Reconstructive Surgical Procedures: Procedures used to reconstruct, restore, or improve defective, damaged, or missing structures.Surgical Procedures, Operative: Operations carried out for the correction of deformities and defects, repair of injuries, and diagnosis and cure of certain diseases. (Taber, 18th ed.)Surgical Procedures, Minor: Surgery restricted to the management of minor problems and injuries; surgical procedures of relatively slight extent and not in itself hazardous to life. (Dorland, 28th ed & Stedman, 25th ed)Postoperative Complications: Pathologic processes that affect patients after a surgical procedure. They may or may not be related to the disease for which the surgery was done, and they may or may not be direct results of the surgery.Treatment Outcome: Evaluation undertaken to assess the results or consequences of management and procedures used in combating disease in order to determine the efficacy, effectiveness, safety, and practicability of these interventions in individual cases or series.Ambulatory Surgical Procedures: Surgery performed on an outpatient basis. It may be hospital-based or performed in an office or surgicenter.Retrospective Studies: Studies used to test etiologic hypotheses in which inferences about an exposure to putative causal factors are derived from data relating to characteristics of persons under study or to events or experiences in their past. The essential feature is that some of the persons under study have the disease or outcome of interest and their characteristics are compared with those of unaffected persons.Surgical Procedures, Minimally Invasive: Procedures that avoid use of open, invasive surgery in favor of closed or local surgery. These generally involve use of laparoscopic devices and remote-control manipulation of instruments with indirect observation of the surgical field through an endoscope or similar device.Oral Surgical Procedures: Surgical procedures used to treat disease, injuries, and defects of the oral and maxillofacial region.Vascular Surgical Procedures: Operative procedures for the treatment of vascular disorders.Cardiac Surgical Procedures: Surgery performed on the heart.Surgical Procedures, Elective: Surgery which could be postponed or not done at all without danger to the patient. Elective surgery includes procedures to correct non-life-threatening medical problems as well as to alleviate conditions causing psychological stress or other potential risk to patients, e.g., cosmetic or contraceptive surgery.Gynecologic Surgical Procedures: Surgery performed on the female genitalia.Digestive System Surgical Procedures: Surgery performed on the digestive system or its parts.Otorhinolaryngologic Surgical Procedures: Surgery performed on the ear and its parts, the nose and nasal cavity, or the throat, including surgery of the adenoids, tonsils, pharynx, and trachea.Urologic Surgical Procedures: Surgery performed on the urinary tract or its parts in the male or female. For surgery of the male genitalia, UROLOGIC SURGICAL PROCEDURES, MALE is available.Obstetric Surgical Procedures: Surgery performed on the pregnant woman for conditions associated with pregnancy, labor, or the puerperium. It does not include surgery of the newborn infant.Ophthalmologic Surgical Procedures: Surgery performed on the eye or any of its parts.Thoracic Surgical Procedures: Surgery performed on the thoracic organs, most commonly the lungs and the heart.Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Cardiovascular Surgical Procedures: Surgery performed on the heart or blood vessels.General Surgery: A specialty in which manual or operative procedures are used in the treatment of disease, injuries, or deformities.Follow-Up Studies: Studies in which individuals or populations are followed to assess the outcome of exposures, procedures, or effects of a characteristic, e.g., occurrence of disease.Preoperative Care: Care given during the period prior to undergoing surgery when psychological and physical preparations are made according to the special needs of the individual patient. This period spans the time between admission to the hospital to the time the surgery begins. (From Dictionary of Health Services Management, 2d ed)Intraoperative Complications: Complications that affect patients during surgery. They may or may not be associated with the disease for which the surgery is done, or within the same surgical procedure.Orthopedic Procedures: Procedures used to treat and correct deformities, diseases, and injuries to the MUSCULOSKELETAL SYSTEM, its articulations, and associated structures.Dermatologic Surgical Procedures: Operative procedures performed on the SKIN.Laparoscopy: A procedure in which a laparoscope (LAPAROSCOPES) is inserted through a small incision near the navel to examine the abdominal and pelvic organs in the PERITONEAL CAVITY. If appropriate, biopsy or surgery can be performed during laparoscopy.Reoperation: A repeat operation for the same condition in the same patient due to disease progression or recurrence, or as followup to failed previous surgery.Neurosurgical Procedures: Surgery performed on the nervous system or its parts.Prospective Studies: Observation of a population for a sufficient number of persons over a sufficient number of years to generate incidence or mortality rates subsequent to the selection of the study group.Operating Rooms: Facilities equipped for performing surgery.Postoperative Care: The period of care beginning when the patient is removed from surgery and aimed at meeting the patient's psychological and physical needs directly after surgery. (From Dictionary of Health Services Management, 2d ed)Oral Surgical Procedures, Preprosthetic: Surgery necessary for a denture to rest on a firm base, free from marked osseous protuberances or undercuts, and devoid of interfering muscle attachments, excess mucoperiosteum, hyperplasias, and fibrous or papillary growths.Surgical Wound Infection: Infection occurring at the site of a surgical incision.Postoperative Period: The period following a surgical operation.Length of Stay: The period of confinement of a patient to a hospital or other health facility.Anesthesia: A state characterized by loss of feeling or sensation. This depression of nerve function is usually the result of pharmacologic action and is induced to allow performance of surgery or other painful procedures.Ultrasonic Surgical Procedures: The use of HIGH-ENERGY SHOCK WAVES, in the frequency range of 20-60 kHz, to cut through or remove tissue. The tissue fragmentation by ultrasonic surgical instruments is caused by mechanical effects not heat as with HIGH-INTENSITY FOCUSED ULTRASOUND ABLATION.Surgery Department, Hospital: Hospital department which administers all departmental functions and the provision of surgical diagnostic and therapeutic services.Intraoperative Care: Patient care procedures performed during the operation that are ancillary to the actual surgery. It includes monitoring, fluid therapy, medication, transfusion, anesthesia, radiography, and laboratory tests.Thoracotomy: Surgical incision into the chest wall.Pulmonary Surgical Procedures: Surgery performed on the lung.Tomography, X-Ray Computed: Tomography using x-ray transmission and a computer algorithm to reconstruct the image.Surgical Equipment: Nonexpendable apparatus used during surgical procedures. They are differentiated from SURGICAL INSTRUMENTS, usually hand-held and used in the immediate operative field.Endoscopy: Procedures of applying ENDOSCOPES for disease diagnosis and treatment. Endoscopy involves passing an optical instrument through a small incision in the skin i.e., percutaneous; or through a natural orifice and along natural body pathways such as the digestive tract; and/or through an incision in the wall of a tubular structure or organ, i.e. transluminal, to examine or perform surgery on the interior parts of the body.Anesthesia, General: Procedure in which patients are induced into an unconscious state through use of various medications so that they do not feel pain during surgery.Monitoring, Intraoperative: The constant checking on the state or condition of a patient during the course of a surgical operation (e.g., checking of vital signs).Methods: A series of steps taken in order to conduct research.Surgical Flaps: Tongues of skin and subcutaneous tissue, sometimes including muscle, cut away from the underlying parts but often still attached at one end. They retain their own microvasculature which is also transferred to the new site. They are often used in plastic surgery for filling a defect in a neighboring region.Surgical Instruments: Hand-held tools or implements used by health professionals for the performance of surgical tasks.Microsurgery: The performance of surgical procedures with the aid of a microscope.Cholecystectomy: Surgical removal of the GALLBLADDER.Anastomosis, Surgical: Surgical union or shunt between ducts, tubes or vessels. It may be end-to-end, end-to-side, side-to-end, or side-to-side.Intraoperative Period: The period during a surgical operation.Suture Techniques: Techniques for securing together the edges of a wound, with loops of thread or similar materials (SUTURES).Decompression, Surgical: A surgical operation for the relief of pressure in a body compartment or on a body part. (From Dorland, 28th ed)Otologic Surgical Procedures: Surgery performed on the external, middle, or internal ear.Surgery, Plastic: The branch of surgery concerned with restoration, reconstruction, or improvement of defective, damaged, or missing structures.Equipment Design: Methods of creating machines and devices.Risk Factors: An aspect of personal behavior or lifestyle, environmental exposure, or inborn or inherited characteristic, which, on the basis of epidemiologic evidence, is known to be associated with a health-related condition considered important to prevent.Pain, Postoperative: Pain during the period after surgery.Osteotomy: The surgical cutting of a bone. (Dorland, 28th ed)Surgery, Veterinary: A board-certified specialty of VETERINARY MEDICINE, requiring at least four years of special education, training, and practice of veterinary surgery after graduation from veterinary school. In the written, oral, and practical examinations candidates may choose either large or small animal surgery. (From AVMA Directory, 43d ed, p278)Urogenital Surgical Procedures: Surgery performed on the urinary tract or its organs and on the male or female genitalia.Surgery, Computer-Assisted: Surgical procedures conducted with the aid of computers. This is most frequently used in orthopedic and laparoscopic surgery for implant placement and instrument guidance. Image-guided surgery interactively combines prior CT scans or MRI images with real-time video.Perioperative Care: Interventions to provide care prior to, during, and immediately after surgery.Surgery, Oral: A dental specialty concerned with the diagnosis and surgical treatment of disease, injuries, and defects of the human oral and maxillofacial region.Gloves, Surgical: Gloves, usually rubber, worn by surgeons, examining physicians, dentists, and other health personnel for the mutual protection of personnel and patient.Anesthesia, Local: A blocking of nerve conduction to a specific area by an injection of an anesthetic agent.Drainage: The removal of fluids or discharges from the body, such as from a wound, sore, or cavity.Hysterectomy: Excision of the uterus.Blood Loss, Surgical: Loss of blood during a surgical procedure.Prostheses and Implants: Artificial substitutes for body parts, and materials inserted into tissue for functional, cosmetic, or therapeutic purposes. Prostheses can be functional, as in the case of artificial arms and legs, or cosmetic, as in the case of an artificial eye. Implants, all surgically inserted or grafted into the body, tend to be used therapeutically. IMPLANTS, EXPERIMENTAL is available for those used experimentally.Postoperative Hemorrhage: Hemorrhage following any surgical procedure. It may be immediate or delayed and is not restricted to the surgical wound.Orthognathic Surgical Procedures: Surgery performed to repair or correct the skeletal anomalies of the jaw and its associated dental and facial structures (e.g. CLEFT PALATE).Specialties, Surgical: Various branches of surgical practice limited to specialized areas.Recurrence: The return of a sign, symptom, or disease after a remission.Anesthesiology: A specialty concerned with the study of anesthetics and anesthesia.Colectomy: Excision of a portion of the colon or of the whole colon. (Dorland, 28th ed)Risk Assessment: The qualitative or quantitative estimation of the likelihood of adverse effects that may result from exposure to specified health hazards or from the absence of beneficial influences. (Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 1988)Tooth Extraction: The surgical removal of a tooth. (Dorland, 28th ed)Laparotomy: Incision into the side of the abdomen between the ribs and pelvis.Electrocoagulation: Procedures using an electrically heated wire or scalpel to treat hemorrhage (e.g., bleeding ulcers) and to ablate tumors, mucosal lesions, and refractory arrhythmias. It is different from ELECTROSURGERY which is used more for cutting tissue than destroying and in which the patient is part of the electric circuit.Catheterization: Use or insertion of a tubular device into a duct, blood vessel, hollow organ, or body cavity for injecting or withdrawing fluids for diagnostic or therapeutic purposes. It differs from INTUBATION in that the tube here is used to restore or maintain patency in obstructions.

Reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament: comparison of outside-in and all-inside techniques. (1/1491)

The aim of this prospective study was to compare two arthroscopic techniques for reconstructing the anterior cruciate ligament, the "outside-in" (two incisions) and the "all-inside" (one incision) techniques. The results obtained for 30 patients operated on using the "outside-in" technique (group I) were compared with those for 29 patients operated on using the "all-inside" technique (group II). Before surgery, there were no significant differences between the groups in terms of Lysholm score, Tegner activity level, patellofemoral pain score, or knee laxity. Both groups displayed significant improvements in Lysholm score after 24 months, from 69 (16) to 91 (9) in group I and from 70 (17) to 90 (15) in group II (means (SD)). There were also significant improvements in patellofemoral pain scores in both groups, from 13 (6) to 18 (5) in group I and from 14 (6) to 18 (4) in group II after 24 months. No difference was found between the groups in knee stability at the 24 month follow up. The IKDC score was identical in both groups at follow up. The operation took significantly longer for patients in group I (mean 94 (15)) than for those in group II (mean 86 (20)) (p = 0.03). The mean sick leave was 7.7 (6.2) weeks in group I and 12.3 (9.7) weeks in group II (p = 0.026), indicating that there may be a higher morbidity associated with the "all-inside" technique. It can be concluded that there were no significant differences between the two different techniques in terms of functional results, knee laxity, or postoperative complications. The results were satisfactory and the outcome was similar in both treatment groups.  (+info)

Soft tissue cover for the exposed knee prosthesis. (2/1491)

This study assess the use of muscle flaps to cover exposed knee prostheses and emphasises the need for early plastic surgery consultation. In five of the six patients studied the wound was successfully covered and the knee prosthesis salvaged with a reasonable functional outcome.  (+info)

Permanent implantation of expanded polytetrafluoroethylene is safe for pelvic surgery. United States Expanded Polytetrafluoroethylene Reproductive Surgery Study Group. (3/1491)

Clinical trials have shown the expanded polytetrafluoroethylene (ePTFE) membrane to be a highly effective adhesion barrier in gynaecological reconstructive surgery, but the material has not gained wide acceptance because of uncertainty about long-term safety. We conducted a prospective, observational multicentre study to determine if permanent implantation of the ePTFE membrane in the pelvis caused any adverse effects. The subjects were 146 women in whom the membrane was implanted permanently during peritoneal reconstruction in 1991-1996. Postoperatively, patients were examined at regular intervals. The mean postoperative observation time was 3.5 years. No long-term complications occurred. There were 10 births by Caesarean section and 12 by vaginal delivery. All of the pregnancies before these 22 births were uneventful, including 10 in which the women had uterine implantation sites. There were two ectopic pregnancies and three spontaneous abortions. Since the primary purpose of the study was to evaluate the long-term safety of ePTFE, early second-look laparoscopy was not performed routinely. Nevertheless, 24 women had a subsequent operation. Adhesions were present at 8/21 of the membrane sites in these women, a significant decrease compared with adhesions at 17/21 sites during the initial procedure (P = 0.005). This large, multicentre study confirmed the long-term safety of the ePTFE membrane in pelvic reconstruction. Removal of the barrier is not necessary.  (+info)

Laparoscopically assisted full thickness skin graft for reconstruction in congenital agenesis of vagina and uterine cervix. (4/1491)

In patients with agenesis of the vagina and cervix but with a functional endometrium, the traditional treatment is hysterectomy with construction of a neovagina. We report successful treatment by laparoscopically assisted full thickness skin graft for reconstruction in a patient with congenital agenesis of the vagina and uterine cervix concomitant with haematometra and ovarian endometrioma in a 12 year old girl. Postoperatively, the vaginal skin graft healed well, and menstruation first appeared 4 weeks later. In our opinion, a combined laparoscopic and vaginal procedure with full thickness skin graft is an efficacious alternative in managing such genital defects.  (+info)

Multi-bracket appliance in management of mandibular reconstruction with vascularized bone graft. (5/1491)

BACKGROUND: The most commonly used tool for maxillo-mandibular fixation to the patient who underwent reconstruction using a vascularized bone graft after mandibular resection is a dental arch-bar. However, the occlusal relationship achieved by this method is not ideal. Different from the dental arch-bar, the multi-bracket appliance which is frequently used in orthodontic treatment can control the position of each individual tooth three dimensionally. Thus, this appliance was applied for maxillo-mandibular fixation to patients who underwent mandibular reconstruction using a vascularized bone graft. METHODS: A multi-bracket appliance was applied to three patients. Prior to the surgery, standard edgewise brackets were bonded to the teeth in the maxilla and in the remaining mandible. After mandibular resection, wires for maxillo-mandibular fixation were applied. The harvested bone was then carefully fixed with miniplates to maintain the occlusion. The multi-bracket appliance was worn for 3 months when the wound contraction became mild. RESULTS: All three cases demonstrated stable and good occlusion. They also demonstrated satisfactory post-surgical facial appearance. CONCLUSIONS: Compared to conventional dental arch-bars, a multi-bracket appliance offers improved management of mandibular reconstruction. Firstly, its properties are helpful in maintaining occlusion of the remaining dentition accurately in bone grafting procedure as well as protecting against postsurgical wound contraction. Secondly, the multi-bracket appliance keeps the oral cavity clean without periodontal injury. As a result, stable occlusion of the residual teeth and good facial appearance were obtained.  (+info)

Cervical vertebral and subclavian artery reconstructions. (6/1491)

At our institution, endovascular treatment of subclavian artery (SA) or vertebral artery (VA) occlusive disease has been used as the treatment of first choice during the last years. Open procedures were performed only in cases of failed or unfeasible endovascular treatment or total occlusion of the proximal VA or SA, respectively. Nineteen open procedures were performed between 1992 and 1996. Proximal reconstructions included SA to common carotid artery (CCA) transpositions or bypasses and VA to CCA transpositions. Distal reconstructions included transposition techniques or direct reconstruction in a few cases of traumatic lesions. The operative procedure used two-channel transcranial Doppler monitoring for cases involving simultaneous CCA and SA or VA cross clamping. There was one technical failure of a distal VA reconstruction. No surgical complications occurred. The recent pertinent literature with regard to indications and techniques of SA and VA reconstructions is discussed.  (+info)

New concepts and advances of immobilization of long bones. (7/1491)

OBJECTIVE: To present some new concepts in the treatment of fractures and bone defects of long bones with internal fixation. METHODS: Animal experiments, mechanical tests and clinical analyses were done. RESULTS AND CONCLUSIONS: Reduction of fracture should be perfect, bone defect can be reconstructed by intramedullary and extramedullary bone graft. Relatively rigid fixation at the early stage and elastic fixation at the later stage are beneficial not only for fracture healing, but also for bone remodeling. In order to avoid complications including non-union, immobilization syndrome of the bone and joint, and implant failure, radiographs should be taken periodically; if there is any bone resorption, weight-bearing should be restricted.  (+info)

A large maxillofacial prosthesis for total mandibular defect: a case report. (8/1491)

We successfully fabricated a large maxillofacial prosthesis for replacement of a total mandibular defect resulting from surgical failure to reconstruct the mandible. Although a number of reports have described procedures for fabricating midfacial prostheses, there is little information on prostheses to compensate for total loss of the mandible. A 54-year-old woman was referred to the Dentistry and Oral Surgery Division of the National Cancer Center Hospital with total loss of the mandible and the surrounding facial soft tissue. The facial prosthesis we used to treat this patient is unique in that it is adequately retained without the use of extraoral implants and conventional adhesives. This prosthesis is retained by the bilateral auricles and the remaining upper front teeth. We present details of the design of this large silicone maxillofacial prosthesis, with which we successfully rehabilitated the patient.  (+info)

  • The results support the view that plastic surgery of the eyelids is permissive, and the rich vascularization of the eyelid due to the anastomotic network of vessels in the tarsal plate may increase the likelihood of flap survival and surgical success. (lu.se)
  • The removal of tumors from the eyelids, or damage that arises from trauma, are often indications for functional and reconstructive surgery of the eyelids with the help of tissue grafts and flaps. (news-medical.net)
  • Interestingly, the highest proportions of young women undergoing reconstructive surgery among young women who had a CPM were geographically clustered in several Northeastern states (Massachusetts, Maine, New Jersey, Connecticut, New York, and Delaware) rather than in the Midwestern region where we observed the highest proportions of women who underwent a CPM," write the authors. (eurekalert.org)
  • In part because of its high costs and the allure of robotic technology, the system has been heavily marketed by both Intuitive Surgical and by clinicians as providing superior surgical results. (questionpro.com)
  • While the term �surgical robotics� encompasses several categories of robotic systems used for surgery of varying complexity, we use the term in its common usage to refer to the da Vinci Surgical System, a master-slave type minimally invasive system that is currently in widespread use. (questionpro.com)
  • The understanding level regarding advanced surgical robotic technology by primary care physicians who act as the referral base is unknown. (questionpro.com)
  • In addition, I have clinical interests in surgical correction of pelvic prolapse (cystocele, rectocele, vaginal prolapse, uterine prolapase) and laparoscopic/robotic gynecologic surgery. (valleymed.org)
  • She has a special interest in obstetrics and minimally invasive surgery including laparoscopic and robotic assisted procedures. (valleymed.org)
  • Surgical intervention is required for treating serious burns, fractures of facial bones and birth defects, tumours and other abnormalities which can seriously impair a person's health or looks. (hindustantimes.com)
  • Minimally invasive approaches to the treatment of surgical disease have improved patient quality of life and recovery time. (questionpro.com)
  • The da Vinci Surgical System by Intuitive Corporation, which received FDA approval in July 2000, has had a significant impact on the dissemination of advanced minimally invasive techniques into routine clinical use. (questionpro.com)
  • Read detailed case studies that illustrate how to optimize every aspect of the care of the reconstructive surgery patient, including the postoperative period and long-term follow-up. (helsinki.fi)
  • The purpose of this study is to evaluate the consequences of 3 selected surgical procedures on abdominal wall perfusion in order to help to reduce postoperative complication related to ina. (bioportfolio.com)
  • This article outlines the basic problem, indications and contraindications, surgical technique, and postoperative rehabilitation protocol for biceps-to-triceps transfer using the medial routing technique with suture anchoring of the biceps muscle tendon unit into the triceps aponeurosis and olecranon. (stanford.edu)
  • patient education through pre- and postoperative images, Facebook is an online social networking service which also as well as intraoperative videos of various procedures, both allows users to search for services (usually through "groups" reconstructive and cosmetic. (who.int)
  • The tracheostomy was also necessary to provide airway management during his transmandibular surgical approach and subsequent postoperative tongue swelling. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • Care should be exercised when previous surgical procedures or radiation therapy have altered the nose, because perfusion of nasal tissues then becomes highly unpredictable. (medscape.com)
  • The global orthopedic instrumentation market is projected to surpass US$56 billion by the year 2017, driven by aging population, rising incidence of age-related conditions such as osteoarthritis, and improving orthopedic surgical procedures. (prweb.com)
  • Before the operation, the patient will have undergone diagnostic procedures such as computed tomography scans (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans to determine the underlying problem that required the craniotomy and to get a better look at the brain's structure. (thefreedictionary.com)