Motivation: Those factors which cause an organism to behave or act in either a goal-seeking or satisfying manner. They may be influenced by physiological drives or by external stimuli.Early Intervention (Education): Procedures and programs that facilitate the development or skill acquisition in infants and young children who have disabilities, who are at risk for developing disabilities, or who are gifted. It includes programs that are designed to prevent handicapping conditions in infants and young children and family-centered programs designed to affect the functioning of infants and children with special needs. (From Journal of Early Intervention, Editorial, 1989, vol. 13, no. 1, p. 3; A Discursive Dictionary of Health Care, prepared for the U.S. House of Representatives Committee on Interstate and Foreign Commerce, 1976)Chronology as Topic: The temporal sequence of events that have occurred.Ecological Parameter Monitoring: Ongoing collection, analysis, and interpretation of ecological data that is used to assess changes in the components, processes, and overall condition and functioning of an ECOSYSTEM.Contingent Negative Variation: A negative shift of the cortical electrical potentials that increases over time. It is associated with an anticipated response to an expected stimulus and is an electrical event indicative of a state of readiness or expectancy.Organizational Innovation: Introduction of changes which are new to the organization and are created by management.Transition to Adult Care: Transfer from pediatric to adult care.Psychotherapy, Brief: Any form of psychotherapy designed to produce therapeutic change within a minimal amount of time, generally not more than 20 sessions.Self Efficacy: Cognitive mechanism based on expectations or beliefs about one's ability to perform actions necessary to produce a given effect. It is also a theoretical component of behavior change in various therapeutic treatments. (APA, Thesaurus of Psychological Index Terms, 1994)Psychology, Military: The branch of applied psychology concerned with psychological aspects of selection, assignment, training, morale, etc., of Armed Forces personnel.Social Work Department, Hospital: Hospital department responsible for administering and providing social services to patients and their families.Questionnaires: Predetermined sets of questions used to collect data - clinical data, social status, occupational group, etc. The term is often applied to a self-completed survey instrument.KentuckyHealth Behavior: Behaviors expressed by individuals to protect, maintain or promote their health status. For example, proper diet, and appropriate exercise are activities perceived to influence health status. Life style is closely associated with health behavior and factors influencing life style are socioeconomic, educational, and cultural.Disaster Planning: Procedures outlined for the care of casualties and the maintenance of services in disasters.Smoking Cessation: Discontinuation of the habit of smoking, the inhaling and exhaling of tobacco smoke.Alcoholism: A primary, chronic disease with genetic, psychosocial, and environmental factors influencing its development and manifestations. The disease is often progressive and fatal. It is characterized by impaired control over drinking, preoccupation with the drug alcohol, use of alcohol despite adverse consequences, and distortions in thinking, most notably denial. Each of these symptoms may be continuous or periodic. (Morse & Flavin for the Joint Commission of the National Council on Alcoholism and Drug Dependence and the American Society of Addiction Medicine to Study the Definition and Criteria for the Diagnosis of Alcoholism: in JAMA 1992;268:1012-4)Mass Casualty Incidents: Events that overwhelm the resources of local HOSPITALS and health care providers. They are likely to impose a sustained demand for HEALTH SERVICES rather than the short, intense peak customary with smaller scale disasters.Health Planning Councils: Organized groups serving in advisory capacities related to health planning activities.Health Promotion: Encouraging consumer behaviors most likely to optimize health potentials (physical and psychosocial) through health information, preventive programs, and access to medical care.Counseling: The giving of advice and assistance to individuals with educational or personal problems.Smoke-Free Policy: Prohibition against tobacco smoking in specific areas to control TOBACCO SMOKE POLLUTION.Attitude to Health: Public attitudes toward health, disease, and the medical care system.Patient Acceptance of Health Care: The seeking and acceptance by patients of health service.Child Care: Care of CHILDREN in the home or in an institution.South CarolinaIntention: What a person has in mind to do or bring about.Diffusion of Innovation: The broad dissemination of new ideas, procedures, techniques, materials, and devices and the degree to which these are accepted and used.Competency-Based Education: Educational programs designed to ensure that students attain prespecified levels of competence in a given field or training activity. Emphasis is on achievement or specified objectives.Models, Organizational: Theoretical representations and constructs that describe or explain the structure and hierarchy of relationships and interactions within or between formal organizational entities or informal social groups.Denial (Psychology): Refusal to admit the truth or reality of a situation or experience.Students: Individuals enrolled in a school or formal educational program.Tobacco Use Cessation: Ending the TOBACCO habits of smoking, chewing, or snuff use.Alcohol Drinking: Behaviors associated with the ingesting of alcoholic beverages, including social drinking.Personal Construct Theory: A psychological theory based on dimensions or categories used by a given person in describing or explaining the personality and behavior of others or of himself. The basic idea is that different people will use consistently different categories. The theory was formulated in the fifties by George Kelly. Two tests devised by him are the role construct repertory test and the repertory grid test. (From Stuart Sutherland, The International Dictionary of Psychology, 1989)United StatesCommunity Networks: Organizations and individuals cooperating together toward a common goal at the local or grassroots level.ReadingDirective Counseling: Counseling during which a professional plays an active role in a client's or patient's decision making by offering advice, guidance, and/or recommendations.Program Development: The process of formulating, improving, and expanding educational, managerial, or service-oriented work plans (excluding computer program development).Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice: Knowledge, attitudes, and associated behaviors which pertain to health-related topics such as PATHOLOGIC PROCESSES or diseases, their prevention, and treatment. This term refers to non-health workers and health workers (HEALTH PERSONNEL).Heliotherapy: The treatment of disease by exposing the body to SUNLIGHT, a therapeutic use of SUNBATHING.Psychometrics: Assessment of psychological variables by the application of mathematical procedures.Program Evaluation: Studies designed to assess the efficacy of programs. They may include the evaluation of cost-effectiveness, the extent to which objectives are met, or impact.Rhode IslandPilot Projects: Small-scale tests of methods and procedures to be used on a larger scale if the pilot study demonstrates that these methods and procedures can work.Temperance: Habitual moderation in the indulgence of a natural appetite, especially but not exclusively the consumption of alcohol.Universities: Educational institutions providing facilities for teaching and research and authorized to grant academic degrees.Schools: Educational institutions.Congo: A republic in central Africa lying between GABON and DEMOCRATIC REPUBLIC OF THE CONGO and south of Cameroon. Its capital is Brazzaville.Social Medicine: A branch of medicine concerned with the role of socio-environmental factors in the occurrence, prevention and treatment of disease.Primary Health Care: Care which provides integrated, accessible health care services by clinicians who are accountable for addressing a large majority of personal health care needs, developing a sustained partnership with patients, and practicing in the context of family and community. (JAMA 1995;273(3):192)Military Personnel: Persons including soldiers involved with the armed forces.Interviews as Topic: Conversations with an individual or individuals held in order to obtain information about their background and other personal biographical data, their attitudes and opinions, etc. It includes school admission or job interviews.Cross-Sectional Studies: Studies in which the presence or absence of disease or other health-related variables are determined in each member of the study population or in a representative sample at one particular time. This contrasts with LONGITUDINAL STUDIES which are followed over a period of time.Africa, Central: The geographical area of Africa comprising CAMEROON; CENTRAL AFRICAN REPUBLIC; CHAD; CONGO; EQUATORIAL GUINEA; GABON; and DEMOCRATIC REPUBLIC OF THE CONGO.Patient Compliance: Voluntary cooperation of the patient in following a prescribed regimen.Ventilator Weaning: Techniques for effecting the transition of the respiratory-failure patient from mechanical ventilation to spontaneous ventilation, while meeting the criteria that tidal volume be above a given threshold (greater than 5 ml/kg), respiratory frequency be below a given count (less than 30 breaths/min), and oxygen partial pressure be above a given threshold (PaO2 greater than 50mm Hg). Weaning studies focus on finding methods to monitor and predict the outcome of mechanical ventilator weaning as well as finding ventilatory support techniques which will facilitate successful weaning. Present methods include intermittent mandatory ventilation, intermittent positive pressure ventilation, and mandatory minute volume ventilation.Emotional Intelligence: The ability to understand and manage emotions and to use emotional knowledge to enhance thought and deal effectively with tasks. Components of emotional intelligence include empathy, self-motivation, self-awareness, self-regulation, and social skill. Emotional intelligence is a measurement of one's ability to socialize or relate to others.Attitude of Health Personnel: Attitudes of personnel toward their patients, other professionals, toward the medical care system, etc.Community Health Services: Diagnostic, therapeutic and preventive health services provided for individuals in the community.Public Health Administration: Management of public health organizations or agencies.Consumer Participation: Community or individual involvement in the decision-making process.Alcohol-Related Disorders: Disorders related to or resulting from abuse or mis-use of alcohol.Motivational Interviewing: It is a client-centered, directive method for eliciting intrinsic motivation to change using open-ended questions, reflective listening, and decisional balancing. This nonjudgmental, nonconfrontational interviewing style is designed to minimize a patient's resistance to change by creating an interaction that supports open discussion of risky or problem behavior.Civil Defense: Preventive emergency measures and programs designed to protect the individual or community in times of hostile attack.Group Processes: The procedures through which a group approaches, attacks, and solves a common problem.Harm Reduction: The application of methods designed to reduce the risk of harm associated with certain behaviors without reduction in frequency of those behaviors. The risk-associated behaviors include ongoing and active addictive behaviors.Educational Measurement: The assessing of academic or educational achievement. It includes all aspects of testing and test construction.Education: Acquisition of knowledge as a result of instruction in a formal course of study.Students, Pharmacy: Individuals enrolled in a school of pharmacy or a formal educational program leading to a degree in pharmacy.Substance-Related Disorders: Disorders related to substance abuse.Substance Abuse Treatment Centers: Health facilities providing therapy and/or rehabilitation for substance-dependent individuals. Methadone distribution centers are included.Delivery of Health Care: The concept concerned with all aspects of providing and distributing health services to a patient population.Professional-Patient Relations: Interactions between health personnel and patients.Telemedicine: Delivery of health services via remote telecommunications. This includes interactive consultative and diagnostic services.Health Education: Education that increases the awareness and favorably influences the attitudes and knowledge relating to the improvement of health on a personal or community basis.Achievement: Success in bringing an effort to the desired end; the degree or level of success attained in some specified area (esp. scholastic) or in general.Factor Analysis, Statistical: A set of statistical methods for analyzing the correlations among several variables in order to estimate the number of fundamental dimensions that underlie the observed data and to describe and measure those dimensions. It is used frequently in the development of scoring systems for rating scales and questionnaires.Data Collection: Systematic gathering of data for a particular purpose from various sources, including questionnaires, interviews, observation, existing records, and electronic devices. The process is usually preliminary to statistical analysis of the data.Community-Institutional Relations: The interactions between members of a community and representatives of the institutions within that community.Mass Screening: Organized periodic procedures performed on large groups of people for the purpose of detecting disease.Self Care: Performance of activities or tasks traditionally performed by professional health care providers. The concept includes care of oneself or one's family and friends.Qualitative Research: Any type of research that employs nonnumeric information to explore individual or group characteristics, producing findings not arrived at by statistical procedures or other quantitative means. (Qualitative Inquiry: A Dictionary of Terms Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications, 1997)Curriculum: A course of study offered by an educational institution.Allied Health Personnel: Health care workers specially trained and licensed to assist and support the work of health professionals. Often used synonymously with paramedical personnel, the term generally refers to all health care workers who perform tasks which must otherwise be performed by a physician or other health professional.Health Care Sector: Economic sector concerned with the provision, distribution, and consumption of health care services and related products.Models, Psychological: Theoretical representations that simulate psychological processes and/or social processes. These include the use of mathematical equations, computers, and other electronic equipment.Smoking: Inhaling and exhaling the smoke of burning TOBACCO.Clinical Competence: The capability to perform acceptably those duties directly related to patient care.Patient Advocacy: Promotion and protection of the rights of patients, frequently through a legal process.Terrorism: The use or threatened use of force or violence against persons or property in violation of criminal laws for purposes of intimidation, coercion, or ransom, in support of political or social objectives.Cooperative Behavior: The interaction of two or more persons or organizations directed toward a common goal which is mutually beneficial. An act or instance of working or acting together for a common purpose or benefit, i.e., joint action. (From Random House Dictionary Unabridged, 2d ed)Patient Education as Topic: The teaching or training of patients concerning their own health needs.KansasEducation, Pharmacy: Formal instruction, learning, or training in the preparation, dispensing, and proper utilization of drugs in the field of medicine.Quality Improvement: The attainment or process of attaining a new level of performance or quality.Dentists: Individuals licensed to practice DENTISTRY.Reaction Time: The time from the onset of a stimulus until a response is observed.Models, Theoretical: Theoretical representations that simulate the behavior or activity of systems, processes, or phenomena. They include the use of mathematical equations, computers, and other electronic equipment.Awareness: The act of "taking account" of an object or state of affairs. It does not imply assessment of, nor attention to the qualities or nature of the object.Adaptation, Psychological: A state of harmony between internal needs and external demands and the processes used in achieving this condition. (From APA Thesaurus of Psychological Index Terms, 8th ed)Military Medicine: The practice of medicine as applied to special circumstances associated with military operations.Interview, Psychological: A directed conversation aimed at eliciting information for psychiatric diagnosis, evaluation, treatment planning, etc. The interview may be conducted by a social worker or psychologist.Outpatients: Persons who receive ambulatory care at an outpatient department or clinic without room and board being provided.Reproducibility of Results: The statistical reproducibility of measurements (often in a clinical context), including the testing of instrumentation or techniques to obtain reproducible results. The concept includes reproducibility of physiological measurements, which may be used to develop rules to assess probability or prognosis, or response to a stimulus; reproducibility of occurrence of a condition; and reproducibility of experimental results.Social Behavior: Any behavior caused by or affecting another individual, usually of the same species.Rural Population: The inhabitants of rural areas or of small towns classified as rural.Social Environment: The aggregate of social and cultural institutions, forms, patterns, and processes that influence the life of an individual or community.Regression Analysis: Procedures for finding the mathematical function which best describes the relationship between a dependent variable and one or more independent variables. In linear regression (see LINEAR MODELS) the relationship is constrained to be a straight line and LEAST-SQUARES ANALYSIS is used to determine the best fit. In logistic regression (see LOGISTIC MODELS) the dependent variable is qualitative rather than continuously variable and LIKELIHOOD FUNCTIONS are used to find the best relationship. In multiple regression, the dependent variable is considered to depend on more than a single independent variable.Dental Hygienists: Persons trained in an accredited school or dental college and licensed by the state in which they reside to provide dental prophylaxis under the direction of a licensed dentist.Community-Based Participatory Research: Collaborative process of research involving researchers and community representatives.Child Health Services: Organized services to provide health care for children.Educational Status: Educational attainment or level of education of individuals.Conduct Disorder: A repetitive and persistent pattern of behavior in which the basic rights of others or major age-appropriate societal norms or rules are violated. These behaviors include aggressive conduct that causes or threatens physical harm to other people or animals, nonaggressive conduct that causes property loss or damage, deceitfulness or theft, and serious violations of rules. The onset is before age 18. (From DSM-IV, 1994)Health Policy: Decisions, usually developed by government policymakers, for determining present and future objectives pertaining to the health care system.New South Wales: A state in southeastern Australia. Its capital is Sydney. It was discovered by Captain Cook in 1770 and first settled at Botany Bay by marines and convicts in 1788. It was named by Captain Cook who thought its coastline resembled that of South Wales. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p840 & Room, Brewer's Dictionary of Names, 1992, p377)Marijuana Abuse: The excessive use of marijuana with associated psychological symptoms and impairment in social or occupational functioning.Delivery of Health Care, Integrated: A health care system which combines physicians, hospitals, and other medical services with a health plan to provide the complete spectrum of medical care for its customers. In a fully integrated system, the three key elements - physicians, hospital, and health plan membership - are in balance in terms of matching medical resources with the needs of purchasers and patients. (Coddington et al., Integrated Health Care: Reorganizing the Physician, Hospital and Health Plan Relationship, 1994, p7)Tobacco Use Disorder: Tobacco used to the detriment of a person's health or social functioning. Tobacco dependence is included.Child Development: The continuous sequential physiological and psychological maturing of an individual from birth up to but not including ADOLESCENCE.Treatment Outcome: Evaluation undertaken to assess the results or consequences of management and procedures used in combating disease in order to determine the efficacy, effectiveness, safety, and practicability of these interventions in individual cases or series.Health Personnel: Men and women working in the provision of health services, whether as individual practitioners or employees of health institutions and programs, whether or not professionally trained, and whether or not subject to public regulation. (From A Discursive Dictionary of Health Care, 1976)AlaskaPhysicians: Individuals licensed to practice medicine.Needs Assessment: Systematic identification of a population's needs or the assessment of individuals to determine the proper level of services needed.Longitudinal Studies: Studies in which variables relating to an individual or group of individuals are assessed over a period of time.School Health Services: Preventive health services provided for students. It excludes college or university students.Intervention Studies: Epidemiologic investigations designed to test a hypothesized cause-effect relation by modifying the supposed causal factor(s) in the study population.MinnesotaPoverty: A situation in which the level of living of an individual, family, or group is below the standard of the community. It is often related to a specific income level.Vocabulary: The sum or the stock of words used by a language, a group, or an individual. (From Webster, 3d ed)Social Support: Support systems that provide assistance and encouragement to individuals with physical or emotional disabilities in order that they may better cope. Informal social support is usually provided by friends, relatives, or peers, while formal assistance is provided by churches, groups, etc.Interinstitutional Relations: The interactions between representatives of institutions, agencies, or organizations.Analysis of Variance: A statistical technique that isolates and assesses the contributions of categorical independent variables to variation in the mean of a continuous dependent variable.Psychological Theory: Principles applied to the analysis and explanation of psychological or behavioral phenomena.Health Services Research: The integration of epidemiologic, sociological, economic, and other analytic sciences in the study of health services. Health services research is usually concerned with relationships between need, demand, supply, use, and outcome of health services. The aim of the research is evaluation, particularly in terms of structure, process, output, and outcome. (From Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 2d ed)Patient Participation: Patient involvement in the decision-making process in matters pertaining to health.Health Care Surveys: Statistical measures of utilization and other aspects of the provision of health care services including hospitalization and ambulatory care.Internal-External Control: Personality construct referring to an individual's perception of the locus of events as determined internally by his or her own behavior versus fate, luck, or external forces. (ERIC Thesaurus, 1996).Nurses: Professionals qualified by graduation from an accredited school of nursing and by passage of a national licensing examination to practice nursing. They provide services to patients requiring assistance in recovering or maintaining their physical or mental health.Learning: Relatively permanent change in behavior that is the result of past experience or practice. The concept includes the acquisition of knowledge.Information Systems: Integrated set of files, procedures, and equipment for the storage, manipulation, and retrieval of information.Attitude to Computers: The attitude and behavior associated with an individual using the computer.Motor Activity: The physical activity of a human or an animal as a behavioral phenomenon.Electroencephalography: Recording of electric currents developed in the brain by means of electrodes applied to the scalp, to the surface of the brain, or placed within the substance of the brain.Efficiency, Organizational: The capacity of an organization, institution, or business to produce desired results with a minimum expenditure of energy, time, money, personnel, materiel, etc.Evidence-Based Practice: A way of providing health care that is guided by a thoughtful integration of the best available scientific knowledge with clinical expertise. This approach allows the practitioner to critically assess research data, clinical guidelines, and other information resources in order to correctly identify the clinical problem, apply the most high-quality intervention, and re-evaluate the outcome for future improvement.Cognitive Therapy: A direct form of psychotherapy based on the interpretation of situations (cognitive structure of experiences) that determine how an individual feels and behaves. It is based on the premise that cognition, the process of acquiring knowledge and forming beliefs, is a primary determinant of mood and behavior. The therapy uses behavioral and verbal techniques to identify and correct negative thinking that is at the root of the aberrant behavior.Life Style: Typical way of life or manner of living characteristic of an individual or group. (From APA, Thesaurus of Psychological Index Terms, 8th ed)Child Welfare: Organized efforts by communities or organizations to improve the health and well-being of the child.Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Follow-Up Studies: Studies in which individuals or populations are followed to assess the outcome of exposures, procedures, or effects of a characteristic, e.g., occurrence of disease.Learning Disorders: Conditions characterized by a significant discrepancy between an individual's perceived level of intellect and their ability to acquire new language and other cognitive skills. These disorders may result from organic or psychological conditions. Relatively common subtypes include DYSLEXIA, DYSCALCULIA, and DYSGRAPHIA.Marijuana Smoking: Inhaling and exhaling the smoke from CANNABIS.Leadership: The function of directing or controlling the actions or attitudes of an individual or group with more or less willing acquiescence of the followers.Behavior, Addictive: The observable, measurable, and often pathological activity of an organism that portrays its inability to overcome a habit resulting in an insatiable craving for a substance or for performing certain acts. The addictive behavior includes the emotional and physical overdependence on the object of habit in increasing amount or frequency.Case Management: A traditional term for all the activities which a physician or other health care professional normally performs to insure the coordination of the medical services required by a patient. It also, when used in connection with managed care, covers all the activities of evaluating the patient, planning treatment, referral, and follow-up so that care is continuous and comprehensive and payment for the care is obtained. (From Slee & Slee, Health Care Terms, 2nd ed)Social Adjustment: Adaptation of the person to the social environment. Adjustment may take place by adapting the self to the environment or by changing the environment. (From Campbell, Psychiatric Dictionary, 1996)Los AngelesParents: Persons functioning as natural, adoptive, or substitute parents. The heading includes the concept of parenthood as well as preparation for becoming a parent.Decision Making: The process of making a selective intellectual judgment when presented with several complex alternatives consisting of several variables, and usually defining a course of action or an idea.Focus Groups: A method of data collection and a QUALITATIVE RESEARCH tool in which a small group of individuals are brought together and allowed to interact in a discussion of their opinions about topics, issues, or questions.Attention: Focusing on certain aspects of current experience to the exclusion of others. It is the act of heeding or taking notice or concentrating.Pediatrics: A medical specialty concerned with maintaining health and providing medical care to children from birth to adolescence.Least-Squares Analysis: A principle of estimation in which the estimates of a set of parameters in a statistical model are those quantities minimizing the sum of squared differences between the observed values of a dependent variable and the values predicted by the model.African Americans: Persons living in the United States having origins in any of the black groups of Africa.Evidence-Based Medicine: An approach of practicing medicine with the goal to improve and evaluate patient care. It requires the judicious integration of best research evidence with the patient's values to make decisions about medical care. This method is to help physicians make proper diagnosis, devise best testing plan, choose best treatment and methods of disease prevention, as well as develop guidelines for large groups of patients with the same disease. (from JAMA 296 (9), 2006)Behavior Therapy: The application of modern theories of learning and conditioning in the treatment of behavior disorders.Socioeconomic Factors: Social and economic factors that characterize the individual or group within the social structure.Risk Reduction Behavior: Reduction of high-risk choices and adoption of low-risk quantity and frequency alternatives.GermanyTranslational Medical Research: The application of discoveries generated by laboratory research and preclinical studies to the development of clinical trials and studies in humans. A second area of translational research concerns enhancing the adoption of best practices.Language: A verbal or nonverbal means of communicating ideas or feelings.Mothers: Female parents, human or animal.Rural Health Services: Health services, public or private, in rural areas. The services include the promotion of health and the delivery of health care.Patient-Centered Care: Design of patient care wherein institutional resources and personnel are organized around patients rather than around specialized departments. (From Hospitals 1993 Feb 5;67(3):14)Psychomotor Performance: The coordination of a sensory or ideational (cognitive) process and a motor activity.Physician-Patient Relations: The interactions between physician and patient.Forecasting: The prediction or projection of the nature of future problems or existing conditions based upon the extrapolation or interpretation of existing scientific data or by the application of scientific methodology.Delivery, Obstetric: Delivery of the FETUS and PLACENTA under the care of an obstetrician or a health worker. Obstetric deliveries may involve physical, psychological, medical, or surgical interventions.Preventive Health Services: Services designed for HEALTH PROMOTION and prevention of disease.Education, Medical, Continuing: Educational programs designed to inform physicians of recent advances in their field.Exercise: Physical activity which is usually regular and done with the intention of improving or maintaining PHYSICAL FITNESS or HEALTH. Contrast with PHYSICAL EXERTION which is concerned largely with the physiologic and metabolic response to energy expenditure.Public Health: Branch of medicine concerned with the prevention and control of disease and disability, and the promotion of physical and mental health of the population on the international, national, state, or municipal level.Risk Factors: An aspect of personal behavior or lifestyle, environmental exposure, or inborn or inherited characteristic, which, on the basis of epidemiologic evidence, is known to be associated with a health-related condition considered important to prevent.Depressive Disorder: An affective disorder manifested by either a dysphoric mood or loss of interest or pleasure in usual activities. The mood disturbance is prominent and relatively persistent.Practice Guidelines as Topic: Directions or principles presenting current or future rules of policy for assisting health care practitioners in patient care decisions regarding diagnosis, therapy, or related clinical circumstances. The guidelines may be developed by government agencies at any level, institutions, professional societies, governing boards, or by the convening of expert panels. The guidelines form a basis for the evaluation of all aspects of health care and delivery.CaliforniaNerve Block: Interruption of NEURAL CONDUCTION in peripheral nerves or nerve trunks by the injection of a local anesthetic agent (e.g., LIDOCAINE; PHENOL; BOTULINUM TOXINS) to manage or treat pain.Ambulatory Care: Health care services provided to patients on an ambulatory basis, rather than by admission to a hospital or other health care facility. The services may be a part of a hospital, augmenting its inpatient services, or may be provided at a free-standing facility.Infant, Newborn: An infant during the first month after birth.Decision Support Techniques: Mathematical or statistical procedures used as aids in making a decision. They are frequently used in medical decision-making.Patient Care Team: Care of patients by a multidisciplinary team usually organized under the leadership of a physician; each member of the team has specific responsibilities and the whole team contributes to the care of the patient.Evoked Potentials: Electrical responses recorded from nerve, muscle, SENSORY RECEPTOR, or area of the CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM following stimulation. They range from less than a microvolt to several microvolts. The evoked potential can be auditory (EVOKED POTENTIALS, AUDITORY), somatosensory (EVOKED POTENTIALS, SOMATOSENSORY), visual (EVOKED POTENTIALS, VISUAL), or motor (EVOKED POTENTIALS, MOTOR), or other modalities that have been reported.Substance Abuse Detection: Detection of drugs that have been abused, overused, or misused, including legal and illegal drugs. Urine screening is the usual method of detection.Prospective Studies: Observation of a population for a sufficient number of persons over a sufficient number of years to generate incidence or mortality rates subsequent to the selection of the study group.Child Behavior Disorders: Disturbances considered to be pathological based on age and stage appropriateness, e.g., conduct disturbances and anaclitic depression. This concept does not include psychoneuroses, psychoses, or personality disorders with fixed patterns.Peer Group: Group composed of associates of same species, approximately the same age, and usually of similar rank or social status.Emergency Service, Hospital: Hospital department responsible for the administration and provision of immediate medical or surgical care to the emergency patient.Health Services Needs and Demand: Health services required by a population or community as well as the health services that the population or community is able and willing to pay for.
Operational Readiness Division[edit]. In October 1945, Rear Admiral Jerauld Wright joined the Office of the Chief of Naval ... For Admiral Jerauld Wright, the best method to evaluate fleet readiness for the U.S. Atlantic Fleet was the staging and ... Wright was involved in the evolution of the military structure of NATO as well as overseeing the modernization and readiness of ... Operations (OPNAV) as the head of its Operational Readiness Division, helping to organize this newly created organization. ...
U.S. Army Reserve Readiness Training Center[edit]. The 83rd United States Army Reserve Readiness Training Center trains ...
Puerto Rico National Guard Readiness Center[edit]. A $33.5 million Readiness Center for the Puerto Rico National Guard at Fort ... This National Guard Readiness Center at Fort Buchanan includes a Metal Storage Building/Maintenance Training Bay, Simulation ... The Puerto Rico National Guard will posthumously name this Readiness Center at Fort Buchanan after Korean War Veteran and ... On October 1, 2008 the Commanding General of the 81st Regional Readiness Command became Fort Buchanan's Senior Mission ...
Weaning Readiness[edit]. A RSBI score of less than 65[3] indicating a relatively low respiratory rate compared to tidal volume ... Patients should be assessed daily for their readiness to be weaned from mechanical ventilation by withdrawing sedation and ... is generally considered as an indication of weaning readiness. A patient with a rapid shallow breathing index (RSBI) of less ...
ANG Weather Readiness. *I.G. Brown Air National Guard Training and Education ...
Readiness; and Policy. All of these positions are Presidential appointments which require U.S. Senate confirmation. Other ... Under Secretary of Defense for Personnel and Readiness (P&R) Assistant Secretary of Defense for Health Affairs (HA) Assistant ... Assistant Secretary of Defense for Logistics and Materiel Readiness (L&MR) Assistant Secretary of Defense for Nuclear, Chemical ...
ANG Weather Readiness. *I.G. Brown Air National Guard Training and Education ...
... a web page devoted to readiness for kids, complete with cartoon-style superheroes,[49] and ran a Thunderclap Campaign in 2014.[ ...
Operations readiness. Titles and ranks[edit]. *Official receiver, a statutory office holder in England and Wales ...
... carried on their Service's AC Retired List in a reduced state of readiness. It is generally easier to recall a retired AC ...
Personnel and Readiness: Vacant. Intelligence: Joseph D. Kernan. Vice Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff. Gen Paul J. Selva ... Commander, United States Readiness Command, 1973 to 1974. Retired in 1974. 26.. GEN Creighton W. Abrams. 12 October 1972. 4 ...
Bruner, J.S. (1957). "On perceptual readiness". Psychological Review. 64: 123-152. doi:10.1037/h0043805. PMID 13420288. Bruner ...
e-Government Readiness Index 0.3551 7000100000000000000♠1 (top 17%) 7000300000000000000♠3 (top 38%) 7001140000000000000♠14 (top ... Networked Readiness Index 3.8 7000100000000000000♠1 (top 17%) 7000300000000000000♠3 (top 38%) 7000700000000000000♠7 (top 13%) ...
Personnel and Readiness: Matthew Donovan (acting). Intelligence: Joseph D. Kernan. Vice Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff. ...
Sales readiness software. *Survey management. *Encyclopedia software. Enterprise infrastructure software[edit]. *Business ...
Technology readiness level. Expendable rocket[5]. 1903[6]. 7002700000000000000♠700 - 7005130000000000000♠130,000. ...
Combat Readiness Medal. Air Force Good Conduct Medal. Air Force Longevity Service Award. ...
... and in 2003 it became the 89th Regional Readiness Command. In its 2005 BRAC recommendations, United States Department of ... and streamline the command and control structure of the Army Reserves that would create the Northwest Regional Readiness ... Defense recommended realigning the Wichita US Army Reserve Center by disestablishing the 89th Regional Readiness Command. This ...
Joint Multinational Readiness Center, Hohenfels. *Joint Multinational Readiness Center. *7th Army Noncommisioned Officers ...
Alternative names for such groups include Computer Emergency Readiness Team and Computer Security Incident Response Team (CSIRT ...
"Naval Readiness Exercise Announced". Release # 101124-2. United States Forces Korea (USFK). 24 November 2010. Archived from the ...
WEF Networked Readiness Index 2007-2008, ranked 57 out of 127 countries[11] ... Economist Intelligence Unit: e-readiness 2008 ranked 56 out of 70 countries[1] ... Economist Intelligence Unit: E-readiness 2008, ranked 56 out of 70 countries ...
Michael Luis Dominguez retired as the Principal Deputy Under Secretary of Defense for Personnel and Readiness within the United ... Dominguez reports to the Under Secretary of Defense for Personnel and Readiness, and is responsible for "providing staff advice ... readiness; reserve component affairs; health affairs; training; and personnel policy and management, including equal ... Michael Luis Dominguez Principal Deputy Under Secretary of Defense for Personnel and Readiness Michael L. Dominguez DefenseLink ...
Alpena Combat Readiness Training Center. *Alternate Processing and Correlation Center. *Arnold Engineering Development Complex ...
... improved training and readiness, as well as the establishment of the Canadian Special Operations Regiment. More funds were also ...
Norwalk School Readiness programs are accredited by the National Association for the Education of Young Children (NAEYC) ... School Readiness is a state-funded initiative administered by the Office of Early Childhood ... Norwalk School Readiness programs promote parental involvement in their childs development and education ... All preschool programs who receive School Readiness funded are monitored by the Norwalk Early Childhood Council. ...
2015). The Bracken School Readiness Assessment (BSRA): The BSRA is a widely used kindergarten readiness test that measures a ... The Diagnostic Screening Test of School Readiness - Revised The Diagnostic Screening Test of School Readiness is commonly known ... Lack of school readiness has been linked with later school dropout. However, longitudinal studies in Quebec suggest that social ... When assessing childrens readiness for kindergarten, much of the discussion is focused on the emergence of basic academic ...
Centers for Preparedness and Response
Centers for Preparedness and Response
1. The risk of injury from the Activities or use of any training or other equipment provided by Clarke or by or at any location or facility at which Clarke conducts its training ("Facility") is significant, including falls which can result in serious injury or death; injury or death due to negligence on the part of myself, my training partner, or other people around me. I am aware that any of these above mentioned risks may result in serious injury or death to myself and or my partner(s). I willingly assume full responsibility for the risks that I am exposing myself to and accept full responsibility for any injury or death that may result from participation in any of the Activities. I acknowledge that I have no physical impairments or illnesses that will endanger me or others ...
Documents Summary of FY15 School Readiness Expansion [PDF]New School Readiness Liaison Orientation [PPT]School Readiness Co- ... Chair Orientation [PDF] RFP RFP Description Due Date School Readiness Grant RFP number: 053/054 Provide quality preschool ... Overview of the School Readiness Program [PDF] General Policy (GP) ... access to children in School Readiness Communities Contact: Andrea Brinnel, Program Manager Phone Number: 860-500-4426 Agency: ...
School Readiness. Full-Day Kindergarten: An Advocacy Guide (2007). NEA believes that full-day kindergarten is a critical ...
Emergency Readiness. Featured. Because natural and manmade disasters can occur at any time, individuals, communities, and ...
The Bracken School Readiness Assessment ("BSRA") is an individual concept knowledge test designed for children, pre-K through ... Retrieved from "https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Bracken_School_Readiness_Assessment&oldid=818781800" ...
Were the contents of the kit useful in promoting kindergarten readiness skills with your child? (1=not useful; 3 = somewhat ... How often do you and your child use the Kindergarten readiness kit? * ...
Published in Print: October 6, 2004, as Kindergarten Readiness Back to Top ...
To learn more about our work in this area, visit Job Readiness and 21st Century Skills Initiative or check out this selection ... For a more comprehensive list of ETS publications, visit Workforce Readiness and 21st Century Skills Initiative. ... ETS has initiated numerous research projects and activities targeting workforce and workforce readiness issues, collaborating ...
Das Drupal 8 Readiness-Programm von Acquia bietet Ihnen Unterstützung von erfahrenen Drupal Consultants, um Ihnen zu vermitteln ... An wen richtet sich der Drupal 8 Readiness Workshop? Neue oder erfahrene Drupal-Teams, die vor oder kurz nach der ... Acquia Drupal 8 Readiness Workshops werden in der Regel über ein bis zwei Wochen durchgeführt, je nach Kundenwunsch und ... Warum brauche ich einen Drupal 8 Readiness Workshop? Drupal 8 ist neu und anders. Mit einem Acquia Drupal Support Consultant ...
Cloud Readiness: Whats New. Review readiness material to learn whats new in your apps cloud service and plan for quarterly ... Readiness material also includes update highlight videos, interactive training, documentation, and product forums to ensure ...
Information on this page relates to prekindergarten and school readiness highlight the following distinct categories: ... Adds school readiness development to the requirements for programs receiving state child care funds.. ... This page is dedicated to understanding the importance of school readiness as it affects long-term achievement by highlighting ... Provides benchmarks for the first steps school readiness assessment and imposes certain requirements for reporting and use of ...
Ericsson showcases 5G readiness in China with Intel. Sep 26, 2017 08:30 (GMT+0:00) ...
... The Institute of International Educations Higher Education Readiness program (HER) ...
Obtaining the right balance between space, power and cooling in the data center is typically the largest challenge facing owner/operators of mission critical facilities. From the placement of compute, network and storage hardware, to the management of return air or inlet air, and the use of supporting critical infrastructure such as air-handlers, these and many more factors can impact airflow in the data center. Simulation techniques offer the only scientific method for effectively providing answers.
"That to me is knowledge readiness," he said. "Its available to you in a [learning management system] that can provide that ... As a result, the idea of knowledge readiness becomes crucial for the organization to measure what people know and what they ... The concept, known as knowledge readiness, allows agency officials to have a complete snapshot of the workforce and rapidly ... The broader human capital management depends on having the ability to do these types of knowledge readiness capabilities." ...
The readiness assessment also questions the preparation of the people in the organization, asking whether they are adaptable to ... Readiness Assessment: You Know Youre Ready When… (Go-Live: Smart Strategies from Davies Award-Winning EHR Implementations). ... One of the first steps in undertaking a health IT implementation is the assessment of the readiness of the organization for ... Readiness assessment addresses the organizational, structural, and human factors in an IT implementation. It questions whether ...
Researchers assessed school readiness in almost 23,000 children in Western Australia by looking at motor skills and physical ... To explore the impact of illness on school readiness, Bell and colleagues examined government health data on children born in ...
Phrases that include readiness: immediate operational readiness, materiel readiness, state of readiness, state of readiness ... readiness: Vocabulary.com [home, info] *readiness: Macmillan Dictionary [home, info] *Readiness, readiness: Wordnik [home, info ... readiness: Merriam-Webster.com [home, info] *readiness, readiness: Oxford Dictionaries [home, info] *readiness: Collins English ... Readiness, readiness: Dictionary.com [home, info] *readiness: UltraLingua English Dictionary [home, info] *readiness: Cambridge ...
College and Career Readiness. "Investing in the Health and Well-Being of Young Adults". ... Published in Print: November 5, 2014, as College and Career Readiness Related Stories ... Beyond ESSA Compliance: Taking college and career readiness to the next level (https://fs24.formsite.com/edweek/dbd6diuz6k/fill ...
Disaster relief at home and abroad, CPR certification and first aid courses, blood donation, and emergency preparedness. Support the American Red Cross today.
The ACT Readiness Benchmarks for ACT Aspire are linked to the ACT College Readiness Benchmarks. Students at or above the ... The ACT College Readiness Benchmarks are scores that represent the level of achievement required for students to have a 50% ... benchmark are on target to meet the corresponding ACT College Readiness Benchmark in grade 11. ...
  • Wisconsin is one of 25 states in the country that doesn't meet a majority of the criteria indicating emergency readiness, according to a report by Trust for America's Health. (wpr.org)
  • Cite this: Pediatric Death Higher in EDs With Lower Pediatric Readiness - Medscape - Aug 23, 2019. (medscape.com)
  • Gen. Raymond Odierno, Army chief of staff, in the same Senate Armed Services Committee hearing, expressed particular concern that force reductions have greatly affected its readiness capability between 2014-2017. (wnd.com)
  • The office is responsible for deployment medicine, force health protection, medical readiness, international health agreements, deployment related health policy, theater information systems, humanitarian and health missions, and national disaster support. (health.mil)
  • The concept of the SCMH is to address medical readiness issues for brigades by consolidating battalion aid station resources and combining them with some hospital clinic capabilities. (dvidshub.net)
  • Use these questions to assess your readiness to lose weight. (mayoclinic.org)
  • In an accompanying editorial , Katherine E. Remick, MD, from Dell Children's Medical Center of Central Texas, Austin, notes that a system-based collaborative approach to assess the effect of pediatric readiness on quality of emergency care delivery or health outcomes is lacking in EDs. (medscape.com)
  • Without the proper standards and the right metrics for tracking how units can meet those standards, senior management will be unable to identify and assess shortfalls in readiness throughout the force. (rand.org)
  • Readiness material also includes update highlight videos, interactive training, documentation, and product forums to ensure your successful implementation and use of Oracle Cloud. (oracle.com)
  • One of the first steps in undertaking a health IT implementation is the assessment of the readiness of the organization for that implementation. (himss.org)
  • Readiness assessment addresses the organizational, structural, and human factors in an IT implementation. (himss.org)
  • As detailed in previous work, the most common reasons for low readiness scores are lack of implementation of ED policies dedicated to children, lack of quality improvement efforts, and absence of a dedicated pediatric emergency care coordinator, all of which are plausibly related to patient outcomes," write Ames and colleagues. (medscape.com)
  • November 27, 2007 - Trillium Software announced the availability of its MDM Readiness Kit to assist enterprises with the design and implementation of their data quality and data governance resources for master data management (MDM) initiatives. (information-management.com)
  • As a result, the idea of knowledge readiness becomes crucial for the organization to measure what people know and what they need to know, she said. (fcw.com)
  • The readiness assessment also questions the preparation of the people in the organization, asking whether they are adaptable to change or understanding how computer literate are they may be. (himss.org)
  • The ACT K-12 Champion is an individual who has created or led a program that positively impacts their organization and community through improved readiness for college and career opportunities. (act.org)
  • The Institute of International Education's Higher Education Readiness program (HER) provides young women in secondary school from underserved communities with a pathway to university. (iie.org)
  • Health Systems Management Network, Inc (HSMN) has announced a new program for physician practices called they Physician Practice Management Reimbursement Readiness Program. (prweb.com)
  • The Employment Readiness Program (ERP) provides services to military Spouses, active duty Military, active Reserve and National Guard, Wounded Warriors, Retirees, DoD Civilians, and all Family Members. (myarmyonesource.com)
  • This document reopens the comment period for the proposed regulations for the Gaining Early Awareness and Readiness for Undergraduate Programs (GEAR UP) program. (federalregister.gov)
  • If you are not currently engaged with Cardinal Health 3PL as a component of your DSCSA readiness program, we encourage you to contact your Client Relationship Manager to identify which Cardinal Health 3PL services may be of value to you. (cardinalhealth.com)
  • To better enable middle and high schools to increase college participation and success rates among their students, the University of Minnesota developed Ramp-Up to Readiness™, a schoolwide advisory program to increase students' likelihood of college enrollment and completion. (air.org)
  • In this section, discussion of readiness assessment along with tools, guidelines and examples are offered. (himss.org)
  • Examples of these excepted activities are operation of dining facilities, physical training and child care activities required to support readiness. (army.mil)
  • ETS has initiated numerous research projects and activities targeting workforce and workforce readiness issues, collaborating with the business community, educational institutions and nonprofit organizations. (ets.org)
  • The concept, known as knowledge readiness, allows agency officials to have a complete snapshot of the workforce and rapidly deploy people or training, depending on the situation. (fcw.com)
  • The Automation Readiness Index looks at 25 advanced economies to determine which is making the greatest strides in preparing their workforce for an automated future. (thenextweb.com)
  • To learn more about our work in this area, visit Job Readiness and 21st Century Skills Initiative or check out this selection of recent ETS-authored or co-authored publications. (ets.org)
  • way to deploy people based on their skills," said Paul Sparta, chief executive officer of Plateau Systems Ltd., which develops learning management systems for knowledge readiness. (fcw.com)
  • Featuring a variety of precalculus questions, the Calculus Readiness Assessment collection is a convenient way for students to test pre-existing knowledge and brush up on precalculus skills. (webassign.net)
  • There are also concerns that if done poorly, efforts to encourage younger kids to gather work-related skills could exacerbate, rather than ease, racial and socioeconomic inequities and turn schools into vehicles for job readiness instead of runways to a college education, which remains the best pathway to higher pay and a better lifestyle . (kqed.org)
  • The data from the two phases of the research informed the creation of the Future of Work Index, which measures the progress of organisations across four critical categories of future-readiness: technology, skills and behaviours, leadership, and new ways of working. (brighttalk.com)
  • For the purposes of this report, technology/end-user application readiness means that methods to mitigate any negative impacts on engines and equipment related to renewable diesel use in Canada are identified. (gc.ca)
  • An assessment to confirm technology/end-user application readiness includes identified potential negative impacts, the end-users and locations where these impacts occur and the magnitude or severity of these impacts. (gc.ca)
  • Unser Drupal 8 Readiness Workshop stellt fest, wo Sie sich befinden und wie Sie sich vorbereiten können. (acquia.com)
  • An wen richtet sich der Drupal 8 Readiness Workshop? (acquia.com)
  • Warum brauche ich einen Drupal 8 Readiness Workshop? (acquia.com)
  • The latest Internet Readiness Index figures suggest that Maharashtra, Delhi and the union territory of Chandigarh have the highest index figures, while Bihar, Arunachal Pradesh, and Daman and Diu are yet to even open their account. (livemint.com)
  • e-Government ICT Development Index Information and Communication Technologies for Development What is e-readiness, IGI Global e-readiness, Association for Progressive Communications A framework for measuring national e-readiness (PDF), Orfalea College of Business Dada, Danish. (wikipedia.org)
  • Exploring the use of the abbreviated Technology Readiness Index for hotel customer segmentation. (psu.edu)
  • However, with the emergence of self-service technologies and with technology-based components added to the list of hotels ' service offerings, the authors propose using the abbreviated Technology Readiness Index (TRI) to improve the effectiveness of customer profiling, not only for technology use but also more generally for market segmentation. (psu.edu)
  • The ACT College Readiness Benchmarks are scores that represent the level of achievement required for students to have a 50% chance of obtaining a B or higher or about a 75% chance of obtaining a C or higher in corresponding credit-bearing courses. (act.org)
  • Ensure your students are prepared for the rigors of calculus from the very first day of the course with our Calculus Readiness Assessment collection. (webassign.net)
  • The government shutdown will affect quality of life and some readiness programs, according to officials. (army.mil)
  • Review readiness material to learn what's new in your apps cloud service and plan for quarterly updates. (oracle.com)
  • WASHINGTON - As if to dramatically illustrate repeated claims top generals have made to WND of a purge of senior officers and a degradation of military readiness under President Obama's leadership, stunning testimony at a recent Senate committee hearing shows America may soon be unable to fight and win a war. (wnd.com)
  • Specifically, the Distance Education Aptitude and Readiness Scale was administered in both hybrid and face-to-face sections of beginning post-secondary French across a two-year span. (westga.edu)
  • Following a discussion of the characteristics commonly ascribed to successful online learners, as well as a review of a sample of the publicly available readiness surveys, an application of one representative tool in both hybrid and face-to-face sections of beginning post-secondary French is described. (westga.edu)
  • This sample Workplace Readiness Action Plan does not include industry specific guidance. (buildings.com)
  • Washington - The Federal COVID-19 Healthcare Resilience Working Group has launched the Rural Healthcare Surge Readiness web portal , a new online tool offering resources and information for health care providers, including dentists, in rural communities. (ada.org)
  • The Deputy Assistant Secretary of Defense (DASD) for Health Readiness Policy and Oversight is the principal staff assistant and advisor to the Assistant Secretary of Defense (Health Affairs) for all medically related Department of Defense policies, programs, and activities. (health.mil)
  • If we can introduce better tracking earlier in life, we can leverage better analytics to deliver individualized, insight-driven care that can interrupt that cycle, strengthening our nation's readiness and the general health of the American people. (accenture.com)
  • Scientists from the National Cancer Institute (NCI), part of the National Institutes of Health, together with collaborators from outside academic centers, have developed a checklist of criteria to evaluate the readiness of complex molecular tests that will guide decisions made during clinical trials. (cancer.gov)
  • Primarily, our findings suggest that patient outcomes may be improved by increasing the readiness of hospitals to care for pediatric emergencies," write Stefanie G. Ames, MD, from the David Geffen School of Medicine at the University of California, Los Angeles, and colleagues. (medscape.com)
  • In their analysis, Ames and colleagues grouped the hospitals by quartiles of pediatric readiness. (medscape.com)
  • The common factors that are taken into consideration for measuring e-readiness of a country are: Information and communications technology (ICT) infrastructure Degree of preparedness of a country's government, citizens, businesses and NGOs to use ICT for sustainable development. (wikipedia.org)
  • You are invited to visit our booth to find out more about how we are helping our military leverage technology and increase wellness and improve readiness. (accenture.com)
  • The end-user is the last link in the renewable diesel supply chain and technology/end-user application readiness looks at their ability to use a renewable diesel blended fuel in their conventional diesel operations. (gc.ca)
  • Following a discussion of the characteristics often attributed to successful online learners, as well as a review of a sample of the publicly available online readiness surveys, an application of one representative tool is described. (westga.edu)
  • Mail survey that included questions on readiness to change, eating habits and perceived benefits and barriers to the consumption of a plant-based diet. (nature.com)