Reagent Strips: Narrow pieces of material impregnated or covered with a substance used to produce a chemical reaction. The strips are used in detecting, measuring, producing, etc., other substances. (From Dorland, 28th ed)Indicators and Reagents: Substances used for the detection, identification, analysis, etc. of chemical, biological, or pathologic processes or conditions. Indicators are substances that change in physical appearance, e.g., color, at or approaching the endpoint of a chemical titration, e.g., on the passage between acidity and alkalinity. Reagents are substances used for the detection or determination of another substance by chemical or microscopical means, especially analysis. Types of reagents are precipitants, solvents, oxidizers, reducers, fluxes, and colorimetric reagents. (From Grant & Hackh's Chemical Dictionary, 5th ed, p301, p499)Schistosomiasis haematobia: A human disease caused by the infection of parasitic worms SCHISTOSOMA HAEMATOBIUM. It is endemic in AFRICA and parts of the MIDDLE EAST. Tissue damages most often occur in the URINARY TRACT, specifically the URINARY BLADDER.Hematuria: Presence of blood in the urine.Hemoglobinuria: The presence of free HEMOGLOBIN in the URINE, indicating hemolysis of ERYTHROCYTES within the vascular system. After saturating the hemoglobin-binding proteins (HAPTOGLOBINS), free hemoglobin begins to appear in the urine.Empyema: Presence of pus in a hollow organ or body cavity.Maleic Anhydrides: Used in copolymerization reactions, in the Diels-Alder(diene)synthesis, in the preparation of resins, pharmaceuticals and agricultural chemicals. It is a powerful irritant and causes burns.Urobilinogen: A colorless compound formed in the intestines by the reduction of bilirubin. Some is excreted in the feces where it is oxidized to urobilin. Some is reabsorbed and re-excreted in the bile as bilirubin. At times, it is re-excreted in the urine, where it may be later oxidized to urobilin.Schistosoma: A genus of trematode flukes belonging to the family Schistosomatidae. There are over a dozen species. These parasites are found in man and other mammals. Snails are the intermediate hosts.Schistosoma haematobium: A species of trematode blood flukes of the family Schistosomatidae which occurs at different stages in development in veins of the pulmonary and hepatic system and finally the bladder lumen. This parasite causes urinary schistosomiasis.Clinical Enzyme Tests: Analyses for a specific enzyme activity, or of the level of a specific enzyme that is used to assess health and disease risk, for early detection of disease or disease prediction, diagnosis, and change in disease status.Carboxylic Ester Hydrolases: Enzymes which catalyze the hydrolysis of carboxylic acid esters with the formation of an alcohol and a carboxylic acid anion.Schistosomiasis: Infection with flukes (trematodes) of the genus SCHISTOSOMA. Three species produce the most frequent clinical diseases: SCHISTOSOMA HAEMATOBIUM (endemic in Africa and the Middle East), SCHISTOSOMA MANSONI (in Egypt, northern and southern Africa, some West Indies islands, northern 2/3 of South America), and SCHISTOSOMA JAPONICUM (in Japan, China, the Philippines, Celebes, Thailand, Laos). S. mansoni is often seen in Puerto Ricans living in the United States.Urine: Liquid by-product of excretion produced in the kidneys, temporarily stored in the bladder until discharge through the URETHRA.Peritonitis: INFLAMMATION of the PERITONEUM lining the ABDOMINAL CAVITY as the result of infectious, autoimmune, or chemical processes. Primary peritonitis is due to infection of the PERITONEAL CAVITY via hematogenous or lymphatic spread and without intra-abdominal source. Secondary peritonitis arises from the ABDOMINAL CAVITY itself through RUPTURE or ABSCESS of intra-abdominal organs.Sensitivity and Specificity: Binary classification measures to assess test results. Sensitivity or recall rate is the proportion of true positives. Specificity is the probability of correctly determining the absence of a condition. (From Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 2d ed)Bacterial Infections: Infections by bacteria, general or unspecified.Nitrites: Salts of nitrous acid or compounds containing the group NO2-. The inorganic nitrites of the type MNO2 (where M=metal) are all insoluble, except the alkali nitrites. The organic nitrites may be isomeric, but not identical with the corresponding nitro compounds. (Grant & Hackh's Chemical Dictionary, 5th ed)Sulfhydryl Reagents: Chemical agents that react with SH groups. This is a chemically diverse group that is used for a variety of purposes. Among these are enzyme inhibition, enzyme reactivation or protection, and labelling.Drug Industry: That segment of commercial enterprise devoted to the design, development, and manufacture of chemical products for use in the diagnosis and treatment of disease, disability, or other dysfunction, or to improve function.Protective Devices: Devices designed to provide personal protection against injury to individuals exposed to hazards in industry, sports, aviation, or daily activities.Marketing: Activity involved in transfer of goods from producer to consumer or in the exchange of services.Urinalysis: Examination of urine by chemical, physical, or microscopic means. Routine urinalysis usually includes performing chemical screening tests, determining specific gravity, observing any unusual color or odor, screening for bacteriuria, and examining the sediment microscopically.Protective Clothing: Clothing designed to protect the individual against possible exposure to known hazards.Early Intervention (Education): Procedures and programs that facilitate the development or skill acquisition in infants and young children who have disabilities, who are at risk for developing disabilities, or who are gifted. It includes programs that are designed to prevent handicapping conditions in infants and young children and family-centered programs designed to affect the functioning of infants and children with special needs. (From Journal of Early Intervention, Editorial, 1989, vol. 13, no. 1, p. 3; A Discursive Dictionary of Health Care, prepared for the U.S. House of Representatives Committee on Interstate and Foreign Commerce, 1976)Benzidines: Very toxic industrial chemicals. They are absorbed through the skin, causing lethal blood, bladder, liver, and kidney damage and are potent, broad-spectrum carcinogens in most species.Antipyrine: An analgesic and antipyretic that has been given by mouth and as ear drops. Antipyrine is often used in testing the effects of other drugs or diseases on drug-metabolizing enzymes in the liver. (From Martindale, The Extra Pharmacopoeia, 30th ed, p29)Dipterocarpaceae: A plant family of the order Theales.Patents as Topic: Exclusive legal rights or privileges applied to inventions, plants, etc.PeroxidasesImmunochromatography: A type of affinity chromatography where ANTIBODIES are used in the affinity capture reaction on the solid support, in the mobile phase, or both.Glucose: A primary source of energy for living organisms. It is naturally occurring and is found in fruits and other parts of plants in its free state. It is used therapeutically in fluid and nutrient replacement.Diagnostic Uses of Chemicals: Chemicals administered to patients in order to diagnose or study the pathology of medical conditions, diseases, or syndromes.Hospital Rapid Response Team: Multidisciplinary team most frequently consisting of INTENSIVE CARE UNIT trained personnel who are available 24 hours per day, 7 days per week for evaluation of patients who develop signs or symptoms of severe clinical deterioration.Diabetic Neuropathies: Peripheral, autonomic, and cranial nerve disorders that are associated with DIABETES MELLITUS. These conditions usually result from diabetic microvascular injury involving small blood vessels that supply nerves (VASA NERVORUM). Relatively common conditions which may be associated with diabetic neuropathy include third nerve palsy (see OCULOMOTOR NERVE DISEASES); MONONEUROPATHY; mononeuropathy multiplex; diabetic amyotrophy; a painful POLYNEUROPATHY; autonomic neuropathy; and thoracoabdominal neuropathy. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p1325)Bottle Feeding: Use of nursing bottles for feeding. Applies to humans and animals.Ichthyosis Bullosa of Siemens: An autosomal dominant form of ichthyosis characterized by generalized reddening of the skin (ERYTHEMA) and widespread blistering. The disease shows similar, but somewhat milder, clinical and histopathological findings to those in HYPERKERATOSIS, EPIDERMOLYTIC and is associated with the gene that encodes KERATIN-2A.Blood: The body fluid that circulates in the vascular system (BLOOD VESSELS). Whole blood includes PLASMA and BLOOD CELLS.PrintingComputer Terminals: Input/output devices designed to receive data in an environment associated with the job to be performed, and capable of transmitting entries to, and obtaining output from, the system of which it is a part. (Computer Dictionary, 4th ed.)Urinary Tract Infections: Inflammatory responses of the epithelium of the URINARY TRACT to microbial invasions. They are often bacterial infections with associated BACTERIURIA and PYURIA.Kidney Diseases: Pathological processes of the KIDNEY or its component tissues.KetonesBacteriuria: The presence of bacteria in the urine which is normally bacteria-free. These bacteria are from the URINARY TRACT and are not contaminants of the surrounding tissues. Bacteriuria can be symptomatic or asymptomatic. Significant bacteriuria is an indicator of urinary tract infection.BelgiumUrinary Catheterization: Passage of a CATHETER into the URINARY BLADDER or kidney.Catheter-Related Infections: Infections resulting from the use of catheters. Proper aseptic technique, site of catheter placement, material composition, and virulence of the organism are all factors that can influence possible infection.Urinary Catheters: Catheters inserted into the URINARY BLADDER or kidney for therapeutic or diagnostic purposes.Dry Eye Syndromes: Corneal and conjunctival dryness due to deficient tear production, predominantly in menopausal and post-menopausal women. Filamentary keratitis or erosion of the conjunctival and corneal epithelium may be caused by these disorders. Sensation of the presence of a foreign body in the eye and burning of the eyes may occur.Tears: The fluid secreted by the lacrimal glands. This fluid moistens the CONJUNCTIVA and CORNEA.Eye Diseases: Diseases affecting the eye.Ophthalmic Solutions: Sterile solutions that are intended for instillation into the eye. It does not include solutions for cleaning eyeglasses or CONTACT LENS SOLUTIONS.Keratoconjunctivitis Sicca: Drying and inflammation of the conjunctiva as a result of insufficient lacrimal secretion. When found in association with XEROSTOMIA and polyarthritis, it is called SJOGREN'S SYNDROME.Xerophthalmia: Dryness of the eye surfaces caused by deficiency of tears or conjunctival secretions. It may be associated with vitamin A deficiency, trauma, or any condition in which the eyelids do not close completely.Conjunctiva: The mucous membrane that covers the posterior surface of the eyelids and the anterior pericorneal surface of the eyeball.

Comparison of a parasite lactate dehydrogenase-based immunochromatographic antigen detection assay (OptiMAL) with microscopy for the detection of malaria parasites in human blood samples. (1/410)

Microscopic examination of blood smears remains the gold standard for malaria diagnosis, but is labor-intensive and requires skilled operators. Rapid dipstick technology provides a potential alternative. A study was conducted in The Gambia to compare the performance of OptiMAL, an immunochromatographic antigen detection assay for the diagnosis of malaria using parasite lactate dehydrogenase, against standard microscopy in patients with suspected malaria. For initial diagnosis of Plasmodium falciparum, irrespective of stage, this assay had a sensitivity of 91.3%, a specificity of 92%, a positive predictive value of 87.2%, and a negative predictive value of 94.7%. The sensitivity of the test decreased markedly at parasitemias < 0.01%. This assay can be used for the diagnosis of malaria in areas where microscopy is not available and for urgent malaria diagnosis at night and at weekends, when routine laboratories are closed and when relatively inexperienced microscopists may be on duty.  (+info)

Comparison of five methods of malaria detection in the outpatient setting. (2/410)

In eastern Africa where 90% of the malaria is due to Plasmodium falciparum, the accuracy of malaria diagnosis at the outpatient level is becoming increasingly important due to problems of drug resistance and use of alternative, costly antimalarial drugs. The quantitative buffy coat (QBC) technique, acridine orange staining with an interference filter system, and the ParaSight-F test have been introduced as alternative methods to conventional microscopy for the diagnosis of malaria. Two hundred thirteen outpatients were tested using these alternative methods and conventional microscopy by five experienced technologists; two were randomly allocated to read the results of each test. Paired results showed the highest level of agreement with the ParaSight-F test (99%), followed by Field stain (92%). The results of the QBC technique showed the least agreement (73%). Using conventional microscopy as the reference standard, the ParaSight-F test had a sensitivity range of 90-92% and a specificity of 99%, staining with acridine orange had a sensitivity range of 77-96% and a specificity range of 81-98% and the QBC technique had a sensitivity range of 88-98% and a specificity range of 58-90%. All microscopic tests showed lower sensitivities (as low as 20% using staining with acridine orange) in detecting low parasitemias (< or = 320/microl) than the ParaSight-F test (70%). Due to the high cost of the ParaSight-F test, Field-stained blood films remain the most appropriate method for diagnosis of P. falciparum in eastern Africa. The ParaSight-F test may be used in situations where no trained microscopists are available, or where malaria is strongly suspected and the results of microscopy are negative.  (+info)

Renal assessment practices and the effect of nurse case management of health maintenance organization patients with diabetes. (3/410)

OBJECTIVE: To examine baseline renal screening practices and the effect of nurse case management of patients with diabetes in a group model health maintenance organization (HMO). RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: We performed both 1-year retrospective and 1-year prospective studies of renal assessment practices and ACE inhibitor usage in a cohort of 133 diabetic patients enrolled in a randomized controlled trial of a diabetes nurse case management program in a group model HMO. In accordance with American Diabetes Association recommendations, urine dipstick and quantitative protein and microalbuminuria testing rates were calculated. RESULTS: At baseline, 77% of patients were screened for proteinuria with dipsticks or had quantitative urine testing. Of patients with negative dipstick findings, 30% had appropriate quantitative protein or microalbumin follow-up at baseline. Baseline ACE inhibitor usage was associated with decreased follow-up testing (relative risk = 0.47). Nurse case management was associated with increased quantitative protein or or microalbumin testing and increased follow-up testing (relative risk = 1.65 and 1.60, respectively). CONCLUSIONS: We found a higher degree of adherence to recommendations for renal testing than has been reported previously. Nurse case management intervention further increased renal screening rates. The inverse association between ACE inhibitor usage and microalbumin testing highlights a potentially ambiguous area of current clinical pathways.  (+info)

A comparative evaluation of Etest and broth microdilution methods for fluconazole and itraconazole susceptibility testing of Candida spp. (4/410)

The Etest strip is a promising tool of broad application in clinical microbiology. The method provides MIC readings and is easier to perform than broth microdilution. We carried out a study to compare the MICs of fluconazole and itraconazole obtained by the Etest with those obtained by broth microdilution, performed according to the guidelines of the NCCLS document M27-A, with 402 clinical isolates (360 Candida albicans, 17 Candida tropicalis, nine Candida krusei, nine Candida glabrata and seven Candida parapsilosis) and seven control isolates. The agreement between MICs by the two methods (at +/- 2 dilutions) was 74.5% for fluconazole and 61.4% for itraconazole. These results suggest that further development is necessary to standardize the medium and incubation conditions before introduction of the Etest as a routine method in the clinical microbiology laboratory for fluconazole and itraconazole susceptibility testing.  (+info)

Validity of interpretation criteria for standardized Western blots (immunoblots) for serodiagnosis of Lyme borreliosis based on sera collected throughout Europe. (5/410)

Western blotting (WB; immunoblotting) is a widely used tool for the serodiagnosis of Lyme borreliosis (LB), but so far, no generally accepted criteria for performance and interpretation have been established in Europe. The current study was preceeded by a detailed analysis of WB with whole-cell lysates of three species of Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato (U. Hauser, G. Lehnert, R. Lobentanzer, and B. Wilske, J. Clin. Microbiol. 35:1433-1444, 1997). In that study, interpretation criteria for a positive WB result were developed with the data for 330 serum samples (from patients with LB in different stages [n = 189] and from a control group [n = 141]) originating mostly from southern Germany. In the present work, the interpretation criteria for strains PKo (Borrelia afzelii) and PBi (Borrelia garinii) developed in the previous study were reevaluated with 224 serum samples (from patients with LB in different stages [n = 97] and from a control group [n = 127]) originating from throughout Europe that were provided by the European Union Concerted Action on Lyme Borreliosis (EUCALB). De novo criteria were developed on the basis of the reactivities of the EUCALB sera and were evaluated with the data for the samples from southern Germany. Comparison of all results led to the following recommendations: For WB for immunoglobulin G (IgG), at least two bands among p83/100, p58, p43, p39, p30, OspC, p21, p17, and p14 for PKo and at least one band among p83/100, p39, p30, OspC, p21, and p17b for PBi; for WB for IgM, at least one band among p39, OspC, and p17 or a strong p41 band for PKo and at least one band among p39 and OspC or a strong p41 band for PBi. WB with PKo was the most sensitive, and this strain is recommended for use in WB for the serodiagnosis of LB throughout Europe.  (+info)

Evaluation of the pathotec Rapid I-D system for identification of Enterobacteriaceae. (6/410)

The PathoTec Rapid I-D System for identifying Enterobacteriaceae was evaluated with 471 cultures. In 4,910 individual test comparisons, 95.5% of the results agreed, with results of only two test strips, those for esculin hydrolysis and urease production, agreeing with conventional tests in less than 94% of the trials. The PathoTec system exhibited 94.3% accuracy in identifying these cultures in a double-blind study with conventional media and procedures as the alternate system. Two newly developed test strips, for 0-nitrophenyl-beta-D-galactopyranoside and ornithine decarboxylase, were found to be highly reliable.  (+info)

Evaluation of a rapid and inexpensive dipstick assay for the diagnosis of Plasmodium falciparum malaria. (7/410)

Rapid, accurate and affordable methods are needed for the diagnosis of malaria. Reported here is an evaluation of a new immunochromatographic strip, the PATH Falciparum Malaria IC Strip, which is impregnated with an immobilized IgM monoclonal antibody that binds to the HRP-II antigen of Plasmodium falciparum. In contrast to other commercially available kits marketed for the rapid diagnosis of falciparum malaria, this kit should be affordable in the malaria-endemic world. Using microscopy and polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based methods as reference standards, we compared two versions of the PATH test for the detection of P. falciparum infection in 200 febrile travellers. As determined by PCR and microscopy, 148 travellers had malaria, 50 of whom (33.8%) were infected with P. falciparum. Compared with PCR, the two versions of the PATH test had initial sensitivities of 90% and 88% and specificities of 97% and 96%, respectively, for the detection of falciparum malaria. When discrepant samples were retested blindly with a modified procedure (increased sample volume and longer washing step) the sensitivity and specificity of both kits improved to 96% and 99%, respectively. The two remaining false negatives occurred in samples with < 100 parasites per microliter of blood. The accuracy, simplicity and predicted low cost may make this test a useful diagnostic tool in malaria-endemic areas.  (+info)

Evaluation of the one-minute ultra-rapid urease test for diagnosing Helicobacter pylori. (8/410)

To determine the diagnostic accuracy of the one-minute ultra-rapid urease test for diagnosing Helicobacter pylori infection, two biopsies were taken from both the gastric corpus and antrum from 1000 patients undergoing upper gastrointestinal endoscopy. All the biopsies were subjected to the one-minute ultra-rapid urease test before imprint smears were prepared from them. Thereafter, the biopsies were fixed in 10% formalin and histological sections were examined for the presence of H pylori by a pathologist who was not aware of the clinical details or the results of the urease test. The prevalence of H pylori in the gastric antrum and corpus was 86.7% and 53.3%, respectively. The sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive value and the overall diagnostic accuracy of the ultra-rapid urease test to diagnose H pylori infection in the gastric antrum were 92%, 100%, 100%, 66%, and 93%, respectively. The corresponding figures for the gastric corpus were 83%, 100%, 100%, 85%, and 91%, respectively. It is concluded that the one-minute ultra-rapid urease test has a high sensitivity and specificity and may be used as a rapid and cheap method to diagnose H pylori infection.  (+info)

  • These are plastic like strips that are used in monitoring the glucose levels in the blood. (wordpress.com)
  • There are some special diabetic strips that allow you to apply blood again in the same spot again several times. (wordpress.com)
  • They used to pour a certain chemical reagent on the blood after which it would change color and the corresponding color would be looked against a chart that had the results conclusions. (wordpress.com)
  • Blood glucose strips are accurate according to the international organization standards and this is only if you use them with the right meter that comes with them. (wordpress.com)
  • If you use a strip without the required meter it comes with, then chances are that you will get inaccurate results. (wordpress.com)
  • However there are some other reasons that can make the strip give wrong results for example there can be strip circuit issues for example if the thickness of the metal gauze is not uniform as this can lead to wrong readings too. (wordpress.com)
  • Williams Valutest™ Urinalysis Reagent Strips can be used for general evaluation of health and aid the diagnosis and monitoring of metabolic or systemic diseases that effect kidney function, endocrine disorders and diseases or disorders of the urinary tract. (wms.co.uk)
  • Hold the strip in a horizontal position to prevent possible cross contamination of chemicals located in adjacent reagent pads. (medimpex.us)
  • While removing, touch the side of the strip against the rim of the urine container to remove excess urine and avoid running over (contamination from adjacent reagent pads. (adwdiabetes.com)
  • For pre-testing a sample in an economic and quick way to estimate the formaldehyde concentration and a possible dilution factor prior to using this quantitative method we recommend our semi-quantitative MQuant® test strips for formaldehyde. (sigmaaldrich.com)
  • Vet-UAC Reagent Strips are used for semi-quantitative determination of albumin and creatinine in urine which can be used to detect early onset of kidney malfunction. (sensorhealthvet.com)
  • The Immunostics Detector 2-Parameter UA Strips are for the semi-quantitative and qualitative detection of Glucose and Protein in urine. (obgynsupply.com)
  • There are strips which serve different purposes, such as qualitative strips that only determine if the sample is positive or negative, or there are semi-quantitative ones that in addition to providing a positive or negative reaction also provide an estimation of a quantitative result, in the latter the colour reactions are approximately proportional to the concentration of the substance being tested for in the sample. (wikipedia.org)
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General Assay & Diagnostic Apparatuses, Medical Devices suppliers and manufacturers - Alibaba (alibaba.com)
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Albustix Urinalysis Reagent Strips by Siemens | Medline Industries, Inc.
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NovoPen 5 3.0ml 1 unit (1-60 units) Insulin Pen (Silver) | Diabetes Shop (diabetes.co.uk)
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Urinalysis - Clinical Pathology and Procedures - Merck Veterinary Manual (merckvetmanual.com)
Reagent strip - definition of reagent strip by The Free Dictionary
Reagent strip - definition of reagent strip by The Free Dictionary (thefreedictionary.com)
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Profile:Serology mfg,Urine strip Glucose & Protein,Triglyceride reagent Gujarat,infinity glucose reagent,Liquid Stable Reagents (angstrombiotech.com)
Questionnaires pour le dépistage rapide de la schistosomiase en Afrique subsaharienne / Christian Lengeler, Jürg Utzinger et...
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Test Strips - Diabetic Test Strips - Diabetes Testing Supplies Online from ActiveForever.com
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Anti-T. Gondii IgG Antibody Measurement
Anti-T. Gondii IgG Antibody Measurement (ukessays.com)
Distinct clinical characteristics and helminth co-infections in adult tuberculosis patients from urban compared to rural...
Distinct clinical characteristics and helminth co-infections in adult tuberculosis patients from urban compared to rural... (link.springer.com)
Blood sugar level - Wikipedia
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Tromed - Electrical Nerve Stimulation and Blood Pressure Monitors (medicaldevice-network.com)
Blood Urine - URS-1B - URS-1 rapid test | FDA-CE | 818-591 3030,USA.
Blood Urine - URS-1B - URS-1 rapid test | FDA-CE | 818-591 3030,USA. (rapidtest.com)
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Immobilized Poly(aryleneethynylene) pH-Strips Discriminate Different Brands of Cola.
Immobilized Poly(aryleneethynylene) pH-Strips Discriminate Different Brands of Cola. (bioportfolio.com)
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Urinalysis: how to interpret results | Clinical | Nursing Times
Urinalysis: how to interpret results | Clinical | Nursing Times (nursingtimes.net)
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Diabetes Test Strips, China Diabetes Test Strips Manufacturers & Suppliers - HiSupplier.com (hisupplier.com)
Protein in Urine: MedlinePlus Medical Test
Protein in Urine: MedlinePlus Medical Test (medlineplus.gov)
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Point of Care Diagnostics for Emerging Infectious Disease Threats (Market Analysis and Technical Considerations)
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