Clinical Alarms: Components of medical instrumentation used for physiological evaluation of patients, that signal when a threshold value is reached.Protective Devices: Devices designed to provide personal protection against injury to individuals exposed to hazards in industry, sports, aviation, or daily activities.FiresEquipment Failure: Failure of equipment to perform to standard. The failure may be due to defects or improper use.Smoke Inhalation Injury: Pulmonary injury following the breathing in of toxic smoke from burning materials such as plastics, synthetics, building materials, etc. This injury is the most frequent cause of death in burn patients.Enuresis: Involuntary discharge of URINE after expected age of completed development of urinary control. This can happen during the daytime (DIURNAL ENURESIS) while one is awake or during sleep (NOCTURNAL ENURESIS). Enuresis can be in children or in adults (as persistent primary enuresis and secondary adult-onset enuresis).Animal Communication: Communication between animals involving the giving off by one individual of some chemical or physical signal, that, on being received by another, influences its behavior.Escape Reaction: Innate response elicited by sensory stimuli associated with a threatening situation, or actual confrontation with an enemy.Pheromones: Chemical substances, excreted by an organism into the environment, that elicit behavioral or physiological responses from other organisms of the same species. Perception of these chemical signals may be olfactory or by contact.Vocalization, Animal: Sounds used in animal communication.Eagles: Large members of the FALCONIFORMES order of birds, family Accipitridae, most especially the genera Aquila, Haliaeetus, Harpia, and Circaetus. They are characterized by their powerful talons, which carry long, curved, pointed claws and by their opposable hindtoe.Predatory Behavior: Instinctual behavior pattern in which food is obtained by killing and consuming other species.Monitoring, Ambulatory: The use of electronic equipment to observe or record physiologic processes while the patient undergoes normal daily activities.Monitoring, Physiologic: The continuous measurement of physiological processes, blood pressure, heart rate, renal output, reflexes, respiration, etc., in a patient or experimental animal; includes pharmacologic monitoring, the measurement of administered drugs or their metabolites in the blood, tissues, or urine.Fire Extinguishing Systems: Automatic or hand operated equipment used to control and extinguish fires.Passeriformes: A widely distributed order of perching BIRDS, including more than half of all bird species.Public Housing: Housing subsidized by tax funds, usually intended for low income persons or families.Cercopithecus: A genus of Old World monkeys found in Africa although some species have been introduced into the West Indies. This genus is composed of at least twenty species: C. AETHIOPS, C. ascanius, C. campbelli, C. cephus, C. denti, C. diana, C. dryas, C. erythrogaster, C. erythrotis, C. hamlyni, C. lhoesti, C. mitis, C. mona, C. neglectus, C. nictitans, C. petaurista, C. pogonias, C. preussi, C. salongo, and C. wolfi.Nocturnal Enuresis: Involuntary discharge of URINE during sleep at night after expected age of completed development of urinary control.Recovery Room: Hospital unit providing continuous monitoring of the patient following anesthesia.Mental Fatigue: A condition of low alertness or cognitive impairment, usually associated with prolonged mental activities or stress.Housing: Living facilities for humans.Sound Spectrography: The graphic registration of the frequency and intensity of sounds, such as speech, infant crying, and animal vocalizations.SmokeAphids: A family (Aphididae) of small insects, in the suborder Sternorrhyncha, that suck the juices of plants. Important genera include Schizaphis and Myzus. The latter is known to carry more than 100 virus diseases between plants.Lemuridae: A family of the order PRIMATES, suborder Strepsirhini (PROSIMII), containing four genera which inhabit Madagascar and the Comoro Island. Most of the lemurs prefer wooded areas. The four genera are Hapalemur, LEMUR, Lepilemur, and Varecia.Falconiformes: An order of diurnal BIRDS of prey, including EAGLES; HAWKS; buzzards; vultures; and falcons.Hypoglycemia: A syndrome of abnormally low BLOOD GLUCOSE level. Clinical hypoglycemia has diverse etiologies. Severe hypoglycemia eventually lead to glucose deprivation of the CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM resulting in HUNGER; SWEATING; PARESTHESIA; impaired mental function; SEIZURES; COMA; and even DEATH.Australian Capital Territory: A territory of Australia consisting of Canberra, the national capital and surrounding land. It lies geographically within NEW SOUTH WALES and was established by law in 1988.Diagnostic Techniques, Digestive System: Methods and procedures for the diagnosis of diseases or dysfunction of the digestive system or its organs or demonstration of their physiological processes.Anesthesiology: A specialty concerned with the study of anesthetics and anesthesia.Songbirds: PASSERIFORMES of the suborder, Oscines, in which the flexor tendons of the toes are separate, and the lower syrinx has 4 to 9 pairs of tensor muscles inserted at both ends of the tracheal half rings. They include many commonly recognized birds such as CROWS; FINCHES; robins; SPARROWS; and SWALLOWS.Bedbugs: Bugs of the family CIMICIDAE, genus Cimex. They are flattened, oval, reddish insects which inhabit houses, wallpaper, furniture, and beds. C. lectularius, of temperate regions, is the common bedbug that attacks humans and is frequently a serious pest in houses, hotels, barracks, and other living quarters. Experiments have shown that bedbugs can transmit a variety of diseases, but they are not normal vectors under natural conditions. (From Dorland, 27th ed; Borror, et al., An Introduction to the Study of Insects, 4th ed, p272)Palinuridae: A family of marine CRUSTACEA, in the order DECAPODA, comprising the clawless lobsters. They are found in tropical and subtropical waters and characterized by short spines along the length of the tail and body.Noise, Occupational: Noise present in occupational, industrial, and factory situations.Cadmium Radioisotopes: Unstable isotopes of cadmium that decay or disintegrate emitting radiation. Cd atoms with atomic weights 103-105, 107, 109, 115, and 117-119 are radioactive cadmium isotopes.Electric Power Supplies: Devices that control the supply of electric current for running electrical equipment.Ear Protective Devices: Personal devices for protection of the ears from loud or high intensity noise, water, or cold. These include earmuffs and earplugs.Hawks: Common name for many members of the FALCONIFORMES order, family Accipitridae, generally smaller than EAGLES, and containing short, rounded wings and a long tail.Behavior, Animal: The observable response an animal makes to any situation.Auditory Perception: The process whereby auditory stimuli are selected, organized, and interpreted by the organism.Dyspepsia: Impaired digestion, especially after eating.Tape Recording: Recording of information on magnetic or punched paper tape.Equipment and Supplies, Hospital: Any materials used in providing care specifically in the hospital.Beds: Equipment on which one may lie and sleep, especially as used to care for the hospital patient.Diatomaceous Earth: A form of SILICON DIOXIDE composed of skeletons of prehistoric aquatic plants which is used for its ABSORPTION quality, taking up 1.5-4 times its weight in water. The microscopic sharp edges are useful for insect control but can also be an inhalation hazard. It has been used in baked goods and animal feed. Kieselguhr is German for flint + earthy sediment.Burns: Injuries to tissues caused by contact with heat, steam, chemicals (BURNS, CHEMICAL), electricity (BURNS, ELECTRIC), or the like.Voice: The sounds produced by humans by the passage of air through the LARYNX and over the VOCAL CORDS, and then modified by the resonance organs, the NASOPHARYNX, and the MOUTH.Hospital Communication Systems: The transmission of messages to staff and patients within a hospital.Blood Glucose Self-Monitoring: Self evaluation of whole blood glucose levels outside the clinical laboratory. A digital or battery-operated reflectance meter may be used. It has wide application in controlling unstable insulin-dependent diabetes.Sympatry: In evolutionary theory, overlapping geographic distribution of diverging species. In sympatric GENETIC SPECIATION, genetic diversion occurs without geographic separation.Deception: The act of deceiving or the fact of being deceived.Operating Rooms: Facilities equipped for performing surgery.OklahomaSound: A type of non-ionizing radiation in which energy is transmitted through solid, liquid, or gas as compression waves. Sound (acoustic or sonic) radiation with frequencies above the audible range is classified as ultrasonic. Sound radiation below the audible range is classified as infrasonic.Security Measures: Regulations to assure protection of property and equipment.Acoustics: The branch of physics that deals with sound and sound waves. In medicine it is often applied in procedures in speech and hearing studies. With regard to the environment, it refers to the characteristics of a room, auditorium, theatre, building, etc. that determines the audibility or fidelity of sounds in it. (From Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed)Cebus: A genus of the family CEBIDAE, subfamily CEBINAE, consisting of four species which are divided into two groups, the tufted and untufted. C. apella has tufts of hair over the eyes and sides of the head. The remaining species are without tufts - C. capucinus, C. nigrivultatus, and C. albifrons. Cebus inhabits the forests of Central and South America.False Positive Reactions: Positive test results in subjects who do not possess the attribute for which the test is conducted. The labeling of healthy persons as diseased when screening in the detection of disease. (Last, A Dictionary of Epidemiology, 2d ed)Safety Management: The development of systems to prevent accidents, injuries, and other adverse occurrences in an institutional setting. The concept includes prevention or reduction of adverse events or incidents involving employees, patients, or facilities. Examples include plans to reduce injuries from falls or plans for fire safety to promote a safe institutional environment.Silica Gel: A non-crystalline form of silicon oxide that has absorptive properties. It is commonly used as a desiccating agent and as a stationary phase for CHROMATOGRAPHY. The fully hydrated form of silica gel has distinct properties and is referred to as SILICIC ACID.Motor Vehicles: AUTOMOBILES, trucks, buses, or similar engine-driven conveyances. (From Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed)Carnivora: An order of MAMMALS, usually flesh eaters with appropriate dentition. Suborders include the terrestrial carnivores Fissipedia, and the aquatic carnivores PINNIPEDIA.Carps: Common name for a number of different species of fish in the family Cyprinidae. This includes, among others, the common carp, crucian carp, grass carp, and silver carp.Emergency Medical Service Communication Systems: The use of communication systems, such as telecommunication, to transmit emergency information to appropriate providers of health services.Volatilization: A phase transition from liquid state to gas state, which is affected by Raoult's law. It can be accomplished by fractional distillation.Strigiformes: An order of BIRDS with the common name owls characterized by strongly hooked beaks, sharp talons, large heads, forward facing eyes, and facial disks. While considered nocturnal RAPTORS, some owls do hunt by day.Safety: Freedom from exposure to danger and protection from the occurrence or risk of injury or loss. It suggests optimal precautions in the workplace, on the street, in the home, etc., and includes personal safety as well as the safety of property.Marmota: A genus of Sciuridae consisting of 14 species. They are shortlegged, burrowing rodents which hibernate in winter.1-Octanol: A colorless, slightly viscous liquid used as a defoaming or wetting agent. It is also used as a solvent for protective coatings, waxes, and oils, and as a raw material for plasticizers. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 5th ed)Oximetry: The determination of oxygen-hemoglobin saturation of blood either by withdrawing a sample and passing it through a classical photoelectric oximeter or by electrodes attached to some translucent part of the body like finger, earlobe, or skin fold. It includes non-invasive oxygen monitoring by pulse oximetry.LondonInsulin Infusion Systems: Portable or implantable devices for infusion of insulin. Includes open-loop systems which may be patient-operated or controlled by a pre-set program and are designed for constant delivery of small quantities of insulin, increased during food ingestion, and closed-loop systems which deliver quantities of insulin automatically based on an electronic glucose sensor.Carbon Monoxide Poisoning: Toxic asphyxiation due to the displacement of oxygen from oxyhemoglobin by carbon monoxide.Algorithms: A procedure consisting of a sequence of algebraic formulas and/or logical steps to calculate or determine a given task.Nesting Behavior: Animal behavior associated with the nest; includes construction, effects of size and material; behavior of the adult during the nesting period and the effect of the nest on the behavior of the young.Colinus: A genus of QUAIL, in the family Odontophoridae, comprised of at least four different species of bobwhites.Behavior Therapy: The application of modern theories of learning and conditioning in the treatment of behavior disorders.Ventilators, Mechanical: Mechanical devices used to produce or assist pulmonary ventilation.Equipment Design: Methods of creating machines and devices.Sleep Stages: Periods of sleep manifested by changes in EEG activity and certain behavioral correlates; includes Stage 1: sleep onset, drowsy sleep; Stage 2: light sleep; Stages 3 and 4: delta sleep, light sleep, deep sleep, telencephalic sleep.Pancreas, Artificial: Devices for simulating the activity of the pancreas. They can be either electromechanical, consisting of a glucose sensor, computer, and insulin pump or bioartificial, consisting of isolated islets of Langerhans in an artificial membrane.Immobility Response, Tonic: An induced response to threatening stimuli characterized by complete loss of muscle strength.Automatic Data Processing: Data processing largely performed by automatic means.Deglutition Disorders: Difficulty in SWALLOWING which may result from neuromuscular disorder or mechanical obstruction. Dysphagia is classified into two distinct types: oropharyngeal dysphagia due to malfunction of the PHARYNX and UPPER ESOPHAGEAL SPHINCTER; and esophageal dysphagia due to malfunction of the ESOPHAGUS.Recognition (Psychology): The knowledge or perception that someone or something present has been previously encountered.Ants: Insects of the family Formicidae, very common and widespread, probably the most successful of all the insect groups. All ants are social insects, and most colonies contain three castes, queens, males, and workers. Their habits are often very elaborate and a great many studies have been made of ant behavior. Ants produce a number of secretions that function in offense, defense, and communication. (From Borror, et al., An Introduction to the Study of Insects, 4th ed, p676)Equipment and Supplies: Expendable and nonexpendable equipment, supplies, apparatus, and instruments that are used in diagnostic, surgical, therapeutic, scientific, and experimental procedures.SesquiterpenesPresbycusis: Gradual bilateral hearing loss associated with aging that is due to progressive degeneration of cochlear structures and central auditory pathways. Hearing loss usually begins with the high frequencies then progresses to sounds of middle and low frequencies.Dendrobium: A plant genus of the family ORCHIDACEAE that contains dihydroayapin (COUMARINS) and phenanthraquinones.Urban Renewal: The planned upgrading of a deteriorating urban area, involving rebuilding, renovation, or restoration. It frequently refers to programs of major demolition and rebuilding of blighted areas.Endoscopy, Gastrointestinal: Endoscopic examination, therapy or surgery of the gastrointestinal tract.Acoustic Stimulation: Use of sound to elicit a response in the nervous system.Poverty Areas: City, urban, rural, or suburban areas which are characterized by severe economic deprivation and by accompanying physical and social decay.Anxiety, Separation: Anxiety experienced by an individual upon separation from a person or object of particular significance to the individual.Odors: The volatile portions of substances perceptible by the sense of smell. (Grant & Hackh's Chemical Dictionary, 5th ed)Fear: The affective response to an actual current external danger which subsides with the elimination of the threatening condition.Nymph: The immature stage in the life cycle of those orders of insects characterized by gradual metamorphosis, in which the young resemble the imago in general form of body, including compound eyes and external wings; also the 8-legged stage of mites and ticks that follows the first moult.Olfactory Bulb: Ovoid body resting on the CRIBRIFORM PLATE of the ethmoid bone where the OLFACTORY NERVE terminates. The olfactory bulb contains several types of nerve cells including the mitral cells, on whose DENDRITES the olfactory nerve synapses, forming the olfactory glomeruli. The accessory olfactory bulb, which receives the projection from the VOMERONASAL ORGAN via the vomeronasal nerve, is also included here.Gastroenterology: A subspecialty of internal medicine concerned with the study of the physiology and diseases of the digestive system and related structures (esophagus, liver, gallbladder, and pancreas).Blood Specimen Collection: The taking of a blood sample to determine its character as a whole, to identify levels of its component cells, chemicals, gases, or other constituents, to perform pathological examination, etc.Insect Control: The reduction or regulation of the population of noxious, destructive, or dangerous insects through chemical, biological, or other means.Noise: Any sound which is unwanted or interferes with HEARING other sounds.Reaction Time: The time from the onset of a stimulus until a response is observed.Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1: A subtype of DIABETES MELLITUS that is characterized by INSULIN deficiency. It is manifested by the sudden onset of severe HYPERGLYCEMIA, rapid progression to DIABETIC KETOACIDOSIS, and DEATH unless treated with insulin. The disease may occur at any age, but is most common in childhood or adolescence.Aversive Therapy: A treatment that suppresses undesirable behavior by simultaneously exposing the subject to unpleasant consequences.Equipment Failure Analysis: The evaluation of incidents involving the loss of function of a device. These evaluations are used for a variety of purposes such as to determine the failure rates, the causes of failures, costs of failures, and the reliability and maintainability of devices.Cues: Signals for an action; that specific portion of a perceptual field or pattern of stimuli to which a subject has learned to respond.Olfactory Pathways: Set of nerve fibers conducting impulses from olfactory receptors to the cerebral cortex. It includes the OLFACTORY NERVE; OLFACTORY BULB; OLFACTORY TRACT; OLFACTORY TUBERCLE; ANTERIOR PERFORATED SUBSTANCE; and OLFACTORY CORTEX.Discrimination (Psychology): Differential response to different stimuli.Critical Care: Health care provided to a critically ill patient during a medical emergency or crisis.Urban Health: The status of health in urban populations.Hematuria: Presence of blood in the urine.Apnea: A transient absence of spontaneous respiration.Cercopithecidae: The family of Old World monkeys and baboons consisting of two subfamilies: CERCOPITHECINAE and COLOBINAE. They are found in Africa and part of Asia.Human Engineering: The science of designing, building or equipping mechanical devices or artificial environments to the anthropometric, physiological, or psychological requirements of the people who will use them.Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Sciuridae: A family of the order Rodentia which contains 49 genera. Some of the more common genera are MARMOTA, which includes the marmot and woodchuck; Sciurus, the gray squirrel, S. carolinensis, and the fox squirrel, S. niger; Tamias, the eastern and western chipmunk; and Tamiasciurus, the red squirrel. The flying squirrels, except the scaly-tailed Anomaluridae, also belong to this family.Emergencies: Situations or conditions requiring immediate intervention to avoid serious adverse results.Olfactory Perception: The process by which the nature and meaning of olfactory stimuli, such as odors, are recognized and interpreted by the brain.Sensitivity and Specificity: Binary classification measures to assess test results. Sensitivity or recall rate is the proportion of true positives. Specificity is the probability of correctly determining the absence of a condition. (From Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 2d ed)Blood Glucose: Glucose in blood.Biomedical Engineering: Application of principles and practices of engineering science to biomedical research and health care.Analysis of Variance: A statistical technique that isolates and assesses the contributions of categorical independent variables to variation in the mean of a continuous dependent variable.Asphyxia: A pathological condition caused by lack of oxygen, manifested in impending or actual cessation of life.Gastrointestinal Hemorrhage: Bleeding in any segment of the GASTROINTESTINAL TRACT from ESOPHAGUS to RECTUM.Hemiptera: A large order of insects characterized by having the mouth parts adapted to piercing or sucking. It is comprised of four suborders: HETEROPTERA, Auchenorrhyncha, Sternorrhyncha, and Coleorrhyncha.
  • BERLIN (AP) - Authorities say a swingers' club in western Germany had to be evacuated mid-party after a carbon monoxide alarm went off and several guests reported feeling unwell. (kxnet.com)
  • Kidde posted a recall of 452,000 dual sensor smoke alarms in the United States and 40,000 in Canada on Wednesday for the most basic reason: They might not let you know there's a fire starting in your home. (mcall.com)
  • Check out the biggest differences between smart smoke alarms and old-school detectors. (vivint.com)
  • Dated smoke alarms require regular maintenance in order to function properly. (vivint.com)
  • Smart smoke alarms are much easier to maintain. (vivint.com)
  • These days, high-tech smoke alarms can detect a sudden rise in temperature before flames even break out, which can make all the difference in preventing a disaster. (vivint.com)
  • Life changes require adjustments that could produce physiological reactions, and sustained and unsuccessful attempts at coping with life could lower bodily resistance and enhance the probability of illness. (healthy.net)
  • Stress causes either a physiological and/or psychological response called the general adaptation syndrome -essentially, the three stages of alarm, resistance, and exhaustion- first described in 1936 by Hans Selye in the journal Nature . (newworldencyclopedia.org)
  • Predominant adverse reactions included central nervous system effects, behavioural effects and autonomic physiological effects. (druglibrary.org)
  • When startled by or alarmed by a predator , it leaps straight upwards while extending the hind legs and flashing the white sides. (wikipedia.org)
  • Body Alarm Response (B.A.R.), or as some like to call it, Adrenal Stress Response, is a reality of most violent encounters. (dragonsociety.com)
  • Law enforcement organizations and the therapeutic community should be aware of the complex type of posttraumatic stress reactions that occur consistently after prolonged, repeated exposure to violent assaults, murders, rapes, child abuse, natural and manmade disasters as well as on-going personal physical assaults. (giftfromwithin.org)
  • In this stage, the body is alarmed by the stressors and mounts an aggressive anti-stress response to overcome the stressors. (drlam.com)
  • The term is also used to refer to the stimuli that elicit such a state or stress reactions. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • The reaction of the body to continuing stress is even more complex. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • Plant operators are often faced with a high number of alarms and abnormal situations and are therefore unable to respond quickly enough to prevent safety related incidents, environmental issues, shutdowns and equipment damage. (yokogawa.com)
  • In order to execute any action, you now need to setup an alerts filter that will listen to this event and create an action like sending alarms to maintenance engineers. (workerbase.com)
  • Thus an internal reaction makes possible external behavior in response to danger. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • When attacked by predators, diverse animals actively or passively release molecules that evoke alarm and related anti-predatory behavior by nearby conspecifics. (biologists.org)
  • P. argus responds primarily with alarm behavior to conspecific blood, but with mixed alarm and appetitive behaviors to blood from the congener Panulirus interruptus , or with appetitive behaviors to blood from the blue crab Callinectes sapidus . (biologists.org)
  • In contrast, some animals when injured by predators passively leak fluids that induce alarm behavior in neighboring conspecifics, including social groups with little genetic relatedness ( Smith, 1992 ). (biologists.org)
  • Because the alarm substance cells (epidermal club cells) of fathead minnows are seasonally lost by males, we used chemical stimuli from pike that had eaten breeding male minnows as a control stimulus. (springer.com)
  • Unfortunately, it's not always easy to tell if a traditional fire alarm is working properly. (vivint.com)
  • Shortly thereafter, the crew responded to a residential fire alarm at 1033 hours and was back in service at 1044 hours. (cdc.gov)
  • A poorly applied alarm management policy resulting in excessive alarms and events can also make operators routinely ignore alarms due to the excessive amount of information being received. (yokogawa.com)
  • Firefighters in the town of Hattingen, between Dortmund and Duesseldorf in North Rhine-Westphalia, told the dpa news agency Sunday that about 300 swingers were brought to safety after the alarm went off late Saturday night. (kxnet.com)
  • You can press the test button, which tests the sound of the alarm itself, but that doesn't mean the fire-detecting sensors within the device are fully operational. (vivint.com)
  • Many crustaceans passively release alarm cues, but the nature of the cues, sensors and responses is poorly characterized. (biologists.org)
  • This circuit monitors light in surrounding areas at all times, displays light level on the LCD and sounds an alarm when light level becomes low. (electronicsforu.com)
  • Perceptual influence of the vibratory component on the audio component of alarms produced by rumble strips, by measuring reaction times - Descarga este documento en PDF. (duhnnae.com)
  • At times the person may not even be aware of the unconscious thought that produces this dramatic reaction. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • Media reaction, including by the non-tabloid "Financial Times," reflected alarm. (goerie.com)
  • Furthermore, Space offers a new generation of smart alarms with OccluGuard which automatically adapts to any infusion setup, without requiring manual adjustments, and detects occlusions and disconnections up to three times faster than traditional methods. (bbraun.com)
  • We used a behavioral assay to determine if the fright response is the result of the incorporation of the minnow alarm pheromone into the chemical signature of the pike. (springer.com)
  • Behavioral response of solitary fathead minnows, Pimephales promelas to alarm substance. (springer.com)
  • A chemical alarm response in Pycnopodia helianthoides (Echinodermata: Asteroidea). (springer.com)
  • there was a delay and lack of response to the alarms, suggesting that relevant alarms may have been ignored by the health care team , thus compromising the patient safety . (bvsalud.org)
  • Intraspecific and cross-superorder responses to chemical alarm signals by brook stickleback. (springer.com)
  • Here we show in laboratory and field experiments that injured Caribbean spiny lobsters, Panulirus argus , passively release alarm cues via blood (hemolymph) that induce alarm responses in the form of avoidance and suppression of feeding. (biologists.org)
  • Some of these alleged effects, which will be examined in detail below, include acute adverse reactions such as depression, anxiety, panic or psychotic-like, short-term responses cannabis augmentation of pre-existing neuroses. (druglibrary.org)
  • When the Vivint smoke detector senses a fire, the alarm sounds, the smart locks unlock to allow access for emergency personnel, airflow is terminated in the HVAC system to slow the spread of the flames, and the authorities are notified immediately by our professional monitoring service, even if you're not home. (vivint.com)
  • Because it is very important to improve the information flow between OpenStack and the applications on top, Aodh now supports raising alarms based on events emitted by OpenStack services, such as notifications about the state changes of virtual machine instances. (ericsson.com)
  • The passive release of alarm cues during predation events is also frequent in aquatic invertebrates. (biologists.org)
  • These reports aid supervisors and managers in identifying which alarms and events are occurring most frequently and where the alarm management policy can be improved. (yokogawa.com)
  • For those Yokogawa systems that use Exaopc, Yokogawa has extended Exaopc's OPC HDA server to include Historical Alarms & Events (HAE), which allows Exaopc to automatically buffer all alarms and events if the network connection to Exaquantum PIMS is lost. (yokogawa.com)
  • Once the connection is restored, all buffered Exaopc alarms and events will be available to be processed by ARA. (yokogawa.com)