Rabbits: The species Oryctolagus cuniculus, in the family Leporidae, order LAGOMORPHA. Rabbits are born in burrows, furless, and with eyes and ears closed. In contrast with HARES, rabbits have 22 chromosome pairs.Medical Records: Recording of pertinent information concerning patient's illness or illnesses.Medical Records Systems, Computerized: Computer-based systems for input, storage, display, retrieval, and printing of information contained in a patient's medical record.Electronic Health Records: Media that facilitate transportability of pertinent information concerning patient's illness across varied providers and geographic locations. Some versions include direct linkages to online consumer health information that is relevant to the health conditions and treatments related to a specific patient.Records as Topic: The commitment in writing, as authentic evidence, of something having legal importance. The concept includes certificates of birth, death, etc., as well as hospital, medical, and other institutional records.Forms and Records Control: A management function in which standards and guidelines are developed for the development, maintenance, and handling of forms and records.Medical Record Linkage: The creation and maintenance of medical and vital records in multiple institutions in a manner that will facilitate the combined use of the records of identified individuals.Patient Access to Records: The freedom of patients to review their own medical, genetic, or other health-related records.Hospital Records: Compilations of data on hospital activities and programs; excludes patient medical records.Dental Records: Data collected during dental examination for the purpose of study, diagnosis, or treatment planning.Health Records, Personal: Longitudinal patient-maintained records of individual health history and tools that allow individual control of access.Diet Records: Records of nutrient intake over a specific period of time, usually kept by the patient.Nursing Records: Data recorded by nurses concerning the nursing care given to the patient, including judgment of the patient's progress.Retrospective Studies: Studies used to test etiologic hypotheses in which inferences about an exposure to putative causal factors are derived from data relating to characteristics of persons under study or to events or experiences in their past. The essential feature is that some of the persons under study have the disease or outcome of interest and their characteristics are compared with those of unaffected persons.Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Medical Records, Problem-Oriented: A system of record keeping in which a list of the patient's problems is made and all history, physical findings, laboratory data, etc. pertinent to each problem are placed under that heading.Cottontail rabbit papillomavirus: The type species of KAPPAPAPILLOMAVIRUS. It is reported to occur naturally in cottontail rabbits in North America.Hemorrhagic Disease Virus, Rabbit: A species in the genus LAGOVIRUS which causes hemorrhagic disease, including hemorrhagic septicemia, in rabbits.Fossils: Remains, impressions, or traces of animals or plants of past geological times which have been preserved in the earth's crust.Immune Sera: Serum that contains antibodies. It is obtained from an animal that has been immunized either by ANTIGEN injection or infection with microorganisms containing the antigen.Disease Models, Animal: Naturally occurring or experimentally induced animal diseases with pathological processes sufficiently similar to those of human diseases. They are used as study models for human diseases.Medical Records Department, Hospital: Hospital department responsible for the creating, care, storage and retrieval of medical records. It also provides statistical information for the medical and administrative staff.Cornea: The transparent anterior portion of the fibrous coat of the eye consisting of five layers: stratified squamous CORNEAL EPITHELIUM; BOWMAN MEMBRANE; CORNEAL STROMA; DESCEMET MEMBRANE; and mesenchymal CORNEAL ENDOTHELIUM. It serves as the first refracting medium of the eye. It is structurally continuous with the SCLERA, avascular, receiving its nourishment by permeation through spaces between the lamellae, and is innervated by the ophthalmic division of the TRIGEMINAL NERVE via the ciliary nerves and those of the surrounding conjunctiva which together form plexuses. (Cline et al., Dictionary of Visual Science, 4th ed)Species Specificity: The restriction of a characteristic behavior, anatomical structure or physical system, such as immune response; metabolic response, or gene or gene variant to the members of one species. It refers to that property which differentiates one species from another but it is also used for phylogenetic levels higher or lower than the species.Cholesterol, Dietary: Cholesterol present in food, especially in animal products.Kinetics: The rate dynamics in chemical or physical systems.Muscles: Contractile tissue that produces movement in animals.Documentation: Systematic organization, storage, retrieval, and dissemination of specialized information, especially of a scientific or technical nature (From ALA Glossary of Library and Information Science, 1983). It often involves authenticating or validating information.Reticulocytes: Immature ERYTHROCYTES. In humans, these are ERYTHROID CELLS that have just undergone extrusion of their CELL NUCLEUS. They still contain some organelles that gradually decrease in number as the cells mature. RIBOSOMES are last to disappear. Certain staining techniques cause components of the ribosomes to precipitate into characteristic "reticulum" (not the same as the ENDOPLASMIC RETICULUM), hence the name reticulocytes.Molecular Sequence Data: Descriptions of specific amino acid, carbohydrate, or nucleotide sequences which have appeared in the published literature and/or are deposited in and maintained by databanks such as GENBANK, European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), National Biomedical Research Foundation (NBRF), or other sequence repositories.Pregnancy: The status during which female mammals carry their developing young (EMBRYOS or FETUSES) in utero before birth, beginning from FERTILIZATION to BIRTH.Amino Acid Sequence: The order of amino acids as they occur in a polypeptide chain. This is referred to as the primary structure of proteins. It is of fundamental importance in determining PROTEIN CONFORMATION.Paleontology: The study of early forms of life through fossil remains.Molecular Weight: The sum of the weight of all the atoms in a molecule.Antibodies: Immunoglobulin molecules having a specific amino acid sequence by virtue of which they interact only with the ANTIGEN (or a very similar shape) that induced their synthesis in cells of the lymphoid series (especially PLASMA CELLS).Muscle Contraction: A process leading to shortening and/or development of tension in muscle tissue. Muscle contraction occurs by a sliding filament mechanism whereby actin filaments slide inward among the myosin filaments.Computer Security: Protective measures against unauthorized access to or interference with computer operating systems, telecommunications, or data structures, especially the modification, deletion, destruction, or release of data in computers. It includes methods of forestalling interference by computer viruses or so-called computer hackers aiming to compromise stored data.Calcium: A basic element found in nearly all organized tissues. It is a member of the alkaline earth family of metals with the atomic symbol Ca, atomic number 20, and atomic weight 40. Calcium is the most abundant mineral in the body and combines with phosphorus to form calcium phosphate in the bones and teeth. It is essential for the normal functioning of nerves and muscles and plays a role in blood coagulation (as factor IV) and in many enzymatic processes.Medical Audit: A detailed review and evaluation of selected clinical records by qualified professional personnel for evaluating quality of medical care.Confidentiality: The privacy of information and its protection against unauthorized disclosure.Dose-Response Relationship, Drug: The relationship between the dose of an administered drug and the response of the organism to the drug.Cross Reactions: Serological reactions in which an antiserum against one antigen reacts with a non-identical but closely related antigen.Electrophoresis, Polyacrylamide Gel: Electrophoresis in which a polyacrylamide gel is used as the diffusion medium.United StatesRisk Factors: An aspect of personal behavior or lifestyle, environmental exposure, or inborn or inherited characteristic, which, on the basis of epidemiologic evidence, is known to be associated with a health-related condition considered important to prevent.Liver: A large lobed glandular organ in the abdomen of vertebrates that is responsible for detoxification, metabolism, synthesis and storage of various substances.Hypercholesterolemia: A condition with abnormally high levels of CHOLESTEROL in the blood. It is defined as a cholesterol value exceeding the 95th percentile for the population.Injections: Introduction of substances into the body using a needle and syringe.Aqueous Humor: The clear, watery fluid which fills the anterior and posterior chambers of the eye. It has a refractive index lower than the crystalline lens, which it surrounds, and is involved in the metabolism of the cornea and the crystalline lens. (Cline et al., Dictionary of Visual Science, 4th ed, p319)Microscopy, Electron: Microscopy using an electron beam, instead of light, to visualize the sample, thereby allowing much greater magnification. The interactions of ELECTRONS with specimens are used to provide information about the fine structure of that specimen. In TRANSMISSION ELECTRON MICROSCOPY the reactions of the electrons that are transmitted through the specimen are imaged. In SCANNING ELECTRON MICROSCOPY an electron beam falls at a non-normal angle on the specimen and the image is derived from the reactions occurring above the plane of the specimen.Vitreous Body: The transparent, semigelatinous substance that fills the cavity behind the CRYSTALLINE LENS of the EYE and in front of the RETINA. It is contained in a thin hyaloid membrane and forms about four fifths of the optic globe.Immunodiffusion: Technique involving the diffusion of antigen or antibody through a semisolid medium, usually agar or agarose gel, with the result being a precipitin reaction.Ambulatory Care Information Systems: Information systems, usually computer-assisted, designed to store, manipulate, and retrieve information for planning, organizing, directing, and controlling administrative activities associated with the provision and utilization of ambulatory care services and facilities.Infant, Newborn: An infant during the first month after birth.Ileum: The distal and narrowest portion of the SMALL INTESTINE, between the JEJUNUM and the ILEOCECAL VALVE of the LARGE INTESTINE.Cattle: Domesticated bovine animals of the genus Bos, usually kept on a farm or ranch and used for the production of meat or dairy products or for heavy labor.Treatment Outcome: Evaluation undertaken to assess the results or consequences of management and procedures used in combating disease in order to determine the efficacy, effectiveness, safety, and practicability of these interventions in individual cases or series.Databases, Factual: Extensive collections, reputedly complete, of facts and data garnered from material of a specialized subject area and made available for analysis and application. The collection can be automated by various contemporary methods for retrieval. The concept should be differentiated from DATABASES, BIBLIOGRAPHIC which is restricted to collections of bibliographic references.Myocardium: The muscle tissue of the HEART. It is composed of striated, involuntary muscle cells (MYOCYTES, CARDIAC) connected to form the contractile pump to generate blood flow.Muscle, Smooth, Vascular: The nonstriated involuntary muscle tissue of blood vessels.Cells, Cultured: Cells propagated in vitro in special media conducive to their growth. Cultured cells are used to study developmental, morphologic, metabolic, physiologic, and genetic processes, among others.Immunoglobulin G: The major immunoglobulin isotype class in normal human serum. There are several isotype subclasses of IgG, for example, IgG1, IgG2A, and IgG2B.Base Sequence: The sequence of PURINES and PYRIMIDINES in nucleic acids and polynucleotides. It is also called nucleotide sequence.Aorta, Thoracic: The portion of the descending aorta proceeding from the arch of the aorta and extending to the DIAPHRAGM, eventually connecting to the ABDOMINAL AORTA.Cohort Studies: Studies in which subsets of a defined population are identified. These groups may or may not be exposed to factors hypothesized to influence the probability of the occurrence of a particular disease or other outcome. Cohorts are defined populations which, as a whole, are followed in an attempt to determine distinguishing subgroup characteristics.Diet, Atherogenic: A diet that contributes to the development and acceleration of ATHEROGENESIS.Guinea Pigs: A common name used for the genus Cavia. The most common species is Cavia porcellus which is the domesticated guinea pig used for pets and biomedical research.Antibody Specificity: The property of antibodies which enables them to react with some ANTIGENIC DETERMINANTS and not with others. Specificity is dependent on chemical composition, physical forces, and molecular structure at the binding site.Ciliary Body: A ring of tissue extending from the scleral spur to the ora serrata of the RETINA. It consists of the uveal portion and the epithelial portion. The ciliary muscle is in the uveal portion and the ciliary processes are in the epithelial portion.Reproducibility of Results: The statistical reproducibility of measurements (often in a clinical context), including the testing of instrumentation or techniques to obtain reproducible results. The concept includes reproducibility of physiological measurements, which may be used to develop rules to assess probability or prognosis, or response to a stimulus; reproducibility of occurrence of a condition; and reproducibility of experimental results.Iris: The most anterior portion of the uveal layer, separating the anterior chamber from the posterior. It consists of two layers - the stroma and the pigmented epithelium. Color of the iris depends on the amount of melanin in the stroma on reflection from the pigmented epithelium.Kidney: Body organ that filters blood for the secretion of URINE and that regulates ion concentrations.Models, Animal: Non-human animals, selected because of specific characteristics, for use in experimental research, teaching, or testing.Incidence: The number of new cases of a given disease during a given period in a specified population. It also is used for the rate at which new events occur in a defined population. It is differentiated from PREVALENCE, which refers to all cases, new or old, in the population at a given time.RNA, Messenger: RNA sequences that serve as templates for protein synthesis. Bacterial mRNAs are generally primary transcripts in that they do not require post-transcriptional processing. Eukaryotic mRNA is synthesized in the nucleus and must be exported to the cytoplasm for translation. Most eukaryotic mRNAs have a sequence of polyadenylic acid at the 3' end, referred to as the poly(A) tail. The function of this tail is not known for certain, but it may play a role in the export of mature mRNA from the nucleus as well as in helping stabilize some mRNA molecules by retarding their degradation in the cytoplasm.Immunization: Deliberate stimulation of the host's immune response. ACTIVE IMMUNIZATION involves administration of ANTIGENS or IMMUNOLOGIC ADJUVANTS. PASSIVE IMMUNIZATION involves administration of IMMUNE SERA or LYMPHOCYTES or their extracts (e.g., transfer factor, immune RNA) or transplantation of immunocompetent cell producing tissue (thymus or bone marrow).Antigen-Antibody Reactions: The processes triggered by interactions of ANTIBODIES with their ANTIGENS.Age Factors: Age as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or the effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from AGING, a physiological process, and TIME FACTORS which refers only to the passage of time.Pseudopregnancy: An acyclic state that resembles PREGNANCY in that there is no ovarian cycle, ESTROUS CYCLE, or MENSTRUAL CYCLE. Unlike pregnancy, there is no EMBRYO IMPLANTATION. Pseudopregnancy can be experimentally induced to form DECIDUOMA in the UTERUS.Follow-Up Studies: Studies in which individuals or populations are followed to assess the outcome of exposures, procedures, or effects of a characteristic, e.g., occurrence of disease.Administration, Topical: The application of drug preparations to the surfaces of the body, especially the skin (ADMINISTRATION, CUTANEOUS) or mucous membranes. This method of treatment is used to avoid systemic side effects when high doses are required at a localized area or as an alternative systemic administration route, to avoid hepatic processing for example.Cholesterol: The principal sterol of all higher animals, distributed in body tissues, especially the brain and spinal cord, and in animal fats and oils.Norepinephrine: Precursor of epinephrine that is secreted by the adrenal medulla and is a widespread central and autonomic neurotransmitter. Norepinephrine is the principal transmitter of most postganglionic sympathetic fibers and of the diffuse projection system in the brain arising from the locus ceruleus. It is also found in plants and is used pharmacologically as a sympathomimetic.Hospital Information Systems: Integrated, computer-assisted systems designed to store, manipulate, and retrieve information concerned with the administrative and clinical aspects of providing medical services within the hospital.Action Potentials: Abrupt changes in the membrane potential that sweep along the CELL MEMBRANE of excitable cells in response to excitation stimuli.Ear: The hearing and equilibrium system of the body. It consists of three parts: the EXTERNAL EAR, the MIDDLE EAR, and the INNER EAR. Sound waves are transmitted through this organ where vibration is transduced to nerve signals that pass through the ACOUSTIC NERVE to the CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM. The inner ear also contains the vestibular organ that maintains equilibrium by transducing signals to the VESTIBULAR NERVE.Attitude to Computers: The attitude and behavior associated with an individual using the computer.Data Collection: Systematic gathering of data for a particular purpose from various sources, including questionnaires, interviews, observation, existing records, and electronic devices. The process is usually preliminary to statistical analysis of the data.Electric Stimulation: Use of electric potential or currents to elicit biological responses.Immunoelectrophoresis: A technique that combines protein electrophoresis and double immunodiffusion. In this procedure proteins are first separated by gel electrophoresis (usually agarose), then made visible by immunodiffusion of specific antibodies. A distinct elliptical precipitin arc results for each protein detectable by the antisera.Fluorescent Antibody Technique: Test for tissue antigen using either a direct method, by conjugation of antibody with fluorescent dye (FLUORESCENT ANTIBODY TECHNIQUE, DIRECT) or an indirect method, by formation of antigen-antibody complex which is then labeled with fluorescein-conjugated anti-immunoglobulin antibody (FLUORESCENT ANTIBODY TECHNIQUE, INDIRECT). The tissue is then examined by fluorescence microscopy.EnglandLung: Either of the pair of organs occupying the cavity of the thorax that effect the aeration of the blood.Sodium: A member of the alkali group of metals. It has the atomic symbol Na, atomic number 11, and atomic weight 23.Potassium: An element in the alkali group of metals with an atomic symbol K, atomic number 19, and atomic weight 39.10. It is the chief cation in the intracellular fluid of muscle and other cells. Potassium ion is a strong electrolyte that plays a significant role in the regulation of fluid volume and maintenance of the WATER-ELECTROLYTE BALANCE.Conjunctiva: The mucous membrane that covers the posterior surface of the eyelids and the anterior pericorneal surface of the eyeball.Heart: The hollow, muscular organ that maintains the circulation of the blood.Arteries: The vessels carrying blood away from the heart.Systems Integration: The procedures involved in combining separately developed modules, components, or subsystems so that they work together as a complete system. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)Membrane Potentials: The voltage differences across a membrane. For cellular membranes they are computed by subtracting the voltage measured outside the membrane from the voltage measured inside the membrane. They result from differences of inside versus outside concentration of potassium, sodium, chloride, and other ions across cells' or ORGANELLES membranes. For excitable cells, the resting membrane potentials range between -30 and -100 millivolts. Physical, chemical, or electrical stimuli can make a membrane potential more negative (hyperpolarization), or less negative (depolarization).Death Certificates: Official records of individual deaths including the cause of death certified by a physician, and any other required identifying information.Injections, Intravenous: Injections made into a vein for therapeutic or experimental purposes.Cloning, Molecular: The insertion of recombinant DNA molecules from prokaryotic and/or eukaryotic sources into a replicating vehicle, such as a plasmid or virus vector, and the introduction of the resultant hybrid molecules into recipient cells without altering the viability of those cells.Birth Certificates: Official certifications by a physician recording the individual's birth date, place of birth, parentage and other required identifying data which are filed with the local registrar of vital statistics.Acetylcholine: A neurotransmitter found at neuromuscular junctions, autonomic ganglia, parasympathetic effector junctions, a subset of sympathetic effector junctions, and at many sites in the central nervous system.Hydrogen-Ion Concentration: The normality of a solution with respect to HYDROGEN ions; H+. It is related to acidity measurements in most cases by pH = log 1/2[1/(H+)], where (H+) is the hydrogen ion concentration in gram equivalents per liter of solution. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)Muscle, Smooth: Unstriated and unstriped muscle, one of the muscles of the internal organs, blood vessels, hair follicles, etc. Contractile elements are elongated, usually spindle-shaped cells with centrally located nuclei. Smooth muscle fibers are bound together into sheets or bundles by reticular fibers and frequently elastic nets are also abundant. (From Stedman, 25th ed)Random Allocation: A process involving chance used in therapeutic trials or other research endeavor for allocating experimental subjects, human or animal, between treatment and control groups, or among treatment groups. It may also apply to experiments on inanimate objects.Kidney Cortex: The outer zone of the KIDNEY, beneath the capsule, consisting of KIDNEY GLOMERULUS; KIDNEY TUBULES, DISTAL; and KIDNEY TUBULES, PROXIMAL.Tissue Distribution: Accumulation of a drug or chemical substance in various organs (including those not relevant to its pharmacologic or therapeutic action). This distribution depends on the blood flow or perfusion rate of the organ, the ability of the drug to penetrate organ membranes, tissue specificity, protein binding. The distribution is usually expressed as tissue to plasma ratios.Clinical Coding: Process of substituting a symbol or code for a term such as a diagnosis or procedure. (from Slee's Health Care Terms, 3d ed.)Registries: The systems and processes involved in the establishment, support, management, and operation of registers, e.g., disease registers.Blood Pressure: PRESSURE of the BLOOD on the ARTERIES and other BLOOD VESSELS.Information Storage and Retrieval: Organized activities related to the storage, location, search, and retrieval of information.Wound Healing: Restoration of integrity to traumatized tissue.Epithelium: One or more layers of EPITHELIAL CELLS, supported by the basal lamina, which covers the inner or outer surfaces of the body.Primary Health Care: Care which provides integrated, accessible health care services by clinicians who are accountable for addressing a large majority of personal health care needs, developing a sustained partnership with patients, and practicing in the context of family and community. (JAMA 1995;273(3):192)Antibodies, Monoclonal: Antibodies produced by a single clone of cells.Microscopy, Electron, Scanning: Microscopy in which the object is examined directly by an electron beam scanning the specimen point-by-point. The image is constructed by detecting the products of specimen interactions that are projected above the plane of the sample, such as backscattered electrons. Although SCANNING TRANSMISSION ELECTRON MICROSCOPY also scans the specimen point by point with the electron beam, the image is constructed by detecting the electrons, or their interaction products that are transmitted through the sample plane, so that is a form of TRANSMISSION ELECTRON MICROSCOPY.Epitopes: Sites on an antigen that interact with specific antibodies.Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay: An immunoassay utilizing an antibody labeled with an enzyme marker such as horseradish peroxidase. While either the enzyme or the antibody is bound to an immunosorbent substrate, they both retain their biologic activity; the change in enzyme activity as a result of the enzyme-antibody-antigen reaction is proportional to the concentration of the antigen and can be measured spectrophotometrically or with the naked eye. Many variations of the method have been developed.Sinoatrial Node: The small mass of modified cardiac muscle fibers located at the junction of the superior vena cava (VENA CAVA, SUPERIOR) and right atrium. Contraction impulses probably start in this node, spread over the atrium (HEART ATRIUM) and are then transmitted by the atrioventricular bundle (BUNDLE OF HIS) to the ventricle (HEART VENTRICLE).Patient Identification Systems: Organized procedures for establishing patient identity, including use of bracelets, etc.Immunohistochemistry: Histochemical localization of immunoreactive substances using labeled antibodies as reagents.Computer Systems: Systems composed of a computer or computers, peripheral equipment, such as disks, printers, and terminals, and telecommunications capabilities.Eye: The organ of sight constituting a pair of globular organs made up of a three-layered roughly spherical structure specialized for receiving and responding to light.Chromatography, Gel: Chromatography on non-ionic gels without regard to the mechanism of solute discrimination.Information Management: Management of the acquisition, organization, storage, retrieval, and dissemination of information. (From Thesaurus of ERIC Descriptors, 1994)Antigen-Antibody Complex: The complex formed by the binding of antigen and antibody molecules. The deposition of large antigen-antibody complexes leading to tissue damage causes IMMUNE COMPLEX DISEASES.gamma-Globulins: Serum globulins that migrate to the gamma region (most positively charged) upon ELECTROPHORESIS. At one time, gamma-globulins came to be used as a synonym for immunoglobulins since most immunoglobulins are gamma globulins and conversely most gamma globulins are immunoglobulins. But since some immunoglobulins exhibit an alpha or beta electrophoretic mobility, that usage is in decline.Questionnaires: Predetermined sets of questions used to collect data - clinical data, social status, occupational group, etc. The term is often applied to a self-completed survey instrument.Breeding: The production of offspring by selective mating or HYBRIDIZATION, GENETIC in animals or plants.Animals, Newborn: Refers to animals in the period of time just after birth.Antigens: Substances that are recognized by the immune system and induce an immune reaction.Sensitivity and Specificity: Binary classification measures to assess test results. Sensitivity or recall rate is the proportion of true positives. Specificity is the probability of correctly determining the absence of a condition. (From Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 2d ed)Fibroma Virus, Rabbit: A species of LEPORIPOXVIRUS causing subcutaneous localized swellings in rabbits, usually on the feet.Myosins: A diverse superfamily of proteins that function as translocating proteins. They share the common characteristics of being able to bind ACTINS and hydrolyze MgATP. Myosins generally consist of heavy chains which are involved in locomotion, and light chains which are involved in regulation. Within the structure of myosin heavy chain are three domains: the head, the neck and the tail. The head region of the heavy chain contains the actin binding domain and MgATPase domain which provides energy for locomotion. The neck region is involved in binding the light-chains. The tail region provides the anchoring point that maintains the position of the heavy chain. The superfamily of myosins is organized into structural classes based upon the type and arrangement of the subunits they contain.Electrophysiology: The study of the generation and behavior of electrical charges in living organisms particularly the nervous system and the effects of electricity on living organisms.Dogs: The domestic dog, Canis familiaris, comprising about 400 breeds, of the carnivore family CANIDAE. They are worldwide in distribution and live in association with people. (Walker's Mammals of the World, 5th ed, p1065)User-Computer Interface: The portion of an interactive computer program that issues messages to and receives commands from a user.Medical Record Administrators: Individuals professionally qualified in the management of patients' records. Duties may include planning, designing, and managing systems for patient administrative and clinical data, as well as patient medical records. The concept includes medical record technicians.Prevalence: The total number of cases of a given disease in a specified population at a designated time. It is differentiated from INCIDENCE, which refers to the number of new cases in the population at a given time.Psoas Muscles: A powerful flexor of the thigh at the hip joint (psoas major) and a weak flexor of the trunk and lumbar spinal column (psoas minor). Psoas is derived from the Greek "psoa", the plural meaning "muscles of the loin". It is a common site of infection manifesting as abscess (PSOAS ABSCESS). The psoas muscles and their fibers are also used frequently in experiments in muscle physiology.Ophthalmic Solutions: Sterile solutions that are intended for instillation into the eye. It does not include solutions for cleaning eyeglasses or CONTACT LENS SOLUTIONS.History, Ancient: The period of history before 500 of the common era.Muscle Relaxation: That phase of a muscle twitch during which a muscle returns to a resting position.Treponema pallidum: The causative agent of venereal and non-venereal syphilis as well as yaws.Microvilli: Minute projections of cell membranes which greatly increase the surface area of the cell.Indomethacin: A non-steroidal anti-inflammatory agent (NSAID) that inhibits the enzyme cyclooxygenase necessary for the formation of prostaglandins and other autacoids. It also inhibits the motility of polymorphonuclear leukocytes.Erythrocytes: Red blood cells. Mature erythrocytes are non-nucleated, biconcave disks containing HEMOGLOBIN whose function is to transport OXYGEN.Diffusion of Innovation: The broad dissemination of new ideas, procedures, techniques, materials, and devices and the degree to which these are accepted and used.Great BritainRadioimmunoassay: Classic quantitative assay for detection of antigen-antibody reactions using a radioactively labeled substance (radioligand) either directly or indirectly to measure the binding of the unlabeled substance to a specific antibody or other receptor system. Non-immunogenic substances (e.g., haptens) can be measured if coupled to larger carrier proteins (e.g., bovine gamma-globulin or human serum albumin) capable of inducing antibody formation.Amino Acids: Organic compounds that generally contain an amino (-NH2) and a carboxyl (-COOH) group. Twenty alpha-amino acids are the subunits which are polymerized to form proteins.MinnesotaRetina: The ten-layered nervous tissue membrane of the eye. It is continuous with the OPTIC NERVE and receives images of external objects and transmits visual impulses to the brain. Its outer surface is in contact with the CHOROID and the inner surface with the VITREOUS BODY. The outer-most layer is pigmented, whereas the inner nine layers are transparent.Swine: Any of various animals that constitute the family Suidae and comprise stout-bodied, short-legged omnivorous mammals with thick skin, usually covered with coarse bristles, a rather long mobile snout, and small tail. Included are the genera Babyrousa, Phacochoerus (wart hogs), and Sus, the latter containing the domestic pig (see SUS SCROFA).Decision Support Systems, Clinical: Computer-based information systems used to integrate clinical and patient information and provide support for decision-making in patient care.Natural Language Processing: Computer processing of a language with rules that reflect and describe current usage rather than prescribed usage.Intraocular Pressure: The pressure of the fluids in the eye.Methods: A series of steps taken in order to conduct research.Information Systems: Integrated set of files, procedures, and equipment for the storage, manipulation, and retrieval of information.Family Practice: A medical specialty concerned with the provision of continuing, comprehensive primary health care for the entire family.Adenosine Triphosphate: An adenine nucleotide containing three phosphate groups esterified to the sugar moiety. In addition to its crucial roles in metabolism adenosine triphosphate is a neurotransmitter.Analysis of Variance: A statistical technique that isolates and assesses the contributions of categorical independent variables to variation in the mean of a continuous dependent variable.Medical Informatics: The field of information science concerned with the analysis and dissemination of medical data through the application of computers to various aspects of health care and medicine.Histocytochemistry: Study of intracellular distribution of chemicals, reaction sites, enzymes, etc., by means of staining reactions, radioactive isotope uptake, selective metal distribution in electron microscopy, or other methods.Protein Biosynthesis: The biosynthesis of PEPTIDES and PROTEINS on RIBOSOMES, directed by MESSENGER RNA, via TRANSFER RNA that is charged with standard proteinogenic AMINO ACIDS.Algorithms: A procedure consisting of a sequence of algebraic formulas and/or logical steps to calculate or determine a given task.Prostaglandins E: (11 alpha,13E,15S)-11,15-Dihydroxy-9-oxoprost-13-en-1-oic acid (PGE(1)); (5Z,11 alpha,13E,15S)-11,15-dihydroxy-9-oxoprosta-5,13-dien-1-oic acid (PGE(2)); and (5Z,11 alpha,13E,15S,17Z)-11,15-dihydroxy-9-oxoprosta-5,13,17-trien-1-oic acid (PGE(3)). Three of the six naturally occurring prostaglandins. They are considered primary in that no one is derived from another in living organisms. Originally isolated from sheep seminal fluid and vesicles, they are found in many organs and tissues and play a major role in mediating various physiological activities.Models, Biological: Theoretical representations that simulate the behavior or activity of biological processes or diseases. For disease models in living animals, DISEASE MODELS, ANIMAL is available. Biological models include the use of mathematical equations, computers, and other electronic equipment.Body Weight: The mass or quantity of heaviness of an individual. It is expressed by units of pounds or kilograms.Peptide Fragments: Partial proteins formed by partial hydrolysis of complete proteins or generated through PROTEIN ENGINEERING techniques.Recombinant Proteins: Proteins prepared by recombinant DNA technology.Prospective Studies: Observation of a population for a sufficient number of persons over a sufficient number of years to generate incidence or mortality rates subsequent to the selection of the study group.Endothelium: A layer of epithelium that lines the heart, blood vessels (ENDOTHELIUM, VASCULAR), lymph vessels (ENDOTHELIUM, LYMPHATIC), and the serous cavities of the body.Keratitis, Dendritic: A form of herpetic keratitis characterized by the formation of small vesicles which break down and coalesce to form recurring dendritic ulcers, characteristically irregular, linear, branching, and ending in knoblike extremities. (Dictionary of Visual Science, 3d ed)Blotting, Western: Identification of proteins or peptides that have been electrophoretically separated by blot transferring from the electrophoresis gel to strips of nitrocellulose paper, followed by labeling with antibody probes.Serum Albumin, Bovine: Serum albumin from cows, commonly used in in vitro biological studies. (From Stedman, 25th ed)BrazilTemperature: The property of objects that determines the direction of heat flow when they are placed in direct thermal contact. The temperature is the energy of microscopic motions (vibrational and translational) of the particles of atoms.Access to Information: Individual's rights to obtain and use information collected or generated by others.Prostaglandins: A group of compounds derived from unsaturated 20-carbon fatty acids, primarily arachidonic acid, via the cyclooxygenase pathway. They are extremely potent mediators of a diverse group of physiological processes.Immunoglobulin Allotypes: Allelic variants of the immunoglobulin light chains (IMMUNOGLOBULIN LIGHT CHAINS) or heavy chains (IMMUNOGLOBULIN HEAVY CHAINS) encoded by ALLELES of IMMUNOGLOBULIN GENES.Hospitalization: The confinement of a patient in a hospital.Population Surveillance: Ongoing scrutiny of a population (general population, study population, target population, etc.), generally using methods distinguished by their practicability, uniformity, and frequently their rapidity, rather than by complete accuracy.Antigens, Bacterial: Substances elaborated by bacteria that have antigenic activity.Chromatography, High Pressure Liquid: Liquid chromatographic techniques which feature high inlet pressures, high sensitivity, and high speed.Endothelium, Vascular: Single pavement layer of cells which line the luminal surface of the entire vascular system and regulate the transport of macromolecules and blood components.Biological Transport: The movement of materials (including biochemical substances and drugs) through a biological system at the cellular level. The transport can be across cell membranes and epithelial layers. It also can occur within intracellular compartments and extracellular compartments.ComputersCell Membrane: The lipid- and protein-containing, selectively permeable membrane that surrounds the cytoplasm in prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells.Biological Evolution: The process of cumulative change over successive generations through which organisms acquire their distinguishing morphological and physiological characteristics.International Classification of Diseases: A system of categories to which morbid entries are assigned according to established criteria. Included is the entire range of conditions in a manageable number of categories, grouped to facilitate mortality reporting. It is produced by the World Health Organization (From ICD-10, p1). The Clinical Modifications, produced by the UNITED STATES DEPT. OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES, are larger extensions used for morbidity and general epidemiological purposes, primarily in the U.S.Nitric Oxide: A free radical gas produced endogenously by a variety of mammalian cells, synthesized from ARGININE by NITRIC OXIDE SYNTHASE. Nitric oxide is one of the ENDOTHELIUM-DEPENDENT RELAXING FACTORS released by the vascular endothelium and mediates VASODILATION. It also inhibits platelet aggregation, induces disaggregation of aggregated platelets, and inhibits platelet adhesion to the vascular endothelium. Nitric oxide activates cytosolic GUANYLATE CYCLASE and thus elevates intracellular levels of CYCLIC GMP.Blood Proteins: Proteins that are present in blood serum, including SERUM ALBUMIN; BLOOD COAGULATION FACTORS; and many other types of proteins.Medical History Taking: Acquiring information from a patient on past medical conditions and treatments.Vasoconstriction: The physiological narrowing of BLOOD VESSELS by contraction of the VASCULAR SMOOTH MUSCLE.Cross-Sectional Studies: Studies in which the presence or absence of disease or other health-related variables are determined in each member of the study population or in a representative sample at one particular time. This contrasts with LONGITUDINAL STUDIES which are followed over a period of time.Geology: The science of the earth and other celestial bodies and their history as recorded in the rocks. It includes the study of geologic processes of an area such as rock formations, weathering and erosion, and sedimentation. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)Sex Factors: Maleness or femaleness as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from SEX CHARACTERISTICS, anatomical or physiological manifestations of sex, and from SEX DISTRIBUTION, the number of males and females in given circumstances.
  • This marks the first confirmed cases of RHD in wild rabbits in Texas and follows the discovery of the disease in domestic rabbits in Hockley County, which was announced in a recent Texas Animal Health Commission news release . (texasoutdoorsjournal.com)
  • Since March 23, detections of the disease in both wild and domestic rabbits have occurred in New Mexico, Colorado, Arizona and Mexico. (texasoutdoorsjournal.com)
  • Texas Animal Health Commission will continue to work alongside our partners, USDA and TPWD, to provide situational updates for all domestic rabbits confirmed with RHDV2," said Dr. Susan Rollo, TAHC State Epidemiologist. (texasoutdoorsjournal.com)
  • A healthy, adult New Zealand white rabbit was anaesthetised for a CT scan as part of a larger study evaluating different methods of providing a secure airway to facilitate ventilation. (bmj.com)
  • This was one of the first Christmas records I purchased as an adult in 1993 and so has sentimental value to me, but Cockburn is an amazing guitarist and songwriter, and on this record takes some chances that uniquely bear his sensibility, like turning "Early On One Christmas Morn'" into a rousing saloon song. (rabbitroom.com)
  • Bone formation and bone healing were studied in the mandible, tibia and skull bones in adult, healthy and estrogen deficient rabbits implanted with different bone substitutes. (diva-portal.org)
  • Alfalfa hay is high in calcium and should generally be avoided in adult rabbits. (bva.co.uk)
  • Check out the best new music out from Atlantic Records artists today! (atlanticrecords.com)
  • You see, what record labels did wrong (took more than their fair share, tried to water down great artists, held records under lock and key) were the unfortunate side effects of the good that they did, mainly fronting the money for records to be made and then doing the work of getting the music out there. (rabbitroom.com)
  • Little Rabbit Barn would like to tell you about one of our partners: Live music is back, but in a different way! (littlerabbitbarn.com)
  • The Edgefield Winery Tasting Room offers free, live music by candlelight several nights a week and is located just a few steps away from the Black Rabbit. (opentable.com)
  • All About Jazz & Jazz Near You were built to promote jazz music: both recorded and live events. (allaboutjazz.com)
  • Hrabko and his Rabbits' music is Americana in the broadest sense. (kcur.org)
  • Slowly but surely gaining a reputation for their music, Frightened Rabbit began work on their first album, initially planning to record at the home studio where they'd done their original demos but eventually opting to record at Glasgow's Diving Bell Studio with Marcus Mackay instead. (apple.com)
  • FIG 1: CT images (sagittal plane) of a three-month-old New Zealand White rabbit pre-intubation (top) and post-intubation (bottom) with a 2.5 mm ID endotracheal tube. (bmj.com)
  • The same could be said for that film's companion soundtrack, and it looks like Alice Through The Looking Glass will be doing the same - starting with Pink's new rendition of the Jefferson Airplane classic "White Rabbit. (cinemablend.com)
  • And included with that crop of songs, unsurprisingly, was "White Rabbit," though the Grace Potter and the Nocturnals version played more like a straightforward cover, rather than a re-imagining. (cinemablend.com)
  • Seeing as the song was obviously inspired by Alice Through The Looking Glass's source material, it's not a surprise that "White Rabbit" has become somewhat of a good luck charm for the billion dollar franchise. (cinemablend.com)
  • Follow the White Rabbit," a trio composition, is a beautiful track featuring superb ensemble playing. (allaboutjazz.com)
  • His biography claims that he's "an exceptional phenomenon, unique in the history of piano playing" that's pushing things a bit too far, but he is certainly an impressive player and writer and Follow The White Rabbit is the product of a fine new Trio. (allaboutjazz.com)
  • The rabbits were found inside of crates inside a large, barn-type structure covered with tarp and other materials," the organization said in a Facebook post. (kwtx.com)
  • The crates were filled with feces, hair, dirt and debris, and the rabbits had little access to appropriate food or water," the post said. (kwtx.com)
  • Many crates contained multiple rabbits, including numerous litters of juvenile rabbits," the SPCA said. (kwtx.com)
  • A report of an unexpected and novel anaesthetic complication in a rabbit, the presence of faecal matter in the oropharynx impeding attempts at intubation, was recently published in Veterinary Record Case Reports. (bmj.com)
  • Rabbits produce two types of faecal pellets, although you may only ever see one type! (bva.co.uk)
  • They produce hard round faecal pellets that are passed throughout the day, but usually at dawn and dusk, rabbits produce soft faeces called caecotrophs, which contain proteins, fatty acids, vitamins and minerals and serve as an additional source of nutrients. (bva.co.uk)
  • The band was formed in 2003 by singer/keyboardist/guitarist Jesika von Rabbit, guitarist/singer Todd Rutherford and bassist/sampler Travis Cline. (wikipedia.org)
  • Frightened Rabbit was founded in Glasgow, Scotland, in 2004, when guitarist Scott Hutchison and his brother Grant, a percussionist who -- like his sibling -- prefers to keep his last name a secret, began recording demos of songs they had written. (apple.com)
  • Learn all about: -Finding a vet -Choosing an appropriate cage -Pellets, hay, and fresh foods -Growing herbs and lettuces for your bunny -Toys to keep your rabbit engaged -Illnesses to watch for -And more! (recordedbooks.com)
  • Make your first year with your bunny a fun and fulfilling experience that will bond you and your new rabbit for life. (recordedbooks.com)
  • Those interested are invited to bring their rabbits to the festival and participate in activities like the Bunny Spa and Bunny Glamour Shots. (recordherald.com)
  • The Bunny Spa offers a variety of "personal hygiene and beauty" services that will leave your rabbit looking adorable, according to the event's website. (recordherald.com)
  • For Rabbit Awareness Week, BVA is sharing top tips to guide pet owners to avoid 'bunny spoilers' and ensure that they are feeding their pets a nutritious and balanced diet. (bva.co.uk)
  • Michael Larkin (Lazarus Clamp) on… Mekons - The Mekons Rock 'n' Roll (Blast First, 1989) I first heard the Mekons when I recorded one of their John Peel sessions from the radio . (adequacy.net)
  • One of the secrets to a hoppy, healthy rabbit is feeding it the right food, the British Veterinary Association is highlighting ahead of Rabbit Awareness Week (2 - 10 June), as survey findings have shown that five of the top six rabbit health problems vets see in practice are attributable to poor diet. (bva.co.uk)
  • "…she's Maria Schneider on steroids…" -Harvey Siders, Jazz Times/ Clairvoyance - Ayn Inserto's DOWN A RABBIT HOLE exhibits her continued exploration and adventures for the modern big band. (summitrecords.com)
  • The energy, creativity, and craft of Ayn's DOWN A RABBIT HOLE is simply magical and inspiring. (summitrecords.com)
  • Down a Rabbit Hole (Summit - 732) conjures up the kind of madcap adventures experienced by Alice in her trip to Wonderland. (summitrecords.com)
  • DOWN A RABBIT HOLE [Summit Records dcdbrings together a number of players found on her 2008 recording Muse on Creative Nation Records. (summitrecords.com)
  • Follow me and the Tennessee Department of Revenue down the open records rabbit hole. (wordpress.com)
  • One rabbit hole of searching later, I found the genesis of a story: the 11th annual letter from the state mine inspector begging for more abandoned mine funding. (sej.org)
  • Below Steve Quayle takes KWN readers around the world on another trip down the rabbit hole of Western lies, propaganda, and missing gold. (kingworldnews.com)
  • This song is about the shadow men who collude behind the darkened corridors of our society and government that take us down the Rabbit Hole behind the looking glass! (kompoz.com)
  • Doing a full release (indie record stores, iTunes) in September gives us a few months to get reviews in magazines and on websites, gives us time to have stories about the concept and the building of the ship told in newspapers and local publications, gives us time to generate some excitement for the project. (rabbitroom.com)
  • If you've ever listened to the indie band Frightened Rabbit, it might not surprise you that frontman Scott Hutchinson knows how depression feels. (stereogum.com)
  • The discography of Gram Rabbit, an American indie rock band from Joshua Tree, California consists of five studio albums, and three extended plays. (wikipedia.org)
  • Churning Scottish epic-indie types Frightened Rabbit have a new three-song EP, and they've thoughtfully posted it for free download. (stereogum.com)
  • The longest rabbit is Darius, a Flemish giant rabbit owned by Annette Edwards (UK), who was found to be 4 ft 3 in (129 cm) long when measured for an article in the UK's Daily Mail newspaper on 6 April 2010. (guinnessworldrecords.com)
  • Retail pet stores in California will only be able to sell kittens, rabbits, and puppies if they come from a rescue organization after a new state law goes into effect Tuesday. (nbclosangeles.com)
  • Secret Passage to Simi Peak (Rabbit Ridge Trail) is a 6.5 mile lightly trafficked loop trail located near Thousand Oaks, California that features beautiful wild flowers and is rated as difficult. (alltrails.com)
  • The source(s) of failed orotracheal intubation attempts in rabbits are usually unknown, although there is a tendency to blame anaesthetist inexperience or anatomical impediments. (bmj.com)
  • Rabbit experts Dr. Micah Kohles and Dr. Barbara Oglesbee will lead a 90-minute educational session with in-depth information on GI Stasis and other rabbit digestive issues. (recordherald.com)
  • Despite the myths perpetuated by cartoon and storybook characters, carrots are actually not good for rabbits as they are high in sugar content, and should only be given occasionally as a treat. (bva.co.uk)
  • Located in Edgefield's main lodge, the Black Rabbit is open daily for breakfast, lunch and dinner. (opentable.com)
  • While many rabbit owners may know that Bugs Bunny's favourite snack, the carrot, should only be fed as an occasional treat due to its high sugar content, many myths still prevail around the best food for their pets. (bva.co.uk)
  • Although muesli diets are colourful and often more attractive to rabbits than pellets, they encourage selective feeding and predispose the animals to dental disease and obesity. (bva.co.uk)
  • Rabbits should be fed a small amount of pellets daily - about an egg cup full - as they are a good complementary source of vitamins and minerals. (bva.co.uk)
  • The best philosophy is full of varied and valuable illustrations, whether written or drawn, that help us to think about things in new and different ways: ducks, rabbits, shadows on the walls of caves, flowing rivers, brains in vats, runaway trolleys. (popmatters.com)
  • Back with their first new record in a decade, this crew's left leaning tendencies make the title an apt choice. (summitrecords.com)
  • However, when you make a record that you feel has a ton of potential beyond your group of supporters, well, that's when it gets tricky. (rabbitroom.com)
  • Rabbits make fantastic pets, but unfortunately many vets are seeing rabbits suffering from completely preventable illnesses due to a poor diet. (bva.co.uk)
  • Put another way, thanks to Hrabko's sly and warm vocals, his band's typically slinky rhythms and brooding arrangements, and (very important) his use of the recording studio as instrument, he puts his songs over in ways that make us eager to hear them again. (kcur.org)
  • In advance of the upcoming album, LOA presents the sleazy EP Little Mighty Rabbit . (metropolis-records.com)
  • Heard It Records a la primeur de proposer le premier album de Skinfaxe : Failure System. (daheardit-records.net)
  • Le résultat est un album à l'intensité croissante où chaque son est taillé à brut, prêt à recevoir apparâts et arrangements pour en faire ressortir un morceau au caractère bien trempé. (daheardit-records.net)
  • The folks at LITTLE RABBIT BARN are very chuffed to feature the new live album from CHERRY LEE MEWIS. (littlerabbitbarn.com)
  • Jesika von Rabbit has released one studio album. (wikipedia.org)
  • Miranda Zickler, Nathan Hamer, Zach Hamer and Jillian Walker, the folk-rock harmony that is Rabbit Wilde, perform "Howl" from their new album, "The Heartland. (seattlechannel.org)
  • The Dead Rabbitts are back with a brand new album titled "This Emptiness" available now via Tragic Hero Records. (youtube.com)
  • While enjoying this new creative process, to the extent that he stated he would 'never [again] write a Frightened Rabbit record in the way I used to,' he also wanted to continue writing solo, and to this end he created the Owl John project, releasing an eponymous album in 2014. (apple.com)
  • Researchers at Virginia Commonwealth University (VCU) Massey Cancer Center's Bone Marrow Transplant Program have demonstrated that the use of antibodies derived from rabbits can improve the survival and relapse outcomes of leukemia and myelodysplasia patients receiving a stem cell transplant from an unrelated donor. (innovations-report.com)
  • The sale of Koons's 1986 "Rabbit" at Christie's on Wednesday was the most expensive work by a living artist to be sold at auction. (independent.ie)
  • The New York Times said Robert E Mnuchin, an art dealer and the father of Treasury secretary Steven Mnuchin, was the winning bidder for "Rabbit", which had an estimated sale price of at least 50 million dollars. (independent.ie)
  • The sale of Koons' 1986 "Rabbit" at Christie's Wednesday was the most expensive work by a living artist ever sold at auction. (mail.com)
  • The organization sent letters to all local stores reminding them of the new law, which does not impact the sale of dogs, cats, or rabbits direct from breeders. (nbclosangeles.com)
  • Species of conservation concern listed under the National Parks and Wildlife Act 1972 which have been recorded on the island include the fairy tern (listed as endangered) and the bush stone-curlew, Cape Barren goose, sooty oystercatcher and rock parrot (listed as rare). (wikipedia.org)
  • Unlike the larger, privately owned Louth Island which sits 3 kilometres (1.9 miles) to the north-west, Rabbit Island is public land and part of the Lincoln National Park. (wikipedia.org)