Chalazion: A non-neoplastic cyst of the MEIBOMIAN GLANDS of the eyelid.Triamcinolone: A glucocorticoid given, as the free alcohol or in esterified form, orally, intramuscularly, by local injection, by inhalation, or applied topically in the management of various disorders in which corticosteroids are indicated. (From Martindale, The Extra Pharmacopoeia, 30th ed, p739)Eyelid Neoplasms: Tumors of cancer of the EYELIDS.Triamcinolone Acetonide: An esterified form of TRIAMCINOLONE. It is an anti-inflammatory glucocorticoid used topically in the treatment of various skin disorders. Intralesional, intramuscular, and intra-articular injections are also administered under certain conditions.Entropion: The turning inward (inversion) of the edge of the eyelid, with the tarsal cartilage turned inward toward the eyeball. (Dorland, 27th ed)Eyelid DiseasesEctropion: The turning outward (eversion) of the edge of the eyelid, resulting in the exposure of the palpebral conjunctiva. (Dorland, 27th ed)Blepharoptosis: Drooping of the upper lid due to deficient development or paralysis of the levator palpebrae muscle.Blepharitis: Inflammation of the eyelids.Eyelids: Each of the upper and lower folds of SKIN which cover the EYE when closed.Ophthalmic Solutions: Sterile solutions that are intended for instillation into the eye. It does not include solutions for cleaning eyeglasses or CONTACT LENS SOLUTIONS.Cicatrix: The fibrous tissue that replaces normal tissue during the process of WOUND HEALING.Cathartics: Agents that are used to stimulate evacuation of the bowels.Eye: The organ of sight constituting a pair of globular organs made up of a three-layered roughly spherical structure specialized for receiving and responding to light.Croatia: Created 7 April 1992 as a result of the division of Yugoslavia.Ebolavirus: A genus in the family FILOVIRIDAE consisting of several distinct species of Ebolavirus, each containing separate strains. These viruses cause outbreaks of a contagious, hemorrhagic disease (HEMORRHAGIC FEVER, EBOLA) in humans, usually with high mortality.Hemorrhagic Fever, Ebola: A highly fatal, acute hemorrhagic fever, clinically very similar to MARBURG VIRUS DISEASE, caused by EBOLAVIRUS, first occurring in the Sudan and adjacent northwestern (what was then) Zaire.New York CityTime Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Meibomian Glands: The sebaceous glands situated on the inner surface of the eyelids between the tarsal plates and CONJUNCTIVA.Cellulitis: An acute, diffuse, and suppurative inflammation of loose connective tissue, particularly the deep subcutaneous tissues, and sometimes muscle, which is most commonly seen as a result of infection of a wound, ulcer, or other skin lesions.Encyclopedias as Topic: Works containing information articles on subjects in every field of knowledge, usually arranged in alphabetical order, or a similar work limited to a special field or subject. (From The ALA Glossary of Library and Information Science, 1983)Adenocarcinoma, Sebaceous: A malignant tumor composed of cells showing differentiation toward sebaceous epithelium. The tumor is solitary, firm, somewhat raised, more or less translucent, and covered with normal or slightly verrucose epidermis. It may be yellow or orange. The face and scalp are the commonest sites. The growth can be slow or rapid but metastasis is uncommon. Surgery cures most of the cases. (From Rook et al., Textbook of Dermatology, 4th ed, pp2403-4)Ointments: Semisolid preparations used topically for protective emollient effects or as a vehicle for local administration of medications. Ointment bases are various mixtures of fats, waxes, animal and plant oils and solid and liquid hydrocarbons.Sebaceous Gland NeoplasmsCarcinoma, Basal Cell: A malignant skin neoplasm that seldom metastasizes but has potentialities for local invasion and destruction. Clinically it is divided into types: nodular, cicatricial, morphaic, and erythematoid (pagetoid). They develop on hair-bearing skin, most commonly on sun-exposed areas. Approximately 85% are found on the head and neck area and the remaining 15% on the trunk and limbs. (From DeVita Jr et al., Cancer: Principles & Practice of Oncology, 3d ed, p1471)Oral Medicine: A branch of dentistry dealing with diseases of the oral and paraoral structures and the oral management of systemic diseases. (Hall, What is Oral Medicine, Anyway? Clinical Update: National Naval Dental Center, March 1991, p7-8)Doxycycline: A synthetic tetracycline derivative with similar antimicrobial activity.Eyelashes: The hairs which project from the edges of the EYELIDS.Mite Infestations: Infestations with arthropods of the subclass ACARI, superorder Acariformes.Eye Infections, Bacterial: Infections in the inner or external eye caused by microorganisms belonging to several families of bacteria. Some of the more common genera found are Haemophilus, Neisseria, Staphylococcus, Streptococcus, and Chlamydia.Hordeolum: Purulent infection of one of the sebaceous glands of Zeis along the eyelid margin (external) or of the meibomian gland on the conjunctival side of the eyelid (internal).Styrene: A colorless, toxic liquid with a strong aromatic odor. It is used to make rubbers, polymers and copolymers, and polystyrene plastics.Blogging: Using an INTERNET based personal journal which may consist of reflections, comments, and often hyperlinks.Sweat Glands: Sweat-producing structures that are embedded in the DERMIS. Each gland consists of a single tube, a coiled body, and a superficial duct.Burns: Injuries to tissues caused by contact with heat, steam, chemicals (BURNS, CHEMICAL), electricity (BURNS, ELECTRIC), or the like.Massage: The systematic and methodical manipulations of body tissues best performed with the hands for the purpose of affecting the nervous and muscular systems and the general circulation.Tears: The fluid secreted by the lacrimal glands. This fluid moistens the CONJUNCTIVA and CORNEA.
  • Depending on the chalazion's texture, the excision procedure varies: while fluid matter can easily be removed under minimal invasion, by merely puncturing the chalazion and exerting pressure upon the surrounding tissue, hardened matter usually necessitates a larger incision, through which it can be scraped out. (wikipedia.org)
  • Chalazion surgery is a simple procedure that is generally performed as a day operation, and the person does not need to remain in the hospital for further medical care. (wikipedia.org)
  • Sebaceous gland adenoma Sebaceous gland carcinoma Sarcoid granuloma Foreign body granuloma Topical antibiotic eye drops or ointment (e.g., chloramphenicol or fusidic acid) are sometimes used for the initial acute infection, but are otherwise of little value in treating a chalazion. (wikipedia.org)
  • People with a history of chalazion and those who often touch their eyelids with unclean hands are more prone to this problem. (top10homeremedies.com)
  • If you are prone to developing chalazia, your physician can prescribe preventative regimens, such as cleaning eyelids, applying for medicine on your eyelid and also prescribing oral medication for underlying conditions. (howtorelief.com)
  • Although sebaceous carcinoma and chalazion are often confused, the lesion shown does not resemble a typical chalazion, and has features suggestive of a more sinister process. (optocase.com)
  • Sebaceous carcinoma is mostly a disease of elderly individuals, diagnosed at a mean age of 68.4 3 and rarely presents before the age of 60. (optocase.com)
  • A chalazion (pronounced ka-LAY-zee-un) is a firm and often-painless nodule that develops within the eyelid when the oil gland becomes obstructed or blocked. (clique2click.com)
  • Cranial neuropathies and rarely develops in cirrhotic liver in long-term management but also applies to manhood initiation rites, circumcision, sexuality and learn how to interpret the sentence as a philosophically insignicant empirical phenomenon was only discussed in further bronchoconstriction and mucous membranes through bites or inapparent abrasions or via direct spread from children to adults. (buffalo.edu)