A process involving chance used in therapeutic trials or other research endeavor for allocating experimental subjects, human or animal, between treatment and control groups, or among treatment groups. It may also apply to experiments on inanimate objects.
The injection of drugs, most often analgesics, into the spinal canal without puncturing the dura mater.
A rapid-onset, short-acting cholinesterase inhibitor used in cardiac arrhythmias and in the diagnosis of myasthenia gravis. It has also been used as an antidote to curare principles.
Works about clinical trials that involve at least one test treatment and one control treatment, concurrent enrollment and follow-up of the test- and control-treated groups, and in which the treatments to be administered are selected by a random process, such as the use of a random-numbers table.
Production of an image when x-rays strike a fluorescent screen.
A plan for collecting and utilizing data so that desired information can be obtained with sufficient precision or so that an hypothesis can be tested properly.
Drugs that block nerve conduction when applied locally to nerve tissue in appropriate concentrations. They act on any part of the nervous system and on every type of nerve fiber. In contact with a nerve trunk, these anesthetics can cause both sensory and motor paralysis in the innervated area. Their action is completely reversible. (From Gilman AG, et. al., Goodman and Gilman's The Pharmacological Basis of Therapeutics, 8th ed) Nearly all local anesthetics act by reducing the tendency of voltage-dependent sodium channels to activate.
Societal or individual decisions about the equitable distribution of available resources.
A method of studying a drug or procedure in which both the subjects and investigators are kept unaware of who is actually getting which specific treatment.
Evaluation undertaken to assess the results or consequences of management and procedures used in combating disease in order to determine the efficacy, effectiveness, safety, and practicability of these interventions in individual cases or series.
Planning for the equitable allocation, apportionment, or distribution of available health resources.
The administrative procedures involved with acquiring TISSUES or organs for TRANSPLANTATION through various programs, systems, or organizations. These procedures include obtaining consent from TISSUE DONORS and arranging for transportation of donated tissues and organs, after TISSUE HARVESTING, to HOSPITALS for processing and transplantation.
Total mass of all the organisms of a given type and/or in a given area. (From Concise Dictionary of Biology, 1990) It includes the yield of vegetative mass produced from any given crop.
Prospective patient listings for appointments or treatments.
The number of males per 100 females.
The total process by which organisms produce offspring. (Stedman, 25th ed)
Available manpower, facilities, revenue, equipment, and supplies to produce requisite health care and services.
Detailed financial plans for carrying out specific activities for a certain period of time. They include proposed income and expenditures.
Criteria and standards used for the determination of the appropriateness of the inclusion of patients with specific conditions in proposed treatment plans and the criteria used for the inclusion of subjects in various clinical trials and other research protocols.
The above-ground plant without the roots.
Planning for health resources at a regional or multi-state level.
Focusing on certain aspects of current experience to the exclusion of others. It is the act of heeding or taking notice or concentrating.
An interactive process whereby members of a community are concerned for the equality and rights of all.
Expanded structures, usually green, of vascular plants, characteristically consisting of a bladelike expansion attached to a stem, and functioning as the principal organ of photosynthesis and transpiration. (American Heritage Dictionary, 2d ed)
Final stage of a liver disease when the liver failure is irreversible and LIVER TRANSPLANTATION is needed.
Individuals supplying living tissue, organs, cells, blood or blood components for transfer or transplantation to histocompatible recipients.
An element with the atomic symbol N, atomic number 7, and atomic weight [14.00643; 14.00728]. Nitrogen exists as a diatomic gas and makes up about 78% of the earth's atmosphere by volume. It is a constituent of proteins and nucleic acids and found in all living cells.
Preferentially rated health-related activities or functions to be used in establishing health planning goals. This may refer specifically to PL93-641.
The number of offspring produced at one birth by an oviparous or ovoviviparous animal.
The usually underground portions of a plant that serve as support, store food, and through which water and mineral nutrients enter the plant. (From American Heritage Dictionary, 1982; Concise Dictionary of Biology, 1990)
A class of free-living freshwater flatworms of North America.
New immature growth of a plant including stem, leaves, tips of branches, and SEEDLINGS.
Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.
The transference of a part of or an entire liver from one human or animal to another.
Woody, usually tall, perennial higher plants (Angiosperms, Gymnosperms, and some Pterophyta) having usually a main stem and numerous branches.
Federal, state, or local government organized methods of financial assistance.
Parts of plants that usually grow vertically upwards towards the light and support the leaves, buds, and reproductive structures. (From Concise Dictionary of Biology, 1990)
Sexual activities of animals.
A philosophically coherent set of propositions (for example, utilitarianism) which attempts to provide general norms for the guidance and evaluation of moral conduct. (from Beauchamp and Childress, Principles of Biomedical Ethics, 4th ed)
A nonmetallic element with atomic symbol C, atomic number 6, and atomic weight [12.0096; 12.0116]. It may occur as several different allotropes including DIAMOND; CHARCOAL; and GRAPHITE; and as SOOT from incompletely burned fuel.
The amounts spent by individuals, groups, nations, or private or public organizations for total health care and/or its various components. These amounts may or may not be equivalent to the actual costs (HEALTH CARE COSTS) and may or may not be shared among the patient, insurers, and/or employers.
The cycle by which the element carbon is exchanged between organic matter and the earth's physical environment.
The principles of professional conduct concerning the rights and duties of the physician, relations with patients and fellow practitioners, as well as actions of the physician in patient care and interpersonal relations with patient families.
System of recording financial transactions.
The spurge family of flowering plants, in the order Euphorbiales, contains some 7,500 species in 275 genera. The family consists of annual and perennial herbs and woody shrubs or trees.
The term "United States" in a medical context often refers to the country where a patient or study participant resides, and is not a medical term per se, but relevant for epidemiological studies, healthcare policies, and understanding differences in disease prevalence, treatment patterns, and health outcomes across various geographic locations.
The synthesis by organisms of organic chemical compounds, especially carbohydrates, from carbon dioxide using energy obtained from light rather than from the oxidation of chemical compounds. Photosynthesis comprises two separate processes: the light reactions and the dark reactions. In higher plants; GREEN ALGAE; and CYANOBACTERIA; NADPH and ATP formed by the light reactions drive the dark reactions which result in the fixation of carbon dioxide. (from Oxford Dictionary of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, 2001)
Processes orchestrated or driven by a plethora of genes, plant hormones, and inherent biological timing mechanisms facilitated by secondary molecules, which result in the systematic transformation of plants and plant parts, from one stage of maturity to another.
The unconsolidated mineral or organic matter on the surface of the earth that serves as a natural medium for the growth of land plants.
A functional system which includes the organisms of a natural community together with their environment. (McGraw Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)
A plant family of the order Caryophyllales, subclass Caryophyllidae, class Magnoliopsida. The species are diverse in appearance and habitat; most have swollen leaf and stem joints.
A method in which either the observer(s) or the subject(s) is kept ignorant of the group to which the subjects are assigned.
Theoretical representations that simulate the behavior or activity of systems, processes, or phenomena. They include the use of mathematical equations, computers, and other electronic equipment.
A method of comparing the cost of a program with its expected benefits in dollars (or other currency). The benefit-to-cost ratio is a measure of total return expected per unit of money spent. This analysis generally excludes consideration of factors that are not measured ultimately in economic terms. Cost effectiveness compares alternative ways to achieve a specific set of results.
Theoretical representations that simulate the behavior or activity of biological processes or diseases. For disease models in living animals, DISEASE MODELS, ANIMAL is available. Biological models include the use of mathematical equations, computers, and other electronic equipment.
Tissue, organ, or gamete donation intended for a designated recipient.
A plant genus of the family ASTERACEAE. The common name of snakeroot is also used for POLYGALA; SANICULA; ARISTOLOCHIA and others.
Absolute, comparative, or differential costs pertaining to services, institutions, resources, etc., or the analysis and study of these costs.
The intrinsic moral worth ascribed to a living being. (Bioethics Thesaurus)
The introduction of error due to systematic differences in the characteristics between those selected and those not selected for a given study. In sampling bias, error is the result of failure to ensure that all members of the reference population have a known chance of selection in the sample.
Abstract standards or empirical variables in social life which are believed to be important and/or desirable.
The number of units (persons, animals, patients, specified circumstances, etc.) in a population to be studied. The sample size should be big enough to have a high likelihood of detecting a true difference between two groups. (From Wassertheil-Smoller, Biostatistics and Epidemiology, 1990, p95)
The process by which decisions are made in an institution or other organization.
Animals and plants which have, as their normal mode of reproduction, both male and female sex organs in the same individual.
Decisions, usually developed by government policymakers, for determining present and future objectives pertaining to the health care system.
Statistical formulations or analyses which, when applied to data and found to fit the data, are then used to verify the assumptions and parameters used in the analysis. Examples of statistical models are the linear model, binomial model, polynomial model, two-parameter model, etc.
The process of cumulative change over successive generations through which organisms acquire their distinguishing morphological and physiological characteristics.
The selection or choice of sexual partner in animals. Often this reproductive preference is based on traits in the potential mate, such as coloration, size, or behavioral boldness. If the chosen ones are genetically different from the rejected ones, then NATURAL SELECTION is occurring.
The transference of a kidney from one human or animal to another.
A dead body, usually a human body.
The physical measurements of a body.
In gonochoristic organisms, congenital conditions in which development of chromosomal, gonadal, or anatomical sex is atypical. Effects from exposure to abnormal levels of GONADAL HORMONES in the maternal environment, or disruption of the function of those hormones by ENDOCRINE DISRUPTORS are included.
A system of medical care regulated, controlled and financed by the government, in which the government assumes responsibility for the health needs of the population.
A technique of operations research for solving certain kinds of problems involving many variables where a best value or set of best values is to be found. It is most likely to be feasible when the quantity to be optimized, sometimes called the objective function, can be stated as a mathematical expression in terms of the various activities within the system, and when this expression is simply proportional to the measure of the activities, i.e., is linear, and when all the restrictions are also linear. It is different from computer programming, although problems using linear programming techniques may be programmed on a computer.
The transference of either one or both of the lungs from one human or animal to another.
The absence of certain expected and acceptable cultural phenomena in the environment which results in the failure of the individual to communicate and respond in the most appropriate manner within the context of society. Language acquisition and language use are commonly used in assessing this concept.
Severe inability of the LIVER to perform its normal metabolic functions, as evidenced by severe JAUNDICE and abnormal serum levels of AMMONIA; BILIRUBIN; ALKALINE PHOSPHATASE; ASPARTATE AMINOTRANSFERASE; LACTATE DEHYDROGENASES; and albumin/globulin ratio. (Blakiston's Gould Medical Dictionary, 4th ed)
'Housing, Animal' refers to the physical structure or environment designed and constructed to provide shelter, protection, and specific living conditions for various domestic or captive animals, meeting their biological and behavioral needs while ensuring their welfare and well-being.
The act of making a selection among two or more alternatives, usually after a period of deliberation.
A statistical technique that isolates and assesses the contributions of categorical independent variables to variation in the mean of a continuous dependent variable.
The process of laying or shedding fully developed eggs (OVA) from the female body. The term is usually used for certain INSECTS or FISHES with an organ called ovipositor where eggs are stored or deposited before expulsion from the body.
Plant tissue that carries nutrients, especially sucrose, by turgor pressure. Movement is bidirectional, in contrast to XYLEM where it is only upward. Phloem originates and grows outwards from meristematic cells (MERISTEM) in the vascular cambium. P-proteins, a type of LECTINS, are characteristically found in phloem.
Great Britain is not a medical term, but a geographical name for the largest island in the British Isles, which comprises England, Scotland, and Wales, forming the major part of the United Kingdom.
The process of making a selective intellectual judgment when presented with several complex alternatives consisting of several variables, and usually defining a course of action or an idea.
A plant family of the order Ebenales, subclass Dilleniidae, class Magnoliopsida.
The capacity of an organization, institution, or business to produce desired results with a minimum expenditure of energy, time, money, personnel, materiel, etc.
The reproductive organs of plants.
A plant genus of the family HAMAMELIDACEAE. The sap is a source of storax, which should not be confused with the similar named STYRAX genus.
Divisions of the year according to some regularly recurrent phenomena usually astronomical or climatic. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)
The time from the onset of a stimulus until a response is observed.
Precise and detailed plans for the study of a medical or biomedical problem and/or plans for a regimen of therapy.
The application of mathematical formulas and statistical techniques to the testing and quantifying of economic theories and the solution of economic problems.
The encapsulated embryos of flowering plants. They are used as is or for animal feed because of the high content of concentrated nutrients like starches, proteins, and fats. Rapeseed, cottonseed, and sunflower seed are also produced for the oils (fats) they yield.
Planning for needed health and/or welfare services and facilities.
Temporary visual deficit or impaired visual processing occurring in a rapid serial visual presentation task. After a person identifies the first of two visual targets, the ability to detect the second target is impaired for the next few hundred milliseconds. This phenomenon is called attentional blink.
Health services required by a population or community as well as the health services that the population or community is able and willing to pay for.
The act of feeding on plants by animals.
A plant species of the family POLYGONACEAE. Itadori tea is prepared from the root of this genus.
A plant genus of the family FAGACEAE.
Areawide planning for hospitals or planning of a particular hospital unit on the basis of projected consumer need. This does not include hospital design and construction or architectural plans.
Any of numerous winged hymenopterous insects of social as well as solitary habits and having formidable stings.
A plant genus in the family PINACEAE, order Pinales, class Pinopsida, division Coniferophyta. They are evergreen trees mainly in temperate climates.
The concept concerned with all aspects of providing and distributing health services to a patient population.
Activities concerned with governmental policies, functions, etc.
The actual costs of providing services related to the delivery of health care, including the costs of procedures, therapies, and medications. It is differentiated from HEALTH EXPENDITURES, which refers to the amount of money paid for the services, and from fees, which refers to the amount charged, regardless of cost.
The capacity to conceive or to induce conception. It may refer to either the male or female.

Analysis of gabapentin in serum and plasma by solid-phase extraction and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry for therapeutic drug monitoring. (1/13054)

A simple method for the determination of gabapentin (Neurontin) is described. The method uses solid-phase extraction by disk column and derivatization followed by gas chromatographic-mass spectrometric analysis. The single-step derivatization with MTBSTFA produces a t-BDMS derivative of both the carboxylic and amine moieties of the molecule. Each step of the procedure was optimized to assure reliable performance of the method. The assay limit of detection was 0.1 microg/mL with a linear range from 1.0 to 35 microg/mL. Within-run (n = 3) and between-run (n = 40) coefficients of variation were less than 8.2 and 15.9%, respectively. The method has proven reliable in routine production for more than a year, producing clean chromatography with unique ion fragments, consistent ion mass ratios, and no interferences. Statistical analysis of the gabapentin concentrations measured in 1020 random specimens over a 2-month period showed a mean concentration of 6.07 microg/mL with a standard deviation of 5.28.  (+info)

Progesterone alters biliary flow dynamics. (2/13054)

OBJECTIVE: To test the hypothesis that progesterone alters sphincter of Oddi and gallbladder function and, therefore, bile flow dynamics. SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA: Although the effects of progesterone on the biliary tract have been implicated in the increased incidence of gallstones among women, the specific effects of prolonged elevation of progesterone levels, such as occurs with contraceptive progesterone implants and during pregnancy, on the sphincter of Oddi and biliary flow dynamics are still incompletely understood. METHODS: Adult female prairie dogs were randomly assigned to receive subcutaneous implants containing either progesterone or inactive pellet matrix only. Hepatic bile partitioning and gallbladder emptying were determined 14 days later using 99mTc-Mebrofenin cholescintigraphy. RESULTS: Significantly less hepatic bile partitioned into the gallbladder in progesterone-treated than in control animals. The gallbladder ejection fraction was significantly reduced from 73+/-6% in controls to 59+/-3% in the progesterone-treated animals. The rate of gallbladder emptying was significantly reduced from 3.6+/-0.3%/minute to 2.9+/-0.1%/minute. CONCLUSIONS: Progesterone administered as subcutaneous implants alters partitioning of hepatic bile between gallbladder and small intestine and, therefore, gallbladder filling. Progesterone also significantly impairs gallbladder emptying in response to cholecystokinin. The effects of progesterone on the sphincter of Oddi and the gallbladder may contribute to the greater prevalence of gallstones and biliary motility disorders among women.  (+info)

Protective effect of bactericidal/permeability-increasing protein (rBPI21) in baboon sepsis is related to its antibacterial, not antiendotoxin, properties. (3/13054)

OBJECTIVE AND SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA: The recombinant fragment of bactericidal/permeability-increasing protein, rBPI21, has potent bactericidal activity against gram-negative bacteria as well as antiendotoxin (lipopolysaccharide [LPS]) action. On the basis of these activities, the authors sought to discover whether rBPI21 would be protective in baboons with live Escherichia coli-induced sepsis and whether the potential protective effects of rBPI21 (together with antibiotics) would be more closely related to its antibacterial or LPS-neutralizing effects. METHODS: In a prospective, randomized, placebo-controlled subchronic laboratory study, the efficacy of rBPI21 or placebo was studied over 72 hours in chronically instrumented male baboons infused with live E. coli under antibiotic therapy. RESULTS: Intravenous rBPI21 attenuated sepsis-related organ failure and increased survival significantly. Bacteremia was significantly reduced in the rBPI21 group at 2 hours after the start of the E. coli infusion, whereas circulating LPS was less affected. The in vivo formation of tumor necrosis factor was significantly suppressed by the rBPI21 treatment regimen. Microcirculation and organ function were improved. CONCLUSIONS: In baboon live E. coli sepsis, the salutary effect of rBPI21 results from a more prevalent antibacterial than antiendotoxin activity.  (+info)

Health at work in the general practice. (4/13054)

BACKGROUND: Poor mental health and high stress levels have been reported in staff working in general practice. Little is known about how practices are tackling these and other issues of health at work in the absence of an established occupational healthcare service. AIM: To establish the extent of knowledge and good practice of health at work policies for staff working in general practice. METHOD: Practice managers in 450 randomly selected general practices in England were interviewed by telephone, and the general practitioner (GP) with lead responsibility for workplace health in the same practice was surveyed by postal questionnaire. We surveyed the existence and implementation of practice policies, causes and effects of stress on practice staff, and agreement between practice managers and GPs on these issues. RESULTS: Seventy-one per cent of GPs and 76% of practice managers responded, with at least one reply from 408 (91%) practices and responses from both the practice manager and GPs from 252 (56%) practices. Seventy-nine per cent of practices had a policy on monitoring risks and hazards. The proportion of practices with other workplace health policies ranged from 21% (policy to minimize stress) to 91% (policy on staff smoking). There was a tendency for practices to have policies but not to implement them. The three causes of stress for practice staff most commonly cites by both GP and practice manager responders were 'patient demands', 'too much work', and 'patient abuse/aggression'. Sixty-five per cent of GPs felt that stress had caused mistakes in their practices. Although there was general agreement between the two groups, there was a considerable lack of agreement between responders working in the same practices. CONCLUSIONS: The study revealed substantial neglect of workplace health issues with many practices falling foul of health and safety legislation. This report should help general practices identify issues to tackle to improve their workplace health, and the Health at Work in the NHS project to focus on areas where their targeted help will be most worthwhile.  (+info)

Effect of meat (beef, chicken, and bacon) on rat colon carcinogenesis. (5/13054)

High intake of red meat or processed meat is associated with increased risk of colon cancer. In contrast, consumption of white meat (chicken) is not associated with risk and might even reduce the occurrence of colorectal cancer. We speculated that a diet containing beef or bacon would increase and a diet containing chicken would decrease colon carcinogenesis in rats. One hundred female Fischer 344 rats were given a single injection of azoxymethane (20 mg/kg i.p.), then randomized to 10 different AIN-76-based diets. Five diets were adjusted to 14% fat and 23% protein and five other diets to 28% fat and 40% protein. Fat and protein were supplied by 1) lard and casein, 2) olive oil and casein, 3) beef, 4) chicken with skin, and 5) bacon. Meat diets contained 30% or 60% freeze-dried fried meat. The diets were given ad libitum for 100 days, then colon tumor promotion was assessed by the multiplicity of aberrant crypt foci [number of crypts per aberrant crypt focus (ACF)]. The ACF multiplicity was nearly the same in all groups, except bacon-fed rats, with no effect of fat and protein level or source (p = 0.7 between 8 groups by analysis of variance). In contrast, compared with lard- and casein-fed controls, the ACF multiplicity was reduced by 12% in rats fed a diet with 30% bacon and by 20% in rats fed a diet with 60% bacon (p < 0.001). The water intake was higher in bacon-fed rats than in controls (p < 0.0001). The concentrations of iron and bile acids in fecal water and total fatty acids in feces changed with diet, but there was no correlation between these concentrations and the ACF multiplicity. Thus the hypothesis that colonic iron, bile acids, or total fatty acids can promote colon tumors is not supported by this study. The results suggest that, in rats, beef does not promote the growth of ACF and chicken does not protect against colon carcinogenesis. A bacon-based diet appears to protect against carcinogenesis, perhaps because bacon contains 5% NaCl and increased the rats' water intake.  (+info)

Gonadotropin-releasing hormone improves reproductive performance of dairy cows with slow involution of the reproductive tract. (6/13054)

Eighty multiparous Holstein cows were assigned randomly at calving to receive either 100 microg of GnRH or saline 13 or 14 d postpartum (PP). From 4 to 28 d PP the cows' reproductive organs were palpated weekly per rectum, and cows were subclassified within each group as undergoing slow (delayed) cervical and uterine involution (abnormal) or as normal cows. Last milk obtained after removing the milking machine was assayed for progesterone 3 times a week for 120 d PP. Fourteen of the 80 cows were removed from the experiment because of culling or various veterinary treatments of pathologic conditions that could confound analysis of the GnRH treatment effects. As expected, the treatment of normal cows with GnRH had no significant effects on the first estrus or the first estrous cycle PP, on services per conception, days open, or any other reproductive trait measured. However, in the abnormal group of cows receiving saline, first rebreeding after calving was delayed (81 vs. 67 d), fewer were pregnant by 105 d PP (23 vs. 64%), and number of days open was greater (121 vs. 87 d) compared with those receiving GnRH; all were significant (P<.05). Treated abnormal cows were equivalent to the control normal cows. Thus, GnRH given 13 to 14 d PP to cows characterized as undergoing slow involution of the reproductive system, but with no other clinical problems, seems to assist in promoting rapid normal reproductive function. Subsequent losses due to culling were greatly reduced.  (+info)

An estimation of the requirement for folic acid in gestating sows: the metabolic utilization of folates as a criterion of measurement. (7/13054)

Sows at their second parity were randomly distributed in five groups of seven animals each to determine the dietary concentration of folic acid that optimizes the metabolic utilization of the vitamin during gestation. The groups differed by dietary supplement of folic acid: 0, 5, 10, 15, or 20 ppm. Sows were fed 2.5 kg of diet each day. The response of serum folates and folate binding capacity to treatments and the excretion of urinary folates after an i.v. injection of folic acid were measured. The total daily excretion of urinary folates was corrected according to the response to one i.v. injection of saline on the day preceding the i.v. injection of folic acid. The decrease of total serum folates throughout gestation was less pronounced in the groups fed 15 and 20 ppm of dietary folic acid (supplement x period interaction, P<.06) than it was in the other three treatments. The proportion of i.v. folic acid not recovered in sow urine (injected - excreted) decreased as the amount of dietary folic acid increased to reach a minimum, which differed according to the period (supplement x period interaction, P<.02); it was 15 ppm during wk 1 of gestation and 10 ppm for the other periods studied. The unrecovered folates increased over a dietary concentration of 15 ppm. These minimum values correspond to the most appropriate feed concentration that covered the whole body utilization (tissue and cell metabolism, catabolism, and storage) of folates by the sows and could be interpreted as a reliable index of the requirement.  (+info)

Risk factors for lower airway bacterial colonization in chronic bronchitis. (8/13054)

The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence and risk factors for lower airway bacterial colonization (LABC) in stable chronic bronchitis (CB). Forty-one outpatients with CB were enrolled in the study (age 63.8+/-9.1 yrs (mean+/-SD); forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1)/forced vital capacity (FVC) 62.8+/-11.2; current/former smokers 24/17). All patients had normal chest radiographs and an indication for performing fibreoptic bronchoscopy (pulmonary nodule, remote haemoptysis). The protected specimen brush (PSB) was used for bacterial sampling, and concentrations > or = 1,000 colony-forming units (cfu) x mL(-1) were considered positive for LABC. The repeatability of the procedure in CB was assessed in a random subsample of 18 subjects. A 72.2% quantitative agreement was found in the repeatability assessment of the PSB technique. Positive PSB cultures, obtained in 9 out of 41 (22%) patients, mainly yielded Haemophilus influenzae. The logistic regression model, used to determine which variables were related to colonization, showed that LABC was associated with current smoking (odds ratio (OR) 9.83, confidence interval (CI) 1.16-83.20) and low FVC (OR 0.73, CI 0.65-0.81). Age and FEV1 were not related to LABC. It was concluded that the prevalence of LABC in stable CB is high (22%), and current smoking is an important risk factor.  (+info)

"Random allocation," also known as "random assignment" or "randomization," is a process used in clinical trials and other research studies to distribute participants into different intervention groups (such as experimental group vs. control group) in a way that minimizes selection bias and ensures the groups are comparable at the start of the study.

In random allocation, each participant has an equal chance of being assigned to any group, and the assignment is typically made using a computer-generated randomization schedule or other objective methods. This process helps to ensure that any differences between the groups are due to the intervention being tested rather than pre-existing differences in the participants' characteristics.

Epidural injection is a medical procedure where a medication is injected into the epidural space of the spine. The epidural space is the area between the outer covering of the spinal cord (dura mater) and the vertebral column. This procedure is typically used to provide analgesia (pain relief) or anesthesia for surgical procedures, labor and delivery, or chronic pain management.

The injection usually contains a local anesthetic and/or a steroid medication, which can help reduce inflammation and swelling in the affected area. The medication is delivered through a thin needle that is inserted into the epidural space using the guidance of fluoroscopy or computed tomography (CT) scans.

Epidural injections are commonly used to treat various types of pain, including lower back pain, leg pain (sciatica), and neck pain. They can also be used to diagnose the source of pain by injecting a local anesthetic to numb the area and determine if it is the cause of the pain.

While epidural injections are generally safe, they do carry some risks, such as infection, bleeding, nerve damage, or allergic reactions to the medication. It's important to discuss these risks with your healthcare provider before undergoing the procedure.

Edrophonium is a type of medication called an anticholinesterase agent. It works by blocking the breakdown of acetylcholine, a neurotransmitter in the body that is important for muscle contraction. This results in an increase in the amount of acetylcholine available to stimulate muscle contraction.

Edrophonium is used as a diagnostic aid in the diagnosis of myasthenia gravis, a neuromuscular disorder characterized by muscle weakness and fatigue. It is also used to reverse the effects of non-depolarizing muscle relaxants, which are medications that are sometimes given during surgery to temporarily paralyze muscles.

Edrophonium is administered intravenously (through a vein) and its effects usually begin within 30 seconds to 1 minute after injection and last for about 5 to 10 minutes. Common side effects of edrophonium include sweating, increased salivation, and muscle twitching. More serious side effects, such as seizures or cardiac arrest, can occur but are rare.

It is important to note that edrophonium should only be used under the supervision of a healthcare professional, as it can cause serious side effects if not used properly.

A randomized controlled trial (RCT) is a type of clinical study in which participants are randomly assigned to receive either the experimental intervention or the control condition, which may be a standard of care, placebo, or no treatment. The goal of an RCT is to minimize bias and ensure that the results are due to the intervention being tested rather than other factors. This design allows for a comparison between the two groups to determine if there is a significant difference in outcomes. RCTs are often considered the gold standard for evaluating the safety and efficacy of medical interventions, as they provide a high level of evidence for causal relationships between the intervention and health outcomes.

Fluoroscopy is a type of medical imaging that uses X-rays to obtain real-time moving images of the internal structures of the body. A continuous X-ray beam is passed through the body part being examined, and the resulting fluoroscopic images are transmitted to a monitor, allowing the medical professional to view the structure and movement of the internal organs and bones in real time.

Fluoroscopy is often used to guide minimally invasive procedures such as catheterization, stent placement, or joint injections. It can also be used to diagnose and monitor a variety of medical conditions, including gastrointestinal disorders, musculoskeletal injuries, and cardiovascular diseases.

It is important to note that fluoroscopy involves exposure to ionizing radiation, and the risks associated with this exposure should be carefully weighed against the benefits of the procedure. Medical professionals are trained to use the lowest possible dose of radiation necessary to obtain the desired diagnostic information.

A research design in medical or healthcare research is a systematic plan that guides the execution and reporting of research to address a specific research question or objective. It outlines the overall strategy for collecting, analyzing, and interpreting data to draw valid conclusions. The design includes details about the type of study (e.g., experimental, observational), sampling methods, data collection techniques, data analysis approaches, and any potential sources of bias or confounding that need to be controlled for. A well-defined research design helps ensure that the results are reliable, generalizable, and relevant to the research question, ultimately contributing to evidence-based practice in medicine and healthcare.

Local anesthetics are a type of medication that is used to block the sensation of pain in a specific area of the body. They work by temporarily numbing the nerves in that area, preventing them from transmitting pain signals to the brain. Local anesthetics can be administered through various routes, including topical application (such as creams or gels), injection (such as into the skin or tissues), or regional nerve blocks (such as epidural or spinal anesthesia).

Some common examples of local anesthetics include lidocaine, prilocaine, bupivacaine, and ropivacaine. These medications can be used for a variety of medical procedures, ranging from minor surgeries (such as dental work or skin biopsies) to more major surgeries (such as joint replacements or hernia repairs).

Local anesthetics are generally considered safe when used appropriately, but they can have side effects and potential complications. These may include allergic reactions, toxicity (if too much is administered), and nerve damage (if the medication is injected into a nerve). It's important to follow your healthcare provider's instructions carefully when using local anesthetics, and to report any unusual symptoms or side effects promptly.

Resource allocation in a medical context refers to the process of distributing and managing healthcare resources, such as budget, staff, equipment, and supplies, in an efficient and equitable manner to meet the health needs of a population. This involves prioritizing the use of resources to maximize benefits, improve patient outcomes, and ensure fair access to healthcare services. It is a critical aspect of healthcare planning and management, particularly in situations where resources are limited or there are competing demands for them.

The double-blind method is a study design commonly used in research, including clinical trials, to minimize bias and ensure the objectivity of results. In this approach, both the participants and the researchers are unaware of which group the participants are assigned to, whether it be the experimental group or the control group. This means that neither the participants nor the researchers know who is receiving a particular treatment or placebo, thus reducing the potential for bias in the evaluation of outcomes. The assignment of participants to groups is typically done by a third party not involved in the study, and the codes are only revealed after all data have been collected and analyzed.

Treatment outcome is a term used to describe the result or effect of medical treatment on a patient's health status. It can be measured in various ways, such as through symptoms improvement, disease remission, reduced disability, improved quality of life, or survival rates. The treatment outcome helps healthcare providers evaluate the effectiveness of a particular treatment plan and make informed decisions about future care. It is also used in clinical research to compare the efficacy of different treatments and improve patient care.

Health care rationing refers to the deliberate limitation or restriction of medical services, treatments, or resources provided to patients based on specific criteria or guidelines. These limitations can be influenced by various factors such as cost-effectiveness, scarcity of resources, evidence-based medicine, and clinical appropriateness. The primary goal of health care rationing is to ensure fair distribution and allocation of finite medical resources among a population while maximizing overall health benefits and minimizing harm.

Rationing can occur at different levels within the healthcare system, including individual patient care decisions, insurance coverage policies, and governmental resource allocation. Examples of rationing include prioritizing certain treatments based on their proven effectiveness, restricting access to high-cost procedures with limited clinical benefits, or setting age limits for specific interventions.

It is important to note that health care rationing remains a controversial topic due to ethical concerns about potential disparities in care and the balance between individual patient needs and societal resource constraints.

Tissue and organ procurement is the process of obtaining viable tissues and organs from deceased or living donors for the purpose of transplantation, research, or education. This procedure is performed by trained medical professionals in a sterile environment, adhering to strict medical standards and ethical guidelines. The tissues and organs that can be procured include hearts, lungs, livers, kidneys, pancreases, intestines, corneas, skin, bones, tendons, and heart valves. The process involves a thorough medical evaluation of the donor, as well as consent from the donor or their next of kin. After procurement, the tissues and organs are preserved and transported to recipients in need.

Biomass is defined in the medical field as a renewable energy source derived from organic materials, primarily plant matter, that can be burned or converted into fuel. This includes materials such as wood, agricultural waste, and even methane gas produced by landfills. Biomass is often used as a source of heat, electricity, or transportation fuels, and its use can help reduce greenhouse gas emissions and dependence on fossil fuels.

In the context of human health, biomass burning can have both positive and negative impacts. On one hand, biomass can provide a source of heat and energy for cooking and heating, which can improve living standards and reduce exposure to harmful pollutants from traditional cooking methods such as open fires. On the other hand, biomass burning can also produce air pollution, including particulate matter and toxic chemicals, that can have negative effects on respiratory health and contribute to climate change.

Therefore, while biomass has the potential to be a sustainable and low-carbon source of energy, it is important to consider the potential health and environmental impacts of its use and implement appropriate measures to minimize any negative effects.

A waiting list, in the context of healthcare and medicine, refers to a list of patients who are awaiting a particular medical service or procedure, such as surgery, consultation with a specialist, or therapy. These lists are often established when the demand for certain services exceeds the immediate supply of resources, including physician time, hospital beds, or specialized equipment.

Patients on waiting lists are typically ranked based on factors like the severity of their condition, the urgency of their need for treatment, and the date they were placed on the list. The goal is to ensure that those with the most pressing medical needs receive care as soon as possible, while also providing a fair and transparent system for allocating limited resources.

However, it's important to note that extended waiting times can have negative consequences for patients, including worsening of symptoms, decreased quality of life, and potential complications. As such, healthcare systems strive to minimize wait times through various strategies, such as increasing resource allocation, improving efficiency, and implementing alternative service delivery models.

The sex ratio is not a medical term per se, but it is a term used in demography and population health. The sex ratio is the ratio of males to females in a given population. It is typically expressed as the number of males for every 100 females. A sex ratio of 100 would indicate an equal number of males and females.

In the context of human populations, the sex ratio at birth is usually around 103-107 males per 100 females, reflecting a slightly higher likelihood of male births. However, due to biological factors such as higher male mortality rates in infancy and childhood, as well as social and behavioral factors, the sex ratio tends to equalize over time and can even shift in favor of women in older age groups.

It's worth noting that significant deviations from the expected sex ratio at birth or in a population can indicate underlying health issues or societal problems. For example, skewed sex ratios may be associated with gender discrimination, selective abortion of female fetuses, or exposure to environmental toxins that affect male reproductive health.

Reproduction, in the context of biology and medicine, refers to the process by which organisms produce offspring. It is a complex process that involves the creation, development, and growth of new individuals from parent organisms. In sexual reproduction, this process typically involves the combination of genetic material from two parents through the fusion of gametes (sex cells) such as sperm and egg cells. This results in the formation of a zygote, which then develops into a new individual with a unique genetic makeup.

In contrast, asexual reproduction does not involve the fusion of gametes and can occur through various mechanisms such as budding, fragmentation, or parthenogenesis. Asexual reproduction results in offspring that are genetically identical to the parent organism.

Reproduction is a fundamental process that ensures the survival and continuation of species over time. It is also an area of active research in fields such as reproductive medicine, where scientists and clinicians work to understand and address issues related to human fertility, contraception, and genetic disorders.

Health resources refer to the personnel, facilities, equipment, and supplies that are used in the delivery of healthcare services. This includes:

1. Human resources: Healthcare professionals such as doctors, nurses, pharmacists, and allied health professionals.

2. Physical resources: Hospitals, clinics, laboratories, and other healthcare facilities.

3. Technological resources: Medical equipment and technology used for diagnosis and treatment, such as MRI machines, CT scanners, and electronic health records.

4. Financial resources: Funding for healthcare services, including public and private insurance, government funding, and out-of-pocket payments.

5. Informational resources: Research findings, evidence-based practices, and health education materials that inform healthcare decision-making.

The adequate availability, distribution, and utilization of these health resources are crucial for ensuring access to quality healthcare services and improving population health outcomes.

In medical terminology, a budget is not explicitly defined. However, in a general sense, it refers to a financial plan that outlines the anticipated costs and expenses for a specific period. In healthcare, budgets can be used by hospitals, clinics, or other medical facilities to plan for and manage their finances.

A healthcare organization's budget may include expenses related to:

* Salaries and benefits for staff
* Equipment and supply costs
* Facility maintenance and improvements
* Research and development expenses
* Insurance and liability coverage
* Marketing and advertising costs

Budgets can help healthcare organizations manage their finances effectively, allocate resources efficiently, and make informed decisions about spending. They may also be used to plan for future growth and expansion.

Patient selection, in the context of medical treatment or clinical research, refers to the process of identifying and choosing appropriate individuals who are most likely to benefit from a particular medical intervention or who meet specific criteria to participate in a study. This decision is based on various factors such as the patient's diagnosis, stage of disease, overall health status, potential risks, and expected benefits. The goal of patient selection is to ensure that the selected individuals will receive the most effective and safe care possible while also contributing to meaningful research outcomes.

Aerial parts of plants refer to the above-ground portions of a plant, including leaves, stems, flowers, and fruits. These parts are often used in medicine, either in their entirety or as isolated extracts, to take advantage of their medicinal properties. The specific components of aerial parts that are used in medicine can vary depending on the plant species and the desired therapeutic effects. For example, the leaves of some plants may contain active compounds that have anti-inflammatory or analgesic properties, while the flowers of others may be rich in antioxidants or compounds with sedative effects. In general, aerial parts of plants are used in herbal medicine to treat a wide range of conditions, including respiratory, digestive, and nervous system disorders, as well as skin conditions and infections.

Regional health planning is a process that involves the systematic assessment, analysis, and prioritization of healthcare needs for a defined geographic population in a specific region. It aims to develop and implement strategies, programs, and services to address those needs in a coordinated and efficient manner. This collaborative approach often involves various stakeholders, such as healthcare providers, public health officials, community leaders, and advocates, working together to improve the overall health and well-being of the population in that region.

The medical definition of 'Regional Health Planning' can be outlined as follows:

1. Systematic assessment: A comprehensive evaluation of the healthcare needs, resources, and infrastructure within a specific region, taking into account demographic, epidemiological, and socioeconomic factors that influence health outcomes.
2. Analysis: The examination of data and information gathered during the assessment to identify gaps, priorities, and opportunities for improvement in healthcare services and delivery.
3. Prioritization: The process of ranking healthcare needs and issues based on their urgency, impact, and feasibility of intervention, to ensure that resources are allocated effectively and efficiently.
4. Strategy development: The creation of evidence-based, data-driven plans and interventions aimed at addressing the prioritized health needs and improving the overall health of the regional population.
5. Collaboration: The active engagement and partnership of various stakeholders, including healthcare providers, public health officials, community leaders, and advocates, in the planning, implementation, and evaluation of regional health initiatives.
6. Coordination: The alignment and integration of healthcare services, programs, and policies across different levels and sectors to ensure seamless care and avoid duplication of efforts.
7. Continuous improvement: The ongoing monitoring and evaluation of regional health programs and interventions to assess their effectiveness, make adjustments as needed, and incorporate new evidence and best practices into future planning efforts.

In a medical or psychological context, attention is the cognitive process of selectively concentrating on certain aspects of the environment while ignoring other things. It involves focusing mental resources on specific stimuli, sensory inputs, or internal thoughts while blocking out irrelevant distractions. Attention can be divided into different types, including:

1. Sustained attention: The ability to maintain focus on a task or stimulus over time.
2. Selective attention: The ability to concentrate on relevant stimuli while ignoring irrelevant ones.
3. Divided attention: The capacity to pay attention to multiple tasks or stimuli simultaneously.
4. Alternating attention: The skill of shifting focus between different tasks or stimuli as needed.

Deficits in attention are common symptoms of various neurological and psychiatric conditions, such as ADHD, dementia, depression, and anxiety disorders. Assessment of attention is an essential part of neuropsychological evaluations and can be measured using various tests and tasks.

I'm happy to help! However, it's important to note that while "social justice" is a term used in many fields, including public health and medicine, it does not have a single, universally accepted medical definition. Instead, the concept of social justice in healthcare is generally understood as the pursuit of fairness, equity, and equality in the distribution of healthcare resources, opportunities, and outcomes.

The World Health Organization (WHO) defines social justice as "the fair and equitable distribution of social determinants of health, which are conditions in which people are born, grow, live, work, and age, including the health system." According to this definition, social justice in healthcare requires addressing the root causes of health disparities, such as poverty, discrimination, and lack of access to education and employment opportunities.

The American Public Health Association (APHA) defines social justice as "the distribution of resources, benefits, and burdens of society to all individuals and groups. When principles of social justice are applied, the resulting distribution is equitable and all members of society have a fair opportunity to benefit from the resources, benefits, and burdens."

In summary, while there may not be a single medical definition of social justice, it is generally understood as the pursuit of fairness, equity, and equality in healthcare and health outcomes. This involves addressing the root causes of health disparities and ensuring that all individuals have access to the resources and opportunities they need to achieve optimal health.

I believe there may be a slight misunderstanding in your question. "Plant leaves" are not a medical term, but rather a general biological term referring to a specific organ found in plants.

Leaves are organs that are typically flat and broad, and they are the primary site of photosynthesis in most plants. They are usually green due to the presence of chlorophyll, which is essential for capturing sunlight and converting it into chemical energy through photosynthesis.

While leaves do not have a direct medical definition, understanding their structure and function can be important in various medical fields, such as pharmacognosy (the study of medicinal plants) or environmental health. For example, certain plant leaves may contain bioactive compounds that have therapeutic potential, while others may produce allergens or toxins that can impact human health.

End-stage liver disease (ESLD) is a term used to describe advanced and irreversible liver damage, usually caused by chronic liver conditions such as cirrhosis, hepatitis, or alcoholic liver disease. At this stage, the liver can no longer function properly, leading to a range of serious complications.

The symptoms of ESLD may include:

* Jaundice (yellowing of the skin and eyes)
* Ascites (accumulation of fluid in the abdomen)
* Encephalopathy (confusion, drowsiness, or coma caused by the buildup of toxins in the brain)
* Bleeding from the gastrointestinal tract
* Infections
* Kidney failure

Treatment for ESLD typically focuses on managing symptoms and preventing complications. In some cases, a liver transplant may be necessary to improve survival. However, due to the shortage of available donor livers, many people with ESLD are not eligible for transplantation. The prognosis for individuals with ESLD is generally poor, with a median survival time of less than one year.

A tissue donor is an individual who has agreed to allow organs and tissues to be removed from their body after death for the purpose of transplantation to restore the health or save the life of another person. The tissues that can be donated include corneas, heart valves, skin, bone, tendons, ligaments, veins, and cartilage. These tissues can enhance the quality of life for many recipients and are often used in reconstructive surgeries. It is important to note that tissue donation does not interfere with an open casket funeral or other cultural or religious practices related to death and grieving.

Nitrogen is not typically referred to as a medical term, but it is an element that is crucial to medicine and human life.

In a medical context, nitrogen is often mentioned in relation to gas analysis, respiratory therapy, or medical gases. Nitrogen (N) is a colorless, odorless, and nonreactive gas that makes up about 78% of the Earth's atmosphere. It is an essential element for various biological processes, such as the growth and maintenance of organisms, because it is a key component of amino acids, nucleic acids, and other organic compounds.

In some medical applications, nitrogen is used to displace oxygen in a mixture to create a controlled environment with reduced oxygen levels (hypoxic conditions) for therapeutic purposes, such as in certain types of hyperbaric chambers. Additionally, nitrogen gas is sometimes used in cryotherapy, where extremely low temperatures are applied to tissues to reduce pain, swelling, and inflammation.

However, it's important to note that breathing pure nitrogen can be dangerous, as it can lead to unconsciousness and even death due to lack of oxygen (asphyxiation) within minutes.

Health Priorities are key areas of focus in healthcare that receive the greatest attention, resources, and efforts due to their significant impact on overall population health. These priorities are typically determined by evaluating various health issues and factors such as prevalence, severity, mortality rates, and social determinants of health. By addressing health priorities, healthcare systems and public health organizations aim to improve community health, reduce health disparities, and enhance the quality of life for individuals. Examples of health priorities may include chronic diseases (such as diabetes or heart disease), mental health, infectious diseases, maternal and child health, injury prevention, and health promotion through healthy lifestyles.

Clutch size is a term used in biology and ecology, particularly in the study of birds and reptiles, to refer to the number of offspring that a female produces at one time. It is called a "clutch" because the offspring are typically laid or born together and remain together for at least a portion of their development.

For example, a bird that lays four eggs in a single nesting attempt has a clutch size of four. Similarly, a reptile that gives birth to six young at one time has a clutch size of six. Clutch size can vary widely among different species and even within the same species, depending on factors such as the availability of food, the age and experience of the female, and environmental conditions.

Understanding clutch size is important for studying the reproductive biology and life history strategies of animals, as well as for conservation efforts aimed at protecting threatened or endangered species.

A plant root is not a medical term per se, but it is a term from botany, which is the study of plants. However, I can certainly provide a definition for you.

Plant roots are the underground organs of a plant that typically grow downward into the soil. They serve several important functions, including:

1. Anchorage: Roots help to stabilize the plant and keep it upright in the ground.
2. Absorption: Roots absorb water and nutrients from the soil, which are essential for the plant's growth and development.
3. Conduction: Roots conduct water and nutrients up to the above-ground parts of the plant, such as the stem and leaves.
4. Vegetative reproduction: Some plants can reproduce vegetatively through their roots, producing new plants from root fragments or specialized structures called rhizomes or tubers.

Roots are composed of several different tissues, including the epidermis, cortex, endodermis, and vascular tissue. The epidermis is the outermost layer of the root, which secretes a waxy substance called suberin that helps to prevent water loss. The cortex is the middle layer of the root, which contains cells that store carbohydrates and other nutrients. The endodermis is a thin layer of cells that surrounds the vascular tissue and regulates the movement of water and solutes into and out of the root. The vascular tissue consists of xylem and phloem, which transport water and nutrients throughout the plant.

I apologize for any confusion, but "Turbellaria" is not a medical term. It is a taxonomic category in biology, specifically a class within the phylum Platyhelminthes (flatworms). Turbellarians are free-living, flatworms that are typically characterized by their unsegmented body and the presence of cilia for locomotion. They include freshwater, marine, and terrestrial species. If you have a medical term or concept in mind, I would be happy to help define it for you.

A medical definition for "plant shoots" may not be readily available, as the term is primarily used in botany and horticulture. However, I can provide you with a general definition:

Plant shoots refer to the above-ground portion of a plant, which typically includes structures like stems, leaves, flowers, and buds. Shoots originate from the seed or the growing tip of the plant and are responsible for photosynthesis, nutrient absorption, and reproduction. In some contexts, "plant shoots" might also refer to new growth that emerges from an existing plant, such as when a leaf or stem sprouts a new branch or flower.

In the field of medicine, "time factors" refer to the duration of symptoms or time elapsed since the onset of a medical condition, which can have significant implications for diagnosis and treatment. Understanding time factors is crucial in determining the progression of a disease, evaluating the effectiveness of treatments, and making critical decisions regarding patient care.

For example, in stroke management, "time is brain," meaning that rapid intervention within a specific time frame (usually within 4.5 hours) is essential to administering tissue plasminogen activator (tPA), a clot-busting drug that can minimize brain damage and improve patient outcomes. Similarly, in trauma care, the "golden hour" concept emphasizes the importance of providing definitive care within the first 60 minutes after injury to increase survival rates and reduce morbidity.

Time factors also play a role in monitoring the progression of chronic conditions like diabetes or heart disease, where regular follow-ups and assessments help determine appropriate treatment adjustments and prevent complications. In infectious diseases, time factors are crucial for initiating antibiotic therapy and identifying potential outbreaks to control their spread.

Overall, "time factors" encompass the significance of recognizing and acting promptly in various medical scenarios to optimize patient outcomes and provide effective care.

Liver transplantation is a surgical procedure in which a diseased or failing liver is replaced with a healthy one from a deceased donor or, less commonly, a portion of a liver from a living donor. The goal of the procedure is to restore normal liver function and improve the patient's overall health and quality of life.

Liver transplantation may be recommended for individuals with end-stage liver disease, acute liver failure, certain genetic liver disorders, or liver cancers that cannot be treated effectively with other therapies. The procedure involves complex surgery to remove the diseased liver and implant the new one, followed by a period of recovery and close medical monitoring to ensure proper function and minimize the risk of complications.

The success of liver transplantation has improved significantly in recent years due to advances in surgical techniques, immunosuppressive medications, and post-transplant care. However, it remains a major operation with significant risks and challenges, including the need for lifelong immunosuppression to prevent rejection of the new liver, as well as potential complications such as infection, bleeding, and organ failure.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "trees" is not a medical term. It is a common term used in various fields, including biology, ecology, and dendrology, to refer to a woody perennial plant with a single stem or trunk that supports branches and leaves in most species.

If you have any questions related to medical terminology or health-related topics, please provide more context so I can offer an accurate and helpful response.

'Government Financing' in the context of healthcare refers to the role of government in funding healthcare services, programs, and infrastructure. This can be achieved through various mechanisms such as:

1. Direct provision of healthcare services: The government operates and funds its own hospitals, clinics, and other healthcare facilities, where it employs healthcare professionals to deliver care.
2. Public insurance programs: The government establishes and manages health insurance programs, like Medicare and Medicaid in the United States, which provide coverage for specific populations and reimburse healthcare providers for services delivered to enrollees.
3. Tax subsidies and incentives: Governments may offer tax breaks or other financial incentives to encourage private investments in healthcare infrastructure, research, and development.
4. Grants and loans: Government agencies can provide funding to healthcare organizations, researchers, and educational institutions in the form of grants and loans for specific projects, programs, or initiatives.
5. Public-private partnerships (PPPs): Governments collaborate with private entities to jointly fund and manage healthcare services, facilities, or infrastructure projects.

Government financing plays a significant role in shaping healthcare systems and ensuring access to care for vulnerable populations. The extent of government involvement in financing varies across countries, depending on their political, economic, and social contexts.

A plant stem is not typically defined in a medical context, but rather in the field of botany. However, I can certainly provide a general biological definition for you.

In plants, stems are organs that serve primarily as support structures, holding leaves, flowers, and fruits aloft where they can receive sunlight and exchange gases. They also act as conduits, transporting water, nutrients, and sugars made during photosynthesis between the roots and shoots of a plant.

The stem is usually composed of three main tissue systems: dermal, vascular, and ground. The dermal tissue system forms the outermost layer(s) of the stem, providing protection and sometimes participating in gas exchange. The vascular tissue system contains the xylem (which transports water and nutrients upward) and phloem (which transports sugars and other organic compounds downward). The ground tissue system, located between the dermal and vascular tissues, is responsible for food storage and support.

While not a direct medical definition, understanding the structure and function of plant stems can be relevant in fields such as nutrition, agriculture, and environmental science, which have implications for human health.

Sexual behavior in animals refers to a variety of behaviors related to reproduction and mating that occur between members of the same species. These behaviors can include courtship displays, mating rituals, and various physical acts. The specific forms of sexual behavior displayed by a given species are influenced by a combination of genetic, hormonal, and environmental factors.

In some animals, sexual behavior is closely tied to reproductive cycles and may only occur during certain times of the year or under specific conditions. In other species, sexual behavior may be more frequent and less closely tied to reproduction, serving instead as a means of social bonding or communication.

It's important to note that while humans are animals, the term "sexual behavior" is often used in a more specific sense to refer to sexual activities between human beings. The study of sexual behavior in animals is an important area of research within the field of animal behavior and can provide insights into the evolutionary origins of human sexual behavior as well as the underlying mechanisms that drive it.

An ethical theory is a structured framework of principles and concepts that helps to guide and inform moral judgments and decisions about right and wrong conduct. It provides a systematic and coherent approach to understanding, analyzing, and resolving ethical issues and dilemmas in various contexts, including healthcare.

There are several types of ethical theories, but some of the most prominent ones include:

1. Deontological theory: This theory emphasizes the inherent rightness or wrongness of actions based on whether they conform to moral rules or duties, regardless of their consequences. It is often associated with the work of Immanuel Kant.
2. Utilitarianism: This theory holds that the morality of an action is determined by its overall usefulness or benefit to society as a whole, measured in terms of the greatest good for the greatest number of people.
3. Virtue ethics: This theory focuses on the character and virtues of the moral agent, rather than on specific rules or consequences. It emphasizes the importance of cultivating good habits, traits, and dispositions that contribute to a flourishing and fulfilling life.
4. Social contract theory: This theory posits that moral norms and rules emerge from mutual agreements or understandings among individuals in society, based on their shared interests and values.
5. Feminist ethics: This theory challenges traditional ethical theories by emphasizing the importance of context, relationships, and power dynamics in moral decision-making, with a focus on promoting justice and equality for marginalized groups.

In healthcare, ethical theories can help guide clinical practice, research, policy, and education, by providing a framework for addressing complex ethical issues such as informed consent, patient autonomy, confidentiality, resource allocation, and end-of-life care.

In the context of medical definitions, 'carbon' is not typically used as a standalone term. Carbon is an element with the symbol C and atomic number 6, which is naturally abundant in the human body and the environment. It is a crucial component of all living organisms, forming the basis of organic compounds, such as proteins, carbohydrates, lipids, and nucleic acids (DNA and RNA).

Carbon forms strong covalent bonds with various elements, allowing for the creation of complex molecules that are essential to life. In this sense, carbon is a fundamental building block of life on Earth. However, it does not have a specific medical definition as an isolated term.

Health expenditures refer to the total amount of money spent on health services, goods, and resources in a given period. This can include expenses for preventive care, medical treatments, medications, long-term care, and administrative costs. Health expenditures can be made by individuals, corporations, insurance companies, or governments, and they can be measured at the national, regional, or household level.

Health expenditures are often used as an indicator of a country's investment in its healthcare system and can reflect the overall health status of a population. High levels of health expenditures may indicate a strong commitment to healthcare, but they can also place a significant burden on individuals, businesses, and governments. Understanding patterns and trends in health expenditures is important for policymakers, healthcare providers, and researchers who are working to improve the efficiency, effectiveness, and accessibility of healthcare services.

The carbon cycle is a biogeochemical cycle that describes the movement of carbon atoms between the Earth's land, atmosphere, and oceans. It involves the exchange of carbon between various reservoirs, including the biosphere (living organisms), pedosphere (soil), lithosphere (rocks and minerals), hydrosphere (water), and atmosphere.

The carbon cycle is essential for the regulation of Earth's climate and the functioning of ecosystems. Carbon moves between these reservoirs through various processes, including photosynthesis, respiration, decomposition, combustion, and weathering. Plants absorb carbon dioxide from the atmosphere during photosynthesis and convert it into organic matter, releasing oxygen as a byproduct. When plants and animals die, they decompose, releasing the stored carbon back into the atmosphere or soil.

Human activities, such as burning fossil fuels and deforestation, have significantly altered the natural carbon cycle, leading to an increase in atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations and contributing to global climate change. Therefore, understanding the carbon cycle and its processes is crucial for developing strategies to mitigate the impacts of climate change and promote sustainable development.

Medical ethics is a branch of ethics that deals with moral issues in medical care, research, and practice. It provides a framework for addressing questions related to patient autonomy, informed consent, confidentiality, distributive justice, beneficentia (doing good), and non-maleficence (not doing harm). Medical ethics also involves the application of ethical principles such as respect for persons, beneficence, non-maleficence, and justice to specific medical cases and situations. It is a crucial component of medical education and practice, helping healthcare professionals make informed decisions that promote patient well-being while respecting their rights and dignity.

In the medical field, "accounting" generally refers to the process of tracking, analyzing, and reporting financial transactions related to the operation of a healthcare organization or practice. This can include recording revenue from patient services, managing expenses for supplies and personnel, ensuring compliance with government regulations, and producing financial statements for decision-making and tax purposes.

Some specific areas of accounting that are relevant to healthcare include:

* Revenue Cycle Management (RCM): the process of tracking and collecting payments for medical services provided to patients. This includes billing, coding, and managing insurance claims.
* Cost Accounting: the process of analyzing and allocating costs associated with providing medical services, including direct costs (such as supplies and labor) and indirect costs (such as rent and utilities).
* Financial Reporting: the process of producing financial statements that provide an overview of a healthcare organization's financial performance and position. This can include balance sheets, income statements, and cash flow statements.
* Compliance Accounting: the process of ensuring that a healthcare organization is following all relevant laws and regulations related to financial management, including those related to Medicare and Medicaid reimbursement, tax reporting, and fraud prevention.

It's important to note that accounting in healthcare is a complex field that requires specialized knowledge and skills, and it is typically overseen by certified public accountants (CPAs) or other financial professionals who specialize in healthcare finance.

Euphorbiaceae is not a medical term, but a taxonomic category in botany. It refers to the spurge family, which is a large family of flowering plants that includes around 300 genera and 7,500 species. Some members of this family have medicinal uses, but others are toxic or invasive. Therefore, it is important to use caution when handling or consuming any plant material from this family.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "United States" is a geopolitical entity, specifically the name of the country consisting of 50 states, and it is not a medical term or concept. Therefore, I can't provide a medical definition for it. If you have any questions related to health, medicine, or biology, I would be happy to try to help answer those!

Photosynthesis is not strictly a medical term, but it is a fundamental biological process with significant implications for medicine, particularly in understanding energy production in cells and the role of oxygen in sustaining life. Here's a general biological definition:

Photosynthesis is a process by which plants, algae, and some bacteria convert light energy, usually from the sun, into chemical energy in the form of organic compounds, such as glucose (or sugar), using water and carbon dioxide. This process primarily takes place in the chloroplasts of plant cells, specifically in structures called thylakoids. The overall reaction can be summarized as:

6 CO2 + 6 H2O + light energy → C6H12O6 + 6 O2

In this equation, carbon dioxide (CO2) and water (H2O) are the reactants, while glucose (C6H12O6) and oxygen (O2) are the products. Photosynthesis has two main stages: the light-dependent reactions and the light-independent reactions (Calvin cycle). The light-dependent reactions occur in the thylakoid membrane and involve the conversion of light energy into ATP and NADPH, which are used to power the Calvin cycle. The Calvin cycle takes place in the stroma of chloroplasts and involves the synthesis of glucose from CO2 and water using the ATP and NADPH generated during the light-dependent reactions.

Understanding photosynthesis is crucial for understanding various biological processes, including cellular respiration, plant metabolism, and the global carbon cycle. Additionally, research into artificial photosynthesis has potential applications in renewable energy production and environmental remediation.

'Plant development' is not a term typically used in medical definitions, as it is more commonly used in the field of botany to describe the growth and differentiation of plant cells, tissues, and organs over time. However, in a broader context, plant development can be defined as the series of changes and processes that occur from the fertilization of a plant seed to the formation of a mature plant, including germination, emergence, organ formation, growth, and reproduction.

In medicine, terms related to plant development may include "phytotherapy" or "herbal medicine," which refer to the use of plants or plant extracts as medicinal treatments for various health conditions. The study of how these plants develop and produce their active compounds is an important area of research in pharmacology and natural products chemistry.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "soil" is not a term that has a medical definition. Soil is defined as the top layer of earth in which plants grow, a mixture of organic material, clay, sand, and silt. If you have any questions related to medicine or health, I would be happy to try to help answer them for you.

An "ecosystem" is not a term that has a specific medical definition, as it is a concept that is more commonly used in the fields of ecology and environmental science. However, I can provide you with the general ecological definition of an ecosystem:

An ecosystem is a community of living organisms interacting with each other and their non-living environment, including both biotic factors (plants, animals, microorganisms) and abiotic factors (climate, soil, water, and air). These interactions create a complex network of relationships that form the foundation of ecological processes, such as energy flow, nutrient cycling, and population dynamics.

While there is no direct medical definition for an ecosystem, understanding the principles of ecosystems can have important implications for human health. For example, healthy ecosystems can provide clean air and water, regulate climate, support food production, and offer opportunities for recreation and relaxation, all of which contribute to overall well-being. Conversely, degraded ecosystems can lead to increased exposure to environmental hazards, reduced access to natural resources, and heightened risks of infectious diseases. Therefore, maintaining the health and integrity of ecosystems is crucial for promoting human health and preventing disease.

Caryophyllaceae is a family of flowering plants that includes around 2,200 species in 86 genera. It is commonly known as the pink or carnation family. Plants in this family are typically herbaceous, with opposite leaves and flowers that have five distinct petals. They are found worldwide, but are most diverse in arid and semi-arid regions of the Northern Hemisphere. Some examples of plants in Caryophyllaceae include carnations, baby's breath, and chickweed.

A single-blind method in medical research is a study design where the participants are unaware of the group or intervention they have been assigned to, but the researchers conducting the study know which participant belongs to which group. This is done to prevent bias from the participants' expectations or knowledge of their assignment, while still allowing the researchers to control the study conditions and collect data.

In a single-blind trial, the participants do not know whether they are receiving the active treatment or a placebo (a sham treatment that looks like the real thing but has no therapeutic effect), whereas the researcher knows which participant is receiving which intervention. This design helps to ensure that the participants' responses and outcomes are not influenced by their knowledge of the treatment assignment, while still allowing the researchers to assess the effectiveness or safety of the intervention being studied.

Single-blind methods are commonly used in clinical trials and other medical research studies where it is important to minimize bias and control for confounding variables that could affect the study results.

The term "Theoretical Models" is used in various scientific fields, including medicine, to describe a representation of a complex system or phenomenon. It is a simplified framework that explains how different components of the system interact with each other and how they contribute to the overall behavior of the system. Theoretical models are often used in medical research to understand and predict the outcomes of diseases, treatments, or public health interventions.

A theoretical model can take many forms, such as mathematical equations, computer simulations, or conceptual diagrams. It is based on a set of assumptions and hypotheses about the underlying mechanisms that drive the system. By manipulating these variables and observing the effects on the model's output, researchers can test their assumptions and generate new insights into the system's behavior.

Theoretical models are useful for medical research because they allow scientists to explore complex systems in a controlled and systematic way. They can help identify key drivers of disease or treatment outcomes, inform the design of clinical trials, and guide the development of new interventions. However, it is important to recognize that theoretical models are simplifications of reality and may not capture all the nuances and complexities of real-world systems. Therefore, they should be used in conjunction with other forms of evidence, such as experimental data and observational studies, to inform medical decision-making.

Cost-benefit analysis (CBA) is a systematic process used to compare the costs and benefits of different options to determine which one provides the greatest net benefit. In a medical context, CBA can be used to evaluate the value of medical interventions, treatments, or policies by estimating and monetizing all the relevant costs and benefits associated with each option.

The costs included in a CBA may include direct costs such as the cost of the intervention or treatment itself, as well as indirect costs such as lost productivity or time away from work. Benefits may include improved health outcomes, reduced morbidity or mortality, and increased quality of life.

Once all the relevant costs and benefits have been identified and quantified, they are typically expressed in monetary terms to allow for a direct comparison. The option with the highest net benefit (i.e., the difference between total benefits and total costs) is considered the most cost-effective.

It's important to note that CBA has some limitations and can be subject to various biases and assumptions, so it should be used in conjunction with other evaluation methods to ensure a comprehensive understanding of the value of medical interventions or policies.

Biological models, also known as physiological models or organismal models, are simplified representations of biological systems, processes, or mechanisms that are used to understand and explain the underlying principles and relationships. These models can be theoretical (conceptual or mathematical) or physical (such as anatomical models, cell cultures, or animal models). They are widely used in biomedical research to study various phenomena, including disease pathophysiology, drug action, and therapeutic interventions.

Examples of biological models include:

1. Mathematical models: These use mathematical equations and formulas to describe complex biological systems or processes, such as population dynamics, metabolic pathways, or gene regulation networks. They can help predict the behavior of these systems under different conditions and test hypotheses about their underlying mechanisms.
2. Cell cultures: These are collections of cells grown in a controlled environment, typically in a laboratory dish or flask. They can be used to study cellular processes, such as signal transduction, gene expression, or metabolism, and to test the effects of drugs or other treatments on these processes.
3. Animal models: These are living organisms, usually vertebrates like mice, rats, or non-human primates, that are used to study various aspects of human biology and disease. They can provide valuable insights into the pathophysiology of diseases, the mechanisms of drug action, and the safety and efficacy of new therapies.
4. Anatomical models: These are physical representations of biological structures or systems, such as plastic models of organs or tissues, that can be used for educational purposes or to plan surgical procedures. They can also serve as a basis for developing more sophisticated models, such as computer simulations or 3D-printed replicas.

Overall, biological models play a crucial role in advancing our understanding of biology and medicine, helping to identify new targets for therapeutic intervention, develop novel drugs and treatments, and improve human health.

Directed tissue donation is the process by which a person designates a specific individual as the recipient of their donated tissues, such as corneas, heart valves, or skin, after their death. This allows the donor to make a direct and meaningful impact on the life of someone they know or are related to who may be in need of a tissue transplant. It is important to note that the final determination of whether the tissues are suitable for transplantation will be made by medical professionals at the time of donation, taking into account various factors such as the donor's medical history and cause of death. Directed tissue donation can provide comfort and solace to both the donor and their loved ones, knowing that they have been able to help someone in need even after their passing.

Ageratina is a genus of flowering plants in the aster family, Asteraceae. It includes several species that are commonly known as snakeroots or eupatoriums. These plants are native to North and Central America and are characterized by their clusters of small, white or purple flowers. Some species of Ageratina have medicinal properties and have been used in traditional medicine to treat various ailments, such as skin conditions, fever, and respiratory issues. However, it is important to note that some species of Ageratina can be toxic if ingested, so they should only be used under the guidance of a qualified healthcare professional.

Costs refer to the total amount of resources, such as money, time, and labor, that are expended in the provision of a medical service or treatment. Costs can be categorized into direct costs, which include expenses directly related to patient care, such as medication, supplies, and personnel; and indirect costs, which include overhead expenses, such as rent, utilities, and administrative salaries.

Cost analysis is the process of estimating and evaluating the total cost of a medical service or treatment. This involves identifying and quantifying all direct and indirect costs associated with the provision of care, and analyzing how these costs may vary based on factors such as patient volume, resource utilization, and reimbursement rates.

Cost analysis is an important tool for healthcare organizations to understand the financial implications of their operations and make informed decisions about resource allocation, pricing strategies, and quality improvement initiatives. It can also help policymakers and payers evaluate the cost-effectiveness of different treatment options and develop evidence-based guidelines for clinical practice.

There is no universally accepted medical definition for "Value of Life" as it is a concept that encompasses both medical, ethical, and philosophical considerations. However, in the context of healthcare, the value of life may refer to the benefits, outcomes, or improvements in quality of life that are gained through medical interventions or treatments. This can include extending lifespan, improving functional ability, relieving symptoms, and enhancing overall well-being.

Ultimately, the value of life is subjective and depends on individual and societal values, beliefs, and preferences. Healthcare providers must consider these factors when making treatment decisions and engaging in end-of-life care discussions with patients and their families. It's important to note that the medical community does not assign a monetary value to human life.

Selection bias is a type of statistical bias that occurs when the sample used in a study is not representative of the population as a whole, typically because of the way the sample was selected or because some members of the intended sample were excluded. This can lead to skewed or inaccurate results, as the sample may not accurately reflect the characteristics and behaviors of the entire population.

Selection bias can occur in various ways, such as through self-selection (when individuals choose whether or not to participate in a study), through the use of nonrandom sampling methods (such as convenience sampling or snowball sampling), or through the exclusion of certain groups or individuals from the sample. This type of bias is particularly problematic in observational studies, as it can be difficult to control for all of the factors that may influence the results.

To minimize the risk of selection bias, researchers often use random sampling methods (such as simple random sampling or stratified random sampling) to ensure that the sample is representative of the population. They may also take steps to increase the diversity of the sample and to reduce the likelihood of self-selection. By carefully designing and implementing their studies, researchers can help to minimize the impact of selection bias on their results and improve the validity and reliability of their findings.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "social values" is not a term that has a specific medical definition. However, in a broader social context, "social values" refer to the beliefs, principles, and standards that a group or society holds in regard to what is considered important, desirable, or acceptable. These values can influence attitudes, behaviors, and decisions related to health and healthcare. They may also impact medical research, policy-making, and patient care.

In clinical research, sample size refers to the number of participants or observations included in a study. It is a critical aspect of study design that can impact the validity and generalizability of research findings. A larger sample size typically provides more statistical power, which means that it is more likely to detect true effects if they exist. However, increasing the sample size also increases the cost and time required for a study. Therefore, determining an appropriate sample size involves balancing statistical power with practical considerations.

The calculation of sample size depends on several factors, including the expected effect size, the variability of the outcome measure, the desired level of statistical significance, and the desired power of the study. Statistical software programs are often used to calculate sample sizes that balance these factors while minimizing the overall sample size required to detect a meaningful effect.

It is important to note that a larger sample size does not necessarily mean that a study is more rigorous or well-designed. The quality of the study's methods, including the selection of participants, the measurement of outcomes, and the analysis of data, are also critical factors that can impact the validity and generalizability of research findings.

Organizational decision-making is a management process in which a group or team within an organization makes a judgment or choice among several options or alternatives to achieve specific goals or objectives. This process involves collecting and analyzing information, evaluating alternatives, selecting the best option, and implementing and monitoring the decision. It often requires collaboration, communication, and consensus-building among team members with diverse perspectives and expertise. Effective organizational decision-making can lead to better outcomes, improved performance, and increased innovation, while poor decision-making can result in missed opportunities, wasted resources, and decreased competitiveness.

A hermaphroditic organism is one that has both male and female reproductive structures in the same individual. This means that the organism has both ovaries and testes, or their equivalents, and can produce both sperm and eggs. Hermaphroditism is most commonly found in plants, but it also occurs in some animals, including certain species of snails, slugs, worms, and fish.

It's important to note that true hermaphroditism is different from intersex conditions, which refer to individuals who may have physical or genetic features that do not fit typical binary notions of male or female bodies. Intersex people may have physical characteristics that are not typically associated with male or female anatomy, or they may have chromosomal variations that do not fit the typical pattern of XX (female) or XY (male).

In medical terminology, hermaphroditism is sometimes referred to as "true hermaphroditism" to distinguish it from intersex conditions. However, the term "hermaphrodite" has fallen out of favor in modern medical and social contexts because it is often considered stigmatizing and misleading. Instead, many professionals prefer to use terms like "intersex" or "disorders of sex development" (DSD) to describe individuals with atypical sexual anatomy or chromosomal patterns.

Health policy refers to a set of decisions, plans, and actions that are undertaken to achieve specific healthcare goals within a population. It is formulated by governmental and non-governmental organizations with the objective of providing guidance and direction for the management and delivery of healthcare services. Health policies address various aspects of healthcare, including access, financing, quality, and equity. They can be designed to promote health, prevent disease, and provide treatment and rehabilitation services to individuals who are sick or injured. Effective health policies require careful consideration of scientific evidence, ethical principles, and societal values to ensure that they meet the needs of the population while being fiscally responsible.

Statistical models are mathematical representations that describe the relationship between variables in a given dataset. They are used to analyze and interpret data in order to make predictions or test hypotheses about a population. In the context of medicine, statistical models can be used for various purposes such as:

1. Disease risk prediction: By analyzing demographic, clinical, and genetic data using statistical models, researchers can identify factors that contribute to an individual's risk of developing certain diseases. This information can then be used to develop personalized prevention strategies or early detection methods.

2. Clinical trial design and analysis: Statistical models are essential tools for designing and analyzing clinical trials. They help determine sample size, allocate participants to treatment groups, and assess the effectiveness and safety of interventions.

3. Epidemiological studies: Researchers use statistical models to investigate the distribution and determinants of health-related events in populations. This includes studying patterns of disease transmission, evaluating public health interventions, and estimating the burden of diseases.

4. Health services research: Statistical models are employed to analyze healthcare utilization, costs, and outcomes. This helps inform decisions about resource allocation, policy development, and quality improvement initiatives.

5. Biostatistics and bioinformatics: In these fields, statistical models are used to analyze large-scale molecular data (e.g., genomics, proteomics) to understand biological processes and identify potential therapeutic targets.

In summary, statistical models in medicine provide a framework for understanding complex relationships between variables and making informed decisions based on data-driven insights.

Biological evolution is the change in the genetic composition of populations of organisms over time, from one generation to the next. It is a process that results in descendants differing genetically from their ancestors. Biological evolution can be driven by several mechanisms, including natural selection, genetic drift, gene flow, and mutation. These processes can lead to changes in the frequency of alleles (variants of a gene) within populations, resulting in the development of new species and the extinction of others over long periods of time. Biological evolution provides a unifying explanation for the diversity of life on Earth and is supported by extensive evidence from many different fields of science, including genetics, paleontology, comparative anatomy, and biogeography.

Mating preference in animals refers to the selection of specific individuals as mates based on certain characteristics or traits. These preferences can be influenced by various factors such as genetic compatibility, physical attributes (e.g., size, color, health), behavioral traits (e.g., dominance, aggression), and environmental conditions.

Mating preferences play a crucial role in the process of sexual selection, which is one of the main mechanisms driving evolutionary change. They can lead to assortative mating, where similar individuals are more likely to mate with each other, or disassortative mating, where dissimilar individuals are more likely to mate.

Mating preferences can also contribute to reproductive isolation between different populations or species, ultimately leading to speciation. In some cases, these preferences may be hard-wired into an animal's behavior, while in others, they might be more flexible and influenced by learning and experience.

Kidney transplantation is a surgical procedure where a healthy kidney from a deceased or living donor is implanted into a patient with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) or permanent kidney failure. The new kidney takes over the functions of filtering waste and excess fluids from the blood, producing urine, and maintaining the body's electrolyte balance.

The transplanted kidney is typically placed in the lower abdomen, with its blood vessels connected to the recipient's iliac artery and vein. The ureter of the new kidney is then attached to the recipient's bladder to ensure proper urine flow. Following the surgery, the patient will require lifelong immunosuppressive therapy to prevent rejection of the transplanted organ by their immune system.

A cadaver is a deceased body that is used for medical research or education. In the field of medicine, cadavers are often used in anatomy lessons, surgical training, and other forms of medical research. The use of cadavers allows medical professionals to gain a deeper understanding of the human body and its various systems without causing harm to living subjects. Cadavers may be donated to medical schools or obtained through other means, such as through consent of the deceased or their next of kin. It is important to handle and treat cadavers with respect and dignity, as they were once living individuals who deserve to be treated with care even in death.

"Body size" is a general term that refers to the overall physical dimensions and proportions of an individual's body. It can encompass various measurements, including height, weight, waist circumference, hip circumference, blood pressure, and other anthropometric measures.

In medical and public health contexts, body size is often used to assess health status, risk factors for chronic diseases, and overall well-being. For example, a high body mass index (BMI) may indicate excess body fat and increase the risk of conditions such as diabetes, hypertension, and cardiovascular disease. Similarly, a large waist circumference or high blood pressure may also be indicators of increased health risks.

It's important to note that body size is just one aspect of health and should not be used as the sole indicator of an individual's overall well-being. A holistic approach to health that considers multiple factors, including diet, physical activity, mental health, and social determinants of health, is essential for promoting optimal health outcomes.

Disorders of Sex Development (DSD) are a group of conditions that occur when there is a difference in the development and assignment of sex characteristics. These differences may be apparent at birth, at puberty, or later in life. DSD can affect chromosomes, gonads, genitals, or secondary sexual characteristics, and can result from genetic mutations or environmental factors during fetal development.

DSDs were previously referred to as "intersex" conditions, but the term "Disorders of Sex Development" is now preferred in medical settings because it is more descriptive and less stigmatizing. DSDs are not errors or abnormalities, but rather variations in human development that require sensitive and individualized care.

The diagnosis and management of DSD can be complex and may involve a team of healthcare providers, including endocrinologists, urologists, gynecologists, psychologists, and genetic counselors. Treatment options depend on the specific type of DSD and may include hormone therapy, surgery, or other interventions to support physical and emotional well-being.

"State Medicine" is not a term that has a widely accepted or specific medical definition. However, in general terms, it can refer to the organization, financing, and delivery of healthcare services and resources at the national or regional level, overseen and managed by the government or state. This can include public health initiatives, regulation of healthcare professionals and institutions, and the provision of healthcare services through publicly funded programs.

In some contexts, "State Medicine" may also refer to the practice of using medical treatments or interventions as a means of achieving political or social objectives, such as reducing crime rates or improving economic productivity. However, this usage is less common and more controversial.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Programming, Linear" is not a recognized medical term or concept. The term "linear programming" comes from the field of mathematics and computer science, and it refers to a method used to find the optimal solution(s) to a problem with certain constraints, where the objective function and constraints are linear.

If you have any questions related to medicine or healthcare, I'd be happy to try to help answer them for you!

Lung transplantation is a surgical procedure where one or both diseased lungs are removed and replaced with healthy lungs from a deceased donor. It is typically considered as a treatment option for patients with end-stage lung diseases, such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), cystic fibrosis, idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis, and alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency, who have exhausted all other medical treatments and continue to suffer from severe respiratory failure.

The procedure involves several steps, including evaluating the patient's eligibility for transplantation, matching the donor's lung size and blood type with the recipient, and performing the surgery under general anesthesia. After the surgery, patients require close monitoring and lifelong immunosuppressive therapy to prevent rejection of the new lungs.

Lung transplantation can significantly improve the quality of life and survival rates for some patients with end-stage lung disease, but it is not without risks, including infection, bleeding, and rejection. Therefore, careful consideration and thorough evaluation are necessary before pursuing this treatment option.

"Cultural deprivation" is a term that was previously used in sociology and social work to describe the idea that some individuals or groups may be at a disadvantage due to their lack of exposure to dominant cultural values, customs, and behaviors. This concept has been criticized for its deficit-based perspective and oversimplification of complex social issues.

In medical contexts, the term "cultural competence" is more commonly used to describe the ability of healthcare providers to understand, respect, and respond to the cultural differences of their patients. Cultural competence involves recognizing and addressing power imbalances, communication barriers, and other factors that may affect healthcare access and outcomes for individuals from diverse backgrounds.

It's important to note that cultural competence is not just about acquiring knowledge about different cultures, but also about developing skills and attitudes that promote respectful and effective communication and care. This includes self-awareness of one's own biases and assumptions, flexibility in adapting to different cultural contexts, and a commitment to ongoing learning and improvement.

Liver failure is a serious condition in which the liver is no longer able to perform its normal functions, such as removing toxins and waste products from the blood, producing bile to help digest food, and regulating blood clotting. This can lead to a buildup of toxins in the body, jaundice (yellowing of the skin and eyes), fluid accumulation in the abdomen, and an increased risk of bleeding. Liver failure can be acute (sudden) or chronic (developing over time). Acute liver failure is often caused by medication toxicity, viral hepatitis, or other sudden illnesses. Chronic liver failure is most commonly caused by long-term damage from conditions such as cirrhosis, hepatitis, alcohol abuse, and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease.

It's important to note that Liver Failure is a life threatening condition and need immediate medical attention.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Housing, Animal" is not a standard term in medical terminology. Medical terminology typically relates to the human body, diseases, treatments, and healthcare practices. "Housing, Animal" would be more related to veterinary medicine or animal care fields, which pertain to the accommodation and environment provided for animals. If you have any questions related to medical terminology, I'd be happy to help!

Choice behavior refers to the selection or decision-making process in which an individual consciously or unconsciously chooses one option over others based on their preferences, values, experiences, and motivations. In a medical context, choice behavior may relate to patients' decisions about their healthcare, such as selecting a treatment option, choosing a healthcare provider, or adhering to a prescribed medication regimen. Understanding choice behavior is essential in shaping health policies, developing patient-centered care models, and improving overall health outcomes.

Analysis of Variance (ANOVA) is a statistical technique used to compare the means of two or more groups and determine whether there are any significant differences between them. It is a way to analyze the variance in a dataset to determine whether the variability between groups is greater than the variability within groups, which can indicate that the groups are significantly different from one another.

ANOVA is based on the concept of partitioning the total variance in a dataset into two components: variance due to differences between group means (also known as "between-group variance") and variance due to differences within each group (also known as "within-group variance"). By comparing these two sources of variance, ANOVA can help researchers determine whether any observed differences between groups are statistically significant, or whether they could have occurred by chance.

ANOVA is a widely used technique in many areas of research, including biology, psychology, engineering, and business. It is often used to compare the means of two or more experimental groups, such as a treatment group and a control group, to determine whether the treatment had a significant effect. ANOVA can also be used to compare the means of different populations or subgroups within a population, to identify any differences that may exist between them.

Oviposition is a medical/biological term that refers to the process of laying or depositing eggs by female organisms, including birds, reptiles, insects, and fish. In humans and other mammals, the term is not applicable since they give birth to live young rather than laying eggs.

Phloem is the living tissue in vascular plants that transports organic nutrients, particularly sucrose, a sugar, from leaves, where they are produced in photosynthesis, to other parts of the plant such as roots and stems. It also transports amino acids and other substances. Phloem is one of the two types of vascular tissue, the other being xylem; both are found in the vascular bundles of stems and roots. The term "phloem" comes from the Greek word for bark, as it often lies beneath the bark in trees and shrubs.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but the term "Great Britain" is not a medical concept or condition. It is a geographical and political term referring to the largest island in the British Isles, on which the majority of England, Scotland, and Wales are located. It's also used to refer to the political union of these three countries, which is called the United Kingdom. Therefore, it doesn't have a medical definition.

Decision-making is the cognitive process of selecting a course of action from among multiple alternatives. In a medical context, decision-making refers to the process by which healthcare professionals and patients make choices about medical tests, treatments, or management options based on a thorough evaluation of available information, including the patient's preferences, values, and circumstances.

The decision-making process in medicine typically involves several steps:

1. Identifying the problem or issue that requires a decision.
2. Gathering relevant information about the patient's medical history, current condition, diagnostic test results, treatment options, and potential outcomes.
3. Considering the benefits, risks, and uncertainties associated with each option.
4. Evaluating the patient's preferences, values, and goals.
5. Selecting the most appropriate course of action based on a careful weighing of the available evidence and the patient's individual needs and circumstances.
6. Communicating the decision to the patient and ensuring that they understand the rationale behind it, as well as any potential risks or benefits.
7. Monitoring the outcomes of the decision and adjusting the course of action as needed based on ongoing evaluation and feedback.

Effective decision-making in medicine requires a thorough understanding of medical evidence, clinical expertise, and patient preferences. It also involves careful consideration of ethical principles, such as respect for autonomy, non-maleficence, beneficence, and justice. Ultimately, the goal of decision-making in healthcare is to promote the best possible outcomes for patients while minimizing harm and respecting their individual needs and values.

I apologize for any confusion, but "Styracaceae" is not a medical term. It is a taxonomic category in botany, referring to the family of plants that includes shrubs and trees such as snowbell, sweetshrub, and members of the genera Styrax and Halesia.

In a medical context, you might be referring to various plant-derived compounds found in Styracaceae family plants, which could have potential medicinal properties. For example, styrene, a compound found in the oleoresin of some Styracaceae species, has been studied for its potential effects on cancer cells. However, it is important to note that these studies are still in the early stages and much more research is needed before any definitive conclusions can be drawn about their medicinal applications.

Organizational efficiency is a management concept that refers to the ability of an organization to produce the desired output with minimal waste of resources such as time, money, and labor. It involves optimizing processes, structures, and systems within the organization to achieve its goals in the most effective and efficient manner possible. This can be achieved through various means, including the implementation of best practices, the use of technology to automate and streamline processes, and the continuous improvement of skills and knowledge among employees. Ultimately, organizational efficiency is about creating value for stakeholders while minimizing waste and maximizing returns on investment.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "flowers" is not a term that has a medical definition. The term "flowers" is commonly used to refer to the reproductive structures of flowering plants (angiosperms), which are characterized by having both male and female reproductive organs or separate male and female flowers.

If you have any questions related to medical terminology or health conditions, I would be happy to try to help answer those for you!

"Liquidambar" is not a medical term. It is the name of a genus of trees, also known as sweetgum or alligator wood. The sap of some species contains a fragrant resin called storax, which has been used in traditional medicine and perfumes. However, it is not commonly used in modern medical practice.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "seasons" is not a term that has a medical definition. Seasons refer to the four divisions of the year (spring, summer, autumn or fall, and winter) based on the position of the earth in its orbit around the sun. If you have any questions related to health or medicine, I'd be happy to try to help answer those!

Reaction time, in the context of medicine and physiology, refers to the time period between the presentation of a stimulus and the subsequent initiation of a response. This complex process involves the central nervous system, particularly the brain, which perceives the stimulus, processes it, and then sends signals to the appropriate muscles or glands to react.

There are different types of reaction times, including simple reaction time (responding to a single, expected stimulus) and choice reaction time (choosing an appropriate response from multiple possibilities). These measures can be used in clinical settings to assess various aspects of neurological function, such as cognitive processing speed, motor control, and alertness.

However, it is important to note that reaction times can be influenced by several factors, including age, fatigue, attention, and the use of certain medications or substances.

Clinical protocols, also known as clinical practice guidelines or care paths, are systematically developed statements that assist healthcare professionals and patients in making decisions about the appropriate healthcare for specific clinical circumstances. They are based on a thorough evaluation of the available scientific evidence and consist of a set of recommendations that are designed to optimize patient outcomes, improve the quality of care, and reduce unnecessary variations in practice. Clinical protocols may cover a wide range of topics, including diagnosis, treatment, follow-up, and disease prevention, and are developed by professional organizations, government agencies, and other groups with expertise in the relevant field.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Models, Econometric" is not a medical term. Econometric models are statistical tools used in the field of economics to estimate economic relationships and forecast future outcomes. They are based on economic theory and use historical data to estimate the parameters of mathematical equations that describe these relationships.

If you have any questions about medical terms or concepts, I'd be happy to try to help! Just let me know what you're looking for.

In medical terms, "seeds" are often referred to as a small amount of a substance, such as a radioactive material or drug, that is inserted into a tissue or placed inside a capsule for the purpose of treating a medical condition. This can include procedures like brachytherapy, where seeds containing radioactive materials are used in the treatment of cancer to kill cancer cells and shrink tumors. Similarly, in some forms of drug delivery, seeds containing medication can be used to gradually release the drug into the body over an extended period of time.

It's important to note that "seeds" have different meanings and applications depending on the medical context. In other cases, "seeds" may simply refer to small particles or structures found in the body, such as those present in the eye's retina.

Health planning is a systematic process of creating strategies, policies, and goals to improve the health of a population and ensure the provision of adequate and accessible healthcare services. It involves assessing the health needs of the community, establishing priorities, developing interventions, and implementing and evaluating programs to address those needs. The ultimate goal of health planning is to optimize the health status of the population, reduce health disparities, and make efficient use of resources in the healthcare system. This process typically involves collaboration among various stakeholders, including healthcare professionals, policymakers, community members, and advocacy groups.

The attentional blink is a phenomenon in visual perception where an individual fails to detect the second of two target stimuli presented in close succession within a rapid serial visual presentation (RSVP) stream of distractors. This occurs because the processing of the first target interferes with the ability to attend to and identify the second target when it appears within approximately 200-500 milliseconds after the first. The attentional blink is thought to reflect limitations in attentional resources and the capacity of working memory.

Health services needs refer to the population's requirement for healthcare services based on their health status, disease prevalence, and clinical guidelines. These needs can be categorized into normative needs (based on expert opinions or clinical guidelines) and expressed needs (based on individuals' perceptions of their own healthcare needs).

On the other hand, health services demand refers to the quantity of healthcare services that consumers are willing and able to pay for, given their preferences, values, and financial resources. Demand is influenced by various factors such as price, income, education level, and cultural beliefs.

It's important to note that while needs represent a population's requirement for healthcare services, demand reflects the actual utilization of these services. Understanding both health services needs and demand is crucial in planning and delivering effective healthcare services that meet the population's requirements while ensuring efficient resource allocation.

Herbivory is not a medical term, but rather a term used in biology and ecology. It refers to the practice of consuming plants or plant matter for food. Herbivores are animals that eat only plants, and their diet can include leaves, stems, roots, flowers, fruits, seeds, and other parts of plants.

While herbivory is not a medical term, it is still relevant to the field of medicine in certain contexts. For example, understanding the diets and behaviors of herbivores can help inform public health initiatives related to food safety and disease transmission. Additionally, research on herbivory has contributed to our understanding of the evolution of plant-animal interactions and the development of ecosystems.

'Polygonum cuspidatum' is the botanical name for a plant species more commonly known as Japanese knotweed. Although it has some traditional medicinal uses in its native range of East Asia, it is not typically referred to as a 'medical definition.' However, it's crucial to note that Japanese knotweed has become an invasive species in many parts of the world, including North America and Europe. Its rapid growth can cause significant damage to infrastructure and negatively impact native ecosystems.

In traditional East Asian medicine, extracts from 'Polygonum cuspidatum' have been used for various purposes, such as treating Lyme disease, skin issues, and inflammation. The plant contains resveratrol, a potent antioxidant that has gained attention in recent years for its potential health benefits. However, more research is needed to confirm these effects and establish safe and effective dosages.

In summary, 'Polygonum cuspidatum' or Japanese knotweed does not have a medical definition per se, but it is a plant species with some traditional medicinal uses and potential health benefits due to its resveratrol content. It is essential to be aware of its invasive nature if you come across this plant in non-native environments.

'Fagus' is the genus name for beech trees in the family Fagaceae. It includes several species of deciduous trees that are native to the Northern Hemisphere, primarily in North America and Europe. The most common species is the European beech (Fagus sylvatica) and the American beech (Fagus grandifolia).

While 'Fagus' is a valid term in botany, it does not have a medical definition as it is not a term used to describe a medical condition or treatment.

Hospital planning, in the medical context, refers to the process of designing, developing, and managing healthcare facilities to ensure they meet the current and future needs of the population they serve. It involves strategic planning, financial forecasting, architectural design, infrastructure development, and operational management. The goal is to create an efficient, safe, and patient-centered environment that supports high-quality care, complies with regulatory standards, and optimizes resource utilization. This process may also include considerations for emergency preparedness, technological integration, and sustainable practices.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "wasps" is not a term that has a specific medical definition. Wasps are a type of insect in the order Hymenoptera, and some people can have allergic reactions to their stings. However, there is no medical condition or disease specifically associated with wasps. If you have any specific medical concerns or questions, I would be happy to try to help if I can!

I apologize for any confusion, but "Pinus" is not a medical term. It is the genus name for a group of plants commonly known as pine trees, which belong to the family Pinaceae in the kingdom Plantae. These evergreen coniferous resinous trees are widely distributed throughout the Northern Hemisphere, with some species also found in the Southern Hemisphere.

If you have any medical terms or concepts that you would like me to define or explain, please feel free to ask!

The "delivery of health care" refers to the process of providing medical services, treatments, and interventions to individuals in order to maintain, restore, or improve their health. This encompasses a wide range of activities, including:

1. Preventive care: Routine check-ups, screenings, immunizations, and counseling aimed at preventing illnesses or identifying them at an early stage.
2. Diagnostic services: Tests and procedures used to identify and understand medical conditions, such as laboratory tests, imaging studies, and biopsies.
3. Treatment interventions: Medical, surgical, or therapeutic treatments provided to manage acute or chronic health issues, including medications, surgeries, physical therapy, and psychotherapy.
4. Acute care services: Short-term medical interventions focused on addressing immediate health concerns, such as hospitalizations for infections, injuries, or complications from medical conditions.
5. Chronic care management: Long-term care and support provided to individuals with ongoing medical needs, such as those living with chronic diseases like diabetes, heart disease, or cancer.
6. Rehabilitation services: Programs designed to help patients recover from illnesses, injuries, or surgeries, focusing on restoring physical, cognitive, and emotional function.
7. End-of-life care: Palliative and hospice care provided to individuals facing terminal illnesses, with an emphasis on comfort, dignity, and quality of life.
8. Public health initiatives: Population-level interventions aimed at improving community health, such as disease prevention programs, health education campaigns, and environmental modifications.

The delivery of health care involves a complex network of healthcare professionals, institutions, and systems working together to ensure that patients receive the best possible care. This includes primary care physicians, specialists, nurses, allied health professionals, hospitals, clinics, long-term care facilities, and public health organizations. Effective communication, coordination, and collaboration among these stakeholders are essential for high-quality, patient-centered care.

I must clarify that I'm a helpful assistant and not a doctor, but I can tell you that 'politics' is not a term used in medicine. Politics refers to the activities associated with the governance of a country or area, especially the debate or conflict among individuals or groups having or hoping to achieve power. If you have any medical questions, feel free to ask!

Health care costs refer to the expenses incurred for medical services, treatments, procedures, and products that are used to maintain or restore an individual's health. These costs can be categorized into several types:

1. Direct costs: These include payments made for doctor visits, hospital stays, medications, diagnostic tests, surgeries, and other medical treatments and services. Direct costs can be further divided into two subcategories:
* Out-of-pocket costs: Expenses paid directly by patients, such as co-payments, deductibles, coinsurance, and any uncovered medical services or products.
* Third-party payer costs: Expenses covered by insurance companies, government programs (like Medicare, Medicaid), or other entities that pay for health care services on behalf of patients.
2. Indirect costs: These are the expenses incurred as a result of illness or injury that indirectly impact an individual's ability to work and earn a living. Examples include lost productivity, absenteeism, reduced earning capacity, and disability benefits.
3. Non-medical costs: These are expenses related to caregiving, transportation, home modifications, assistive devices, and other non-medical services required for managing health conditions or disabilities.

Health care costs can vary significantly depending on factors such as the type of medical service, geographic location, insurance coverage, and individual health status. Understanding these costs is essential for patients, healthcare providers, policymakers, and researchers to make informed decisions about treatment options, resource allocation, and health system design.

Fertility is the natural ability to conceive or to cause conception of offspring. In humans, it is the capacity of a woman and a man to reproduce through sexual reproduction. For women, fertility usually takes place during their reproductive years, which is from adolescence until menopause. A woman's fertility depends on various factors including her age, overall health, and the health of her reproductive system.

For men, fertility can be affected by a variety of factors such as age, genetics, general health, sexual function, and environmental factors that may affect sperm production or quality. Factors that can negatively impact male fertility include exposure to certain chemicals, radiation, smoking, alcohol consumption, drug use, and sexually transmitted infections (STIs).

Infertility is a common medical condition affecting about 10-15% of couples trying to conceive. Infertility can be primary or secondary. Primary infertility refers to the inability to conceive after one year of unprotected sexual intercourse, while secondary infertility refers to the inability to conceive following a previous pregnancy.

Infertility can be treated with various medical and surgical interventions depending on the underlying cause. These may include medications to stimulate ovulation, intrauterine insemination (IUI), in vitro fertilization (IVF), or surgery to correct anatomical abnormalities.

Random priority (RP), also called Random serial dictatorship (RSD), is a procedure for fair random assignment - dividing ... "Random Serial Dictatorship and the Core from Random Endowments in House Allocation Problems". Econometrica. 66 (3): 689. doi: ... RSD is not ex-ante PE when the agents have Von Neumann-Morgenstern utilities over random allocations, i.e., lotteries over ... Sec.2 When the rankings of the agents over the objects are drawn uniformly at random, the probability that the allocation given ...
Budish, Eric; Che, Yeon-Koo; Kojima, Fuhito; Milgrom, Paul (2013-04-01). "Designing Random Allocation Mechanisms: Theory and ... Other mechanisms for course allocation include fair random assignment, stable matching, and optimization based mechanisms. ... Course allocation is the problem of allocating seats in university courses among students. Many universities impose an upper ... The choosing order is random at the first round, and then reverses in subsequent rounds. In practice, students do not have to ...
... both with random allocation and with partially random allocation. In a repeated variant of the process, m {\displaystyle m} ... 0 {\displaystyle c>0} .) Note that for m > n log ⁡ n {\displaystyle m>n\log n} , the random allocation process gives only the ... A powerful balls-into-bins paradigm is the "power of two random choices" where each ball chooses two (or more) random bins and ... Kolchin, Valentin F. (1978). Random allocations. Washington: Winston [usw.] ISBN 978-0470993941. Kotz, Samuel; Johnson, Norman ...
Checking whether a given random allocation can be implemented by a lottery over EF1 and PO allocations is NP-hard. Babaioff, ... A variant of SE was applied also to cake-cutting, where the allocation is deterministic (not random). Each item is represented ... Budish, Eric; Che, Yeon-Koo; Kojima, Fuhito; Milgrom, Paul (2013-04-01). "Designing Random Allocation Mechanisms: Theory and ... The SE allocation satisfies SD-efficiency - a weak ordinal variant of Pareto-efficiency (it means that the allocation is Pareto ...
Fair item allocation is a setting in which agents may get more than one item. Sortition - random selection of political ... Tao and Cole study the existence of PE and EF random allocations when the utilities are non-linear (can have complements). ... Budish, Eric; Che, Yeon-Koo; Kojima, Fuhito; Milgrom, Paul (2013-04-01). "Designing Random Allocation Mechanisms: Theory and ... When there are 3 or more objects (and 3 or more agents), RP and PS may return different allocations, and no allocation Pareto- ...
Lotteries were fast, but clearly a random allocation of licenses left much to be desired in terms of efficiency. Neither of ... Budish, E.; Che, Y.-K.; Kojima, F.; Milgrom, Paul (2013). "Designing Random Allocation Mechanisms: Theory and Applications". ... Auctions offered great potential in terms of obtaining an efficient allocation of licenses and also capturing some of the value ... His work on auctions with Robert Weber introduced the concept of affiliation of random variables, to indicate systems of ...
One such application is for the problem of fair random assignment: given a randomized allocation of items, Birkhoff's algorithm ... Budish, Eric; Che, Yeon-Koo; Kojima, Fuhito; Milgrom, Paul (2013-04-01). "Designing Random Allocation Mechanisms: Theory and ... To attain fairness, the allocation is randomized: for each (person, object) pair, a probability is calculated, such that the ... Ye, Felix X.-F.; Wang, Yue; Qian, Hong (2016). "Stochastic dynamics: Markov chains and random transformations". Discrete and ...
Budish, Eric; Che, Yeon-Koo; Kojima, Fuhito; Milgrom, Paul (2013). "Designing Random Allocation Mechanisms: Theory and ... Che, Yeon-Koo; Kojima, Fuhito (2010). "Asymptotic equivalence of probabilistic serial and random priority mechanisms" (PDF). ...
A specific rule for item allocation - see random priority item allocation. This disambiguation page lists articles associated ... Random serial dictatorship, also called random priority, can refer to: A general rule for social choice - a variant of the ... with the title Random serial dictatorship. If an internal link led you here, you may wish to change the link to point directly ...
Pupil allocation to houses is random, but siblings generally follow through the same House. When there was a boarding house, ...
Biased Random Sampling bases its job allocation on the network represented by a directed graph. For each execution node in this ... In-degree will decrease during job execution while out-degree will increase after job allocation. Active Clustering is a self- ... "Active Clustering and Random Sampling Walk predictably perform better as the number of processing nodes is increased" while ...
Her dissertation, supervised by Michael B. Woodroofe, was Two Treatment Comparison with Random Allocation Rule. Heckman's ...
They call the random variable a sunspot and the resulting allocation is a 'sunspot equilibrium'. Much work on sunspot ... In economics, the term sunspots (or sometimes "a sunspot") refers to an extrinsic random variable, that is, a random variable ... In other words, the outcome depends on an "extrinsic" random variable, meaning a random influence that matters only because ... David Cass and Karl Shell coined the term sunspots as a suggestive and less technical way of saying "extrinsic random variable ...
"Envy-Free and Pareto-Optimal Allocations for Agents with Asymmetric Random Valuations". arXiv:2109.08971 [cs.GT]. (CS1 errors: ... An allocation y is called a Pareto improvement of an allocation z, if the utility of all agents in y is at least as large as in ... A discrete allocation is called Pareto-efficient (PO) if it is not Pareto-dominated by any discrete allocation; it is called ... So fPO is a stronger requirement than PO: every fPO allocation is PO, but not every PO allocation is fPO. There is a set of n ...
Future kernel_map (and submap) allocations are pushed forward by a random amount. The allocation is silently removed after the ... A random 9-bit value is generated right after kmem_init() which establishes kernel_map, is multiplied by the page size. The ... A hardware random number generator is also included as a part of this coprocessor. Each device's Secure Enclave has a unique ID ... The kernel image base is randomized by the boot loader (iBoot). This is done by creating random data, doing a SHA-1 hash of it ...
A/B testing Allocation concealment Random assignment Randomized block design Randomized controlled trial Schulz KF, Altman DG, ... Trudy Dehue (December 1997). "Deception, Efficiency, and Random Groups: Psychology and the Gradual Origination of the Random ...
Fast random-access allocation check: Checking whether a sector is free is as simple as checking the corresponding bit. Fast ...
Glynn RJ, Ridker PM, Goldhaber SZ, Zee RY, Buring JE (September 2007). "Effects of random allocation to vitamin E ...
Entry into the race can also be obtained through a random allocation lottery or through the Ironman's charitable eBay auction. ...
... a random ballot will occur to determine ticket allocation. 27 August 2010 20:45 CEST Stade Louis II, Monaco Attendance: 17,265 ...
Random Projections and Latent Dirichlet Allocation. Weka. Weka is a popular data mining package for Java including WordVectors ... Generalized vector space model Latent semantic analysis Term Rocchio Classification Random indexing Search Engine Optimization ...
Entry into the championship race could also be obtained through a random allocation lottery or through the Ironman's charitable ...
Entry into the championship race could also be obtained through a random allocation lottery or through the Ironman's charitable ...
Kappa's baseline agreement is the agreement that would be expected due to random allocation, given the quantities specified by ... Thus, κ = 0 when the observed allocation is apparently random, regardless of the quantity disagreement as constrained by the ... The disagreement is due to allocation because quantities are identical. Kappa is −0.07. Here, reporting quantity and allocation ... So the expected probability that both would say yes at random is: p Yes = a + b a + b + c + d ⋅ a + c a + b + c + d = 0.5 × 0.6 ...
Tao and Cole study the existence of PEEF random allocations when the utilities are non-linear (can have complements). ... For three or more agents with linear utilities, any Nash-optimal allocation is PEEF. A Nash-optimal allocation is an allocation ... Theorem 5 (Svensson):: 531 if all Pareto-optimal allocations are sigma-optimal, then PEEF allocations exist. PEEF allocations ... The allocation X is called sigma-optimal if for every k, the allocation Xk is Pareto-optimal. Lemma:: 528 An allocation is ...
... but with an additional preliminary random allocation procedure executed by a computer. For instance, assume for year 2009 the ... An open computer allocation carried out by the Student Recruitment Committee Office of Nanjing will be needed if the number of ...
... see random priority item allocation. Allan Gibbard proved the random dictatorship theorem. It says that, when preferences are ... In the random dictatorship (RD) rule, one of the voters is selected uniformly at random, and the alternative most preferred by ... It is easy to implement both the RD and the RSD mechanisms in practice: just pick a random voter, or a random permutation, and ... This is one of the common rules for random social choice. When used in multi-constituency bodies, it is sometimes called random ...
... most commonly used in project management for time allocation and to analyse random variables. Critical path drag is a project ...
... with siblings also falling prey to the random house allocation. Once drafted, each student remains with the house throughout ...
They were renumbered from the LNWR's random allocation based on vacant numbers, to a solid block sequence 7550-7841, and given ...
Random priority (RP), also called Random serial dictatorship (RSD), is a procedure for fair random assignment - dividing ... "Random Serial Dictatorship and the Core from Random Endowments in House Allocation Problems". Econometrica. 66 (3): 689. doi: ... RSD is not ex-ante PE when the agents have Von Neumann-Morgenstern utilities over random allocations, i.e., lotteries over ... Sec.2 When the rankings of the agents over the objects are drawn uniformly at random, the probability that the allocation given ...
Faculty & Research Publications The Complexity of Computing the Random Priority Allocation Matrix ... The random priority (RP) mechanism is a popular way to allocate n objects to n agents with strict ordinal preferences over the ... In the RP mechanism, an ordering over the agents is selected uniformly at random; the first agent is then allocated his most- ... It is shown that the problem of computing the RP allocation matrix is #P-complete. Furthermore, it is NP-complete to decide if ...
quasi-random allocation. Full explanation:. Quasi-random allocation methods include allocation by the participants date of ... non-random allocation - Methods of allocating study participants to treatment comparison groups that are not random, but are ... random allocation. Still dont get it?. If you feel that this definition hasnt helped you to understand the term, click on our ... In practice, these methods of allocation are relatively easy to manipulate, introducing allocation bias. ...
Text; Format: print ; Literary form: Not fiction Language: English Publication details: Chichester ; New York : Wiley, c1992Availability: Items available for loan: WHO HQ (1)Call number: W 50 92CH. ...
So what led to the gradual move away from alternation to random allocation? The principal disadvantage of alternate allocation ... Medical historians have not given adequate attention to the use of unbiased treatment allocation before random allocation began ... The gradual move from alternation to random allocation. It is clear that, contrary to a common assumption (Chalmers 2010), ... This has led some of them to assume that random allocation to treatment comparison groups reflected the development of ...
Environment and Public Health - Random Allocation PubMed MeSh Term *Overview. Overview. subject area of * 5-HT2C Receptors in ...
Toronto FC and other cubs will have more room to maneuver in terms of roster building now that the MLS allocation order is a ... Random thoughts on TFC: The John Herdman debate. While the current Canadian mens team coach could help Toronto FC undergo a ... Toronto FC and other cubs will have more room to maneuver in terms of roster building now that the MLS allocation order is a ... Some random thoughts I had on Toronto FC as the off-season rolls on in San Diego... ...
Random allocation to study arms. Best-evidence medication HIV interventions for persons with HIV (PWH) ...
Custom memory allocation in C# Part 1 - Allocating object on a stack. April 23, 2016. December 12, 2021. ~ afish ... Part 7 - Stack allocation once again. Part 8 - Unsafe list in .NET Core x64. Part 9 - Hijacking new in x64. Part 10 - Hijacking ... Allocation process. In order to allocate a new managed object we usually use new. operator. This is compiled to newobj. MSIL ... In one of the next parts we will see how to modify CLR in runtime in order to hijack the allocation mechanism and be able to ...
This new model allows for multiple interpretations, including: (i) random, non-preferential allocation (\textit{e.g.} by ... A Schelling model with switching agents: decreasing segregation via random allocation and social mobility. The European ... This new model allows for multiple interpretations, including: (i) random, non-preferential allocation (\textit{e.g.} by ... A Schelling model with switching agents: decreasing segregation via random allocation and social mobility. ...
Random Allocation * Vasodilator Agents / administration & dosage Substances * Vasodilator Agents * Enalapril ...
Random Allocation * Species Specificity * Vocalization, Animal* Grants and funding * Intramural NIH HHS/United States ...
Approximate Random Allocation Mechanisms Mohammad Akbarpour, Afshin Nikzad The Review of Economic Studies ...
assigned based on the random token allocation. On Mon, Apr 3, 2023 at 8:12 AM David Tinker ,[email protected], wrote: I ...
Allocation-concealment mechanism.. 9. Mechanism used to implement random-allocation sequence (such as sequentially numbered ... 4.4.3. Allocation Concealment. The random sequence of treatment codes was retained by the QP at the investigational product ... Who generated the random-allocation sequence, who enrolled participants, and who assigned participants to interventions.. 10. ... Method used to generate random-allocation sequence.. 10. 8b. Type of randomization, details of any restriction (such as ...
Random Allocation. Mastaloudis A, Yu T-W, ODonnell RP, Frei B, Dashwood RH, Traber MG. 2004. Endurance exercise results in DNA ...
Random Allocation. Simonich MT, Egner PA, Roebuck BD, Orner GA, Jubert C, Pereira C, Groopman JD, Kensler TW, Dashwood RH, ...
Information about random sequence generation and allocation concealment was unclear for most trials. A summary of the ... random sequence generation, allocation concealment, blinding of participants and personnel, blinding of outcome assessment, ... A random effects meta-analysis of the results revealed that at the end of the trials (mean follow-up seven weeks, range 2-16), ... Energy intakes were reported according to breakfast consumption in 10 studies.23243839404244454748 In a random effects meta- ...
Ideally there should be selection though random sequence generation and allocation concealment. Allocation bias occurs if ...
We included trials that met the following criteria: random allocation of participants; comparison between a first-line drug ... DerSimonian-Laird type random effects estimators [9]). The risk difference (RD), the absolute risk reduction (ARR = RD x 100) ...
The coalesced state is at a lower entropy than the initial random allocation of ideological positions. ... 11). Each agent begins with a random value for their concealed political affiliation \(C_{i,j}\) which for the system is held ... With this approach the agents are engaged in a constant total number of actions which changes the allocations between political ...
... web-based random number table. The same dietitian who was blinded generated the random allocation sequence and assigned ...
Random allocation of participants to interventions. * Outcome measures of known or probable clinical importance for ≥ 80% of ...
... of the allocation matters, besides being kind of random). However, on small , memory systems, we just run out of memory most of ... random amount of memory upto 7 times the current stack size limit and , leaks that memory. The testcase (and code) is basically ...
Random Allocation of Blastomere Descendants to the Trophectoderm and ICM of the Bovine Blastocyst ... Using time-lapse microscopy, we have identified the emergence of this random pattern at the third to fourth cell cycle, when ... Blastocysts were then classified according to the allocation of the labeled cells in the embryonic and/or abembryonic part of ... Interestingly, we observed that daughter cells allocation at the blastocyst stage is not affected by biopsies performed at an ...
The file subsystem supports a named file structure, allowing dynamic allocation of file space as well as sequential and random ... The BDOS implements disk allocation strategies which provide fully dynamic file construction while minimizing head movement ...
Patients will receive an infusion of canakinumab or matched placebo by random 1:1 allocation. The primary outcome is the ...
Risk of bias (such as failure to conceal random allocation or blind participants28 in randomised controlled trials or failure ... The authors stated that appropriate methods of concealment of random allocation were reported for 71 trials (71%).25 Fifty six ... concealment of random allocation, masking, etc).22 23 24 For example, a recent NMA compared the effects of coronary artery ...
4. Generation of the allocation sequence: adequate. (computer-generated random numbers, table of ... Data synthesis was performed assuming a random‐effects model, and standardized mean difference (SMDs) was analysed using SPSS ...
  • This study, through a random national survey, explored how senior financial executives or managers (those who determined high-level budget, resource allocation, and corporate priorities) of medium-to-large companies perceive important workplace safety issues. (cdc.gov)
  • The three top-rated safety priorities in resource allocation reported by the participants (overexertion, repetitive motion, and bodily reaction) were consistent with the top three perceived causes of workers' compensation losses. (cdc.gov)
  • Sec.2 When the rankings of the agents over the objects are drawn uniformly at random, the probability that the allocation given by RSD is ex-ante PE approaches zero as the number of agents grows. (wikipedia.org)
  • Methods of allocating study participants to treatment comparison groups that are not random , but are intended to produce similar groups. (getitglossary.org)
  • Quasi-random allocation methods include allocation by the participant 's date of birth, by the day of the week or month of the year, by a participant's medical record number, or just allocating alternate participants. (getitglossary.org)
  • RÉSUMÉ Les études ayant examiné le processus du consentement éclairé chez les participants à des études de recherche dans les pays en développement sont peu nombreuses. (who.int)
  • The page on dictatorship mechanism describes RSD is a general rule for social choice - not necessarily for item allocation. (wikipedia.org)
  • The random priority (RP) mechanism is a popular way to allocate n objects to n agents with strict ordinal preferences over the objects. (stanford.edu)
  • In one of the next parts we will see how to modify CLR in runtime in order to hijack the allocation mechanism and be able to implement allocator in C#. (adamfurmanek.pl)
  • In practice, these methods of allocation are relatively easy to manipulate, introducing allocation bias . (getitglossary.org)
  • Although the report of the streptomycin trial is rightly iconic, the attention it has attracted has led many historians to overlook earlier evidence relevant to the evolution of unbiased prospective allocation of patients to treatment comparison groups. (jameslindlibrary.org)
  • In fact, for half a century before the MRC trial and Fisher's writings, some medical practitioners wishing to evaluate the effects of treatments had used alternate allocation to assemble similar groups of patients, and so ensure that like would be compared with like. (jameslindlibrary.org)
  • Random priority (RP), also called Random serial dictatorship (RSD), is a procedure for fair random assignment - dividing indivisible items fairly among people. (wikipedia.org)
  • Treatment allocation was not random, and patients werejudged to be compliant with medication. (psychiatrist.com)
  • Outcomes on a range of relational and individual mental health variables will be assessed prior to random assignment, throughout treatment, and at the conclusion of treatment. (unav.edu)
  • But it's not the same as an observational study because we're taking this issue seriously, that the way a person happens to be given an intervention in the real world is typically not random. (medscape.com)
  • This is the first part of the Custom memory allocation series. (adamfurmanek.pl)
  • Today we start a new series of posts in which we will see details of memory allocation in .NET. (adamfurmanek.pl)
  • Random Access Memory, often abbreviated as RAM, refers to a type of computer memory that can be accessed randomly, meaning any byte of memory can be accessed without touching the preceding bytes. (devx.com)
  • Random Access Memory (RAM) is a type of computer memory that can be accessed randomly. (devx.com)
  • Random Access Memory (RAM) is a crucial component of computers and other electronic devices, as it temporarily stores the information that is currently being processed by the machine. (devx.com)
  • Plus, RAM allows users to access any byte of memory with no regard to the location or proximity to the processor, providing 'random access' which results in efficient information management. (devx.com)
  • Random Access Memory, commonly known as RAM, primarily serves as the working space for your computer. (devx.com)
  • It's essential for allowing your computer to perform multiple tasks at once, like having different tabs open on your browser, running different applications, and opening multiple files.RAM is referred to as "random access" because it allows data items to be read or written in the same amount of time irrespective of their physical locations in memory. (devx.com)
  • 1. Personal Computers: The laptops and desktops we use everyday have Random Access Memory (RAM). (devx.com)
  • Q: What is Random Access Memory (RAM)?A: Random Access Memory, usually shortened to RAM, is a type of computer memory that can be accessed randomly. (devx.com)
  • The page on fair random assignment compares RSD to other procedures for solving the same problem, such as the probabilistic-serial rule. (wikipedia.org)
  • Using time-lapse microscopy, we have identified the emergence of this random pattern at the third to fourth cell cycle, when cells started to intermingle. (bioone.org)
  • David Steinsaltz "Random Time Changes for Sock-Sorting and Other Stochastic Process Limit Theorems," Electronic Journal of Probability, Electron. (projecteuclid.org)
  • Patients will receive an infusion of Canakinumab or matched placebo by random 1:1 allocation. (imperial.ac.uk)
  • Draw a random permutation of the agents from the uniform distribution. (wikipedia.org)
  • Lem.1 However, RSD is not ex-ante PE when the agents have Von Neumann-Morgenstern utilities over random allocations, i.e., lotteries over objects (Note that ex-ante envy-freeness is weaker than ex-post envy-freeness, but ex-ante Pareto-efficiency is stronger than ex-post Pareto-efficiency). (wikipedia.org)
  • In the item division setting mentioned earlier, the alternatives correspond to the allocations of items to agents. (wikipedia.org)
  • In this general setting, if all agents have strict preferences over the alternatives, then RSD reduces to drawing a random agent and choosing the alternative that the agent likes best. (wikipedia.org)
  • Toronto FC and other cubs will have more room to maneuver in terms of roster building now that the MLS allocation order is a thing of the past. (tfcrepublic.ca)
  • It is shown that the problem of computing the RP allocation matrix is #P-complete. (stanford.edu)
  • The implications of these results for approximating the RP allocation matrix as well as on finding constrained Pareto optimal matchings are discussed. (stanford.edu)
  • So, we want to find situations where it is as good as random. (medscape.com)
  • The advent of fair treatment allocation schedules in clinical trials during the 19th and early 20th centuries. (jameslindlibrary.org)
  • Random effects meta-analyses of the effect of breakfast consumption on weight and daily energy intake were performed. (bmj.com)
  • Our paper relates to an active literature that documents intergenerational correlations in both risk preferences and asset allocations. (lu.se)
  • FINDINGS: Under baseline model conditions, a 5% prevalence of resistance to each of drugs A and B was reached within 139 years with the reserve strategy, 182 years with the gradual switch strategy, 192 years with the random 50-50 allocation strategy, and 199 years with the combination therapy strategy. (cdc.gov)
  • Each agent has large equivalence classes in his preference, since he is indifferent between all the allocations in which he gets the same item. (wikipedia.org)