning and experience.Pulse: The rhythmical expansion and contraction of an ARTERY produced by waves of pressure caused by the ejection of BLOOD from the left ventricle of the HEART as it contracts.Feathers: Flat keratinous structures found on the skin surface of birds. Feathers are made partly of a hollow shaft fringed with barbs. They constitute the plumage.Equipment Design: Methods of creating machines and devices.Pulse Wave Analysis: Evaluation of the contour of the PULSE waves which vary in different parts of the circulation and depend on physiological as well as pathophysiological conditions of the individual.Equipment Failure Analysis: The evaluation of incidents involving the loss of function of a device. These evaluations are used for a variety of purposes such as to determine the failure rates, the causes of failures, costs of failures, and the reliability and maintainability of devices.Surface Properties: Characteristics or attributes of the outer boundaries of objects, including molecules.History, 20th Century: Time period from 1901 through 2000 of the common era.Pigmentation: Coloration or discoloration of a part by a pigment.Microscopy, Confocal: A light microscopic technique in which only a small spot is illuminated and observed at a time. An image is constructed through point-by-point scanning of the field in this manner. Light sources may be conventional or laser, and fluorescence or transmitted observations are possible.Fundus Oculi: The concave interior of the eye, consisting of the retina, the choroid, the sclera, the optic disk, and blood vessels, seen by means of the ophthalmoscope. (Cline et al., Dictionary of Visual Science, 4th ed)Optical Devices: Products or parts of products used to detect, manipulate, or analyze light, such as LENSES, refractors, mirrors, filters, prisms, and OPTICAL FIBERS.Acoustics: The branch of physics that deals with sound and sound waves. In medicine it is often applied in procedures in speech and hearing studies. With regard to the environment, it refers to the characteristics of a room, auditorium, theatre, building, etc. that determines the audibility or fidelity of sounds in it. (From Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed)Ophthalmoscopes: Devices for examining the interior of the eye, permitting the clear visualization of the structures of the eye at any depth. (UMDNS, 1999)Skin Pigmentation: Coloration of the skin.Writing: The act or practice of literary composition, the occupation of writer, or producing or engaging in literary work as a profession.Reproducibility of Results: The statistical reproducibility of measurements (often in a clinical context), including the testing of instrumentation or techniques to obtain reproducible results. The concept includes reproducibility of physiological measurements, which may be used to develop rules to assess probability or prognosis, or response to a stimulus; reproducibility of occurrence of a condition; and reproducibility of experimental results.Spectrophotometry: The art or process of comparing photometrically the relative intensities of the light in different parts of the spectrum.Lasers: An optical source that emits photons in a coherent beam. Light Amplification by Stimulated Emission of Radiation (LASER) is brought about using devices that transform light of varying frequencies into a single intense, nearly nondivergent beam of monochromatic radiation. Lasers operate in the infrared, visible, ultraviolet, or X-ray regions of the spectrum.Tympanic Membrane: An oval semitransparent membrane separating the external EAR CANAL from the tympanic cavity (EAR, MIDDLE). It contains three layers: the skin of the external ear canal; the core of radially and circularly arranged collagen fibers; and the MUCOSA of the middle ear.Color Perception: Mental processing of chromatic signals (COLOR VISION) from the eye by the VISUAL CORTEX where they are converted into symbolic representations. Color perception involves numerous neurons, and is influenced not only by the distribution of wavelengths from the viewed object, but also by its background color and brightness contrast at its boundary.Philosophy, MedicalSatellite Communications: Communications using an active or passive satellite to extend the range of radio, television, or other electronic transmission by returning signals to earth from an orbiting satellite.Water: A clear, odorless, tasteless liquid that is essential for most animal and plant life and is an excellent solvent for many substances. The chemical formula is hydrogen oxide (H2O). (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)Radial Artery: The direct continuation of the brachial trunk, originating at the bifurcation of the brachial artery opposite the neck of the radius. Its branches may be divided into three groups corresponding to the three regions in which the vessel is situated, the forearm, wrist, and hand.Fluorescence: The property of emitting radiation while being irradiated. The radiation emitted is usually of longer wavelength than that incident or absorbed, e.g., a substance can be irradiated with invisible radiation and emit visible light. X-ray fluorescence is used in diagnosis.Aorta: The main trunk of the systemic arteries.Models, Biological: Theoretical representations that simulate the behavior or activity of biological processes or diseases. For disease models in living animals, DISEASE MODELS, ANIMAL is available. Biological models include the use of mathematical equations, computers, and other electronic equipment.Interferometry: Measurement of distances or movements by means of the phenomena caused by the interference of two rays of light (optical interferometry) or of sound (acoustic interferometry).Blood Pressure: PRESSURE of the BLOOD on the ARTERIES and other BLOOD VESSELS.Photography: Method of making images on a sensitized surface by exposure to light or other radiant energy.Biophysics: The study of PHYSICAL PHENOMENA and PHYSICAL PROCESSES as applied to living things.Computer-Aided Design: The use of computers for designing and/or manufacturing of anything, including drugs, surgical procedures, orthotics, and prosthetics.Microscopy, Polarization: Microscopy using polarized light in which phenomena due to the preferential orientation of optical properties with respect to the vibration plane of the polarized light are made visible and correlated parameters are made measurable.Biophysical Phenomena: The physical characteristics and processes of biological systems.Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Manometry: Measurement of the pressure or tension of liquids or gases with a manometer.Nephelometry and Turbidimetry: Chemical analysis based on the phenomenon whereby light, passing through a medium with dispersed particles of a different refractive index from that of the medium, is attenuated in intensity by scattering. In turbidimetry, the intensity of light transmitted through the medium, the unscattered light, is measured. In nephelometry, the intensity of the scattered light is measured, usually, but not necessarily, at right angles to the incident light beam.Elasticity: Resistance and recovery from distortion of shape.Audiology: The study of hearing and hearing impairment.Colorimetry: Any technique by which an unknown color is evaluated in terms of standard colors. The technique may be visual, photoelectric, or indirect by means of spectrophotometry. It is used in chemistry and physics. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)Arteries: The vessels carrying blood away from the heart.Ear, Middle: The space and structures directly internal to the TYMPANIC MEMBRANE and external to the inner ear (LABYRINTH). Its major components include the AUDITORY OSSICLES and the EUSTACHIAN TUBE that connects the cavity of middle ear (tympanic cavity) to the upper part of the throat.Transducers: Any device or element which converts an input signal into an output signal of a different form. Examples include the microphone, phonographic pickup, loudspeaker, barometer, photoelectric cell, automobile horn, doorbell, and underwater sound transducer. (McGraw Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)Optical Imaging: The use of light interaction (scattering, absorption, and fluorescence) with biological tissue to obtain morphologically based information. It includes measuring inherent tissue optical properties such as scattering, absorption, and autofluorescence; or optical properties of exogenous targeted fluorescent molecular probes such as those used in optical MOLECULAR IMAGING, or nontargeted optical CONTRAST AGENTS.Thysanoptera: An order of very small, fringed-wing INSECTS including many agricultural pests.Vascular Stiffness: Loss of vascular ELASTICITY due to factors such as AGING; and ARTERIOSCLEROSIS. Increased arterial stiffness is one of the RISK FACTORS for many CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASES.Germanium: A rare metal element with a blue-gray appearance and atomic symbol Ge, atomic number 32, and atomic weight 72.63.Membranes, Artificial: Artificially produced membranes, such as semipermeable membranes used in artificial kidney dialysis (RENAL DIALYSIS), monomolecular and bimolecular membranes used as models to simulate biological CELL MEMBRANES. These membranes are also used in the process of GUIDED TISSUE REGENERATION.Models, Theoretical: Theoretical representations that simulate the behavior or activity of systems, processes, or phenomena. They include the use of mathematical equations, computers, and other electronic equipment.Otoacoustic Emissions, Spontaneous: Self-generated faint acoustic signals from the inner ear (COCHLEA) without external stimulation. These faint signals can be recorded in the EAR CANAL and are indications of active OUTER AUDITORY HAIR CELLS. Spontaneous otoacoustic emissions are found in all classes of land vertebrates.Algorithms: A procedure consisting of a sequence of algebraic formulas and/or logical steps to calculate or determine a given task.Image Processing, Computer-Assisted: A technique of inputting two-dimensional images into a computer and then enhancing or analyzing the imagery into a form that is more useful to the human observer.Blood Flow Velocity: A value equal to the total volume flow divided by the cross-sectional area of the vascular bed.Calibration: Determination, by measurement or comparison with a standard, of the correct value of each scale reading on a meter or other measuring instrument; or determination of the settings of a control device that correspond to particular values of voltage, current, frequency or other output.Fluorescent Dyes: Agents that emit light after excitation by light. The wave length of the emitted light is usually longer than that of the incident light. Fluorochromes are substances that cause fluorescence in other substances, i.e., dyes used to mark or label other compounds with fluorescent tags.Mathematics: The deductive study of shape, quantity, and dependence. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)Cell Membrane: The lipid- and protein-containing, selectively permeable membrane that surrounds the cytoplasm in prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells.Secretory Vesicles: Vesicles derived from the GOLGI APPARATUS containing material to be released at the cell surface.Spectrometry, Fluorescence: Measurement of the intensity and quality of fluorescence.Birefringence: The property of nonisotropic media, such as crystals, whereby a single incident beam of light traverses the medium as two beams, each plane-polarized, the planes being at right angles to each other. (Cline et al., Dictionary of Visual Science, 4th ed)Perceptual Distortion: Lack of correspondence between the way a stimulus is commonly perceived and the way an individual perceives it under given conditions.Retinal Pigments: Photosensitive protein complexes of varied light absorption properties which are expressed in the PHOTORECEPTOR CELLS. They are OPSINS conjugated with VITAMIN A-based chromophores. Chromophores capture photons of light, leading to the activation of opsins and a biochemical cascade that ultimately excites the photoreceptor cells.Sensitivity and Specificity: Binary classification measures to assess test results. Sensitivity or recall rate is the proportion of true positives. Specificity is the probability of correctly determining the absence of a condition. (From Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 2d ed)History, 21st Century: Time period from 2001 through 2100 of the common era.Color Vision: Function of the human eye that is used in bright illumination or in daylight (at photopic intensities). Photopic vision is performed by the three types of RETINAL CONE PHOTORECEPTORS with varied peak absorption wavelengths in the color spectrum (from violet to red, 400 - 700 nm).Butterflies: Slender-bodies diurnal insects having large, broad wings often strikingly colored and patterned.Animal Communication: Communication between animals involving the giving off by one individual of some chemical or physical signal, that, on being received by another, influences its behavior.Microscopy, Acoustic: A scientific tool based on ULTRASONOGRAPHY and used not only for the observation of microstructure in metalwork but also in living tissue. In biomedical application, the acoustic propagation speed in normal and abnormal tissues can be quantified to distinguish their tissue elasticity and other properties.Reagent Strips: Narrow pieces of material impregnated or covered with a substance used to produce a chemical reaction. The strips are used in detecting, measuring, producing, etc., other substances. (From Dorland, 28th ed)Biosensing Techniques: Any of a variety of procedures which use biomolecular probes to measure the presence or concentration of biological molecules, biological structures, microorganisms, etc., by translating a biochemical interaction at the probe surface into a quantifiable physical signal.Ophthalmoscopy: Examination of the interior of the eye with an ophthalmoscope.Forehead: The part of the face above the eyes.Optical Processes: Behavior of LIGHT and its interactions with itself and materials.Actins: Filamentous proteins that are the main constituent of the thin filaments of muscle fibers. The filaments (known also as filamentous or F-actin) can be dissociated into their globular subunits; each subunit is composed of a single polypeptide 375 amino acids long. This is known as globular or G-actin. In conjunction with MYOSINS, actin is responsible for the contraction and relaxation of muscle.ArtMicroscopy: The use of instrumentation and techniques for visualizing material and details that cannot be seen by the unaided eye. It is usually done by enlarging images, transmitted by light or electron beams, with optical or magnetic lenses that magnify the entire image field. With scanning microscopy, images are generated by collecting output from the specimen in a point-by-point fashion, on a magnified scale, as it is scanned by a narrow beam of light or electrons, a laser, a conductive probe, or a topographical probe.Brachial Artery: The continuation of the axillary artery; it branches into the radial and ulnar arteries.Adsorption: The adhesion of gases, liquids, or dissolved solids onto a surface. It includes adsorptive phenomena of bacteria and viruses onto surfaces as well. ABSORPTION into the substance may follow but not necessarily.Pinctada: A genus of pearl oysters in the family Pteriidae, class BIVALVIA. Both cultured and natural pearls are obtained from species in the genus. They are distinct from the distantly related, edible true oysters of the family OSTREIDAE.Lenses: Pieces of glass or other transparent materials used for magnification or increased visual acuity.Loligo: A genus of SQUID in the family Loliginidae, superorder DECAPODIFORMES, with a spindle-shaped body. They are well-studied, common inshore squids of the Atlantic and eastern Pacific Oceans, but their various species are taxonomically unresolved.Narration: The act, process, or an instance of narrating, i.e., telling a story. In the context of MEDICINE or ETHICS, narration includes relating the particular and the personal in the life story of an individual.Neutrons: Electrically neutral elementary particles found in all atomic nuclei except light hydrogen; the mass is equal to that of the proton and electron combined and they are unstable when isolated from the nucleus, undergoing beta decay. Slow, thermal, epithermal, and fast neutrons refer to the energy levels with which the neutrons are ejected from heavier nuclei during their decay.Medicine in Literature: Written or other literary works whose subject matter is medical or about the profession of medicine and related areas.Staff Development: The process by which the employer promotes staff performance and efficiency consistent with management goals and objectives.Computer Simulation: Computer-based representation of physical systems and phenomena such as chemical processes.Lipid Bilayers: Layers of lipid molecules which are two molecules thick. Bilayer systems are frequently studied as models of biological membranes.Electromagnetic Radiation: Waves of oscillating electric and MAGNETIC FIELDS which move at right angles to each other and outward from the source.Fourier Analysis: Analysis based on the mathematical function first formulated by Jean-Baptiste-Joseph Fourier in 1807. The function, known as the Fourier transform, describes the sinusoidal pattern of any fluctuating pattern in the physical world in terms of its amplitude and its phase. It has broad applications in biomedicine, e.g., analysis of the x-ray crystallography data pivotal in identifying the double helical nature of DNA and in analysis of other molecules, including viruses, and the modified back-projection algorithm universally used in computerized tomography imaging, etc. (From Segen, The Dictionary of Modern Medicine, 1992)Form Perception: The sensory discrimination of a pattern shape or outline.Models, Cardiovascular: Theoretical representations that simulate the behavior or activity of the cardiovascular system, processes, or phenomena; includes the use of mathematical equations, computers and other electronic equipment.Clinical Competence: The capability to perform acceptably those duties directly related to patient care.Osmosis: Tendency of fluids (e.g., water) to move from the less concentrated to the more concentrated side of a semipermeable membrane.Morals: Standards of conduct that distinguish right from wrong.Tomography, Optical: Projection of near-IR light (INFRARED RAYS), in the 700-1000 nm region, across an object in parallel beams to an array of sensitive photodetectors. This is repeated at various angles and a mathematical reconstruction provides three dimensional MEDICAL IMAGING of tissues. Based on the relative transparency of tissues to this spectra, it has been used to monitor local oxygenation, brain and joints.Photons: Discrete concentrations of energy, apparently massless elementary particles, that move at the speed of light. They are the unit or quantum of electromagnetic radiation. Photons are emitted when electrons move from one energy state to another. (From Hawley's Condensed Chemical Dictionary, 11th ed)Exocytosis: Cellular release of material within membrane-limited vesicles by fusion of the vesicles with the CELL MEMBRANE.Diffusion: The tendency of a gas or solute to pass from a point of higher pressure or concentration to a point of lower pressure or concentration and to distribute itself throughout the available space. Diffusion, especially FACILITATED DIFFUSION, is a major mechanism of BIOLOGICAL TRANSPORT.1,2-Dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine: Synthetic phospholipid used in liposomes and lipid bilayers to study biological membranes. It is also a major constituent of PULMONARY SURFACTANTS.Vision, Ocular: The process in which light signals are transformed by the PHOTORECEPTOR CELLS into electrical signals which can then be transmitted to the brain.Vascular Resistance: The force that opposes the flow of BLOOD through a vascular bed. It is equal to the difference in BLOOD PRESSURE across the vascular bed divided by the CARDIAC OUTPUT.Students, Medical: Individuals enrolled in a school of medicine or a formal educational program in medicine.Contrast Sensitivity: The ability to detect sharp boundaries (stimuli) and to detect slight changes in luminance at regions without distinct contours. Psychophysical measurements of this visual function are used to evaluate visual acuity and to detect eye disease.PaintingsMentors: Senior professionals who provide guidance, direction and support to those persons desirous of improvement in academic positions, administrative positions or other career development situations.Solutions: The homogeneous mixtures formed by the mixing of a solid, liquid, or gaseous substance (solute) with a liquid (the solvent), from which the dissolved substances can be recovered by physical processes. (From Grant & Hackh's Chemical Dictionary, 5th ed)Remote Sensing Technology: Observation and acquisition of physical data from a distance by viewing and making measurements from a distance or receiving transmitted data from observations made at distant location.Phantoms, Imaging: Devices or objects in various imaging techniques used to visualize or enhance visualization by simulating conditions encountered in the procedure. Phantoms are used very often in procedures employing or measuring x-irradiation or radioactive material to evaluate performance. Phantoms often have properties similar to human tissue. Water demonstrates absorbing properties similar to normal tissue, hence water-filled phantoms are used to map radiation levels. Phantoms are used also as teaching aids to simulate real conditions with x-ray or ultrasonic machines. (From Iturralde, Dictionary and Handbook of Nuclear Medicine and Clinical Imaging, 1990)Pressure: A type of stress exerted uniformly in all directions. Its measure is the force exerted per unit area. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)Skin: The outer covering of the body that protects it from the environment. It is composed of the DERMIS and the EPIDERMIS.Depth Perception: Perception of three-dimensionality.Carotid Arteries: Either of the two principal arteries on both sides of the neck that supply blood to the head and neck; each divides into two branches, the internal carotid artery and the external carotid artery.Nursing: The field of nursing care concerned with the promotion, maintenance, and restoration of health.Ultraviolet Rays: That portion of the electromagnetic spectrum immediately below the visible range and extending into the x-ray frequencies. The longer wavelengths (near-UV or biotic or vital rays) are necessary for the endogenous synthesis of vitamin D and are also called antirachitic rays; the shorter, ionizing wavelengths (far-UV or abiotic or extravital rays) are viricidal, bactericidal, mutagenic, and carcinogenic and are used as disinfectants.Photoplethysmography: Plethysmographic determination in which the intensity of light reflected from the skin surface and the red cells below is measured to determine the blood volume of the respective area. There are two types, transmission and reflectance.Myosins: A diverse superfamily of proteins that function as translocating proteins. They share the common characteristics of being able to bind ACTINS and hydrolyze MgATP. Myosins generally consist of heavy chains which are involved in locomotion, and light chains which are involved in regulation. Within the structure of myosin heavy chain are three domains: the head, the neck and the tail. The head region of the heavy chain contains the actin binding domain and MgATPase domain which provides energy for locomotion. The neck region is involved in binding the light-chains. The tail region provides the anchoring point that maintains the position of the heavy chain. The superfamily of myosins is organized into structural classes based upon the type and arrangement of the subunits they contain.Curriculum: A course of study offered by an educational institution.Lawyers: Persons whose profession is to give legal advice and assistance to clients and represent them in legal matters. (American Heritage Dictionary, 3d ed)Air: The mixture of gases present in the earth's atmosphere consisting of oxygen, nitrogen, carbon dioxide, and small amounts of other gases.Kinetics: The rate dynamics in chemical or physical systems.Blood Circulation: The movement of the BLOOD as it is pumped through the CARDIOVASCULAR SYSTEM.Beak: In some animals, the jaws together with their horny covering. The beak usually refers to the bill of birds in which the whole varies greatly in form according of the food and habits of the bird. While the beak refers most commonly to birds, the anatomical counterpart is found also in the turtle, squid, and octopus. (From Webster, 3d ed & Storer, et al., General Zoology, 6th ed, p491, 755)Bioethical Issues: Clusters of topics that fall within the domain of BIOETHICS, the field of study concerned with value questions that arise in biomedicine and health care delivery.Protein Conformation: The characteristic 3-dimensional shape of a protein, including the secondary, supersecondary (motifs), tertiary (domains) and quaternary structure of the peptide chain. PROTEIN STRUCTURE, QUATERNARY describes the conformation assumed by multimeric proteins (aggregates of more than one polypeptide chain).Melanins: Insoluble polymers of TYROSINE derivatives found in and causing darkness in skin (SKIN PIGMENTATION), hair, and feathers providing protection against SUNBURN induced by SUNLIGHT. CAROTENES contribute yellow and red coloration.Erythema: Redness of the skin produced by congestion of the capillaries. This condition may result from a variety of causes.Glass: Hard, amorphous, brittle, inorganic, usually transparent, polymerous silicate of basic oxides, usually potassium or sodium. It is used in the form of hard sheets, vessels, tubing, fibers, ceramics, beads, etc.Internship, Nonmedical: Advanced programs of training to meet certain professional requirements in fields other than medicine or dentistry, e.g., pharmacology, nutrition, nursing, etc.Models, Educational: Theoretical models which propose methods of learning or teaching as a basis or adjunct to changes in attitude or behavior. These educational interventions are usually applied in the fields of health and patient education but are not restricted to patient care.Absorption: The physical or physiological processes by which substances, tissue, cells, etc. take up or take in other substances or energy.Self-Assessment: Appraisal of one's own personal qualities or traits.Ethics, Dental: The principles of proper professional conduct concerning the rights and duties of the dentist, relations with patients and fellow practitioners, as well as actions of the dentist in patient care and interpersonal relations with patient families. (From Stedman, 25th ed)Crystallization: The formation of crystalline substances from solutions or melts. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)Microscopy, Atomic Force: A type of scanning probe microscopy in which a probe systematically rides across the surface of a sample being scanned in a raster pattern. The vertical position is recorded as a spring attached to the probe rises and falls in response to peaks and valleys on the surface. These deflections produce a topographic map of the sample.Cues: Signals for an action; that specific portion of a perceptual field or pattern of stimuli to which a subject has learned to respond.Problem-Based Learning: Instructional use of examples or cases to teach using problem-solving skills and critical thinking.Nursing Theory: Concepts, definitions, and propositions applied to the study of various phenomena which pertain to nursing and nursing research.Molecular Conformation: The characteristic three-dimensional shape of a molecule.Microspectrophotometry: Analytical technique for studying substances present at enzyme concentrations in single cells, in situ, by measuring light absorption. Light from a tungsten strip lamp or xenon arc dispersed by a grating monochromator illuminates the optical system of a microscope. The absorbance of light is measured (in nanometers) by comparing the difference between the image of the sample and a reference image.Video Recording: The storing or preserving of video signals for television to be played back later via a transmitter or receiver. Recordings may be made on magnetic tape or discs (VIDEODISC RECORDING).Clinical Clerkship: Undergraduate education programs for second- , third- , and fourth-year students in health sciences in which the students receive clinical training and experience in teaching hospitals or affiliated health centers.Photic Stimulation: Investigative technique commonly used during ELECTROENCEPHALOGRAPHY in which a series of bright light flashes or visual patterns are used to elicit brain activity.Coercion: The use of force or intimidation to obtain compliance.Social Values: Abstract standards or empirical variables in social life which are believed to be important and/or desirable.Passeriformes: A widely distributed order of perching BIRDS, including more than half of all bird species.Teaching: The educational process of instructing.Myosin Type V: A subclass of myosin involved in organelle transport and membrane targeting. It is abundantly found in nervous tissue and neurosecretory cells. The heavy chains of myosin V contain unusually long neck domains that are believed to aid in translocating molecules over large distances.Jupiter: The fifth planet in order from the sun. It is one of the five outer planets of the solar system. Its sixteen natural satellites include Callisto, Europa, Ganymede, and Io.Nerve Fibers: Slender processes of NEURONS, including the AXONS and their glial envelopes (MYELIN SHEATH). Nerve fibers conduct nerve impulses to and from the CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM.Semiconductors: Materials that have a limited and usually variable electrical conductivity. They are particularly useful for the production of solid-state electronic devices.Compliance: Distensibility measure of a chamber such as the lungs (LUNG COMPLIANCE) or bladder. Compliance is expressed as a change in volume per unit change in pressure.Professional Role: The expected function of a member of a particular profession.Microscopy, Electron, Scanning: Microscopy in which the object is examined directly by an electron beam scanning the specimen point-by-point. The image is constructed by detecting the products of specimen interactions that are projected above the plane of the sample, such as backscattered electrons. Although SCANNING TRANSMISSION ELECTRON MICROSCOPY also scans the specimen point by point with the electron beam, the image is constructed by detecting the electrons, or their interaction products that are transmitted through the sample plane, so that is a form of TRANSMISSION ELECTRON MICROSCOPY.Learning: Relatively permanent change in behavior that is the result of past experience or practice. The concept includes the acquisition of knowledge.Retina: The ten-layered nervous tissue membrane of the eye. It is continuous with the OPTIC NERVE and receives images of external objects and transmits visual impulses to the brain. Its outer surface is in contact with the CHOROID and the inner surface with the VITREOUS BODY. The outer-most layer is pigmented, whereas the inner nine layers are transparent.Image Enhancement: Improvement of the quality of a picture by various techniques, including computer processing, digital filtering, echocardiographic techniques, light and ultrastructural MICROSCOPY, fluorescence spectrometry and microscopy, scintigraphy, and in vitro image processing at the molecular level.Tomography, Optical Coherence: An imaging method using LASERS that is used for mapping subsurface structure. When a reflective site in the sample is at the same optical path length (coherence) as the reference mirror, the detector observes interference fringes.Dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine: A synthetic phospholipid used in liposomes and lipid bilayers for the study of biological membranes.Miniaturization: The design or construction of objects greatly reduced in scale.Onions: Herbaceous biennial plants and their edible bulbs, belonging to the Liliaceae.Pigments, Biological: Any normal or abnormal coloring matter in PLANTS; ANIMALS or micro-organisms.Blood Pressure Determination: Techniques for measuring blood pressure.Models, Molecular: Models used experimentally or theoretically to study molecular shape, electronic properties, or interactions; includes analogous molecules, computer-generated graphics, and mechanical structures.Image Interpretation, Computer-Assisted: Methods developed to aid in the interpretation of ultrasound, radiographic images, etc., for diagnosis of disease.Dermoscopy: A noninvasive technique that enables direct microscopic examination of the surface and architecture of the SKIN.Transillumination: Passage of light through body tissues or cavities for examination of internal structures.Education, Medical: Use for general articles concerning medical education.Professional Competence: The capability to perform the duties of one's profession generally, or to perform a particular professional task, with skill of an acceptable quality.Social Change: Social process whereby the values, attitudes, or institutions of society, such as education, family, religion, and industry become modified. It includes both the natural process and action programs initiated by members of the community.Protein Structure, Secondary: The level of protein structure in which regular hydrogen-bond interactions within contiguous stretches of polypeptide chain give rise to alpha helices, beta strands (which align to form beta sheets) or other types of coils. This is the first folding level of protein conformation.Incus: One of three ossicles of the middle ear. It conducts sound vibrations from the MALLEUS to the STAPES.Educational Measurement: The assessing of academic or educational achievement. It includes all aspects of testing and test construction.Retinal Cone Photoreceptor Cells: Photosensitive afferent neurons located primarily within the FOVEA CENTRALIS of the MACULA LUTEA. There are three major types of cone cells (red, blue, and green) whose photopigments have different spectral sensitivity curves. Retinal cone cells operate in daylight vision (at photopic intensities) providing color recognition and central visual acuity.Aging: The gradual irreversible changes in structure and function of an organism that occur as a result of the passage of time.Hearing Disorders: Conditions that impair the transmission of auditory impulses and information from the level of the ear to the temporal cortices, including the sensorineural pathways.Hemoglobins: The oxygen-carrying proteins of ERYTHROCYTES. They are found in all vertebrates and some invertebrates. The number of globin subunits in the hemoglobin quaternary structure differs between species. Structures range from monomeric to a variety of multimeric arrangements.Students, Pharmacy: Individuals enrolled in a school of pharmacy or a formal educational program leading to a degree in pharmacy.Imaging, Three-Dimensional: The process of generating three-dimensional images by electronic, photographic, or other methods. For example, three-dimensional images can be generated by assembling multiple tomographic images with the aid of a computer, while photographic 3-D images (HOLOGRAPHY) can be made by exposing film to the interference pattern created when two laser light sources shine on an object.Cattle: Domesticated bovine animals of the genus Bos, usually kept on a farm or ranch and used for the production of meat or dairy products or for heavy labor.
Reflection coefficient[edit]. Staverman's reflection coefficient (σ) corrects the actual colloid osmotic pressure difference to ... Glomerular capillaries have a reflection coefficient close to 1 as normally no protein crosses into the glomerular filtrate. ... In contrast, hepatic sinusoids have no reflection coefficient as they are fully permeable to protein. Hepatic interstitial ...
Total internal reflection[edit]. Main article: Total internal reflection. When light traveling in an optically dense medium ... This is called diffuse reflection or scattering, and it is typically characterized by wide variety of reflection angles. ... Daniel Colladon first described this "light fountain" or "light pipe" in an 1842 article titled On the reflections of a ray of ... Light is kept in the core by the phenomenon of total internal reflection which causes the fiber to act as a waveguide.[5] ...
Theoretical and methodological reflections[edit]. In several texts of the corpus, the ancient physicians develop theories of ... 3.2 Theoretical and methodological reflections *3.2.1 Reason and experience. *3.2.2 Epistemology and the scientific status of ...
Reflection in art[edit]. In 1938 the story of the German writer Reinhold Schneider "Las Kasas and Charles V" ("Las Casas vor ...
1980s reflections of private equity[edit]. Although private equity rarely received a thorough treatment in popular culture, ... Contemporary reflections of private equity and private equity controversies[edit]. Carlyle group featured prominently in ...
Self-Reflection/Comparison to other species. *I have moved "comparison to other species" from biology to self-reflection. This ... is "self-reflection" even a good title for the section? the word is slightly tautological but well attested (1E5 google hits). ... btw, I have started a new section Self-Reflection further down the page. So far it is very incomplete, giving only two examples ... Maybe the whole self-reflection thing can be exported to a separate article after all. I was very quick in completing the ...
Total internal reflection[edit]. Main article: Total internal reflection. When light traveling in an optically dense medium ... This is called diffuse reflection or scattering, and it is typically characterized by wide variety of reflection angles. ... Light is kept in the core by the phenomenon of total internal reflection which causes the fiber to act as a waveguide.[5] ... Reflection and transmission of light waves occur because the frequencies of the light waves do not match the natural resonant ...
Reflection[edit]. Main article: Reflection (physics). When a wave strikes a reflective surface, it changes direction, such that ... Newton, Isaac (1704). "Prop VII Theor V". Opticks: Or, A treatise of the Reflections, Refractions, Inflexions and Colours of ... Standing waves commonly arise when a boundary blocks further propagation of the wave, thus causing wave reflection, and ... Light beam exhibiting reflection, refraction, transmission and dispersion when encountering a prism ...
Reflection/Emission modulations[edit]. Short-period planets in close orbits around their stars will undergo reflected light ...
Absorption and reflection[edit]. Part of the radiation reaching an object is absorbed and the remainder reflected. Usually the ...
The power reflection coefficients become: R. s. =. ,. n. 1. cos. ⁡. θ. i. −. n. 2. cos. ⁡. θ. t. n. 1. cos. ⁡. θ. i. +. n. 2. ... Total internal reflection[edit]. Main article: Total internal reflection. When light travelling in a denser medium strikes the ... The relationship between these angles is given by the law of reflection: θ. i. =. θ. r. ,. {\displaystyle \theta _{\mathrm {i ... Reflections of signals on conducting lines. Notes[edit]. *^ Some authors use the opposite sign convention for rp, so that rp is ...
"Reflection" (from Mulan). Matthew Wilder (music) and David Zippel (lyrics). 4:26. ...
Si: Reflection. *Tǐ: Substance. *Tiān: Divine force. *Wú wéi: Nonaction. *Xiào: Filial piety ...
See also: Reflection seismology. Ecotracer[edit]. Ecotracer is an acoustic locator that was used to determining the presence ...
Reflection nebula. Protoplanetary nebula. HST image of the Watery Lily Nebula by Sun Kwok, Bruce Hrivnak, and Kate Su ...
"Reflection Overview". scala-lang.org. Retrieved 2014-11-07.. *^ Burmako, Eugene. "Def Macros". scala-lang.org. Retrieved 2014- ...
Celebrity Reflection. 2012. 3,046. 126,000 GT. Malta. Celebrity's biggest cruise ship (by passenger count)[3]. ... The fourth ship, Celebrity Silhouette, sailed on her Maiden Voyage on 23 July 2011; and the fifth, Celebrity Reflection,[3] was ... "Delivery of Celebrity Reflection". Meyerwerft website. 9 October 2012. Retrieved 15 October 2012.. ... Celebrity Reflection was recently handed over on 9 October 2012.[12] ...
... 7/2 - 1993 (R2003) Graphic technology - Color reflection target for input scanner calibration[edit]. This standard defines ... 1.3 IT8.7/2 - 1993 (R2003) Graphic technology - Color reflection target for input scanner calibration ...
"Reflection Lake Nantahala. Retrieved 21 November 2013.. *^ Scientist says he found Japan fish thought extinct Bay Ledger, ...
Reflection coefficient ( σ ). Clinical significance[edit]. Disorders of capillary formation as a developmental defect or ...
Their combined work informed the study of imperialism's impact on Europe, as well as contributed to reflections on the rise of ... excerpt MacKenzie, John M (2015). "The British Empire: Ramshackle or Rampaging? A Historiographical Reflection". Journal of ...
Total Internal Reflection. One of the "Forgotten"/"Oubliettionaries": Systems Vehicles remaining indefinitely in secretive ...
Meta-reflection[edit]. Just as teaching is no longer seen as simply transferring factual information, so educating teachers ... Howard, T. C. (2003). "Culturally Relevant Pedagogy: Ingredients for Critical Teacher Reflection". Theory into Practice. 42 (3 ... support for the process of self-reflection that all teachers engage in (e.g. through the keeping of a journal). ... such as modelling and meta-reflection, that enable them to teach about teaching.[33] ...
Reflection on action.. Group stages[edit]. According to B. Aubrey Fisher, there are four stages or phases that should be ...
In this case, the reflections of a steady source of light can be made to add destructively and hence reduce reflections by a ... To calculate reflection in this case, effective medium approximations can be used. To minimize reflection, various profiles of ... The amount of light reflected is known as the reflection loss. In the more complicated scenario of multiple reflections, say ... Practical anti-reflection coatings, however, rely on an intermediate layer not only for its direct reduction of reflection ...
Reflection · Genie in a Bottle · What a Girl Wants · I Turn to Tou · Come on Over (All I Want Is You) · Pero me acuerdo de tí · ... Genie Gets Her Wish · My Reflection · Stripped Live in the UK · Back to Basics: Live and Down Under. ...
... back reflection, insertion loss, and the like. As described above, these optical characteristics may be critical measurements ...
Reflection is not enabled for shared registry keys or for registry keys that are not redirected. For example, reflection is not ... Applications should disable reflection only for the registry keys that they create and not attempt to disable reflection for ... Registry Reflection. [The information in this topic applies to Windows Server 2008, Windows Vista, Windows Server 2003, and ... Registry reflection uses a "last writer wins" policy as illustrated in the following example:. *After a clean installation of ...
Management: Proper reflection. Reflective practice and learning have been embraced by many other professions for quite some ... reflection may be a way of life and something which they expect to use in their professional development. ...
3. NO artificial reflections, all reflections must be captured by the camera, not created by post-processing. ... Lake Reflections (Color Only) Make sure you read ALL the rules. Challenge #9 in the Creation! series. Hosted by James A Rinner ... The reflections on a still lake usually take our breath away. This challenge is for COLOR ONLY. ... 4. Must be "lake" reflections which means no pools, fountains, oceans, seas, rivers, kitchen sinks, etc.. ...
... of reflected wave propagation are ground reflection, where the wave is reflected off land or water, and ionospheric reflection ... Other articles where Ground reflection is discussed: telecommunications media: Reflected propagation: … ... of reflected wave propagation are ground reflection, where the wave is reflected off land or water, and ionospheric reflection ...
Did you notice that I use this: ^_^ too much? I dunno, but I sure did. I used it lets see... 4 times in this section so far. Wow... arent I talented? Not ...
Reflections ,International/English title, is a strong , abstruse film and quite a few impact, though failed at Spanish Box ...
... Table of Contents -- November 1999. You are viewing the electronic version of Emerald Reflections, ... More information on that will be in the next Reflections.. The annual attendance prize drawing was won by Mary Kennedy. The ... We are sorry for any inconvenience that our notice in October Emerald Reflections stating that the A.O.H. spaghetti dinner and ... If you have information that you would like to have in the Reflections, please contact Sheila OBrien at 608 / 221-2431, or fax ...
Reflection. It is important that you give yourself sufficient time to reflect on and process your study abroad experience ...
For a list of the invariant conditions for other terms used in generic reflection, see the Type.IsGenericType property. ...
Technology can play a powerful role in supporting student reflection. Sociocognitive theories provide a conceptual framework ... Reflection Educational Technology Designing Technology Design Feature Modern Technology These keywords were added by machine ... Cobb, P., Boufi, A, McClain, K., & Whitenack, J. (1994).Reflective discourse and collective reflection. Manuscript.Google ... Kirkpatrik, D., Stern, J., & Linn, M.C. (1993).Computers as learning partner: An environment for reflection. Paper presented at ...
Reflection.. IFieldAccessor. Allows fields to be reflectively accessed. Summary. Inheritance. Direct Known Subclasses:Google. ...
Reflection.. OneofAccessor Reflection access for a oneof, allowing clear and "get case" actions. ... Reflection. Summary. Enumerations. FieldType{. Double,. Float,. Int64,. UInt64,. Int32,. Fixed64,. Fixed32,. Bool,. String,. ... Reflection.. OneofDescriptor Describes a "oneof" field collection in a message type: a set of fields of which at most one can ... Reflection.. OriginalNameAttribute Specifies the original name (in the .proto file) of a named element, such as an enum value. ...
Britton Gildersleeve is a third culture kid. Years spent living on the margins - in places with exotic names and food shortages - have left her with a visceral response to folks without, as well as a desire to live her Buddhism in an engaged fashion. Shes a writer and a teacher, the former director of a federal non-profit for teachers who write. She believes that if we talk to each other, we can learn to love each other (but shes still learning how). And she believes in tea. She is (still) working on her beginners heart ...
Investigation Update on the Celebrity Reflection. Alert_06. Archived: This Page Is No Longer Being Updated This website is ...
Download Reflection TN3270 TN5250 Lite and enjoy it on your iPhone, iPad, and iPod touch. ... Read reviews, compare customer ratings, see screenshots, and learn more about Reflection TN3270 TN5250 Lite. ... anyplace with Reflection. And if you have any doubt Reflection for TN3270 and TN5250 will delight, please check out these ... Reflection® for TN3270 and TN5250 is THE enterprise-class terminal emulation client for IBM 3270 and 5250 terminal emulation on ...
Im trying to use reflection open a mdi child. The catch is Im using a helper class to do it. The menu on the mdi parent passes ... Im trying to use reflection open a mdi child. The catch is Im using a helper class to do it.. The menu on the mdi parent ...
Quiet reflection is good for your brain and can lead to better choices. by Bill Stump, AARP The Magazine, April/May 2015 ...
"I think theyre a reflection of a dysfunctional economic environment and while that economic environment remains dysfunctional ...
At the end of the semester, students prepare a final self-reflection essay about what they learned about lawyering from their ...
China Power Reflection Suppliers and Manufacturers Directory - Source a Large Selection of Power Reflection Products at ... Mirror reflection type: 12m. Diffuse reflection type: 2.5m. Please click the button below to view our homepage. ... And whether power reflection is waterproof, anti-static, or illuminated. There are 9,099 power reflection suppliers, mainly ... The top supplying country is China (Mainland), which supply 100% of power reflection respectively. Power reflection products ...
Reflection¶. PyObject* PyEval_GetBuiltins. ()¶. Return value: Borrowed reference.. Return a dictionary of the builtins in the ...
The Clarity of Reflection. Reflection is anything but passive. It leads to insight, action, engagement, and emotional ... Reflection leads to better insights into innovation, strategy, and execution. Reflection gives rise to better outcomes and ... The Rewards of CEO Reflection. June 29, 2017 By Roselinde Torres , Martin Reeves , Peter Tollman , and Christian Veith ... The Roadblocks to Reflection. The world of business is typically seen as the world of action. Leaders drive performance and ...
Students use a microcomputer connected to a light sensor and temperature probe to explore the reflection and absorption of ... The complete activity in pdf format can be viewed at Reflection and Absorption of Light The cost of the interface, temperature ... Students use a microcomputer connected to a light sensor and temperature probe to explore the reflection and absorption of ... The activity description at Reflection and Absorption of Light comes complete with two pages of Teacher Information. Doing ...
  • With reflective learning increasingly being used in schools and law degrees, we will begin to meet trainees and young lawyers to whom some form of 'reflection' may be a way of life and something which they expect to use in their professional development. (law.com)
  • These theoretical frameworks suggest four ways that technology can provide powerful scaffolding for reflection: (a) process displays, (b) process prompts, (c) process models, and (d) a forum for reflective social discourse. (springer.com)
  • Modern technologies can provide students with rich resources for reflection and help students develop adaptive learning expertise through reflective practice. (springer.com)
  • At the end of the semester, students prepare a final self-reflection essay about what they learned about lawyering from their clinical experience. (berkeley.edu)
  • We also broadened the scope of the project to encompass other means for the development of student agency, particularly through self-reflection and metacognitive exercises. (carleton.edu)
  • Its direction is usually described by the angle of incidence, which is the angle that it makes with the normal, or line perpendicular to the reflecting surface at the point of reflection. (encyclopedia.com)
  • The angle formed by the reflected ray and the normal is called the angle of reflection and is equal to the angle of incidence. (encyclopedia.com)
  • if the angle of incidence exceeds this angle, total reflection occurs. (encyclopedia.com)
  • In two dimensions, the finite reflection groups are the dihedral groups, which are generated by reflection in two lines that form an angle of 2 π / n {\displaystyle 2\pi /n} and correspond to the Coxeter diagram I 2 ( n ) . {\displaystyle I_{2}(n). (wikipedia.org)
  • If the angle between two lines is an irrational multiple of pi, the group generated by reflections in these lines is infinite and non-discrete, hence, it is not a reflection group. (wikipedia.org)
  • Wavefronts that originate from a source near the mirror will be highly curved, while those emitted by distant light sources will be almost linear, a factor that will affect the angle of reflection. (fsu.edu)
  • Mary Helen Immordino-Yang, an associate professor of education, psychology, and neuroscience at the University of Southern California, has written about the role of "constructive internal reflection" in "making meaning of new information and for distilling creative, emotionally relevant connections between complex ideas. (bcg.com)
  • Internal reflection accounts in part for a number of natural phenomena. (encyclopedia.com)
  • A mirage is also partially the result of internal reflection. (encyclopedia.com)
  • The study involved 243 males who were randomly selected to receive a dose of testosterone gel or placebo gel before taking a cognitive reflection test. (psychcentral.com)
  • The questions included on the cognitive reflection test were similar to the following: A bat and a ball cost $1.10 in total. (psychcentral.com)
  • However, another person might realize their initial mistake through cognitive reflection and come up with the correct answer. (psychcentral.com)
  • We recommend including a short (five to seven minutes or so) reflection activity, usually a "think-write-pair-share," at the end of class two or three times a week. (edweek.org)
  • Thus, viewed as an abstract group, every reflection group is a Coxeter group. (wikipedia.org)
  • Instead of focusing on others, begin to study your own reflection, your own experiences. (dailystrength.org)
  • In Feminist Reflections, we draw upon our personal experiences, linking them to our research and current social justice topics. (thesocietypages.org)
  • You can follow their shared experiences here through their daily reflections and photographs. (bc.edu)
  • As you turn the pages of Reflections of the Heart I hope you find yourself inspired to accomplish all that your heart desires, and get to reflect on your own life, and all the experiences that shaped you into the person you are today. (lulu.com)
  • Another method for removing the troublesome artifact is to apply polarizing filters to the instrument in order to eliminate the reflection from optical elements. (microscopyu.com)
  • Scientists have attempted for years to create materials that can eliminate unwanted reflections, which can degrade the performance of various optical components and devices. (eurekalert.org)
  • Starting with Windows 7 and Windows Server 2008 R2, WOW64 no longer uses registry reflection and formerly reflected keys are shared instead. (microsoft.com)
  • The process of registry reflection copies registry keys and values between two registry views to keep them synchronized. (microsoft.com)
  • Reflection is not enabled for shared registry keys or for registry keys that are not redirected. (microsoft.com)
  • Typically, this process keeps two separate physical copies of the same registry keys in both views in the registry, and is called registry reflection or registry mirroring. (microsoft.com)
  • Other optical components in the microscope, such as specially designed prisms, filters, and lens coatings, also carry out their functions in forming the image with a crucial reliance on the phenomenon of light reflection. (fsu.edu)
  • The symmetry group of a regular polytope or of a tiling of the Euclidean space by congruent copies of a regular polytope is necessarily a reflection group. (wikipedia.org)
  • 16. The reflection media of claim 1 wherein the reflection media comprises a substrate. (google.co.uk)
  • 17. The reflection media of claim 16 wherein the substrate is a polymer. (google.co.uk)
  • 19. The reflection media of claim 16 wherein the substrate is holographic. (google.co.uk)
  • IntelliSense also uses reflection to describe the parameters that a method takes while you are entering those parameters. (oreilly.com)
  • Every year we try to learn from the experience of the pilgrims, and through an assessment make changes that improve the learning and the reflection. (merrimack.edu)
  • Technology can play a powerful role in supporting student reflection. (springer.com)
  • Click on a year to the left to see student reflections from the trip(s) that year! (udallas.edu)
  • This excerpt from our upcoming book, The ESL/ELL Teacher's Survival Guide , highlights student reflection as a tool for assessing the learning of English-language learners. (edweek.org)
  • We believe student reflections can be useful formative assessments. (edweek.org)
  • So if you do not know much about your object hierarchy or you have somehow found an assembly external to your application and you need to parse through the object and call its methods say, then Reflection would be the right choice for you. (codeproject.com)
  • Reflections of China et précédemment Wonders of China sont des films de type Circle-Vision 360° projetés dans le pavillon de la Chine à Epcot , deuxième parc à thème de Walt Disney World Resort en Floride. (wikipedia.org)
  • So basically Reflection allows you to create plugin type of applications where you define an Interface and publish the same for your application and let others create those plugins for you to seamlessly add to your application. (codeproject.com)
  • Community Health Nursing Reflection Community health nursing is a specialty field of nursing which care is provided to people in the community setting. (bartleby.com)
  • Community Health Nursing Reflection Maria Jelyn Engelhardt-Parales NUR/405 August 27, 2012 Amy Weaver Community Health Nursing Reflection Community health nursing practice aims to improve community health by promoting a healthier group of people, individuals, families, and residents within the community. (bartleby.com)
  • Yes, basically few people try to work everything based on Reflection. (codeproject.com)
  • Community and Public Health Nursing Reflection Lorraine Gambino NUR/405 May 6, 2013 Bonnie Schoettle Community and Public Health Nursing Reflection Incorporating preventative recommendations into clinical work can be a complicated and multidimensional obligation. (bartleby.com)
  • High quality Window Reflection inspired Canvas Prints by independent artists and designers from around the world. (redbubble.com)
  • The top screen shows the world as you'd expect to see it with your feet on the ground, but the bottom screen shows the reflection of the top screen. (ign.com)
  • I only made it a little bit into the upside down world that is Reflection, but I'm definitely intrigued. (ign.com)
  • I thought of checking how reflection works in real world scenarios. (codeproject.com)
  • It sets a world record by decreasing the reflectivity compared to conventional anti-reflection coatings by an order of magnitude. (eurekalert.org)
  • One way is to use an environment layer to create reflections. (lynda.com)
  • It's done by using an element for each bar, then duplicating each and every one of these elements to create the reflection and finally adding a gradient cover to create the fading effect. (css-tricks.com)
  • Before we get to reflections, let's see how we create, position and shade the bars as this part is common for all browsers. (css-tricks.com)
  • Anna and Jack Krupka opened Reflections on Deep Lake in Lake Villa 18 years ago because she saw a demand for Polish food outside Chicago. (chicagotribune.com)
  • Susan Crane, a member of the Jonah House community, offers this reflection of acting on behalf of Sam al Haj, a journalist recently released from Guantanamo. (commondreams.org)
  • Community Health Nursing Reflection NUR/405 2012 Diane Schlicke RN MSN Community Health Nursing Reflection The role of the community health nurse in the participating family's community is to focus on the health needs of the aggregate or group. (bartleby.com)
  • This Seventh Edition of Munson's Intervention and Reflection responds to the fast-paced changes occurring in our society, the legal environment, the scientific community, and medical practice. (worldcat.org)
  • Sadly, while the code can be compacted a bit using a preprocessor (not much outside what can get generated in a loop though), the method of duplicating all bars for the reflection and using a gradient cover for the fading effect is still the best way of doing this if we don't want to use canvas and we want the result to work across the current versions of all main browsers. (css-tricks.com)
  • Reflection is made truly late bound approach to browse through the object hierarchy or to call methods inside the object. (codeproject.com)
  • Reflection works very well when you know the object. (codeproject.com)