Inorganic or organic compounds derived from phosphine (PH3) by the replacement of H atoms. (From Grant & Hackh's Chemical Dictionary, 5th ed)
The application of smoke, vapor, or gas for the purpose of disinfecting or destroying pests or microorganisms.
Organic compounds that contain GOLD as an integral part of the molecule. Some are used as ANTIRHEUMATIC AGENTS. The term chrysotherapy derives from an ancient Greek term for gold.
A chemical element having an atomic weight of 106.4, atomic number of 46, and the symbol Pd. It is a white, ductile metal resembling platinum, and following it in abundance and importance of applications. It is used in dentistry in the form of gold, silver, and copper alloys.
Acyclic branched or unbranched hydrocarbons having two carbon-carbon double bonds.
Inorganic compounds that contain fluorine as an integral part of the molecule.
A genus of small beetles of the family Tenebrionidae; T. confusum is the "confused flour beetle".
Neutral or negatively charged ligands bonded to metal cations or neutral atoms. The number of ligand atoms to which the metal center is directly bonded is the metal cation's coordination number, and this number is always greater than the regular valence or oxidation number of the metal. A coordination complex can be negative, neutral, or positively charged.
The collective name for the boron hydrides, which are analogous to the alkanes and silanes. Numerous boranes are known. Some have high calorific values and are used in high-energy fuels. (From Grant & Hackh's Chemical Dictionary, 5th ed)
The location of the atoms, groups or ions relative to one another in a molecule, as well as the number, type and location of covalent bonds.
The development by insects of resistance to insecticides.
A group of thermoplastic or thermosetting polymers containing polyisocyanate. They are used as ELASTOMERS, as coatings, as fibers and as foams.
Skin irritant and allergen used in the manufacture of polyurethane foams and other elastomers.
Compounds formed by the joining of smaller, usually repeating, units linked by covalent bonds. These compounds often form large macromolecules (e.g., BIOPOLYMERS; PLASTICS).
Polyhydric alcohols having no more than one hydroxy group attached to each carbon atom. They are formed by the reduction of the carbonyl group of a sugar to a hydroxyl group.(From Dorland, 28th ed)
A polyhydric alcohol with about half the sweetness of sucrose. Sorbitol occurs naturally and is also produced synthetically from glucose. It was formerly used as a diuretic and may still be used as a laxative and in irrigating solutions for some surgical procedures. It is also used in many manufacturing processes, as a pharmaceutical aid, and in several research applications.
A naturally occurring product of plants obtained following reduction of GALACTOSE. It appears as a white crystalline powder with a slight sweet taste. It may form in excess in the lens of the eye in GALACTOSEMIAS, a deficiency of GALACTOKINASE.
Organic compounds that contain phosphorus as an integral part of the molecule. Included under this heading is broad array of synthetic compounds that are used as PESTICIDES and DRUGS.
Poisoning due to exposure to ORGANOPHOSPHORUS COMPOUNDS, such as ORGANOPHOSPHATES; ORGANOTHIOPHOSPHATES; and ORGANOTHIOPHOSPHONATES.
An organophosphorus ester compound that produces potent and irreversible inhibition of cholinesterase. It is toxic to the nervous system and is a chemical warfare agent.
Compounds containing carbon-phosphorus bonds in which the phosphorus component is also bonded to one or more sulfur atoms. Many of these compounds function as CHOLINERGIC AGENTS and as INSECTICIDES.
A highly toxic cholinesterase inhibitor that is used as an acaricide and as an insecticide.
A wide spectrum aliphatic organophosphate insecticide widely used for both domestic and commercial agricultural purposes.
Inorganic compounds that contain nitrogen as an integral part of the molecule.
Unsaturated hydrocarbons of the type Cn-H2n, indicated by the suffix -ene. (Grant & Hackh's Chemical Dictionary, 5th ed, p408)
Elements with partially filled d orbitals. They constitute groups 3-12 of the periodic table of elements.
A trace element with atomic symbol Mn, atomic number 25, and atomic weight 54.94. It is concentrated in cell mitochondria, mostly in the pituitary gland, liver, pancreas, kidney, and bone, influences the synthesis of mucopolysaccharides, stimulates hepatic synthesis of cholesterol and fatty acids, and is a cofactor in many enzymes, including arginase and alkaline phosphatase in the liver. (From AMA Drug Evaluations Annual 1992, p2035)
The creation of an amine. It can be produced by the addition of an amino group to an organic compound or reduction of a nitro group.
Electropositive chemical elements characterized by ductility, malleability, luster, and conductance of heat and electricity. They can replace the hydrogen of an acid and form bases with hydroxyl radicals. (Grant & Hackh's Chemical Dictionary, 5th ed)
A trace element with the atomic symbol Ni, atomic number 28, and atomic weight 58.69. It is a cofactor of the enzyme UREASE.
A trace element that is a component of vitamin B12. It has the atomic symbol Co, atomic number 27, and atomic weight 58.93. It is used in nuclear weapons, alloys, and pigments. Deficiency in animals leads to anemia; its excess in humans can lead to erythrocytosis.
Polymeric resins derived from OXIRANES and characterized by strength and thermosetting properties. Epoxy resins are often used as dental materials.
Compounds which contain the methyl radical substituted with two benzene rings. Permitted are any substituents, but ring fusion to any of the benzene rings is not allowed.
Enzymes that catalyze reversibly the formation of an epoxide or arene oxide from a glycol or aromatic diol, respectively.
Organic compounds that include a cyclic ether with three ring atoms in their structure. They are commonly used as precursors for POLYMERS such as EPOXY RESINS.
The adherence and merging of cell membranes, intracellular membranes, or artificial membranes to each other or to viruses, parasites, or interstitial particles through a variety of chemical and physical processes.
The sum of the weight of all the atoms in a molecule.
Commonly observed BASE SEQUENCE or nucleotide structural components which can be represented by a CONSENSUS SEQUENCE or a SEQUENCE LOGO.
Complex compounds of high molecular weight occurring in living cells. These are basically of two types, ribonucleic (RNA) and deoxyribonucleic (DNA) acids, both of which consist of nucleotides (nucleoside phosphates linked together by phosphate bridges).
Works containing information articles on subjects in every field of knowledge, usually arranged in alphabetical order, or a similar work limited to a special field or subject. (From The ALA Glossary of Library and Information Science, 1983)
Time period from 1601 through 1700 of the common era.
Techniques used for determining the values of photometric parameters of light resulting from LUMINESCENCE.
Emission of LIGHT when ELECTRONS return to the electronic ground state from an excited state and lose the energy as PHOTONS. It is sometimes called cool light in contrast to INCANDESCENCE. LUMINESCENT MEASUREMENTS take advantage of this type of light emitted from LUMINESCENT AGENTS.
Phosphorus used in foods or obtained from food. This element is a major intracellular component which plays an important role in many biochemical pathways relating to normal physiological functions. High concentrations of dietary phosphorus can cause nephrocalcinosis which is associated with impaired kidney function. Low concentrations of dietary phosphorus cause an increase in calcitriol in the blood and osteoporosis.
A trace element that is required in bone formation. It has the atomic symbol Sn, atomic number 50, and atomic weight 118.71.
Substances used to destroy or inhibit the action of rats, mice, or other rodents.
Agreements between two or more parties, especially those that are written and enforceable by law (American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 4th ed). It is sometimes used to characterize the nature of the professional-patient relationship.
Inorganic compounds that contain aluminum as an integral part of the molecule.
A metallic element, atomic number 49, atomic weight 114.82, symbol In. It is named from its blue line in the spectrum. (From Dorland, 28th ed)
Inorganic compounds that contain tin as an integral part of the molecule.
It is a colorless liquid that reacts with water and oxygen. The compound is used to prepare tertiary phosphines and phosphinite ... Chlorodiisopropylphosphine reacts with Grignard reagents and organolithium compounds to give phosphines: [(CH3)2CH]2PCl + RM ... CH3)2CH]2PR + MCl Chlorodiisopropylphosphine reacts with alcohols and phenols to give phosphinites, this reaction typically is ...
These compounds react with water to form phosphine. Other phosphides, for example Na3P7, are known for these reactive metals. ... Unlike ammonia, phosphine is oxidised by air. Phosphine is also far less basic than ammonia. Other phosphines are known which ... Phosphorus has an oxidation number of -3 in phosphine. Phosphine is produced by hydrolysis of calcium phosphide, Ca3P2. ... Phosphine (PH3) and its organic derivatives (PR3) are structural analogues of ammonia (NH3), but the bond angles at phosphorus ...
This compound may further react with phosphines to give phosphine complexes of palladium. An alternative method of preparing ... This salt, and the analogous alkali metal salts of the form M2PdCl4, may be prepared simply by reacting palladium(II) chloride ... followed by reaction with phosphines. Daniele Choueiry and Ei-ichi Negishi (2002). "II.2.3 Pd(0) and Pd(II) Complexes ... such phosphine complexes is to break up the coordination polymer of palladium(II) chloride into reactive, monomeric ...
PMe3 is easily oxidised to the phosphine oxide with oxygen. It reacts with methyl bromide to give tetramethylphosphonium ... With a pKa of 8.65, PMe3 reacts with strong acids to give salts [HPMe3]X. This reaction is reversible. With strong bases, such ... As a result, the lone pair of trimethylphosphine has predominantly s-character as is the case for phosphine, PH3. PMe3 can be ... Being a relatively compact phosphine, several can bind to a single transition metal, as illustrated by the existence of Pt(PEt3 ...
Similarly, secondary phosphines can react with chalcogens to form secondary phosphine chalcogenides. However, these compounds ... These form when carbon group hydrides react or when heavier versions of carbenes react.[dubious - discuss] Sulfur and tellurium ... Tertiary phosphines can react with chalcogens to form compounds in the form of R3PE, where E is a chalcogen. When E is sulfur, ... Secondary phosphine chalcogenides are weak acids. Binary compounds consisting of antimony or arsenic and a chalcogen. These ...
P-diferrocenyl-P-phenyl phosphine. Ferrocene reacts with P4S10 forms a diferrocenyl-dithiadiphosphetane disulfide. Ferrocene ... The vapor reacted with the pipe wall, creating a "yellow sludge" that clogged the pipe. Years later, a sample of the sludge ... In oxidizing conditions it can reversibly react with strong acids to form the ferrocenium cation Fe(C 5H 5)+ 2. The rapid ... The phosphine ligand 1,1'-bis(diphenylphosphino)ferrocene (dppf) is prepared from dilithioferrocene. Ferrocene undergoes a one- ...
The ylide reacts with the electrophilic ester trap through intramolecular cyclization to form a five-membered ring. This ring ... The phosphine reagents slowly undergo air oxidation in living systems. Additionally, it is likely that they are metabolized in ... Phosphines are completely absent from living systems and do not reduce disulfide bonds despite mild reduction potential. Azides ... Currently most cyclooctynes react to form regioisomeric mixtures. [m] Computation analysis has found that while gas phase ...
It reacts slowly with atmospheric oxygen, and rapidly with other oxidizing agents, to give the corresponding phosphine oxide. ... 3 BuMgCl + PCl 3 → PBu 3 + 3 MgCl 2 Tributylphosphine reacts with oxygen to give the phosphine oxide: 2 PBu3 + O2 → 2 OPBu3 ... The phosphine is also easily alkylated. For example, benzyl chloride gives the phosphonium salt: PBu3 + PhCH2Cl → [PhCH2PBu3]Cl ... NMR data for tributylphosphine Material Safety Data Sheet Use of tributyl phosphine for the reduction of disulfide bonds in ...
The acid in the digestive system of the rodent reacts with the phosphide to generate toxic phosphine gas. This method of vermin ... pungent garlic-like odor due to the phosphine liberated by hydrolysis. The odor attracts (or, at least, does not repel) rodents ... which helps reduce the potential for spontaneous combustion or explosion of the phosphine gas.[citation needed] Metal ...
... reacts with moisture and acids producing phosphine (PH3), a toxic and pyrophoric gas. Iron phosphide can be used ... Contact lenses have been known to react poorly with iron phosphide due to its corrosive properties,[citation needed] but the ...
BF hardly reacts with C2F4 or SiF4. BF does react with arsine, carbon monoxide, phosphorus trifluoride, phosphine, and ... Also, it reacts with acetylene to make 1,4-difluoro-1,4-diboracyclohexadiene. Propene reacts to make a mix of cyclic and non- ... BF reacts with BF3 to form B2F4. BF and B2F4 further combine to form B3F5. B3F5 is unstable above −50 °C and forms B8F12. This ... Vidovic and Aldridge reacted NaRu(CO)2(C5H5) with (Et2O)·BF3. Note that the BF was formed in place rather than added on. ...
... when it reacts with water and acids. Phosphine is very toxic and, with trace amounts of P2H4, pyrophoric. Phosphine is also ... Zinc phosphide reacts with water to produce phosphine (PH3) and zinc hydroxide (Zn(OH)2): Zn3P2 + 6 H2O → 2 PH3 + 3 Zn(OH)2 ... The acid in the digestive system of the rodent reacts with the phosphide to generate toxic phosphine gas. This method of vermin ... 3 Zn + 2 P → Zn3P2 Another method of preparation include reacting tri-n-octylphosphine with dimethylzinc. ...
After being ingested, phosphide reacts with hydrochloric acid in the stomach, generating phosphine, a highly toxic gas. ...
A method of manufacturing triazofos produces the substance in the presence of triethylamine by reacting 1-phenyl-3-hydroxy-1H-1 ... The chemical compound is susceptible to highly toxic and flammable phosphine gas formation in the presence of strong reducing ... Liquids with these reactive groups have been known to react with mineral-based and clay-based absorbents. Furthermore, partial ... agents (such as hydrides). It belongs to the reactive groups of: amines, phosphines and pyridines. Azo, diazo, azido, hydrazine ...
... phosphine) complexes are labile and are readily substituted by other ligands. Notably, the tetrakis(phosphine) complex is a ... Dichlorotris(triphenylphosphine)ruthenium(II) reacts with carbon monoxide to produce the all trans isomer of dichloro( ... In the presence of excess of triphenylphosphine, RuCl2(PPh3)3 binds a fourth phosphine to give black RuCl2(PPh3)4. The ... triphenylphosphine ligands in both the tris(phosphine) and tetrakis( ...
To obtain the ylide needed, firstly triphenyl phosphine is reacted with ethyl bromoacetate to form a phosphonium salt; after ... treatment of this salt with a mild base, the ylide can be reacted with the aldehyde in toluene. After hydrogenation of the ...
Chiral phosphine MBH catalysts often contain Bronsted acid moiety in their backbones. For example, chiral phosphines containing ... Using an allene instead of a simple alkene as the precursor for the gives an intermediate that can react at the gamma carbon ... BINOL-derived chiral phosphine catalyst is also effective for an asymmetric aza-MBH reaction of N-tosyl imines with activated ... P-Chiral phosphines have been investigated. Simple diamines can also be employed as MBH catalysts. Methyl vinyl ketone and ...
The acid in the digestive system of the rodent reacts with the phosphide to generate the toxic gas phosphine. This method of ... On contact with acids or water, the material releases phosphine, which is toxic and is readily ignited. Phosphorus Richard C. ... Calcium phosphide is a common impurity in calcium carbide, which may cause the resulting phosphine-contaminated acetylene to ...
The acid in the digestive system of the rodent reacts with the phosphide to generate the toxic phosphine gas. Other pesticides ... The deaths occurred accidentally due to aluminium phosphide reacting with water or moisture, and becoming phosphine, leading to ... Aluminium phosphide reacts with water or acids to release phosphine: AlP + 3 H2O → Al(OH)3 + PH3 AlP + 3 H+ → Al3+ + PH3 AlP is ... It generates phosphine gas according to the following hydrolysis equation. 2 AlP + 6 H2O → Al2O3∙3 H2O + 2 PH3 It is used as a ...
WF6 reacts upon contact with a silicon substrate. The WF6 decomposition on silicon is temperature-dependent: 2 WF6 + 3 Si → 2 W ... The decomposition is usually facilitated by mixing WF6 with hydrogen, silane, germane, diborane, phosphine, and related ... An alternative procedure for producing tungsten fluoride is to react tungsten trioxide (WO3) with HF, BrF3 or SF4. Tungsten ...
Alcohols react with Si(II) to form exclusively the silyl ether. With water, two NHSis will insert to each of the O-H bonds to ... With Mo(Cp)2(PEt3) the phosphine is replaced, while with Mo(Cp)2H2 an NHSi inserts between a metal-hydride bond to form a ... NiCl2(PPh3)2 reacts with 4 equivalents of benzo-fused NHSi to form Ni(NHSi)3(PPh3) while 5 equivalents are needed to produce ... Alkenes and alkynes react with NHSis only if their C-C bond is highly polarized such as is the case with ...
ZnP2, like Zn3P2, is highly toxic due to the release of phosphine gas when the material reacts with gastric acid. Litvinchuk, A ...
For example, "GaI" can react with primary, secondary, and tertiary amines, secondary or tertiary phosphines or ethers to form ... "GaI" can also react with PPh3 to form a Ga(III)I3PPh3 complex. It can also react with a less sterically encumbered PEt3 ligand ... When GaCp* reacts with Co2(CO)8, two equivalents of CO gas are released, forming (CO)3Co[μ2-(η5-GaCp*)]2-Co(CO)3. This is a ... "GaI" can react with a wide range of monodentate Lewis bases to form Ga(II), Ga(III), or mixed valent species, as well as ...
Because of the nature of the carbanion propagating center, substituents that react with bases or nucleophiles either must not ... Highly electrophilic monomers such as cyanoacrylates require only weakly nucleophilic initiators, such as amines, phosphines, ... Nucleophilic initiators include covalent or ionic metal amides, alkoxides, hydroxides, cyanides, phosphines, amines and ... phosphines). Most prominent example is the curing of cyanoacrylate, which constitutes the basis for superglue. Here, only ...
... triphenylphosphine does not react). Phosphines such as trimethylphosphine are important ligands in inorganic chemistry. Mainly ... In these processes, the phosphine is oxidized to the phosphine oxide. Phosphines have also been found to reduce activated ... Phosphine oxides (designation δ3λ3) have the general structure R3P=O with formal oxidation state V. Phosphine oxides form ... Phosphines are easily oxidized to the corresponding phosphine oxides, whereas amine oxides are less readily generated. In part ...
It reacts with acetylacetone to give rhodium acetylacetonate. Solutions of RhCl3(H2O)3 react with ammonia in the presence of ... Reaction of RhCl3(H2O)3 under mild conditions with tertiary phosphines affords adducts akin to the aforementioned thioether ... 3 react in ethanol to give cyclooctadiene rhodium chloride dimer. RhCl3(H2O)3 in methanol reacts with carbon monoxide (1 bar) ... RhCl(PPh3)3 reacts with CO to give trans-RhCl(CO)(PPh3)2, stoichiometrically analogous to but less reactive than Vaska's ...
... s can be made when thionyl chloride SOCl2 reacts with a primary amine. Mixtures of phosphine and borane ... This can happen with tris(tert-butyl) phosphine and tris-(pentafluorophenyl)borane. Krishna's Advanced Organic Chemistry; ...
... reacts vigorously with water, producing phosphorous acid (H3PO3) and hydroiodic acid (HI), along with ... smaller amounts of phosphine and various P-P-containing compounds. Alcohols likewise form alkyl iodides, this providing the ...
Like other metal phosphides, it is acutely toxic when swallowed due to the formation of phosphine gas when it reacts with ...
B(C6F5)3 reacts with dimesitylphosphine to give the zwitterionic phosphonic-boronate (mes = C6H2Me3): ... The combination of BCF and bulky basic phosphines, such as tricyclohexylphosphine (PCy3) cleaves H2:[10] ...
Complex B reacts in a transmetallation with the copper acetylide, complex F, which is produced in the copper cycle, to give ... The Pd II catalyst is reduced to Pd0 in the reaction mixture by either an amine, a phosphine ligand, or a reactant, allowing ... Copper(I) salts, such as copper iodide, react with the terminal alkyne and produce a copper(I) acetylide, which acts as an ... The active palladium catalyst is the 14 electron compound Pd0L2, complex A, which reacts with the aryl or vinyl halide in an ...
... reacts with nitrogen at high temperature to form calcium cyanamide:[5] ... contamination often leads to trace production of phosphine and arsine.[19][20] These impurities can be removed by passing the ...
The magnesium silicide reacts with the acid to produce silane gas, which burns on contact with air and produces tiny explosions ... Kondo, S.; Tokuhashi, K.; Nagai, H.; Iwasaka, M. & Kaise, M. (1995). "Spontaneous Ignition Limits of Silane and Phosphine". ... In all cases, these substances react with Brønsted-Lowry acids to produce some type of hydride of silicon that is dependent on ...
Aminooxazolines can react with cyanoacetylene in a mild and highly efficient manner, controlled by inorganic phosphate, to give ...
Heartbroken, Donald is present when the paramedics remove Jane's body and hardly reacts to Jesse's presence. A month later, he ... While mixing chemicals, Walter creates a small explosion that produces phosphine gas which appears to kill both Emilio and ... trapping Emilio and Krazy-8 inside the RV with deadly phosphine gas. Emilio dies and Jesse subsequently disposes of his body by ...
In the process called oxidative addition, low-valent metals often react with alkylating agents to give metal alkyls. This ... Similar reactions occur when tertiary phosphines are treated with alkyl halides, the products being phosphonium salts. ...
CO reacts with sodium to give products resulting from C-C coupling such as sodium acetylenediolate 2Na+. ·C. 2O2−. 2. It reacts ... It reacts with hydroxyl radical (•OH) to produce a radical intermediate •HOCO, which transfers rapidly its radical hydrogen to ... For instance, iridium trichloride and triphenylphosphine react in boiling 2-methoxyethanol or DMF to afford IrCl(CO)(PPh3)2. ... In the presence of strong acids and water, carbon monoxide reacts with alkenes to form carboxylic acids in a process known as ...
For example, diphenyldiazomethane reacts readily with C60 to give the compound C61Ph2.[37] Phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester ... For example, C60 reacts with lithium in liquid ammonia, followed by tert-butanol to give a mixture of polyhydrofullerenes such ... 60 not being "superaromatic". C60 behaves very much like an electron deficient alkene and readily reacts with electron rich ... The exposed surface of the structure can selectively react with other species while maintaining the spherical geometry.[25] ...
Some antimonides react with water to make this gas. Stibine can also be made by reacting any antimony(III) compound such as ... Stibine is a highly toxic gas, similar in toxicity to phosphine. It is too unstable to be of any hazard outside the laboratory ... Antimony is reacted with a mixture of zinc and hydrochloric acid in a tube, making stibine. The stibine is heated and a shiny ... Some claim that it is used as a fumigant, but phosphine works much better. ...
Phosphorigsäureester oder O-Phosphine". Berichte. 31: 1048. doi:10.1002/cber.189803101190. Arbuzov, A. E. (1906). J. Russ. Phys ... The displaced halide anion reacts via another SN2 reaction with the phosphonium intermediate to give the desired phosphonate (4 ... This reaction is widely used for the synthesis of various phosphonates, phosphinates, and phosphine oxides. Several reviews ...
In 1991, Utimoto reacted gold(III) (NaAuCl4) with alkynes and water. Teles identified a major drawback of this method as Au(III ... The development of well-defined phosphine- or NHC-ligated gold(I) complexes was an important advance and led to significant ... Propargyl esters can serve as precursors for cationic gold-vinylcarbene intermediates, which can react with alkenes in a ... In a simple mechanistic picture, gold(I) simultaneously coordinates to two phosphine ligands and the carbon isocyanate group ...
It is isotypic with the better-known analogous uranium compound uranocene.[59] It can be prepared by reacting K2C8H8 with ... Tetramethylthorium, Th(CH3)4, is not known, but its adducts are stabilised by phosphine ligands.[34] ... Thorium germanides are also known.[52] Thorium reacts with hydrogen to form the thorium hydrides ThH2 and Th4H15, the latter of ... It is somewhat hygroscopic and reacts readily with water and many gases;[46] it dissolves easily in concentrated nitric acid in ...
... when dry reacts with Al, Zn, Pb, Sb, Bi, Ni, Cu, Ag, Cd; when wet reacts also with Fe. Forms an explosive compound with copper ... They include paraquinone dioxime, toluene-2,4-diisocyanate, tris(1-(2-methyl) aziridinyl) phosphine oxide, N,N,O-tri(1,2-epoxy ... Reacts with magnesium when wet and liberates heat and ammonia, can self-ignite. In contact with potassium nitrate (e.g. in ... Reacts with nitrates, except ammonium nitrate, yielding nitrogen oxides, ammonia, and heat (the reaction is slow at room ...
For example, when sodium hydroxide reacts with hydrochloric acid, sodium chloride is formed: NaOH(aq) + HCl(aq) → NaCl(aq) + H2 ... Sodium hydroxide also reacts with acidic oxides, such as sulfur dioxide. Such reactions are often used to "scrub" harmful ... Sodium hydroxide reacts with aluminium and water to release hydrogen gas. The aluminium takes the oxygen atom from sodium ... Glass reacts slowly with aqueous sodium hydroxide solutions at ambient temperatures to form soluble silicates. Because of this ...
It also finds use for the synthesis of hydantoins, which can be useful synthetic intermediates, when reacted with a carbonyl ...
Gaseous ammonia was first isolated by Joseph Black in 1756 by reacting sal ammoniac (Ammonium Chloride) with calcined magnesia ... phosphine 14.6 kJ/mol) and can therefore be used in laboratories in uninsulated vessels without additional refrigeration. See ... Ammonia reacts violently with the halogens. Nitrogen triiodide, a primary high explosive, is formed when ammonia comes in ... Ammonia fumes react with the natural tannins in the wood and cause it to change colours.[82] ...
Ethylene oxide reacts with water to produce ethylene glycol according to the chemical equation:. C2H4O + H2O → HO−CH2CH2−OH. ...
The starting material for ring B was 3-methyl-4-oxo-2-pentenoic acid 46 which was reacted with butadiene in a Diels-Alder ... cyanoethyl phosphine/ trifluoroacetic acid/sulfolane) yielded cyanocorrigenolide 57 with the propionic acid ester group of ring ... which reacted further to the tetracycle 33 called alpha-corrnorsterone in an amine-carbonyl condensation - aldol condensation ...
React. 2000, 56, 1. doi:10.1002/0471264180.or056.01 *^ a b Pino, P.; Botteghi, C. (1977). "Aldehydes from olefins: ... Using chiral phosphine ligands, the hydroformylation can be tailored to favor one enantiomer.[11] Thus, for example, ... The Shell process uses cobalt complexes modified with phosphine ligands for the hydroformylation of C7-C14 olefins. The ... Low temperatures and high carbon monoxide pressure and an excess of phosphine, which blocks free coordination sites, can lead ...
As a bifunctional molecule, glycine reacts with many reagents. These can be classified into N-centered and carboxylate-center ...
It decomposes by reacting with oxygen and hydroxyl radical to form formyl cyanide and formaldehyde.[6] Acrylonitrile is harmful ...
... reacts rapidly with strong acids to release hydrogen cyanide. This dangerous process represents a significant ...
There are several other sodium phosphides that do not have the formula Na3P. It reacts with acids to make phosphine gas. It is ... It can be made by reacting liquid sodium with phosphorus(V) chloride. It can also be made by reacting sodium with phosphorus. ...
The remaining oxygen was reacted with alkaline pyrogallate to leave behind an apparently non-reactive gas which they called ... Argon is preferred to less expensive nitrogen in cases where nitrogen may react with the reagents or apparatus. ...
The hydride reacts with the weak Bronsted acid releasing H2.. *Hydrides such as calcium hydride are used as desiccants, i.e. ... phosphorus: phosphine (note 'phosphane' is the IUPAC recommended name). *arsenic: arsine (note 'arsane' is the IUPAC ... The hydride reacts with water forming hydrogen and hydroxide salt. The dry solvent can then be distilled or vac transferred ... While hydrides traditionally react as Lewis bases or reducing agents, some metal hydrides behave as hydrogen-atom donors and ...
It is not attacked by alkali and only slowly reacts with halogens. It can be oxidised by nitric acid to phosphoric acid. ... The safety risks associated with phosphine generation and friction sensitivity of red phosphorus can be effectively reduced by ...
... and it reacts first to the impact of heavy water. In 1972 it was demonstrated that an increase in the percentage content of ... where it acts as a neutron moderator to slow down neutrons so that they are more likely to react with the fissile uranium-235 ...
Phosphine is used in the semiconductor industry to introduce phosphorus into silicon crystals . It is also used as a fumigant, ... Phosphine decomposes on heating or on burning, producing toxic fumes.. *Phosphine reacts with acids, air, copper, moisture, and ... Several solids (phosphides) release phosphine gas. When phosphine toxicity is suspected, but phosphine exposure has not ... Phosphine gas produces no known adverse effects on the eyes.. *Ocular exposure to phosphine gas has not been known to cause ...
Phosphine has been found in at least 7 of the 1,585 National Priorities List sites identified by the Environmental Protection ... Exposure to phosphine can cause abdominal pain, nausea, and vomiting. High levels can cause weakness, bronchitis, pulmonary ... The general population may be exposed to very small amounts of phosphine in air, food or water. Workers who use this chemical ... In the air, phosphine will exist solely as a gas. Phosphine gas reacts with substances commonly found in the air. Half of the ...
When phosphides are ingested or exposed to moisture, they release phosphine gas. Phosphine gas may also be released when ... Synonyms of phosphine include hydrogen phosphide, phosphorus hydride, phosphorus trihydride, and phosphoretted hydrogen. ... Phosphine is a colorless, flammable, and toxic gas with an odor of garlic or decaying fish. It can ignite spontaneously on ... Phosphine is produced when metallic phosphides (e.g., aluminum, calcium, or zinc phosphides) react with water or acid. Both ...
Similarly, secondary phosphines can react with chalcogens to form secondary phosphine chalcogenides. However, these compounds ... These form when carbon group hydrides react or when heavier versions of carbenes react.[dubious - discuss] Sulfur and tellurium ... Tertiary phosphines can react with chalcogens to form compounds in the form of R3PE, where E is a chalcogen. When E is sulfur, ... Elemental chalcogens react with certain lanthanide compounds to form lanthanide clusters rich in chalcogens.[dubious - discuss] ...
Phosphorus reacts with strong bases to produce toxic phosphine gas.. *EXPLOSION HAZARDS: *Phosphorus reacts violently with ... Phosphorus reacts violently with oxidants, halogens, some metals, nitrites, sulfur, and many other compounds, causing a fire ... Phosphorus reacts violently with oxidants, halogens, some metals, nitrites, sulfur, and many other compounds, causing a fire ... Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry determination of phosphine residues in stored products and processed foods. J Agric Food ...
Reacts violently with acids, water and moist air. This produces phosphine (see ICSC 0694). This generates fire and toxic hazard ... Reacts violently with strong oxidants. This generates fire and explosion hazard. Formula: Ca3P2. Molecular mass: 182.2 Melting ...
It is a colorless liquid that reacts with water and oxygen. The compound is used to prepare tertiary phosphines and phosphinite ... Chlorodiisopropylphosphine reacts with Grignard reagents and organolithium compounds to give phosphines: [(CH3)2CH]2PCl + RM ... CH3)2CH]2PR + MCl Chlorodiisopropylphosphine reacts with alcohols and phenols to give phosphinites, this reaction typically is ...
These compounds react with water to form phosphine. Other phosphides, for example Na3P7, are known for these reactive metals. ... Unlike ammonia, phosphine is oxidised by air. Phosphine is also far less basic than ammonia. Other phosphines are known which ... Phosphorus has an oxidation number of -3 in phosphine. Phosphine is produced by hydrolysis of calcium phosphide, Ca3P2. ... Phosphine (PH3) and its organic derivatives (PR3) are structural analogues of ammonia (NH3), but the bond angles at phosphorus ...
Allyl phosphines electron donating like cyanide. In biology CN stabilised by protein, but in real life reacts with ... Does not react with dye and semiconductor Can be sealed into unit ...
The pesticide is usually applied as a metal phosphide and reacts with moisture to liberate phosphine gas. Phosphine is also ... L. Phosphine 1. Description. Phosphine is a colorless gas used as a fumigant against insects and rodents in stored grain. ... The AEGL-3 was based on a NOEL for lethality (18 ppm phosphine) in Sprague Dawley rats exposed to phosphine for 6 hrs. (Newton ... Summary of Proposed AEGL Values For Phosphine [ppm(mg/m3)]. Classification. 10 mins.. 30 mins.. 1 hr.. 4 hrs.. 8 hrs.. Endpoint ...
It reacts violently with bases and is corrosive. Reacts violently with acids and oxidants. Formula: C2H7O3P. Molecular mass: ... This produces toxic fumes including phosphorus oxides and phosphine. Decomposes on contact with moist air above 220°C. This ...
Planetary Society Reacts to Loss of Arecibo Observatory Radio Telescope. Jason Davis ... Did Scientists Just Find Life on Venus? Heres How to Interpret the Phosphine Discovery. Casey Dreier ...
Preferably, the polyisocyanate is reacted with a partially alkoxylated polyoxyalkylenediamine. This polymer polyol may be used ... A polymer polyol made by the reaction of a partially reacted polyamine with an organic polyisocyanate in a polyether polyol ... b) Tertiary phosphines such as trialkylphosphines, dialkylbenzylphosphines, and the like;. (c) Strong bases such as alkali and ... Ethylene oxide (44 g) was then reacted at 80.degree.-85.degree. C. at 25 psig. Propylene oxide (400g) was then reacted at 80. ...
... triphenylphosphine does not react). Phosphines such as trimethylphosphine are important ligands in inorganic chemistry. Mainly ... In these processes, the phosphine is oxidized to the phosphine oxide. Phosphines have also been found to reduce activated ... Phosphine oxides (designation δ3λ3) have the general structure R3P=O with formal oxidation state V. Phosphine oxides form ... Phosphines are easily oxidized to the corresponding phosphine oxides, whereas amine oxides are less readily generated. In part ...
The reaction of a Rh(I) precursor [Rh(μ-Cl)(CO)2]2 with 8-hydroxyquinoline in the presence of a base followed by phosphines (L ... React. Inorg. Metal-Org. Chem. 5, 357 (1975) http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/00945717508057328[Crossref] ... Polar-phosphines Rh(I) catalysts 8-hydroxyquinolate Δδ31P vs. ν(C≡O) Hydroformylation ... A first effort employing a range of polar-group functionalized phosphines (L 1 -L 7 ) to design mononuclear Rh(I) compounds of ...
Likewise styrene poorly reacts with hindered phosphines such as HPCy3 or monophosphines such as H2PPh. ... Finally, methanol can react on the allylic radical species in a Michael-type approach giving a formally anti-Markovnikov ... This Cu-Xantphos complex is able to react not only with the primary alcohols but also with the secondary ones. A chiral ... King, A.K.; Buchard, A.; Mahon, M.F.; Webster, R.L. Facile, Catalytic Dehydrocoupling of phosphines using β-diketiminate iron( ...
The process is particularly useful in reacting an epoxy resin having a molecular weight of less than about 500 with bisphenol-A ... trihydrocarbyl phosphine)iminium salt catalyst to produce a high molecular weight fusion reaction product. ... in the presence of a bis(phosphine)iminium halide to produce a fusion reaction product having a molecular weight within the ... a relatively low molecular weight epoxy resin is reacted with a hydroxyl group-containing compound in the presence of a bis( ...
Unlike ammonia, phosphine is unstable and it reacts instantly with air giving off phosphoric acid clouds. Arsenic is even less ... Phosphine, diphosphine and phosphonium salts. Phosphine (PH3) and arsine (AsH3) are structural analogs with ammonia (NH3) and ... Phosphine is produced in a manner similar to the production of ammonia. Hydrolysis of calcium phosphide, Ca3P2, or calcium ... Although phosphine is less basic than ammonia, it can form some phosphonium salts (like PH4I), analogs of ammonium salts, but ...
May react with water or acids to produce phosphine gas which is toxic and flammable.. Contact with acids liberates very toxic ... Inflammability (solid, gaseous) May react with water or acids to produce phosphine gas which is toxic and flammable.. Ignition ... Information about protection against explosions and fires: May react with water or acids to produce phosphine gas which is ... Information about protection against explosions and fires: May react with water or acids to produce phosphine gas which is ...
Hydroperoxide decomposers that react with hydroperoxides without formation of free radicals.. - Metal chelators with which ... These inhibitors include sulfur compounds, phosphites and phosphines, which reduce hydroperoxides into the more stable alcohols ... Other preventive antioxidants are the peroxide destroyers, which react with hydroperoxides to give stable products by ... each of them being able to react in different reactions; l-ascorbic acid is a "perfect" example. Several reactions related to ...
It reacts under the stomach acidic environment with acids to liberate the toxic phosphine molecule, which can kill the rodent. ... Phosphines is used in the organic labs in the famous Witting reaction, which is used to convert a ketone to a double bond. The ... specific phosphine used in the Witting reaction is triphenylphosphine. This is a convenient compound to use because it is solid ...
Reacts with water to form the highly toxic and flammable phosphine; [Hawley] "This chemical ingredient is not found in any ... Reacts with water to form the highly toxic and flammable phosphine; [Hawley] "This chemical ingredient is not found in any ...
The methyl phosphonium ylide reacts with the carbonyl to give an alkene and a phosphine oxide:. In the next step, the osmium ...
What is the chemical formula of phosphine gas? and find homework help for other Science questions at eNotes ... Phosphorous comes in two forms, white and red, and both react with oxygen to provide luminous combustion quite readily. Red ... Phosphine is also known as phosphane, and is a colorless, odorless, flammable gas. Although it typically is odorless, it may, ... Phosphine is also known as phosphane, and is a colorless, odorless, flammable gas. Although it typically is odorless, it may, ...
its the phosphine gas it gives off as it reacts with moisture in the air thats toxic. This gas permeates an enclosed space, ...
Advantageously in the simultaneous presence of a hydrophobic fumed (pyrogenic reacted) silica and triphenyl phosphine, the ... 2. The macromolecular material of claim 1, wherein said antioxidant is triphenyl phosphine, tritolyl phosphine or trixylyl ... The macromolecular material of claim 12, wherein said antioxidant is triphenyl phosphine, tritolyl phosphine or trixylyl ... Triphenyl phosphine (available under reference 60404 from RIEDEL de HAEN), which is a solid product at ambient temperature and ...
Phosphines are phosphorous-containing molecules that react with azides to form a stable phosphorous-nitrogen compound. Both ... She also is investigating another type of probe that is not a phosphine but will also react with azides in a highly selective ... If a label, such as a fluorescent dye or a contrast agent, were attached to the phosphine, she would be able to label cells for ... The unnatural chemicals she chose do not react with any biological molecules, so that the only reaction is between them, as if ...
Most growers at some time will have used phosphine, sold as phostoxin or fumitoxin, to keep grain free of live insects as it is ... However, phosphine is an indirect toxin. This means the gas itself does not cause death but it reacts with oxygen to form toxic ... Phosphine is a small molecule and is roughly the same density as air. It is easy for phosphine to escape from an unsealed silo ... Phosphine kills insects by tricking them into creating toxic compounds. "In other words, phosphine forces the pests to create ...
  • The compound is used to prepare tertiary phosphines and phosphinite ligands. (wikipedia.org)
  • An ordered mesoporous carbon (OMC) was functionalized with ammonium or chelating phosphine ligands. (ac.be)
  • Chapter 2 describes the synthesis of latent olefin metathesis catalysts with chelating alkylidenes with a range of donor ligands: including phosphines, pyridines, imines, amines, and thioethers. (caltech.edu)
  • Anions of benzylsulfonamides have been shown to react with a series of allyl acetates in the presence of Pd0 catalysts, phosphine ligands and base at room temperature, enabling the synthesis of sp3-functionalised sulfonamides. (hud.ac.uk)
  • Early symptoms of acute phosphine intoxication include pain in the diaphragm, nausea, vomiting, excitement, and a phosphorus smell on the breath. (cdc.gov)
  • When phosphine burns it produces a dense white cloud of phosphorus pentoxide, P 2 O 5 fume. (cdc.gov)
  • however, particles of white phosphorus that do not react with air may contaminate agricultural products. (cdc.gov)
  • This produces toxic fumes including phosphorus oxides and phosphine. (inchem.org)
  • 10 Krenske demonstrated computationally that the rate-determining step (RDS) of the reduction is an intramolecular hydride transfer from silicon to phosphorus after coordination of the phosphine oxide to the silane. (rsc.org)
  • White phosphorus reacts with air and can spontaneously ignite, if heated slightly, forming phosphorus pentoxide . (sciencemadness.org)
  • Red phosphorus is much more stable in air, but will react with halogens. (sciencemadness.org)
  • White phosphorus will react with nitric acid to produce phosphoric acid and nitrogen dioxide . (sciencemadness.org)
  • To follow up this discovery and related future exoplanet biosignature detections, it is important to spectroscopically detect the presence of phosphorus-bearing atmospheric molecules that could be involved in the chemical networks producing, destroying or reacting with phosphine. (frontiersin.org)
  • Phosphine, as will be seen in a future article, also has a structure identical to ammonia and arsine, with a phosphorus atom surrounded by three hydrogen atoms. (fireengineering.com)
  • The question behind the paper was, "If phosphorus doesn't react to form a solid at these high temperatures, then maybe it can form a different type of solid in the cold reaches," says Pasek. (phys.org)
  • The gas phosphine (PH 3 ) is the principal volatile phase of phosphorus at low temperatures. (phys.org)
  • Pasek's paper aims to determine how quickly phosphorus would react with solids - "very fast", Pasek quips - and then how long it would take to cool and be attracted back toward warmer environments. (phys.org)
  • Ultimately, the goal was to determine the distribution of volatile forms of phosphorus, such as phosphine, and how they were distributed throughout the Solar System. (phys.org)
  • According to a theoretical model, which combined thermodynamics, rates at which phosphorus reacts with metals, and gas diffusion models, Pasek's research found that most phosphorus should be in a solid form everywhere in the Solar System, out to about Saturn. (phys.org)
  • Alternatively, the acidcatalyzed disproportioning of white phosphorus may be used, which yields phosphoric acid and phosphine. (gasworld.com)
  • Phosphine is used in silicon processing as a phosphorus (N-type dopant) source in chemical vapor deposition (CVD) and ion implantation. (gasworld.com)
  • Both compounds showed moderate vapor pressures and were treated with thallium hexafluoroacetylacetonate, phosphorus trifluoride, and tris(trifluoromethyl)phosphine in an attempt to synthesize monomeric compounds with higher vapor pressures. (rice.edu)
  • Several solids (phosphides) release phosphine gas. (cdc.gov)
  • When phosphides are ingested or exposed to moisture, they release phosphine gas. (cdc.gov)
  • Prior to the EPA registration of Bell Laboratories' ZP products (tracking powder, commensal rodent bait and ag bait) it was generally believed and accepted that the active Ingredient, zinc phosphide, reacted with the moisture in the atmosphere to release phosphine gas. (unl.edu)
  • Compounds related to phosphine oxides are the imides (R3PNR') and related chalcogenides (R3PE, where E = S, Se, Te). (wikipedia.org)
  • A first effort employing a range of polar-group functionalized phosphines (L 1 -L 7 ) to design mononuclear Rh(I) compounds of [Rh(quin-8-O)(CO)(L)] (quin-8-O = 8-hydroxy quinolate) is described. (edu.pl)
  • The reaction of a Rh(I) precursor [Rh(μ-Cl)(CO)2]2 with 8-hydroxyquinoline in the presence of a base followed by phosphines (L 1 -L 7 ) produced only a single isomer of [Rh(quin-8-O)(CO)(L)] compounds (1-7) with pendant, i.e. non-bonded, polar-groups (includes carboxyl, hydroxyl and formyl). (edu.pl)
  • When the Rh(I) compounds contained strong σ-donor phosphines, the π-acceptor properties of the pyridine ring of 8-hydroxyquinolate were found to be beneficial for the facile cleavage of the CO group during hydroformylation, and additionally, to improve the kinetic stability of catalysts. (edu.pl)
  • Both types of molecules have shown no harmful effects in the body, based on use of the AIDS drug AZT (azidothymidine) and phosphine-gold compounds for treating arthritis. (berkeley.edu)
  • Phosphine kills insects by 'tricking' them into creating toxic compounds. (grdc.com.au)
  • The lability of the co-ordinated keto or amido group has been assessed by addition of a range of phosphines to compounds 4-6. (bath.ac.uk)
  • Since the elements nitrogen and arsenic both have five electrons in their last orbital ring, they will react in similar fashion and thus form similar compounds. (fireengineering.com)
  • Enantioenriched a-chiral boron compounds were first obtained using chiral rhodium-phosphine complexes from the catalytic hydroboration of prochiral alkenes. (docme.ru)
  • 2010, 122, 5256 -5260 Angewandte Chemie Herein, we describe a method for the synthesis of bborated carbonyl compounds by reacting B2pin2 with either a,b-unsaturated esters or ketones in the presence of chiral phosphine catalyts. (docme.ru)
  • Phosphine oxides (designation δ3λ3) have the general structure R3P=O with formal oxidation state V. Phosphine oxides form hydrogen bonds and some are therefore soluble in water. (wikipedia.org)
  • A novel bridged [2.2.1] bicyclic phosphine oxide, devised to circumvent the waste generation and burdens of purification that are typical of reactions driven by the generation of phosphine oxides, has been prepared in three steps from commercially available cyclopent-3-ene-1-carboxylic acid. (rsc.org)
  • Consequently, we directed our study to the development of new phosphine oxides that can be reduced under milder conditions to realize the γ-umpolung-Wittig reaction in a catalytic mode. (rsc.org)
  • 7,8 The currently accepted mechanism for silane-mediated reduction of phosphine oxides to phosphines is based on the studies of Horner and Mislow ( Scheme 2 ). (rsc.org)
  • O.William Lever Jr. Preparation of α-oxygenated phosphine oxides from chlorodiphenylphosphine. (alfa.com)
  • A polymer polyol made by the reaction of a partially reacted polyamine with an organic polyisocyanate in a polyether polyol solvent of about 3,000 to 8,000 molecular weight is disclosed. (patentgenius.com)
  • They are generated by the reaction of phosphine with formaldehyde in the presence of the mineral acid: PH3 + HX + 4 CH2O → [P(CH2OH)4+]X− A variety of phosphonium salts can be prepared by alkylation and arylation of organophosphines: PR3 + R'X → [PR3R'+]X− The methylation of triphenylphosphine is the first step in the preparation of the Wittig reagent. (wikipedia.org)
  • According to the invention, a relatively low molecular weight epoxy resin is reacted with a hydroxyl group-containing compound in the presence of a bis(trihydrocarbyl phosphine)iminium salt catalyst to produce a high molecular weight fusion reaction product. (google.es)
  • The process is particularly useful in reacting an epoxy resin having a molecular weight of less than about 500 with bisphenol-A in the presence of a bis(phosphine)iminium halide to produce a fusion reaction product having a molecular weight within the range of about 500 to 7000. (google.es)
  • The unnatural chemicals she chose do not react with any biological molecules, so that the only reaction is between them, as if the body were simply a flask of water. (berkeley.edu)
  • The reaction she focused on was a simple one between azides and phosphines, described last century by German synthetic-organic chemist Hermann Staudinger, a pioneering polymer chemist who won the Nobel Prize in 1953. (berkeley.edu)
  • 1 The reaction is, however, far from ideal in terms of its environmental impact, requiring stoichiometric amounts of organic halide, base, and tertiary phosphine and producing stoichiometric amounts of base-halide salt and phosphine oxide wastes. (rsc.org)
  • 6 In our reaction, phosphine adds to the allenoate 1a to form the zwitterionic intermediate A ( Scheme 1 ). (rsc.org)
  • In 2009, O'Brien and coworkers reported the first phosphine oxide-catalyzed Wittig reaction for the synthesis of alkenes, with the phosphine oxide byproduct reduced by a silane in situ back to the phosphine. (rsc.org)
  • In particular, it is well known to react in vivo with cysteines by the so-called S -nitrosylation reaction. (frontiersin.org)
  • The nickel complex reacts immediately with the Grignard reagent, and the resulting clear-tan reaction mixture is allowed to warm to room temperature, with stirring. (orgsyn.org)
  • 8. The composition of claim 1 wherein the rheology modifying resin is the reaction product of (i) an epoxy component, (ii) an ethylenically unsaturated carboxylic acid or reactive derivative thereof and (iii) a fatty acid or reactive derivative thereof, said components (i), (ii) and (iii) being reacted in the presence of a polyamide based on a polymerized fatty acid. (google.com.au)
  • Both routes have industrial significance, with the acid route as the preferred method if further reaction of the phosphine to substituted phosphines is needed. (gasworld.com)
  • In contrast, the use of a rigid linker (here mesitylphenyl) leads to a well-defined active site far away from the surface, stabilized only by a phosphine ligand which under reaction conditions leaves probably irreversibly, leading to faster decomposition and deactivation of the catalysts. (archives-ouvertes.fr)
  • In a reaction-diffusion mechanism similar to the nanoscale Kirkendall effect it is speculated that the cadmium migrates outwardly through this shell to react with more selenium, causing the CdSe shell to thicken. (rice.edu)
  • Whereas complex 1 fails to react with o-methoxybenzonitrile, its reaction with benzonitrile or pentafluorobenzonitrile gives triphenyl-1,3,5-triazine (4) or the hexacoordinate lithium polymer [LiN(4-NCC6F4)(C6F5)·THF·TMEDA]n (7), respectively. (benran.ru)
  • We first optimized the reaction conditions using ethylcrotonate as a model substrate, B2pin2 as the boron source, and PPh3 (the most common achiral phosphine) as the catalyst. (docme.ru)
  • Therefore, in addition to a catalytic method, we report an alternative method reacting benzylsulfonamides with allyl bromide electrophiles via a nucleophilic substitution reaction, using mild conditions (LDA, THF at -20 °C). (hud.ac.uk)
  • Phosphine is a colorless, flammable, and explosive gas at ambient temperature that has the odor of garlic or decaying fish. (cdc.gov)
  • Phosphine is a colorless, flammable, and toxic gas with an odor of garlic or decaying fish. (cdc.gov)
  • It is a colorless liquid that reacts with water and oxygen. (wikipedia.org)
  • Phosphine breaks down rapidly in the environment so the general population may only be exposed to small amounts of this compound by inhaling air, drinking water and eating foods. (cdc.gov)
  • In this system, a phosphine is a δ3λ3 compound. (wikipedia.org)
  • Phosphine is not to be confused with phosgene, which is a totally different molecular compound. (enotes.com)
  • Phosphines are phosphorous-containing molecules that react with azides to form a stable phosphorous-nitrogen compound. (berkeley.edu)
  • It could also undergo Staudinger ligation with phosphine containing compound. (biotium.com)
  • rm \lbrack (C\sb5 Me\sb5)Rh(TMT)\rbrack\sp{2+}$ (TMT = tetramethylthiophene) reacts with cobaltocene to give the new compound ($\rm C\sb5Me\sb5)Rh(\eta\sp4$-TMT), 2. (illinois.edu)
  • and (d) a leveler, wherein the leveler comprises a quaternized dipyridyl compound prepared by reacting a dipyridyl compound with a d. (sumobrain.com)
  • ine is a phosphine precursor for ligand preparation in Negishi and Suzuki coupling reactions. (sigmaaldrich.com)
  • Cp,Cp-MannOP, a chiral diphosphinite ligand by reacting with mannitol. (sigmaaldrich.com)
  • Both groups indicated that a rhodium catalyst, modified with a chiral phosphine ligand, was capable of inducing asymmetric hydrogenation in a suitable prochiral substrate. (pharmtech.com)
  • When phosphine toxicity is suspected, but phosphine exposure has not occurred, ingestion or transdermal contamination from phosphides should be considered. (cdc.gov)
  • Ingestion of metal phosphides results in release of phosphine in your stomach which can cause nausea, vomiting, abdominal pain, and diarrhea. (cdc.gov)
  • Phosphine and metal phosphides are used to kill rats in areas used for grain storage, but should not be used in family dwellings. (cdc.gov)
  • Metallic phosphides on clothes, skin, or hair can react with water or moisture to generate phosphine gas. (cdc.gov)
  • Vomitus containing phosphides can also off-gas phosphine. (cdc.gov)
  • Most phosphine exposures occur by inhalation of the gas or ingestion of metallic phosphides, but dermal exposure to phosphides can also cause systemic effects. (cdc.gov)
  • Ingestion of metallic phosphides can produce phosphine intoxication when the solid phosphide contacts gastric acid. (cdc.gov)
  • Phosphine is produced when metallic phosphides (e.g., aluminum, calcium, or zinc phosphides) react with water or acid. (cdc.gov)
  • Reacts with several metals to form phosphides. (nih.gov)
  • Most often produced when metallic phosphides such as aluminium, calcium, or zinc phosphides react with water or acid, phosphine can also be produced during the generation of acetylene gas. (gasworld.com)
  • The general population may be exposed to very small amounts of phosphine in air, food or water. (cdc.gov)
  • Direct contact with phosphine liquid may cause frostbite. (cdc.gov)
  • Liquid phosphine on your skin can cause frostbite. (cdc.gov)
  • Contact with liquefied or compressed phosphine gas may cause frostbite. (cdc.gov)
  • Reacts with alkali hydroxides with formation of phosphine and sodium hypophosphite. (nih.gov)
  • 7a This strategy has since been employed to promote Wittig, Appel, Staudinger, and Mitsunobu reactions, as well as other reactions that are thermodynamically driven by virtue of the formation of phosphine oxide. (rsc.org)
  • Information about protection against explosions and fires: May react with water or acids to produce phosphine gas which is toxic and flammable. (americanelements.com)
  • However, consumption of food contaminated with metal phosphide pesticide can produce phosphine intoxication when the solid phosphide contacts acid in the stomach. (cdc.gov)
  • Phosphine gas may also be released when acetylene is made by the action of water on calcium carbide which is contaminated with calcium phosphide as is commonly the case. (cdc.gov)
  • Phostoxin gassing tablets contain aluminium phosphide, which reacts with normal atmospheric moisture to liberate phosphine (hydrogen phosphide) gas. (rentokil.co.uk)
  • The acid in the digestive system of the rodent reacts with the phosphide to generate the toxic phosphine gas. (qcsupply.com)
  • This Alert describes 205 cases of illness or injury in workers exposed to phosphine gas associated with phosphide fumigants. (cdc.gov)
  • Phosphide fumigants release toxic phosphine gas (PH3) when they contact moisture in the air. (cdc.gov)
  • Phosphine is released into the air via emissions from various manufacturing processes and from the use of metal (magnesium, aluminium and zinc) phosphide fumigants and pesticides, which release phosphine on contact with water or acid. (gasworld.com)
  • Long-term exposure to very low levels of phosphine can result in anemia, bronchitis, gastrointestinal effects, and visual, speech and motor problems. (cdc.gov)
  • Most families will not be exposed to significant levels of phosphine. (cdc.gov)
  • Children exposed to the same levels of phosphine as adults may receive a larger dose because they have greater lung surface area:body weight ratios and increased minute volumes:weight ratios. (cdc.gov)
  • In addition, they may be exposed to higher levels than adults in the same location because of their short stature and the higher levels of phosphine found nearer to the ground. (cdc.gov)
  • Although less prevalent, ylides can also be prepared by simply mixing activated alkenes, acetylenes, and allenes with tertiary phosphines. (rsc.org)
  • 2. The macromolecular material of claim 1, wherein said antioxidant is triphenyl phosphine, tritolyl phosphine or trixylyl phosphine. (google.ca)
  • Treatment of the tetrazole moiety with triphenyl phosphine gives the 4-amino derivative. (google.com)
  • Phosphine gas produces no adverse effects on the skin or eyes, and contact does not result in systemic toxicity. (cdc.gov)
  • This produces phosphine (see ICSC 0694). (inchem.org)
  • When phosphine is inhaled, it can react with moisture in the lungs to form phosphoric acid, which can cause blistering and edema. (cdc.gov)
  • Ethyl 2,3-butadienoate may be used in the synthesis of dihydropyrans by reacting with acyclic enones. (sigmaaldrich.com)
  • Versatile Building Block for the Synthesis of Phosphine-Containing Peptides: The Sulfide of Diphenylphosphinoserine," J. Am. Chem. (patentgenius.com)
  • Synthesis of Phosphine-Rhodium Complexes Attached to a Standard peptide Synthesis Resin," Organometallics, vol. 15, pp. 4678-4680, (1996). (patentgenius.com)
  • Phosphine interferes with enzymes and protein synthesis, primarily in the mitochondria of heart and lung cells. (gasworld.com)
  • No. 513,599 filed on July 14, 1983 which concerns polymer polyols made by reacting an alkylene oxide adduct of a hydroxyl containing amine with an organic polyisocyanate in a polyetherpolyol of 3,000 to 8,000 molecular weight. (patentgenius.com)
  • The pendant amine groups were then either quaternized or further reacted with phosphine. (ac.be)
  • Reacts violently with acids, water and moist air. (inchem.org)
  • Reacts violently with acids and oxidants. (inchem.org)
  • Reacts violently with strong oxidants. (inchem.org)
  • It reacts violently with bases and is corrosive. (inchem.org)
  • These mononuclear Rh(I)-Phosphines were investigated as catalysts in the hydroformylation of 1-hexene and cyclohexene in aqueous two-phase and single-phase solvent systems. (edu.pl)
  • The Rh(I) catalysts with strong σ-donor and hydrophilic phosphines provided better yields and selectivities for the hydroformylation products, which is a reverse trend compared to literature reports. (edu.pl)
  • However, for some applications, catalysts that react only at higher temperatures are desirable. (caltech.edu)
  • Agricultural: If phosphine is released as a gas, it is highly unlikely to contaminate agricultural products. (cdc.gov)
  • Exposure to phosphine can cause abdominal pain, nausea, and vomiting. (cdc.gov)
  • Inhalation is the most likely route of exposure to phosphine. (cdc.gov)
  • Children appear to be affected by exposure to phosphine in the same ways as adults. (cdc.gov)
  • We do not know if exposure to phosphine will result in birth defects or other developmental effects in people. (cdc.gov)
  • How can families reduce the risk of exposure to phosphine? (cdc.gov)
  • Exposure to phosphine has also been linked with other effects such as chest tightness, headache, dizziness, and nausea. (cdc.gov)
  • In 1988, NIOSH published survey results showing that worker exposure to phosphine often substantially exceeded the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) permissible exposure limit (PEL) [Zaebst et. (cdc.gov)
  • Inhalation is the major route of phosphine toxicity. (cdc.gov)
  • University of Queensland's Associate Professor Paul Ebert says the direct toxicity of phosphine is relatively low. (grdc.com.au)
  • Phosphine is also used as a condensation catalyst and in the manufacture of some polymers, though it can also be used in the production of some chemicals and metal alloys and is an unintentional by-product in the production of the drug methamphetamine. (gasworld.com)
  • A relationship between Δgd31P chemical shifts and the ν(C≡O) was derived to evaluate and explain the σ-donor properties of these phosphines with respect to the electronic properties of the polar groups and the extent of π-back-bonding to the CO group. (edu.pl)
  • What is the chemical formula of phosphine gas? (enotes.com)
  • The chemical formula for phosphine is PH3. (enotes.com)
  • The main uses of phosphine are as a chemical dopant in the manufacture of semi-conductors for the electronics industry, and in the fumigation of stored agricultural products such as cereal grains and tobacco. (gasworld.com)
  • Ingestion of phosphine is unlikely because it is a gas at room temperature. (cdc.gov)
  • At high concentrations, phosphine vapors may spontaneously combust in air. (cdc.gov)
  • Phosphine is pyrophoric in high concentrations and may form explosive mixtures with air - it ignites spontaneously on contact with air. (gasworld.com)
  • The performance of this novel phosphine oxide was superior to those of current best-in-class counterparts, as verified experimentally through kinetic analysis of its silane-mediated reduction. (rsc.org)
  • To minimize the generation of the phosphine oxide byproduct, we turned our attention to the recently developed catalytic Wittig conditions. (rsc.org)
  • The second, is by reacting 1-Isobutyl- lH-imidazo- [4,5-c]-quinoline-5-N-oxide (III) with ammonium hydroxide or its salts in presence of tosyl chloride at 0 - 5°C. The third reported method is by reacting 1-Isobutyl-lH- imidazo-[4,5-c]-quinoline-5-N-oχide with benzoyl isocyanate. (google.com)
  • Instead of producing energy, phosphine causes the cells to generate highly reactive and extremely toxic oxygen radicals. (grdc.com.au)
  • NIOSH therefore requests that editors of trade journals, safety and health officials, labor unions, and agricultural employers bring this Alert to the attention of all workers who handle products that generate phosphine gas. (cdc.gov)
  • Thus in processes disclosed heretofore, it is generally necessary first to react the olefin to be hydroformylated with carbon monoxide and hydrogen to form the corresponding aldehyde. (google.com.au)
  • The level at which humans detect the odor of phosphine (odor threshold) does not provide sufficient warning of dangerous concentrations. (cdc.gov)
  • Phosphine has a fish- or garlic-like odor, but may not provide adequate warning of hazardous concentrations. (cdc.gov)
  • Allyl phosphines electron donating like cyanide. (scribd.com)
  • 6. The macromolecular material of claim 5, wherein said thixotropic agent is a hydrophilic fumed pyrogenic reacted silica. (google.ca)
  • Phosphine can be absorbed into the body by inhalation. (cdc.gov)
  • The method comprises: reacting an alkene with 9-bbn at 0-80˚C for 0.5-12 h, and then adding an imine to react at. (sumobrain.com)
  • Improved protein solubility in two-dimensional electrophoresis using tributyl phosphine as reducing agent. (nih.gov)
  • Tributyl phosphine improves protein solubility during isoelectric focusing, which results in shorter run times and increased resolution. (nih.gov)
  • α,β-Unsaturated nitriles generally react at the α-position to give α,β-unsaturated ketones. (wiley.com)
  • It may also be used to synthesize spiranic heterocycles by reacting with heterocyclic bis-arylidene ketones via phosphine-catalyzed [3+2] annulations. (sigmaaldrich.com)
  • Phosphine has an odor of garlic or decaying fish but is odorless when pure. (cdc.gov)
  • Phosphine is a respiratory tract irritant that attacks primarily the cardiovascular and respiratory systems causing peripheral vascular collapse, cardiac arrest and failure, and pulmonary edema. (cdc.gov)
  • The baits have strong, pungent garlic-like odor characteristic for phosphine liberated by hydrolysis. (qcsupply.com)
  • Bertozzi figured that if she could attach an azide to a natural sugar and feed it to cells, she could insinuate the sugar into the sugar polymers (oligosaccharides) that decorate the exterior of cells, then use the Staudinger ligation to attach phosphines to these azides. (berkeley.edu)
  • Phosphine makes the cells produce more oxygen radicals, which themselves trigger radical chain reactions in the cells as the fumigation progresses ( Figure 1 ). (grdc.com.au)
  • Resistant insects can still be controlled with phosphine but the fumigation time required is much longer. (grdc.com.au)
  • For phosphine to be effective this means extending the fumigation time. (grdc.com.au)
  • NIOSH alert: preventing phosphine poisoning and explosions during fumigation. (cdc.gov)
  • Many organometallic species react with triplet oxygen to form the corresponding hydroperoxides, 1 , 2 although the products are more usually reduced in situ or during workup to afford alcohols as the isolated products. (wiley.com)
  • This means the gas itself does not cause death but it reacts with oxygen to form toxic by-products that cause death. (grdc.com.au)
  • Biotin azide reacts with alkyne to form 1,2,3-triazole by copper(I) catalyzed 1,3-dipolar Huisgen cycloaddition. (biotium.com)
  • rm C\sb5Me\sb4Et)Ru$) $\sb2$S$\sb6$(CO)$\sb2$ eliminates SCO to give (($\rm C\sb5Me\sb4Et)Ru$) $\sb2$S$\sb5$(CO). (($\rm C\sb5Me\sb4Et)Ru$) $\sb2$S$\sb4$ reacts with CO to form (($\rm C\sb5Me\sb4Et)Ru$) $\sb2$S$\sb4$(CO) (3). (illinois.edu)
  • The invention more particularly relates to polymer polyols made from partially reacted polyamines with an organic polyisocyanate in a polyether polyol solvent. (patentgenius.com)
  • Most growers at some time will have used phosphine, sold as phostoxin or fumitoxin, to keep grain free of live insects as it is inexpensive, controls all pests (if used correctly) and is accepted by international markets. (grdc.com.au)
  • Water: Phosphine breaks down in water and cannot be used to contaminate water supplies. (cdc.gov)
  • Phosphine is expected to react with water and be broken down into other products. (cdc.gov)
  • Reacts with water. (alfa.com)
  • Because of these characteristics, phosphine is widely used as a fumigant of metabolically dormant stored products such as grain. (gasworld.com)