Blood Coagulation: The process of the interaction of BLOOD COAGULATION FACTORS that results in an insoluble FIBRIN clot.Blood Coagulation Factors: Endogenous substances, usually proteins, that are involved in the blood coagulation process.Factor XIII: A fibrin-stabilizing plasma enzyme (TRANSGLUTAMINASES) that is activated by THROMBIN and CALCIUM to form FACTOR XIIIA. It is important for stabilizing the formation of the fibrin polymer (clot) which culminates the coagulation cascade.Factor IX: Storage-stable blood coagulation factor acting in the intrinsic pathway. Its activated form, IXa, forms a complex with factor VIII and calcium on platelet factor 3 to activate factor X to Xa. Deficiency of factor IX results in HEMOPHILIA B (Christmas Disease).Factor X: Storage-stable glycoprotein blood coagulation factor that can be activated to factor Xa by both the intrinsic and extrinsic pathways. A deficiency of factor X, sometimes called Stuart-Prower factor deficiency, may lead to a systemic coagulation disorder.Factor VII: Heat- and storage-stable plasma protein that is activated by tissue thromboplastin to form factor VIIa in the extrinsic pathway of blood coagulation. The activated form then catalyzes the activation of factor X to factor Xa.Factor Xa: Activated form of factor X that participates in both the intrinsic and extrinsic pathways of blood coagulation. It catalyzes the conversion of prothrombin to thrombin in conjunction with other cofactors.Factor VIII: Blood-coagulation factor VIII. Antihemophilic factor that is part of the factor VIII/von Willebrand factor complex. Factor VIII is produced in the liver and acts in the intrinsic pathway of blood coagulation. It serves as a cofactor in factor X activation and this action is markedly enhanced by small amounts of thrombin.Blood Coagulation Tests: Laboratory tests for evaluating the individual's clotting mechanism.Thromboplastin: Constituent composed of protein and phospholipid that is widely distributed in many tissues. It serves as a cofactor with factor VIIa to activate factor X in the extrinsic pathway of blood coagulation.Blood Coagulation Disorders: Hemorrhagic and thrombotic disorders that occur as a consequence of abnormalities in blood coagulation due to a variety of factors such as COAGULATION PROTEIN DISORDERS; BLOOD PLATELET DISORDERS; BLOOD PROTEIN DISORDERS or nutritional conditions.Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation: A disorder characterized by procoagulant substances entering the general circulation causing a systemic thrombotic process. The activation of the clotting mechanism may arise from any of a number of disorders. A majority of the patients manifest skin lesions, sometimes leading to PURPURA FULMINANS.Factor XIa: Activated form of factor XI. In the intrinsic pathway, Factor XI is activated to XIa by factor XIIa in the presence of cofactor HMWK; (HIGH MOLECULAR WEIGHT KININOGEN). Factor XIa then activates factor IX to factor IXa in the presence of calcium.Factor VIIa: Activated form of factor VII. Factor VIIa activates factor X in the extrinsic pathway of blood coagulation.Factor V: Heat- and storage-labile plasma glycoprotein which accelerates the conversion of prothrombin to thrombin in blood coagulation. Factor V accomplishes this by forming a complex with factor Xa, phospholipid, and calcium (prothrombinase complex). Deficiency of factor V leads to Owren's disease.Prothrombin: A plasma protein that is the inactive precursor of thrombin. It is converted to thrombin by a prothrombin activator complex consisting of factor Xa, factor V, phospholipid, and calcium ions. Deficiency of prothrombin leads to hypoprothrombinemia.Factor XI: Stable blood coagulation factor involved in the intrinsic pathway. The activated form XIa activates factor IX to IXa. Deficiency of factor XI is often called hemophilia C.Factor IXa: Activated form of factor IX. This activation can take place via the intrinsic pathway by the action of factor XIa and calcium, or via the extrinsic pathway by the action of factor VIIa, thromboplastin, and calcium. Factor IXa serves to activate factor X to Xa by cleaving the arginyl-leucine peptide bond in factor X.Partial Thromboplastin Time: The time required for the appearance of FIBRIN strands following the mixing of PLASMA with phospholipid platelet substitute (e.g., crude cephalins, soybean phosphatides). It is a test of the intrinsic pathway (factors VIII, IX, XI, and XII) and the common pathway (fibrinogen, prothrombin, factors V and X) of BLOOD COAGULATION. It is used as a screening test and to monitor HEPARIN therapy.Coagulants: Agents that cause clotting.Prothrombin Time: Clotting time of PLASMA recalcified in the presence of excess TISSUE THROMBOPLASTIN. Factors measured are FIBRINOGEN; PROTHROMBIN; FACTOR V; FACTOR VII; and FACTOR X. It is used for monitoring anticoagulant therapy with COUMARINS.Thrombin: An enzyme formed from PROTHROMBIN that converts FIBRINOGEN to FIBRIN.Factor XII: Stable blood coagulation factor activated by contact with the subendothelial surface of an injured vessel. Along with prekallikrein, it serves as the contact factor that initiates the intrinsic pathway of blood coagulation. Kallikrein activates factor XII to XIIa. Deficiency of factor XII, also called the Hageman trait, leads to increased incidence of thromboembolic disease. Mutations in the gene for factor XII that appear to increase factor XII amidolytic activity are associated with HEREDITARY ANGIOEDEMA TYPE III.Protein C: A vitamin-K dependent zymogen present in the blood, which, upon activation by thrombin and thrombomodulin exerts anticoagulant properties by inactivating factors Va and VIIIa at the rate-limiting steps of thrombin formation.Blood Coagulation Factor Inhibitors: Substances, usually endogenous, that act as inhibitors of blood coagulation. They may affect one or multiple enzymes throughout the process. As a group, they also inhibit enzymes involved in processes other than blood coagulation, such as those from the complement system, fibrinolytic enzyme system, blood cells, and bacteria.Factor Va: Activated form of factor V. It is an essential cofactor for the activation of prothrombin catalyzed by factor Xa.Hemophilia B: A deficiency of blood coagulation factor IX inherited as an X-linked disorder. (Also known as Christmas Disease, after the first patient studied in detail, not the holy day.) Historical and clinical features resemble those in classic hemophilia (HEMOPHILIA A), but patients present with fewer symptoms. Severity of bleeding is usually similar in members of a single family. Many patients are asymptomatic until the hemostatic system is stressed by surgery or trauma. Treatment is similar to that for hemophilia A. (From Cecil Textbook of Medicine, 19th ed, p1008)Hemophilia A: The classic hemophilia resulting from a deficiency of factor VIII. It is an inherited disorder of blood coagulation characterized by a permanent tendency to hemorrhage.Recombinant Proteins: Proteins prepared by recombinant DNA technology.Vitamin K: A lipid cofactor that is required for normal blood clotting. Several forms of vitamin K have been identified: VITAMIN K 1 (phytomenadione) derived from plants, VITAMIN K 2 (menaquinone) from bacteria, and synthetic naphthoquinone provitamins, VITAMIN K 3 (menadione). Vitamin K 3 provitamins, after being alkylated in vivo, exhibit the antifibrinolytic activity of vitamin K. Green leafy vegetables, liver, cheese, butter, and egg yolk are good sources of vitamin K.Factor VIIIa: Activated form of factor VIII. The B-domain of factor VIII is proteolytically cleaved by thrombin to form factor VIIIa. Factor VIIIa exists as a non-covalent dimer in a metal-linked (probably calcium) complex and functions as a cofactor in the enzymatic activation of factor X by factor IXa. Factor VIIIa is similar in structure and generation to factor Va.1-Carboxyglutamic Acid: Found in various tissues, particularly in four blood-clotting proteins including prothrombin, in kidney protein, in bone protein, and in the protein present in various ectopic calcifications.Antithrombin III: A plasma alpha 2 glycoprotein that accounts for the major antithrombin activity of normal plasma and also inhibits several other enzymes. It is a member of the serpin superfamily.Fibrinogen: Plasma glycoprotein clotted by thrombin, composed of a dimer of three non-identical pairs of polypeptide chains (alpha, beta, gamma) held together by disulfide bonds. Fibrinogen clotting is a sol-gel change involving complex molecular arrangements: whereas fibrinogen is cleaved by thrombin to form polypeptides A and B, the proteolytic action of other enzymes yields different fibrinogen degradation products.Hemostasis: The process which spontaneously arrests the flow of BLOOD from vessels carrying blood under pressure. It is accomplished by contraction of the vessels, adhesion and aggregation of formed blood elements (eg. ERYTHROCYTE AGGREGATION), and the process of BLOOD COAGULATION.Thrombelastography: Use of a thrombelastograph, which provides a continuous graphic record of the physical shape of a clot during fibrin formation and subsequent lysis.Transglutaminases: Transglutaminases catalyze cross-linking of proteins at a GLUTAMINE in one chain with LYSINE in another chain. They include keratinocyte transglutaminase (TGM1 or TGK), tissue transglutaminase (TGM2 or TGC), plasma transglutaminase involved with coagulation (FACTOR XIII and FACTOR XIIIa), hair follicle transglutaminase, and prostate transglutaminase. Although structures differ, they share an active site (YGQCW) and strict CALCIUM dependence.Molecular Sequence Data: Descriptions of specific amino acid, carbohydrate, or nucleotide sequences which have appeared in the published literature and/or are deposited in and maintained by databanks such as GENBANK, European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), National Biomedical Research Foundation (NBRF), or other sequence repositories.Amino Acid Sequence: The order of amino acids as they occur in a polypeptide chain. This is referred to as the primary structure of proteins. It is of fundamental importance in determining PROTEIN CONFORMATION.Fibrin: A protein derived from FIBRINOGEN in the presence of THROMBIN, which forms part of the blood clot.Antithrombins: Endogenous factors and drugs that directly inhibit the action of THROMBIN, usually by blocking its enzymatic activity. They are distinguished from INDIRECT THROMBIN INHIBITORS, such as HEPARIN, which act by enhancing the inhibitory effects of antithrombins.Factor XII Deficiency: An absence or reduced level of blood coagulation factor XII. It normally occurs in the absence of patient or family history of hemorrhagic disorders and is marked by prolonged clotting time.Anticoagulants: Agents that prevent clotting.Factor XIII Deficiency: A deficiency of blood coagulation FACTOR XIII or fibrin stabilizing factor (FSF) that prevents blood clot formation and results in a clinical hemorrhagic diathesis.Coagulation Protein Disorders: Hemorrhagic and thrombotic disorders resulting from abnormalities or deficiencies of coagulation proteins.Fibrinolysis: The natural enzymatic dissolution of FIBRIN.Blood Coagulation Disorders, Inherited: Hemorrhagic and thrombotic disorders that occur as a consequence of inherited abnormalities in blood coagulation.Arcidae: A family of ark shell mollusks, in the class BIVALVIA. They have soft bodies with platelike GILLS enclosed within two shells hinged together.Factor XIIa: Activated form of factor XII. In the initial event in the intrinsic pathway of blood coagulation, kallikrein (with cofactor HIGH MOLECULAR WEIGHT KININOGEN) cleaves factor XII to XIIa. Factor XIIa is then further cleaved by kallikrein, plasmin, and trypsin to yield smaller factor XII fragments (Hageman-Factor fragments). These fragments increase the activity of prekallikrein to kallikrein but decrease the procoagulant activity of factor XII.Vitamin K Deficiency: A nutritional condition produced by a deficiency of VITAMIN K in the diet, characterized by an increased tendency to hemorrhage (HEMORRHAGIC DISORDERS). Such bleeding episodes may be particularly severe in newborn infants. (From Cecil Textbook of Medicine, 19th ed, p1182)Binding Sites: The parts of a macromolecule that directly participate in its specific combination with another molecule.Protein S: The vitamin K-dependent cofactor of activated PROTEIN C. Together with protein C, it inhibits the action of factors VIIIa and Va. A deficiency in protein S; (PROTEIN S DEFICIENCY); can lead to recurrent venous and arterial thrombosis.Whole Blood Coagulation Time: The time required by whole blood to produce a visible clot.Kinetics: The rate dynamics in chemical or physical systems.Benzamidines: Amidines substituted with a benzene group. Benzamidine and its derivatives are known as peptidase inhibitors.Factor XI Deficiency: A hereditary deficiency of blood coagulation factor XI (also known as plasma thromboplastin antecedent or PTA or antihemophilic factor C) resulting in a systemic blood-clotting defect called hemophilia C or Rosenthal's syndrome, that may resemble classical hemophilia.Thrombin Time: Clotting time of PLASMA mixed with a THROMBIN solution. It is a measure of the conversion of FIBRINOGEN to FIBRIN, which is prolonged by AFIBRINOGENEMIA, abnormal fibrinogen, or the presence of inhibitory substances, e.g., fibrin-fibrinogen degradation products, or HEPARIN. BATROXOBIN, a thrombin-like enzyme unaffected by the presence of heparin, may be used in place of thrombin.Serine Endopeptidases: Any member of the group of ENDOPEPTIDASES containing at the active site a serine residue involved in catalysis.Protein Binding: The process in which substances, either endogenous or exogenous, bind to proteins, peptides, enzymes, protein precursors, or allied compounds. Specific protein-binding measures are often used as assays in diagnostic assessments.Serine Proteinase Inhibitors: Exogenous or endogenous compounds which inhibit SERINE ENDOPEPTIDASES.Peptide Fragments: Partial proteins formed by partial hydrolysis of complete proteins or generated through PROTEIN ENGINEERING techniques.Thrombosis: Formation and development of a thrombus or blood clot in the blood vessel.Factor V Deficiency: A deficiency of blood coagulation factor V (known as proaccelerin or accelerator globulin or labile factor) leading to a rare hemorrhagic tendency known as Owren's disease or parahemophilia. It varies greatly in severity. Factor V deficiency is an autosomal recessive trait. (Dorland, 27th ed)Factor XIIIa: Activated form of FACTOR XIII, a transglutaminase, which stabilizes the formation of the fibrin polymer (clot) culminating the blood coagulation cascade.Fibrin Fibrinogen Degradation Products: Soluble protein fragments formed by the proteolytic action of plasmin on fibrin or fibrinogen. FDP and their complexes profoundly impair the hemostatic process and are a major cause of hemorrhage in intravascular coagulation and fibrinolysis.Base Sequence: The sequence of PURINES and PYRIMIDINES in nucleic acids and polynucleotides. It is also called nucleotide sequence.Blood Platelets: Non-nucleated disk-shaped cells formed in the megakaryocyte and found in the blood of all mammals. They are mainly involved in blood coagulation.Hemorrhagic Disorders: Spontaneous or near spontaneous bleeding caused by a defect in clotting mechanisms (BLOOD COAGULATION DISORDERS) or another abnormality causing a structural flaw in the blood vessels (HEMOSTATIC DISORDERS).Enzyme Precursors: Physiologically inactive substances that can be converted to active enzymes.Heparin: A highly acidic mucopolysaccharide formed of equal parts of sulfated D-glucosamine and D-glucuronic acid with sulfaminic bridges. The molecular weight ranges from six to twenty thousand. Heparin occurs in and is obtained from liver, lung, mast cells, etc., of vertebrates. Its function is unknown, but it is used to prevent blood clotting in vivo and vitro, in the form of many different salts.Factor X Deficiency: Blood coagulation disorder usually inherited as an autosomal recessive trait, though it can be acquired. It is characterized by defective activity in both the intrinsic and extrinsic pathways, impaired thromboplastin time, and impaired prothrombin consumption.Factor VII Deficiency: An autosomal recessive characteristic or a coagulation disorder acquired in association with VITAMIN K DEFICIENCY. FACTOR VII is a Vitamin K dependent glycoprotein essential to the extrinsic pathway of coagulation.Protein Conformation: The characteristic 3-dimensional shape of a protein, including the secondary, supersecondary (motifs), tertiary (domains) and quaternary structure of the peptide chain. PROTEIN STRUCTURE, QUATERNARY describes the conformation assumed by multimeric proteins (aggregates of more than one polypeptide chain).Hypoprothrombinemias: Absence or reduced levels of PROTHROMBIN in the blood.Models, Molecular: Models used experimentally or theoretically to study molecular shape, electronic properties, or interactions; includes analogous molecules, computer-generated graphics, and mechanical structures.Prekallikrein: A plasma protein which is the precursor of kallikrein. Plasma that is deficient in prekallikrein has been found to be abnormal in thromboplastin formation, kinin generation, evolution of a permeability globulin, and plasmin formation. The absence of prekallikrein in plasma leads to Fletcher factor deficiency, a congenital disease.Thrombomodulin: A cell surface glycoprotein of endothelial cells that binds thrombin and serves as a cofactor in the activation of protein C and its regulation of blood coagulation.Kaolin: The most common mineral of a group of hydrated aluminum silicates, approximately H2Al2Si2O8-H2O. It is prepared for pharmaceutical and medicinal purposes by levigating with water to remove sand, etc. (From Merck Index, 11th ed) The name is derived from Kao-ling (Chinese: "high ridge"), the original site. (From Grant & Hackh's Chemical Dictionary, 5th ed)Cattle: Domesticated bovine animals of the genus Bos, usually kept on a farm or ranch and used for the production of meat or dairy products or for heavy labor.Hydroxyethyl Starch Derivatives: Starches that have been chemically modified so that a percentage of OH groups are substituted with 2-hydroxyethyl ether groups.Phospholipids: Lipids containing one or more phosphate groups, particularly those derived from either glycerol (phosphoglycerides see GLYCEROPHOSPHOLIPIDS) or sphingosine (SPHINGOLIPIDS). They are polar lipids that are of great importance for the structure and function of cell membranes and are the most abundant of membrane lipids, although not stored in large amounts in the system.Molecular Weight: The sum of the weight of all the atoms in a molecule.Reptilian Proteins: Proteins obtained from species of REPTILES.Plasma: The residual portion of BLOOD that is left after removal of BLOOD CELLS by CENTRIFUGATION without prior BLOOD COAGULATION.Argon Plasma Coagulation: A method of tissue ablation and bleeding control that uses ARGON plasma (ionized argon gas) to deliver a current of thermocoagulating energy to the area of tissue to be coagulated.Protein Structure, Tertiary: The level of protein structure in which combinations of secondary protein structures (alpha helices, beta sheets, loop regions, and motifs) pack together to form folded shapes called domains. Disulfide bridges between cysteines in two different parts of the polypeptide chain along with other interactions between the chains play a role in the formation and stabilization of tertiary structure. Small proteins usually consist of only one domain but larger proteins may contain a number of domains connected by segments of polypeptide chain which lack regular secondary structure.Genetic Vectors: DNA molecules capable of autonomous replication within a host cell and into which other DNA sequences can be inserted and thus amplified. Many are derived from PLASMIDS; BACTERIOPHAGES; or VIRUSES. They are used for transporting foreign genes into recipient cells. Genetic vectors possess a functional replicator site and contain GENETIC MARKERS to facilitate their selective recognition.Hemostatics: Agents acting to arrest the flow of blood. Absorbable hemostatics arrest bleeding either by the formation of an artificial clot or by providing a mechanical matrix that facilitates clotting when applied directly to the bleeding surface. These agents function more at the capillary level and are not effective at stemming arterial or venous bleeding under any significant intravascular pressure.Electrophoresis, Polyacrylamide Gel: Electrophoresis in which a polyacrylamide gel is used as the diffusion medium.Plasma Substitutes: Any liquid used to replace blood plasma, usually a saline solution, often with serum albumins, dextrans or other preparations. These substances do not enhance the oxygen- carrying capacity of blood, but merely replace the volume. They are also used to treat dehydration.Hemorrhage: Bleeding or escape of blood from a vessel.Fibrinopeptide A: Two small peptide chains removed from the N-terminal segment of the alpha chains of fibrinogen by the action of thrombin during the blood coagulation process. Each peptide chain contains 18 amino acid residues. In vivo, fibrinopeptide A is used as a marker to determine the rate of conversion of fibrinogen to fibrin by thrombin.Enzyme Activation: Conversion of an inactive form of an enzyme to one possessing metabolic activity. It includes 1, activation by ions (activators); 2, activation by cofactors (coenzymes); and 3, conversion of an enzyme precursor (proenzyme or zymogen) to an active enzyme.Sequence Homology, Amino Acid: The degree of similarity between sequences of amino acids. This information is useful for the analyzing genetic relatedness of proteins and species.von Willebrand Factor: A high-molecular-weight plasma protein, produced by endothelial cells and megakaryocytes, that is part of the factor VIII/von Willebrand factor complex. The von Willebrand factor has receptors for collagen, platelets, and ristocetin activity as well as the immunologically distinct antigenic determinants. It functions in adhesion of platelets to collagen and hemostatic plug formation. The prolonged bleeding time in VON WILLEBRAND DISEASES is due to the deficiency of this factor.alpha-2-Antiplasmin: A member of the serpin superfamily found in plasma that inhibits the lysis of fibrin clots which are induced by plasminogen activator. It is a glycoprotein, molecular weight approximately 70,000 that migrates in the alpha 2 region in immunoelectrophoresis. It is the principal plasmin inactivator in blood, rapidly forming a very stable complex with plasmin.Afibrinogenemia: A deficiency or absence of FIBRINOGEN in the blood.Carbon-Carbon Ligases: Enzymes that catalyze the joining of two molecules by the formation of a carbon-carbon bond. These are the carboxylating enzymes and are mostly biotinyl-proteins. EC 6.4.Recombinant Fusion Proteins: Recombinant proteins produced by the GENETIC TRANSLATION of fused genes formed by the combination of NUCLEIC ACID REGULATORY SEQUENCES of one or more genes with the protein coding sequences of one or more genes.Thrombophilia: A disorder of HEMOSTASIS in which there is a tendency for the occurrence of THROMBOSIS.Cell Line: Established cell cultures that have the potential to propagate indefinitely.Platelet Activation: A series of progressive, overlapping events, triggered by exposure of the PLATELETS to subendothelial tissue. These events include shape change, adhesiveness, aggregation, and release reactions. When carried through to completion, these events lead to the formation of a stable hemostatic plug.Mutation: Any detectable and heritable change in the genetic material that causes a change in the GENOTYPE and which is transmitted to daughter cells and to succeeding generations.Platelet Aggregation: The attachment of PLATELETS to one another. This clumping together can be induced by a number of agents (e.g., THROMBIN; COLLAGEN) and is part of the mechanism leading to the formation of a THROMBUS.Calcium: A basic element found in nearly all organized tissues. It is a member of the alkaline earth family of metals with the atomic symbol Ca, atomic number 20, and atomic weight 40. Calcium is the most abundant mineral in the body and combines with phosphorus to form calcium phosphate in the bones and teeth. It is essential for the normal functioning of nerves and muscles and plays a role in blood coagulation (as factor IV) and in many enzymatic processes.Platelet Count: The number of PLATELETS per unit volume in a sample of venous BLOOD.Liver: A large lobed glandular organ in the abdomen of vertebrates that is responsible for detoxification, metabolism, synthesis and storage of various substances.Laser Coagulation: The use of green light-producing LASERS to stop bleeding. The green light is selectively absorbed by HEMOGLOBIN, thus triggering BLOOD COAGULATION.Amino Acids: Organic compounds that generally contain an amino (-NH2) and a carboxyl (-COOH) group. Twenty alpha-amino acids are the subunits which are polymerized to form proteins.Lipoproteins: Lipid-protein complexes involved in the transportation and metabolism of lipids in the body. They are spherical particles consisting of a hydrophobic core of TRIGLYCERIDES and CHOLESTEROL ESTERS surrounded by a layer of hydrophilic free CHOLESTEROL; PHOSPHOLIPIDS; and APOLIPOPROTEINS. Lipoproteins are classified by their varying buoyant density and sizes.Crystallography, X-Ray: The study of crystal structure using X-RAY DIFFRACTION techniques. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)Crotalid Venoms: Venoms from snakes of the subfamily Crotalinae or pit vipers, found mostly in the Americas. They include the rattlesnake, cottonmouth, fer-de-lance, bushmaster, and American copperhead. Their venoms contain nontoxic proteins, cardio-, hemo-, cyto-, and neurotoxins, and many enzymes, especially phospholipases A. Many of the toxins have been characterized.Receptor, PAR-1: A thrombin receptor subtype that couples to HETEROTRIMERIC GTP-BINDING PROTEINS resulting in the activation of a variety of signaling mechanisms including decreased intracellular CYCLIC AMP, increased TYPE C PHOSPHOLIPASES and increased PHOSPHOLIPASE A2.Kallikreins: Proteolytic enzymes from the serine endopeptidase family found in normal blood and urine. Specifically, Kallikreins are potent vasodilators and hypotensives and increase vascular permeability and affect smooth muscle. They act as infertility agents in men. Three forms are recognized, PLASMA KALLIKREIN (EC 3.4.21.34), TISSUE KALLIKREIN (EC 3.4.21.35), and PROSTATE-SPECIFIC ANTIGEN (EC 3.4.21.77).Kininogens: Endogenous peptides present in most body fluids. Certain enzymes convert them to active KININS which are involved in inflammation, blood clotting, complement reactions, etc. Kininogens belong to the cystatin superfamily. They are cysteine proteinase inhibitors. HIGH-MOLECULAR-WEIGHT KININOGEN; (HMWK); is split by plasma kallikrein to produce BRADYKININ. LOW-MOLECULAR-WEIGHT KININOGEN; (LMWK); is split by tissue kallikrein to produce KALLIDIN.Warfarin: An anticoagulant that acts by inhibiting the synthesis of vitamin K-dependent coagulation factors. Warfarin is indicated for the prophylaxis and/or treatment of venous thrombosis and its extension, pulmonary embolism, and atrial fibrillation with embolization. It is also used as an adjunct in the prophylaxis of systemic embolism after myocardial infarction. Warfarin is also used as a rodenticide.Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Cloning, Molecular: The insertion of recombinant DNA molecules from prokaryotic and/or eukaryotic sources into a replicating vehicle, such as a plasmid or virus vector, and the introduction of the resultant hybrid molecules into recipient cells without altering the viability of those cells.Electrocoagulation: Procedures using an electrically heated wire or scalpel to treat hemorrhage (e.g., bleeding ulcers) and to ablate tumors, mucosal lesions, and refractory arrhythmias. It is different from ELECTROSURGERY which is used more for cutting tissue than destroying and in which the patient is part of the electric circuit.Bleeding Time: Duration of blood flow after skin puncture. This test is used as a measure of capillary and platelet function.Peptides: Members of the class of compounds composed of AMINO ACIDS joined together by peptide bonds between adjacent amino acids into linear, branched or cyclical structures. OLIGOPEPTIDES are composed of approximately 2-12 amino acids. Polypeptides are composed of approximately 13 or more amino acids. PROTEINS are linear polypeptides that are normally synthesized on RIBOSOMES.Antifibrinolytic Agents: Agents that prevent fibrinolysis or lysis of a blood clot or thrombus. Several endogenous antiplasmins are known. The drugs are used to control massive hemorrhage and in other coagulation disorders.Macromolecular Substances: Compounds and molecular complexes that consist of very large numbers of atoms and are generally over 500 kDa in size. In biological systems macromolecular substances usually can be visualized using ELECTRON MICROSCOPY and are distinguished from ORGANELLES by the lack of a membrane structure.Snake Venoms: Solutions or mixtures of toxic and nontoxic substances elaborated by snake (Ophidia) salivary glands for the purpose of killing prey or disabling predators and delivered by grooved or hollow fangs. They usually contain enzymes, toxins, and other factors.Receptors, Thrombin: A family of proteinase-activated receptors that are specific for THROMBIN. They are found primarily on PLATELETS and on ENDOTHELIAL CELLS. Activation of thrombin receptors occurs through the proteolytic action of THROMBIN, which cleaves the N-terminal peptide from the receptor to reveal a new N-terminal peptide that is a cryptic ligand for the receptor. The receptors signal through HETEROTRIMERIC GTP-BINDING PROTEINS. Small synthetic peptides that contain the unmasked N-terminal peptide sequence can also activate the receptor in the absence of proteolytic activity.Thrombophlebitis: Inflammation of a vein associated with a blood clot (THROMBUS).Plasminogen: Precursor of plasmin (FIBRINOLYSIN). It is a single-chain beta-globulin of molecular weight 80-90,000 found mostly in association with fibrinogen in plasma; plasminogen activators change it to fibrinolysin. It is used in wound debriding and has been investigated as a thrombolytic agent.Epidermal Growth Factor: A 6-kDa polypeptide growth factor initially discovered in mouse submaxillary glands. Human epidermal growth factor was originally isolated from urine based on its ability to inhibit gastric secretion and called urogastrone. Epidermal growth factor exerts a wide variety of biological effects including the promotion of proliferation and differentiation of mesenchymal and EPITHELIAL CELLS. It is synthesized as a transmembrane protein which can be cleaved to release a soluble active form.Hirudins: Single-chain polypeptides of about 65 amino acids (7 kDa) from LEECHES that have a neutral hydrophobic N terminus, an acidic hydrophilic C terminus, and a compact, hydrophobic core region. Recombinant hirudins lack tyr-63 sulfation and are referred to as 'desulfato-hirudins'. They form a stable non-covalent complex with ALPHA-THROMBIN, thereby abolishing its ability to cleave FIBRINOGEN.Phosphatidylserines: Derivatives of phosphatidic acids in which the phosphoric acid is bound in ester linkage to a serine moiety. Complete hydrolysis yields 1 mole of glycerol, phosphoric acid and serine and 2 moles of fatty acids.Cricetinae: A subfamily in the family MURIDAE, comprising the hamsters. Four of the more common genera are Cricetus, CRICETULUS; MESOCRICETUS; and PHODOPUS.Arthropod Proteins: Proteins synthesized by organisms belonging to the phylum ARTHROPODA. Included in this heading are proteins from the subdivisions ARACHNIDA; CRUSTACEA; and HORSESHOE CRABS. Note that a separate heading for INSECT PROTEINS is listed under this heading.Horseshoe Crabs: An arthropod subclass (Xiphosura) comprising the North American (Limulus) and Asiatic (Tachypleus) genera of horseshoe crabs.Surface Plasmon Resonance: A biosensing technique in which biomolecules capable of binding to specific analytes or ligands are first immobilized on one side of a metallic film. Light is then focused on the opposite side of the film to excite the surface plasmons, that is, the oscillations of free electrons propagating along the film's surface. The refractive index of light reflecting off this surface is measured. When the immobilized biomolecules are bound by their ligands, an alteration in surface plasmons on the opposite side of the film is created which is directly proportional to the change in bound, or adsorbed, mass. Binding is measured by changes in the refractive index. The technique is used to study biomolecular interactions, such as antigen-antibody binding.Venous Thrombosis: The formation or presence of a blood clot (THROMBUS) within a vein.Peptide Hydrolases: Hydrolases that specifically cleave the peptide bonds found in PROTEINS and PEPTIDES. Examples of sub-subclasses for this group include EXOPEPTIDASES and ENDOPEPTIDASES.Blood Proteins: Proteins that are present in blood serum, including SERUM ALBUMIN; BLOOD COAGULATION FACTORS; and many other types of proteins.Trimeresurus: A genus of snakes of the family VIPERIDAE. About 30 species are currently recognized, found in southeast Asia and adjacent island chains. The Okinawa habu frequently enters dwellings in search of rats and mice; the Chinese habu is often found in suburban and agricultural areas. They are quite irritable. (Moore: Poisonous Snakes of the World, 1980, p136)Invertebrate Hormones: Hormones produced by invertebrates, usually insects, mollusks, annelids, and helminths.Point Mutation: A mutation caused by the substitution of one nucleotide for another. This results in the DNA molecule having a change in a single base pair.Fibrinolysin: A product of the lysis of plasminogen (profibrinolysin) by PLASMINOGEN activators. It is composed of two polypeptide chains, light (B) and heavy (A), with a molecular weight of 75,000. It is the major proteolytic enzyme involved in blood clot retraction or the lysis of fibrin and quickly inactivated by antiplasmins.Glycoproteins: Conjugated protein-carbohydrate compounds including mucins, mucoid, and amyloid glycoproteins.Thromboembolism: Obstruction of a blood vessel (embolism) by a blood clot (THROMBUS) in the blood stream.Russell's Viper: A genus of snakes of the family VIPERIDAE. It is distributed in West Pakistan, most of India, Burma, Ceylon, Thailand, southeast China, Taiwan, and a few islands of Indonesia. It hisses loudly when disturbed and strikes with great force and speed. Very prolific, it gives birth to 20-60 young. This viper is the leading cause of snakebite in India and Burma. (Moore: Poisonous Snakes of the World, 1980, p127)Fibrinolytic Agents: Fibrinolysin or agents that convert plasminogen to FIBRINOLYSIN.Rabbits: The species Oryctolagus cuniculus, in the family Leporidae, order LAGOMORPHA. Rabbits are born in burrows, furless, and with eyes and ears closed. In contrast with HARES, rabbits have 22 chromosome pairs.Structure-Activity Relationship: The relationship between the chemical structure of a compound and its biological or pharmacological activity. Compounds are often classed together because they have structural characteristics in common including shape, size, stereochemical arrangement, and distribution of functional groups.Cells, Cultured: Cells propagated in vitro in special media conducive to their growth. Cultured cells are used to study developmental, morphologic, metabolic, physiologic, and genetic processes, among others.Blood Loss, Surgical: Loss of blood during a surgical procedure.Blood Transfusion: The introduction of whole blood or blood component directly into the blood stream. (Dorland, 27th ed)Activated Protein C Resistance: A hemostatic disorder characterized by a poor anticoagulant response to activated protein C (APC). The activated form of Factor V (Factor Va) is more slowly degraded by activated protein C. Factor V Leiden mutation (R506Q) is the most common cause of APC resistance.Protein C Deficiency: An absence or deficiency in PROTEIN C which leads to impaired regulation of blood coagulation. It is associated with an increased risk of severe or premature thrombosis. (Stedman's Med. Dict., 26th ed.)Vitamin K Deficiency Bleeding: Hemorrhage caused by vitamin K deficiency.Platelet Adhesiveness: The process whereby PLATELETS adhere to something other than platelets, e.g., COLLAGEN; BASEMENT MEMBRANE; MICROFIBRILS; or other "foreign" surfaces.CHO Cells: CELL LINE derived from the ovary of the Chinese hamster, Cricetulus griseus (CRICETULUS). The species is a favorite for cytogenetic studies because of its small chromosome number. The cell line has provided model systems for the study of genetic alterations in cultured mammalian cells.Chromogenic Compounds: Colorless, endogenous or exogenous pigment precursors that may be transformed by biological mechanisms into colored compounds; used in biochemical assays and in diagnosis as indicators, especially in the form of enzyme substrates. Synonym: chromogens (not to be confused with pigment-synthesizing bacteria also called chromogens).Vitamin K Epoxide Reductases: OXIDOREDUCTASES which mediate vitamin K metabolism by converting inactive vitamin K 2,3-epoxide to active vitamin K.DNA, Recombinant: Biologically active DNA which has been formed by the in vitro joining of segments of DNA from different sources. It includes the recombination joint or edge of a heteroduplex region where two recombining DNA molecules are connected.Strongylida: An order of nematodes of the subclass SECERNENTEA. Characteristics include an H-shaped excretory system with two subventral glands.Hemodilution: Reduction of blood viscosity usually by the addition of cell free solutions. Used clinically (1) in states of impaired microcirculation, (2) for replacement of intraoperative blood loss without homologous blood transfusion, and (3) in cardiopulmonary bypass and hypothermia.Tissue Plasminogen Activator: A proteolytic enzyme in the serine protease family found in many tissues which converts PLASMINOGEN to FIBRINOLYSIN. It has fibrin-binding activity and is immunologically different from UROKINASE-TYPE PLASMINOGEN ACTIVATOR. The primary sequence, composed of 527 amino acids, is identical in both the naturally occurring and synthetic proteases.Cadaverine: A foul-smelling diamine formed by bacterial decarboxylation of lysine.Substrate Specificity: A characteristic feature of enzyme activity in relation to the kind of substrate on which the enzyme or catalytic molecule reacts.Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay: An immunoassay utilizing an antibody labeled with an enzyme marker such as horseradish peroxidase. While either the enzyme or the antibody is bound to an immunosorbent substrate, they both retain their biologic activity; the change in enzyme activity as a result of the enzyme-antibody-antigen reaction is proportional to the concentration of the antigen and can be measured spectrophotometrically or with the naked eye. Many variations of the method have been developed.Dose-Response Relationship, Drug: The relationship between the dose of an administered drug and the response of the organism to the drug.Viper Venoms: Venoms from SNAKES of the viperid family. They tend to be less toxic than elapid or hydrophid venoms and act mainly on the vascular system, interfering with coagulation and capillary membrane integrity and are highly cytotoxic. They contain large amounts of several enzymes, other factors, and some toxins.Antibodies, Monoclonal: Antibodies produced by a single clone of cells.Mutagenesis, Site-Directed: Genetically engineered MUTAGENESIS at a specific site in the DNA molecule that introduces a base substitution, or an insertion or deletion.RNA, Messenger: RNA sequences that serve as templates for protein synthesis. Bacterial mRNAs are generally primary transcripts in that they do not require post-transcriptional processing. Eukaryotic mRNA is synthesized in the nucleus and must be exported to the cytoplasm for translation. Most eukaryotic mRNAs have a sequence of polyadenylic acid at the 3' end, referred to as the poly(A) tail. The function of this tail is not known for certain, but it may play a role in the export of mature mRNA from the nucleus as well as in helping stabilize some mRNA molecules by retarding their degradation in the cytoplasm.Endothelium, Vascular: Single pavement layer of cells which line the luminal surface of the entire vascular system and regulate the transport of macromolecules and blood components.Isoflurophate: A di-isopropyl-fluorophosphate which is an irreversible cholinesterase inhibitor used to investigate the NERVOUS SYSTEM.Sequence Alignment: The arrangement of two or more amino acid or base sequences from an organism or organisms in such a way as to align areas of the sequences sharing common properties. The degree of relatedness or homology between the sequences is predicted computationally or statistically based on weights assigned to the elements aligned between the sequences. This in turn can serve as a potential indicator of the genetic relatedness between the organisms.Chromatography, Affinity: A chromatographic technique that utilizes the ability of biological molecules to bind to certain ligands specifically and reversibly. It is used in protein biochemistry. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)Binding, Competitive: The interaction of two or more substrates or ligands with the same binding site. The displacement of one by the other is used in quantitative and selective affinity measurements.Plasminogen Activator Inhibitor 1: A member of the serpin family of proteins. It inhibits both the tissue-type and urokinase-type plasminogen activators.Viperidae: A family of snakes comprising three subfamilies: Azemiopinae (the mountain viper, the sole member of this subfamily), Viperinae (true vipers), and Crotalinae (pit vipers). They are widespread throughout the world, being found in the United States, Central and South America, Europe, Asia and Africa. Their venoms act on the blood (hemotoxic) as compared to the venom of elapids which act on the nervous system (neurotoxic). (Goin, Goin, and Zug, Introduction to Herpetology, 3d ed, pp333-36)Polygeline: A 3.5 per cent colloidal solution containing urea-cross-linked polymerized peptides. It has a molecular weight of approximately 35,000 and is prepared from gelatin and electrolytes. The polymeric solution is used as a plasma expander.DNA, Complementary: Single-stranded complementary DNA synthesized from an RNA template by the action of RNA-dependent DNA polymerase. cDNA (i.e., complementary DNA, not circular DNA, not C-DNA) is used in a variety of molecular cloning experiments as well as serving as a specific hybridization probe.Disease Models, Animal: Naturally occurring or experimentally induced animal diseases with pathological processes sufficiently similar to those of human diseases. They are used as study models for human diseases.Gene Expression: The phenotypic manifestation of a gene or genes by the processes of GENETIC TRANSCRIPTION and GENETIC TRANSLATION.Mice, Inbred C57BLInflammation: A pathological process characterized by injury or destruction of tissues caused by a variety of cytologic and chemical reactions. It is usually manifested by typical signs of pain, heat, redness, swelling, and loss of function.Glycosylation: The chemical or biochemical addition of carbohydrate or glycosyl groups to other chemicals, especially peptides or proteins. Glycosyl transferases are used in this biochemical reaction.Transfection: The uptake of naked or purified DNA by CELLS, usually meaning the process as it occurs in eukaryotic cells. It is analogous to bacterial transformation (TRANSFORMATION, BACTERIAL) and both are routinely employed in GENE TRANSFER TECHNIQUES.Receptor, PAR-2: A G-protein-coupled, proteinase-activated receptor that is expressed in a variety of tissues including ENDOTHELIUM; LEUKOCYTES; and the GASTROINTESTINAL TRACT. The receptor is activated by TRYPSIN, which cleaves off the N-terminal peptide from the receptor. The new N-terminal peptide is a cryptic ligand for the receptor. The uncleaved receptor can also be activated by the N-terminal peptide present on the activated THROMBIN RECEPTOR and by small synthetic peptides that contain the unmasked N-terminal sequence.DNA Primers: Short sequences (generally about 10 base pairs) of DNA that are complementary to sequences of messenger RNA and allow reverse transcriptases to start copying the adjacent sequences of mRNA. Primers are used extensively in genetic and molecular biology techniques.Lymphangiosarcoma: A malignant tumor originating from the endothelial cells of lymphatic vessels. Most lymphangiosarcomas arise in an arm secondary to radical mastectomy but they sometimes complicate idiopathic lymphedema. The lymphedema has usually been present for 6 to 10 years before malignant changes develop. (From Dorland, 27th ed; Holland et al., Cancer Medicine, 3d ed, p1866)Antibodies: Immunoglobulin molecules having a specific amino acid sequence by virtue of which they interact only with the ANTIGEN (or a very similar shape) that induced their synthesis in cells of the lymphoid series (especially PLASMA CELLS).DNA: A deoxyribonucleotide polymer that is the primary genetic material of all cells. Eukaryotic and prokaryotic organisms normally contain DNA in a double-stranded state, yet several important biological processes transiently involve single-stranded regions. DNA, which consists of a polysugar-phosphate backbone possessing projections of purines (adenine and guanine) and pyrimidines (thymine and cytosine), forms a double helix that is held together by hydrogen bonds between these purines and pyrimidines (adenine to thymine and guanine to cytosine).Models, Biological: Theoretical representations that simulate the behavior or activity of biological processes or diseases. For disease models in living animals, DISEASE MODELS, ANIMAL is available. Biological models include the use of mathematical equations, computers, and other electronic equipment.Calcium Chloride: A salt used to replenish calcium levels, as an acid-producing diuretic, and as an antidote for magnesium poisoning.Polymorphism, Genetic: The regular and simultaneous occurrence in a single interbreeding population of two or more discontinuous genotypes. The concept includes differences in genotypes ranging in size from a single nucleotide site (POLYMORPHISM, SINGLE NUCLEOTIDE) to large nucleotide sequences visible at a chromosomal level.Endopeptidases: A subclass of PEPTIDE HYDROLASES that catalyze the internal cleavage of PEPTIDES or PROTEINS.Blood Component Transfusion: The transfer of blood components such as erythrocytes, leukocytes, platelets, and plasma from a donor to a recipient or back to the donor. This process differs from the procedures undertaken in PLASMAPHERESIS and types of CYTAPHERESIS; (PLATELETPHERESIS and LEUKAPHERESIS) where, following the removal of plasma or the specific cell components, the remainder is transfused back to the donor.Oligopeptides: Peptides composed of between two and twelve amino acids.Disulfides: Chemical groups containing the covalent disulfide bonds -S-S-. The sulfur atoms can be bound to inorganic or organic moieties.Gene Expression Regulation: Any of the processes by which nuclear, cytoplasmic, or intercellular factors influence the differential control (induction or repression) of gene action at the level of transcription or translation.Serpins: A family of serine proteinase inhibitors which are similar in amino acid sequence and mechanism of inhibition, but differ in their specificity toward proteolytic enzymes. This family includes alpha 1-antitrypsin, angiotensinogen, ovalbumin, antiplasmin, alpha 1-antichymotrypsin, thyroxine-binding protein, complement 1 inactivators, antithrombin III, heparin cofactor II, plasminogen inactivators, gene Y protein, placental plasminogen activator inhibitor, and barley Z protein. Some members of the serpin family may be substrates rather than inhibitors of SERINE ENDOPEPTIDASES, and some serpins occur in plants where their function is not known.Elapid Venoms: Venoms from snakes of the family Elapidae, including cobras, kraits, mambas, coral, tiger, and Australian snakes. The venoms contain polypeptide toxins of various kinds, cytolytic, hemolytic, and neurotoxic factors, but fewer enzymes than viper or crotalid venoms. Many of the toxins have been characterized.Protein PrecursorsSwine: Any of various animals that constitute the family Suidae and comprise stout-bodied, short-legged omnivorous mammals with thick skin, usually covered with coarse bristles, a rather long mobile snout, and small tail. Included are the genera Babyrousa, Phacochoerus (wart hogs), and Sus, the latter containing the domestic pig (see SUS SCROFA).
... factor VII comes into contact with tissue factors which starts a process called the blood coagulation cascade. Its purpose is ... Hirudins today are produced by recombinant biotechnology using yeast. These recombinant hirudins lack a sulfate group at Tyr-63 ... These factors generate more thrombin. Thrombin also activates factor XIII that stabilizes the fibrin complex and therefore the ... Most of those drugs are in the class of direct factor Xa inhibitors, but there is one DTI called AZD0837, which is a follow-up ...
Walsh PN (July 2001). "Roles of platelets and factor XI in the initiation of blood coagulation by thrombin". Thrombosis and ... Factor XIa and XIIa are two main factors involved in the plasminogen activator. Factor XI (FXI) is a serine protase produced by ... These recombinant forms of tPA have been shown to have a longer half-life in the blood and a greater resistance to inhibition, ... Factor XIIa is another plasma protein that is involved in the activation of zymogen factor is activated into factor XIa. This ...
Upon exposure to blood and platelets, TF binds with activated factor VIIa (normally present in trace amounts in the blood), ... Due to extensive coagulation there is consumption of coagulation factors which causes bleeding. ... Recombinant factor VII has been proposed as a "last resort" in those with severe hemorrhage due to obstetric or other causes, ... Disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC) is a condition in which blood clots form throughout the body, blocking small blood ...
... participates in blood coagulation; it is a cofactor for factor IXa which, in the presence of Ca2+ and phospholipids ... FVIII concentrated from donated blood plasma, or alternatively recombinant FVIIa can be given to hemophiliacs to restore ... the incidence of these inhibitors is dependent of various factors, including the factor VIII product itself. In the 1980s, some ... The active protein (sometimes written as coagulation factor VIIIa) interacts with another coagulation factor called factor IX. ...
1dan: COMPLEX OF ACTIVE SITE INHIBITED HUMAN BLOOD COAGULATION FACTOR VIIA WITH HUMAN RECOMBINANT SOLUBLE TISSUE FACTOR ... the interface between factor Xa and tissue factor in the quaternary complex tissue factor-factor VIIa-factor Xa-tissue factor ... The best known function of tissue factor is its role in blood coagulation. The complex of TF with factor VIIa catalyzes the ... Engelmann B (2007). "Initiation of coagulation by tissue factor carriers in blood". Blood Cells, Molecules & Diseases. 36 (2): ...
... (EC 3.4.21.21, blood-coagulation factor VIIa, activated blood coagulation factor VII, formerly known as proconvertin ... "The use of recombinant factor VIIa in the treatment of bleeding disorders". Blood. 104 (13): 3858-64. doi:10.1182/blood-2004-06 ... Factor VII shares a common domain architecture with factors IX and X. The gene for factor VII is located on chromosome 13 ( ... the interface between factor Xa and tissue factor in the quaternary complex tissue factor-factor VIIa-factor Xa-tissue factor ...
Factors VII, IX, and X all play key roles in blood coagulation and also share a common domain architecture. The factor IX ... BeneFIX Coagulation Factor IX (Recombinant) Official Site". EMA: Idelvion "Home: Alprolix [Coagulation Factor IX (Recombinant ... and a Factor VIII cofactor, it hydrolyses one arginine-isoleucine bond in factor X to form factor Xa. Factor IX is inhibited by ... "Home: Factor IX Mutation Database". Davie EW, Fujikawa K (1975). "Basic mechanisms in blood coagulation". Annual Review of ...
Recombinant factor XIII (rFXIII) is the only drug alternative to receiving blood transfusions, the traditional treatment for ... 1999). "Blood coagulation factor XIII: structure and function". Thrombosis Research. 94 (5): 271-305. doi:10.1016/S0049-3848(99 ... rFXIII acts by inhibiting fibrinolysis factors which enzymatically cleave the fibrin matrix, leading to the ultimate formation ... Blood. 108 (1): 57-62. doi:10.1182/blood-2005-02-0788. PMID 16556896. "Recombinant Factor XIII". 2010. http://www.hemophilia. ...
rFVIIa, which is an activated form of factor VII, bypasses factors VIII and IX and causes coagulation without the need for ... Recombinant factor VIIa (rFVIIa) is a form of blood factor VII that has been manufactured via recombinant technology. The most ... Recombinant human factor VII, while initially looking promising in intracerebral hemorrhage, failed to show benefit following ... It is important for some patients to shift to proper blood factors according to their level of NAbs. Other indications include ...
Whole blood coagulation thrombelastographic profiles employing minimal tissue factor activation. J Thromb Haemost. 2003;1:551-8 ... Prolongation of CT may be a result of coagulation deficiencies, primarily coagulation factors, or heparin (dependent on the ... Patterns of response to recombinant factor VIIa. J Thromb Haemost. 2004;2:102-10. Karger R, Egbring R, Weippert-Kretschmer M, ... Whole blood thrombelastographic coagulation profiles using minimal tissue factor activation can display hypercoagulation in ...
... is major protein domain of many blood coagulation factors. Blood coagulation factors V and VIII contain a C-terminal, twice ... "Localization of functionally important epitopes within the second C-type domain of coagulation factor V using recombinant ... Davie EW, Kane WH (1986). "Cloning of a cDNA coding for human factor V, a blood coagulation factor homologous to factor VIII ... Davie EW, Kane WH (1988). "Blood coagulation factors V and VIII: structural and functional similarities and their relationship ...
... activated blood-coagulation factor II, blood-coagulation factor IIa, factor IIa, E thrombin, beta-thrombin, gamma-thrombin) is ... Warfarin and related drugs inhibit vitamin K-dependent carboxylation of several coagulation factors, including prothrombin. ... Recombinant thrombin is available as a powder for reconstitution into aqueous solution. It can be applied topically during ... In the blood coagulation pathway, thrombin acts to convert factor XI to XIa, VIII to VIIIa, V to Va, fibrinogen to fibrin, and ...
rFVIIa, which is an activated form of factor VII, bypasses factors VIII and IX and causes coagulation without the need for ... Recombinant factor VIIa (rFVIIa) is a form of blood factor VII that has been manufactured via recombinant technology. The most ... "Recombinant factor VIIa" - news · newspapers · books · scholar · JSTOR (July 2012) (Learn how and when to remove this template ... other than in those with factor VII deficiency, it should only be given in clinical trials.[1] Recombinant human factor VII, ...
TAP and antistasin were used to estimate factor Xa as a drug target. Blood coagulation is a complex process by which the blood ... Factors IIa, Xa, VIIa, IXa and XIa are all proteolytic enzymes that have a specific role in the coagulation cascade. Factor Xa ... It acts as a slow, tight-binding inhibitor of factor Xa with a Ki value of 0.3-0.6 nM but it also inhibits trypsin. Recombinant ... Heparin targets multiple factors in the blood coagulation cascade, one of them being FXa. At first, it had many side effects ...
"Inhibition of coagulation factors by recombinant barley serpin BSZx". FEBS Letters. 394 (2): 165-8. doi:10.1016/0014-5793(96) ... which is able to inhibit trypsin and chymotrypsin as well as several blood coagulation factors. However, close relatives of ... Johnson DJ, Li W, Adams TE, Huntington JA (May 2006). "Antithrombin-S195A factor Xa-heparin structure reveals the allosteric ... Blood. 104 (13): 3965-70. doi:10.1182/blood-2004-02-0598. PMID 15315969. Aihara K, Azuma H, Akaike M, Ikeda Y, Sata M, Takamori ...
Pipe SW (May 2008). "Recombinant clotting factors". Thrombosis and Haemostasis. 99 (5): 840-50. doi:10.1160/TH07-10-0593. PMID ... Key NS, Negrier C (August 2007). "Coagulation factor concentrates: past, present, and future". Lancet. 370 (9585): 439-48. doi: ... Indeed, transfusion of blood products had previously led to unintentional infection of haemophiliacs with HIV or hepatitis C; ... These recombinant proteins are safer than the products they replaced. Prior to recombinant protein products, several treatments ...
... (PCC), also known as factor IX complex, is a medication made up of blood clotting factors II, ... A version that is made by recombinant methods which only contains factor IX is also available. In the United States a dose of ... However, if the PCC is given because factor levels are low, it can restore normal coagulation. As PCC products contain heparin ... PCC contains a number of blood clotting factors. Typically this includes factor II, IX, and X. Some versions also contain ...
Co-factor of VIIa (formerly known as factor III). IV Calcium. Required for coagulation factors to bind to phospholipid ( ... cryoprecipitate and fresh frozen plasma are commonly used coagulation factor products. Recombinant activated human factor VII ... Coagulation (also known as clotting) is the process by which blood changes from a liquid to a gel, forming a blood clot. It ... Secondary hemostasis occurs simultaneously: Additional coagulation factors or clotting factors beyond Factor VII (listed below ...
GpIIb/IIIa is essential to blood coagulation since the activated receptor has the ability to bind fibrinogen (as well as von ... Recombinant factor VIIa, AryoSeven or NovoSeven FDA approved this drug for the treatment of the disease on July 2014. ... Unidentified factors other than the platelet defect itself may have important roles. Glanzmann's thrombasthenia is associated ... Blood. 118 (23): 5996-6005. doi:10.1182/blood-2011-07-365635. PMID 21917754. F.Z. Elmouatarif; B. Badre; S. Elarabi (2013). " ...
Secondary hemostasis occurs simultaneously: Additional coagulation factors or clotting factors beyond Factor VII (listed below ... cryoprecipitate and fresh frozen plasma are commonly used coagulation factor products. Recombinant activated human factor VII ... Coagulation (also known as clotting) is the process by which blood changes from a liquid to a gel, forming a blood clot. It ... If a coagulation factor is part of the contact activation or tissue factor pathway, a deficiency of that factor will affect ...
The skin can show the effects of vascular damage often coupled with depletion of coagulation factors in the form of petechiae, ... with the most promising ones being ELISA tests using a recombinant version of a protein in the LAL assay, Factor C. Bioaerosol ... Normal human blood serum contains anti-LOS antibodies that are bactericidal and patients that have infections caused by ... The presence of endotoxins in the blood is called endotoxemia. It can lead to septic shock, if the immune response is severely ...
Clotting factors synthesized by modern recombinant methods are now in routine clinical use for hemophilia, as the risks of ... Landsteiner K, Wiener AS (1940). "An agglutinable factor in human blood recognized by immune sera for rhesus blood". Proc Soc ... or disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC). Units of packed red cells are made by removing as much of the plasma as ... Blood types and compatibility bloodbook.com "Blood Component ABO Compatibility Chart Red Blood Cells and Plasma". Blood Bank ...
"Mechanisms of action of recombinant activated factor VII in the context of tissue factor concentration and distribution". Blood ... resolved imaging of other active coagulation factors High sensitivity to both pro- and anticoagulant changes in the hemostatic ... of blood coagulation initiated by localized coagulation activator under conditions similar to the conditions of the blood ... Thrombodynamics is a method for blood coagulation monitoring and anticoagulant control. This test is based on imitation of ...
... also involved in blood coagulation. However it inactivates certain other serine proteases that are not involved in coagulation ... Factor XI (XIa), Factor XII (XIIa) and, to a greater extent, Factor II (thrombin) (IIa), and also the activated form of Factor ... Blood. 80 (9): 2159-2171. PMID 1421387. Thrombate III label FDA website for ATryn (BL 125284) Antithrombin (Recombinant) US ... of angiogenic stimulatory factors is required along with a reduction in the quantity of angiogenic inhibitory factors tumor ...
The clotting factors are made either from human blood or by recombinant methods. Up to 20% of people develop antibodies to the ... such as porcine factor VIII.[citation needed] If a person becomes refractory to replacement coagulation factor as a result of ... Factor VIII is used in haemophilia A and factor IX in haemophilia B. Factor replacement can be either isolated from human blood ... Chapter 38 Coagulation Factors V and VIII by GC White and GE Gilbert Archived 2017-09-11 at the Wayback Machine. in Blood: ...
... or fibrin stabilizing factor is an enzyme (EC 2.3.2.13) of the blood coagulation system that crosslinks fibrin. Deficiency of this factor (FXIIID) affects clot stability. FXIIID, while generally rare, does occur, with Iran having the highest global incidence of the disorder with 473 cases. The city of Khash, located in Sistan and Balochistan provinces, has the highest incidence in Iran, with a high rate of consanguineous marriage. Factor XIII is a transglutaminase that circulates in the plasma as a heterotetramer of two catalytic A subunits and two carrier B subunits. When thrombin has converted fibrinogen to fibrin, the latter forms a proteinaceous network in which every E-unit is crosslinked to only one D-unit. Factor XIII is activated by thrombin into factor XIIIa; its activation into Factor XIIIa requires calcium as a cofactor. A ...
... (TEG) is a method of testing the efficiency of blood coagulation. It is a test mainly used in surgery and anesthesiology, although few centers are capable of performing it. More common tests of blood coagulation include prothrombin time (PT,INR) and partial thromboplastin time (aPTT) which measure coagulation factor function, but TEG also can assess platelet function, clot strength, and fibrinolysis which these other tests cannot. Thromboelastometry (TEM), previously named rotational thromboelastography (ROTEG) or rotational thromboelastometry (ROTEM), is another version of TEG in which it is the sensor shaft, rather than the cup, that rotates. A small sample of blood is taken from the selected person and rotated gently through 4º 45', six times a minute, to imitate sluggish venous flow and activate ...
... (FVIII) is an essential blood-clotting protein, also known as anti-hemophilic factor (AHF). In humans, factor VIII is encoded by the F8 gene. Defects in this gene result in hemophilia A, a recessive X-linked coagulation disorder. Factor VIII is produced in liver sinusoidal cells and endothelial cells outside the liver throughout the body. This protein circulates in the bloodstream in an inactive form, bound to another molecule called von Willebrand factor, until an injury that damages blood vessels occurs. In response to injury, coagulation factor VIII is activated and separates from von Willebrand factor. The active protein (sometimes written as coagulation factor VIIIa) interacts with another ...
... (EC 3.4.21.5, fibrinogenase, thrombase, thrombofort, topical, thrombin-C, tropostasin, activated blood-coagulation factor II, blood-coagulation factor IIa, factor IIa, E thrombin, beta-thrombin, gamma-thrombin) is a serine protease, an enzyme that, in humans, is encoded by the F2 gene. Prothrombin (coagulation factor II) is proteolytically cleaved to form thrombin in the clotting process. Thrombin in turn acts as a serine protease that converts soluble fibrinogen into insoluble strands of fibrin, as well as catalyzing many other coagulation-related reactions. After the description of fibrinogen and fibrin, Alexander Schmidt hypothesised the existence of an enzyme that converts fibrinogen into fibrin in 1872. Thrombin is produced by the enzymatic cleavage of two sites on ...
... (TEM), previously named rotational thromboelastography (ROTEG) or rotational thromboelastometry (ROTEM), is an established viscoelastic method for hemostasis testing in whole blood. It is a modification of traditional thromboelastography (TEG). TEM investigates the interaction of coagulation factors, their inhibitors, anticoagulant drugs, blood cells, specifically platelets, during clotting and subsequent fibrinolysis. The rheological conditions mimic the sluggish flow of blood in veins. TEM is performed with the ROTEM whole blood analyzer (Tem Innovations GmbH, Munich) and is an enhancement of thrombelastography, originally described by H. Hartert in 1948. While traditional thromboelastography is a global assay for blood clotting disorders and drug effects, TEM is primarily used in combination with appropriate differential assays. They allow testing in the presence of ...
Direct Xa inhibitors are a class of relatively new oral anticoagulant drugs that inhibit factor Xa in splitting prothrombin into thrombin in the final stages of the blood coagulation cascade. They have a fast onset, predictable pharmacokinetics and don't require as strict monitoring as the older anticoagulant drugs. The discovery of direct Xa inhibitors was a long process which started in the early 1980s. In the late 1980s, two naturally occurring Xa inhibitors were discovered which were used as a basis for developing possible Xa inhibitors, TAP and antistasin. The binding sites of FXa are well established which makes it relatively easier to create molecules with appropriate moieties for binding to FXa. Four known binding sites are present on factor Xa, S1-S4, of which S1 and S4 are the most important for binding. Both of these binding sites have hydrophobic pockets meaning it binds to non-polar moieties, however, there ...
Gamma-carboxyglutamic acid residues play an important role in coagulation. The high-affinity calcium binding sites in the GLA domain of factor IX, which is a serine protease of the coagulation system, were found to partially mediate the binding of factor IXa to platelets and in factor-X activation.[4] In addition, upon mechanical injury to the blood vessel wall, a cell-associated tissue factor becomes exposed and initiates a series of enzymatic reactions localized on a membrane surface generally provided by cells and accumulating platelets. Gla residues partly govern the activation and binding of circulating blood-clotting enzymes and zymogens to this exposed cell membrane surface. Specifically, gla residues are needed in calcium binding and in exposing hydrophobic membrane binding regions to the cell bilayer. Lack of these gla residues ...
... are synthetic compounds that possess similar characteristics to heparin, that is it can be used clinically as an anticoagulant. These compounds like heparin possess a negative charge density that allows it to interact and inhibit the coagulation process. Glucose or mannose-contain n-alkyl urea peptoid oligomer, glucose modified diamine with pedant monosaccharides are examples of heparin mimicking polymers. Heparin mimicking polymers can also be used to create biomaterials for surgical application such as pacemakers, stents, etc. Heparin is widely used as a clinical anticoagulant however, it possesses drawbacks creating a need for synthetic heparin mimicking polymers. Events such as the 2008 heparin contamination event, and mad cow disease further enhance the new demand for more robust anticoagulants. Additionally prolonged use of heparin results in heparin induced thrombocytopenia. Three aspects of synthetic mimicking polymers are currently focused on: mimicking ...
The underlying scientific basis for blood clotting and hemostasis is discussed in detail in the articles, coagulation, hemostasis and related articles. The discussion here is limited to the common practical aspects of blood clot formation which manifest as bleeding. Some medical conditions can also make patients susceptible to bleeding. These are conditions that affect the normal hemostatic (bleeding-control) functions of the body. Such conditions either are, or cause, bleeding diatheses. Hemostasis involves several components. The main components of the hemostatic system include platelets and the coagulation system. Platelets are small blood components that form a plug in the blood vessel wall that stops bleeding. Platelets also produce a variety of substances that stimulate the production of a blood clot. One of the most common causes of increased bleeding ...
PEP produces minimal undesirable effects on coagulation factors and is thought to increase the risk of blood clots little or not at all.[28][29] This is in spite of the fact that estradiol levels can reach high concentrations of as much as 700 pg/mL with high-dose (320 mg/month) PEP therapy.[30] It is also in contrast to oral synthetic estrogens such as diethylstilbestrol and ethinylestradiol, which produce marked increases in coagulation factors and high rates of blood clots at the high doses used to achieve castrate levels of testosterone in prostate cancer.[28][29][6] The difference between the two types of therapies is due to the bioidentical and parenteral nature of PEP and its minimal influence on liver protein synthesis.[28][29][6] PEP might actually reduce the risk of blood clots, due to decreases in levels of certain procoagulatory proteins.[28][29] ...
A clot is a semi-solid substance that blood forms, especially when it is in air. When a person bleeds, the blood turns into a clot at the injury. A blood clot is also called a thrombus. The process is called coagulation. If a person gets a cut on their body, that person may bleed. To stop the bleeding, the human body does several things. First, the brain orders the liver to produce chemicals that will help the clot to form. When the chemicals released by the liver arrive at the injury, the coagulation begins. In the mean time, the brain also lessens the blood flow near the injury (by tightening the veins and arteries in that area), so that not as much blood is lost. There is a limit to how quickly a clot can form. If the cut is very deep and the person bleeds too much, a clot may not be able to form and a lot of blood may be lost. ...
A clot is a semi-solid substance that blood forms, especially when it is in air. When a person bleeds, the blood turns into a clot at the injury. A blood clot is also called a thrombus. The process is called coagulation. If a person gets a cut on their body, that person may bleed. To stop the bleeding, the human body does several things. First, the brain orders the liver to produce chemicals that will help the clot to form. When the chemicals released by the liver arrive at the injury, the coagulation begins. In the mean time, the brain also lessens the blood flow near the injury (by tightening the veins and arteries in that area), so that not as much blood is lost. There is a limit to how quickly a clot can form. If the cut is very deep and the person bleeds too much, a clot may not be able to form and a lot of blood may be lost. ...
Cho, K., Tanaka, T., Cook, R.R., Kisiel, W., Fujikawa, K., Kurachi, K. and Powers, J.C. (1984). „Active-site mapping of bovine and human blood coagulation serine proteases using synthetic peptide 4-nitroanilide and thio ester substrates". Biochemistry. 23: 644-650. PMID 6370301 ...
This process is called the coagulation cascade. It involves special proteins called coagulation, or clotting factors. You may ... Plasma factor VII activity. Factor VII activity. The factor VII assay is a blood test to measure the activity of factor VII. ... recombinant) factor VII. ... Factor VII is one such coagulation factor. Factor VII ... Factor VII (seven) deficiency is a disorder caused by a lack of a protein called factor VII in the blood. It leads to problems ...
Coagulation Factor IX (Recombinant). Coagulation factor X. target. DB00100. Coagulation Factor IX (Recombinant). Coagulation ... Coagulation Factor IX (Recombinant). Coagulation factor VII. target. DB00100. Coagulation Factor IX (Recombinant). Vitamin K- ... Coagulation factor VIIa Recombinant Human. Coagulation factor X. target. DB00036. Coagulation factor VIIa Recombinant Human. ... Coagulation Factor IX (Recombinant). Coagulation factor VIII. target. DB00100. Coagulation Factor IX (Recombinant). Prothrombin ...
Consider administration of recombinant coagulation factors and non-blood product hemostatic agents ... Currently, the use of activated coagulation factors in surgical bleeding is an off-label indication. The coagulation factor ... recombinant or activated coagulation factors can play an important role. Several recombinant coagulation factors are ... In massive blood loss, PCCs are administered to rapidly restore vitamin K-dependent coagulation factors. The recommended dose ...
Although acquired factor XIII deficiency has been described in association with hepatic failure, inflammatory bowel disease, ... Congenital factor XIII (FXIII) deficiency, originally recognized by Duckert in 1960, is a rare autosomal recessive disease ... Clotting factors function as cofactors in the blood-coagulation cascade.. Factor XIII A-subunit, recombinant (Tretten). *View ... Recombinant factor XIII: a safe and novel treatment for congenital factor XIII deficiency. Blood. 2012 May 31. 119(22):5111-7. ...
Complex of active site inhibited human blood coagulation factor VIIA with human recombinant soluble tissue factor. ... Initiates blood coagulation by forming a complex with circulating factor VII or VIIa. The [TF:VIIa] complex activates factors ... factor VIIa then converts factor X to factor Xa by limited proteolysis. Factor VIIa will also convert factor IX to factor IXa ... Blood coagulation is initiated when tissue factor binds to coagulation factor VIIa to give an enzymatically active complex ...
1dan: COMPLEX OF ACTIVE SITE INHIBITED HUMAN BLOOD COAGULATION FACTOR VIIA WITH HUMAN RECOMBINANT SOLUBLE TISSUE FACTOR ... the interface between factor Xa and tissue factor in the quaternary complex tissue factor-factor VIIa-factor Xa-tissue factor ... The best known function of tissue factor is its role in blood coagulation. The complex of TF with factor VIIa catalyzes the ... Engelmann B (2007). "Initiation of coagulation by tissue factor carriers in blood". Blood Cells, Molecules & Diseases. 36 (2): ...
Blood Coagulation Factors. DEA CLASS. Rx. DESCRIPTION. Recombinant, fusion protein with antihemophilic factor linked to the Fc ... Factor VIIa, Recombinant: (Major) The risk of potential interaction between factor VIIa, recombinant and coagulation factor ... Factor VIII inhibitors may develop in patients receiving antihemophilic factor, Fc fusion protein, recombinant. All patients ... Administration of recombinant antihemophilic factor Fc fusion protein normalizes the aPTT over the effective dosing period. ...
1990) Characterization of recombinant tick anticoagulant peptide. A highly selective inhibitor of blood coagulation factor Xa. ... 1993) Factors contributing to increased vascular fibrinolytic activity in mongrel dogs. Circulation 87:1990-2000. ... 1988) The lipoprotein-associated coagulation inhibitor that inhibits the factor VII-tissue factor complex also inhibits factor ... Coagulation Assays and Bleeding Time.. Blood samples were collected in 3.8% sodium citrate (1 part citrate to 9 parts blood) ...
Recombinant), albumin fusion protein reference guide for safe and effective use from the American Society of Health-System ... Biosynthetic (recombinant DNA-origin) preparation of blood coagulation factor IX genetically fused to recombinant albumin via a ... Extending the pharmacokinetic half-life of coagulation factors by fusion to recombinant albumin. Thromb Haemost. 2013; 110:931- ... Biosynthetic (recombinant DNA origin) preparation of blood coagulation factor IX (rIX-FP) genetically fused to recombinant ...
Recombinant Protein with GST-tag at N-terminal 25µg Life Sciences:Protein Biology:Proteins:Proteins A-Z:Proteins ... This gene encodes coagulation factor XII which circulates in blood as a zymogen. This single chain zymogen is converted to a ... It activates coagulation factors VII and XI. Defects in this gene do not cause any clinical symptoms and the sole effect is ... which then cleaves factor XII first to alpha-factor XIIa and then to beta-factor XIIa. The active factor XIIa participates in ...
Coagulation factors - Replace platelets 27 What are the indications for Recombinant Factor VIII? ... Replacement of blood loss will lead to DILUATION of coagulation factorsadditional bleeding - Fibrinogen levels can drop ... Generally, the treatment of coagulation factor deficiencies involving fibrinogen and Factor VIII i.e.. 1) Fibrinogen ... Prothrombin complex concentrate is made via plasma fractionation and contains Vitamin K dependent coagulation factors; thus, it ...
... initiates blood coagulation by promoting FXa generation (extrinsic-Xa). Subsequent generation of intrinsic FXa … ... CrossRefPubMed Komiyama Y, Pedersen AH, Kisiel W. Proteolytic activation of human factors IX and X by recombinant human factor ... Proteolysis of blood coagulation factor VIII by the factor VIIa-tissue factor complex: generation of an inactive factor VIII ... Proteolysis of blood coagulation factor VIII by the factor VIIa-tissue factor complex: generation of an inactive factor VIII ...
Successful use of recombinant factor VIIa in a preterm infant with life-threatening haematuria. Faust, Kirstin; Tröger, Birthe ... Intrinsic clotting factors in dependency of age, sex, body mass index, and oral contraceptives: definition and risk of elevated ... Thought you might appreciate this item(s) I saw at Blood Coagulation & Fibrinolysis.. ... Tissue factor/its pathway inhibitor system and kynurenines in chronic kidney disease patients on conservative treatment. Pawlak ...
Antiarrhythmic drugs Cardiovascular drug innovation Thrombolytics Renin inhibitors Recombinant blood coagulation factors ... Human recombinant DNA-derived anti-hemophilic factor (factor VIII) in the treatment of hemophilia A. N Engl J Med 1990;323:1800 ... Finally, the large-scale availability of blood fractions (coagulation factors) prepared by recombinant technology may help ... Use of recombinant antihemophilic factor in the treatment of two patients with classic hemophilia. N Engl J Med 1989;320:166-70 ...
Helping you find trustworthy answers on Factor IX Deficiency , Latest evidence made easy ... Find all the evidence you need on Factor IX Deficiency via the Trip Database. ... J Blood Med . 2018. 9:227-39. . . Media Gallery Intrinsic and extrinsic pathways of coagulation. Factor VII/tissue factor ... A Safety and Efficacy Study of a Recombinant Fusion Protein Linking Coagulation Factor IX With Albumin (rIX-FP) in Patients ...
Recombinant factor XIII (rFXIII) is the only drug alternative to receiving blood transfusions, the traditional treatment for ... 1999). "Blood coagulation factor XIII: structure and function". Thrombosis Research. 94 (5): 271-305. doi:10.1016/S0049-3848(99 ... rFXIII acts by inhibiting fibrinolysis factors which enzymatically cleave the fibrin matrix, leading to the ultimate formation ... Blood. 108 (1): 57-62. doi:10.1182/blood-2005-02-0788. PMID 16556896. "Recombinant Factor XIII". 2010. http://www.hemophilia. ...
Tick anticoagulant peptide: kinetic analysis of the recombinant inhibitor with blood coagulation factor Xa. Biochemistry. 1990; ... Biomaterial-associated thrombosis: roles of coagulation factors, complement, platelets and leukocytes. Biomaterials. 2004;25: ... Tissue factor pathway inhibitor and the current concept of blood coagulation. Blood Coagul Fibrinolysis. 1995;6(suppl 1): S7- ... factor VIIIa/factor IXa), prothrombinase (factor Va/factor Xa), and factor XIa complexes on PS-exposed activated platelets. We ...
Enhanced recombinant human blood coagulation factor VIII expression in the milk of goats using replication-defective adenovirus ... Completion of developmental stages of insects may be influenced by a number of biochemical factors triggered by the primary ... High-level expression of recombinant human blood coagulation factor in milk of farm animals at a large scale provides a ... During the present study, a factorial 23 experimental design was conducted, which assessed three factors: i) two species of ...
Blood coagulation factors: their complementary DNAs, genes, and expression. Coleman RW, Hirsh J, Marder VJ, et al, eds. ... Recombinant factor XIII: a safe and novel treatment for congenital factor XIII deficiency. Blood. 2012 May 31. 119(22):5111-7. ... Recombinant factor XIII: a safe and novel treatment for congenital factor XIII deficiency. Blood. 2012 May 31. 119(22):5111-7. ... Role of blood coagulation factor XIII in vascular diseases. Swiss Med Wkly. 2001 Jan 27. 131(3-4):31-4. [Medline]. ...
Blood coagulation factors: their complementary DNAs, genes, and expression. Coleman RW, Hirsh J, Marder VJ, et al, eds. ... Recombinant factor XIII: a safe and novel treatment for congenital factor XIII deficiency. Blood. 2012 May 31. 119(22):5111-7. ... Recombinant factor XIII: a safe and novel treatment for congenital factor XIII deficiency. Blood. 2012 May 31. 119(22):5111-7. ... Role of blood coagulation factor XIII in vascular diseases. Swiss Med Wkly. 2001 Jan 27. 131(3-4):31-4. [Medline]. ...
Coagulation medications & anti-inhibitor treatments effectively manage hemophilia A and hemophilia B blood disorders symptoms ... Coagulation factors are proteins in blood plasma that treat Factor VII, Factor VIII, and Factor IX deficiencies. ... Coagulation Factor Products. Coagulation products are proteins in blood plasma that are responsible for effective clotting of ... von Willebrand Factor (Recombinant). Product: VONVENDI®. Prescribing Information. Size: 450-850 IU SDV 5 mL ...
Stable gene transfer and expression of human blood coagulation factor IX after intramuscular injection of recombinant adeno- ... Other factors such as pH, possible drug-mucus interactions and the viscosity of the mucus may also influence drug diffusion and ... Maxwell, M.J.; Wilson, M.J.A. Complications of blood transfusion. Contin. Educ. Anaesth. Crit. Care Pain 2006, 6, 225-229. [ ... The environmental factors that influence drug integrity and absorption include the average length of the segment, pH, thickness ...
... and coagulation factors act together to arrest bleeding. Hemostasis occurs by the coagulation process where blood is solidified ... Recombinant Thrombin Market - Global Industry Analysis, Size, Share, Growth, Trends and Forecast 2017 - 2025 Hemostasis is the ... Aided by declining prices of sequencing, a factor that has consequently trigged R&D activities in SNP genotyping and analysis, ...
... and coagulation factors act together to arrest bleeding. Hemostasis occurs by the coagulation process where blood is solidified ... Recombinant Thrombin Market - Global Industry Analysis, Size, Share, Growth, Trends and Forecast 2017 - 2025 Hemostasis is the ... in almost every aspect of biotechnology-related research and product development is the prime contributing factor for the ... Impact factors such as market attractiveness analysis by geography in terms of value (%) for the year 2012 and Porters five ...
  • Bovine thrombin is a topical thrombin indicated to aid hemostasis whenever oozing blood and minor bleeding from capillaries and small venules is accessible and control of bleeding by standard surgical techniques (like suture, ligature, or cautery) is ineffective or impractical [FDA Label]. (drugbank.ca)
  • If you have such antibodies, you may be at an increased risk of sudden and severe allergic reactions (e.g. anaphylactic reaction) during future treatment with factor IX. (medicines.org.uk)
  • The March 2006 RCSB PDB Molecule of the Month feature on Tissue Factor by David S. Goodsell is 10.2210/rcsb_pdb/mom_2006_3 . (proteopedia.org)
  • In addition to the membrane-bound tissue factor, soluble form of tissue factor was also found which results from alternatively spliced tissue factor mRNA transcripts, in which exon 5 is absent and exon 4 is spliced directly to exon 6. (wikipedia.org)
  • The best known function of tissue factor is its role in blood coagulation . (wikipedia.org)
  • Belongs to the tissue factor family. (abcam.com)
  • Tissue factor (TF) encryption is the post-translational suppression of TF procoagulant activity (PCA) on the cell surface. (ahajournals.org)
  • Diverse oncogenic transformations result in the constitutive expression of tissue factor (TF) in cancer cells. (ahajournals.org)
  • For all patients, treatment with cryoprecipitate and fresh frozen plasma (FFP) should be considered in the event of acute bleeding if concentrate and recombinant factor are not available. (medscape.com)
  • Association of psychosocial risk factors with risk of acute myocardial infarction in 11119 cases and 13648 controls from 52 countries (the INTERHEART study): case-control study," The Lancet , vol. 364, no. 9438, pp. 953-962, 2004. (hindawi.com)
  • The effect of natural habituation on coagulation responses to acute mental stress and recovery in men," Thrombosis and Haemostasis , vol. 92, no. 6, pp. 1327-1335, 2004. (hindawi.com)
  • Essential Guide to Blood Coagulation covers both the stable and the acute stages of hereditary and acquired bleeding and thrombotic disorders. (wiley.com)
  • As described in the label, results demonstrated that Andexxa rapidly and significantly reversed anti-Factor Xa activity (the anticoagulant mechanism of these medicines). (globenewswire.com)
  • However, recombinant DNA of chymosin has been in use since 1990, and is genetically and structurally identical to the original enzyme, but can be produced in larger quantities and a lower cost. (news-medical.net)
  • Faced with a bleeding patient, it may be difficult to determine whether blood loss is due to a local factor, or an underlying hemostatic defect. (wiley.com)
  • PTLA ) today announced that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved Andexxa ® [coagulation factor Xa (recombinant), inactivated-zhzo], the first and only antidote indicated for patients treated with rivaroxaban and apixaban, when reversal of anticoagulation is needed due to life-threatening or uncontrolled bleeding. (globenewswire.com)
  • Data from 185 evaluable patients showed that Andexxa rapidly and significantly reversed anti-Factor Xa activity when administered as a bolus and sustained this reversal when followed by a 120-minute infusion. (globenewswire.com)