A bibliographic database that includes MEDLINE as its primary subset. It is produced by the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI), part of the NATIONAL LIBRARY OF MEDICINE. PubMed, which is searchable through NLM's Web site, also includes access to additional citations to selected life sciences journals not in MEDLINE, and links to other resources such as the full-text of articles at participating publishers' Web sites, NCBI's molecular biology databases, and PubMed Central.
A publication issued at stated, more or less regular, intervals.
"The business or profession of the commercial production and issuance of literature" (Webster's 3d). It includes the publisher, publication processes, editing and editors. Production may be by conventional printing methods or by electronic publishing.
The presence of bacteria, viruses, and fungi in the soil. This term is not restricted to pathogenic organisms.
The premier bibliographic database of the NATIONAL LIBRARY OF MEDICINE. MEDLINE® (MEDLARS Online) is the primary subset of PUBMED and can be searched on NLM's Web site in PubMed or the NLM Gateway. MEDLINE references are indexed with MEDICAL SUBJECT HEADINGS (MeSH).
Publications in any medium issued in successive parts bearing numerical or chronological designations and intended to be continued indefinitely. (ALA Glossary of Library and Information Science, 1983, p203)
Group II chaperonins found in species of ARCHAEA.
Injuries to DNA that introduce deviations from its normal, intact structure and which may, if left unrepaired, result in a MUTATION or a block of DNA REPLICATION. These deviations may be caused by physical or chemical agents and occur by natural or unnatural, introduced circumstances. They include the introduction of illegitimate bases during replication or by deamination or other modification of bases; the loss of a base from the DNA backbone leaving an abasic site; single-strand breaks; double strand breaks; and intrastrand (PYRIMIDINE DIMERS) or interstrand crosslinking. Damage can often be repaired (DNA REPAIR). If the damage is extensive, it can induce APOPTOSIS.
A family of multisubunit protein complexes that form into large cylindrical structures which bind to and encapsulate non-native proteins. Chaperonins utilize the energy of ATP hydrolysis to enhance the efficiency of PROTEIN FOLDING reactions and thereby help proteins reach their functional conformation. The family of chaperonins is split into GROUP I CHAPERONINS, and GROUP II CHAPERONINS, with each group having its own repertoire of protein subunits and subcellular preferences.
A group I chaperonin protein that forms the barrel-like structure of the chaperonin complex. It is an oligomeric protein with a distinctive structure of fourteen subunits, arranged in two rings of seven subunits each. The protein was originally studied in BACTERIA where it is commonly referred to as GroEL protein.
The sequence of PURINES and PYRIMIDINES in nucleic acids and polynucleotides. It is also called nucleotide sequence.
A series of heterocyclic compounds that are variously substituted in nature and are known also as purine bases. They include ADENINE and GUANINE, constituents of nucleic acids, as well as many alkaloids such as CAFFEINE and THEOPHYLLINE. Uric acid is the metabolic end product of purine metabolism.
The study of those aspects of energy and matter in terms of elementary principles and laws. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)
A specialty field of radiology concerned with diagnostic, therapeutic, and investigative use of radioactive compounds in a pharmaceutical form.
The amount of radiation energy that is deposited in a unit mass of material, such as tissues of plants or animal. In RADIOTHERAPY, radiation dosage is expressed in gray units (Gy). In RADIOLOGIC HEALTH, the dosage is expressed by the product of absorbed dose (Gy) and quality factor (a function of linear energy transfer), and is called radiation dose equivalent in sievert units (Sv).
Hospital department responsible for the administration and management of nuclear medicine services.
Discrete concentrations of energy, apparently massless elementary particles, that move at the speed of light. They are the unit or quantum of electromagnetic radiation. Photons are emitted when electrons move from one energy state to another. (From Hawley's Condensed Chemical Dictionary, 11th ed)
The science concerned with problems of radiation protection relevant to reducing or preventing radiation exposure, and the effects of ionizing radiation on humans and their environment.
Harmful effects of non-experimental exposure to ionizing or non-ionizing radiation in VERTEBRATES.
Non-invasive, endoscopic imaging by use of VIDEO CAPSULE ENDOSCOPES to perform examination of the gastrointestinal tract, especially the small bowel.
Chronic, non-specific inflammation of the GASTROINTESTINAL TRACT. Etiology may be genetic or environmental. This term includes CROHN DISEASE and ULCERATIVE COLITIS.
Endoscopy of the small intestines accomplished while advancing the endoscope into the intestines from the stomach by alternating the inflation of two balloons, one on an innertube of the endoscope and the other on an overtube.
A chronic transmural inflammation that may involve any part of the DIGESTIVE TRACT from MOUTH to ANUS, mostly found in the ILEUM, the CECUM, and the COLON. In Crohn disease, the inflammation, extending through the intestinal wall from the MUCOSA to the serosa, is characteristically asymmetric and segmental. Epithelioid GRANULOMAS may be seen in some patients.
Inflammation of the COLON that is predominantly confined to the MUCOSA. Its major symptoms include DIARRHEA, rectal BLEEDING, the passage of MUCUS, and ABDOMINAL PAIN.
Endoscopic examination, therapy or surgery of the gastrointestinal tract.

Role for caspase-mediated cleavage of Rad51 in induction of apoptosis by DNA damage. (1/1510)

We report here that the Rad51 recombinase is cleaved in mammalian cells during the induction of apoptosis by ionizing radiation (IR) exposure. The results demonstrate that IR induces Rad51 cleavage by a caspase-dependent mechanism. Further support for involvement of caspases is provided by the finding that IR-induced proteolysis of Rad51 is inhibited by Ac-DEVD-CHO. In vitro studies show that Rad51 is cleaved by caspase 3 at a DVLD/N site. Stable expression of a Rad51 mutant in which the aspartic acid residues were mutated to alanines (AVLA/N) confirmed that the DVLD/N site is responsible for the cleavage of Rad51 in IR-induced apoptosis. The functional significance of Rad51 proteolysis is supported by the finding that, unlike intact Rad51, the N- and C-terminal cleavage products fail to exhibit recombinase activity. In cells, overexpression of the Rad51(D-A) mutant had no effect on activation of caspase 3 but did abrogate in part the apoptotic response to IR exposure. We conclude that proteolytic inactivation of Rad51 by a caspase-mediated mechanism contributes to the cell death response induced by DNA damage.  (+info)

Monoclonal antibody to HER-2/neureceptor modulates repair of radiation-induced DNA damage and enhances radiosensitivity of human breast cancer cells overexpressing this oncogene. (2/1510)

The management of human breast cancer frequently includes radiation therapy as an important intervention, and improvement in the clinical efficacy of radiation is desirable. Overexpression of the HER-2 growth factor receptor occurs in 25-30% of human breast cancers and correlates with poor clinical outcome, including earlier local relapse following conservative surgery accompanied by radiation therapy. In breast cancer cells with overexpression of HER-2 receptor, recombinant humanized monoclonal antibodies (rhuMAbs) to HER-2 receptors (rhuMAb HER-2) decrease cell proliferation in vitro and reduce tumor formation in nude mice. Therapy with rhuMAb HER-2 enhances tumor sensitivity to radiation at doses of 1-5 Gy, exceeding remission rates obtained with radiation alone. This benefit is specific to cells with HER-2 overexpression and does not occur in cells without overexpression. Treatment of cells with radiation (2-4 Gy) alone provokes a marked increase in unscheduled DNA synthesis, a measure of DNA repair, but HER-2-overexpressing cells treated with a combination of rhuMAb HER-2 and radiation demonstrate a decrease of unscheduled DNA synthesis to 25-44% of controls. Using an alternate test of DNA repair, i.e., radiation-damaged or undamaged reporter DNA, we introduced a cytomegalovirus-driven beta3-galactosidase into HER-2-overexpressing breast cancer cells that had been treated with rhuMAb HER-2 or control. At 24 h posttransfection, the extent of repair assayed by measuring reporter DNA expression was high after exposure to radiation alone but significantly lower in cells treated with combined radiation and rhuMAb HER-2 therapy. To further characterize effects of rhuMAb HER-2 and the combination of antibody and radiation on cell growth, analyses of cell cycle phase distribution were performed. Antibody reduces the fraction of HER-2-overexpressing breast cancer cells in S phase at 24 and 48 h. Radiation treatment is also known to promote cell cycle arrest, predominantly at G1, with low S-phase fraction at 24 and 48 h. In the presence of rhuMAb HER-2, radiation elicits a similar reduction in S phase at 24 h, but a significant reversal of this arrest appears to begin 48 h postradiation exposure. The level of S-phase fraction at 48 h is significantly greater than that found at 24 h with the combined antibody-radiation therapy, suggesting that early escape from cell cycle arrest in the presence of antireceptor antibody may not allow sufficient time for completion of DNA repair in HER-2-overexpressing cells. Because it is well known that failure of adequate p21WAF1 induction after DNA damage is associated with failure of cell cycle arrest, we also assessed the activity of this critical mediator of the cellular response to DNA damage. The results show induction of p21WAF1 transcripts and protein product at 6, 12, and 24 h after radiation treatment; however, increased levels of p21WAF1 transcript and protein are not sustained in HER-2-overexpressing cells exposed to radiation in the presence of rhuMAb HER-2. Although transcript and protein levels increase at 6-12 h, they are both diminished by 24 h. Levels of p21WAF1 transcript and protein at 24 h are significantly lower than in cells treated by radiation without antibody. A reduction in the basal level of p21WAF1 transcript also occurred after 12-24 h exposure to antibody alone. The effect of HER-2 antibody may be related to tyrosine phosphorylation of p21WAF1 protein. Tyrosine phosphorylation of p21WAF1 is increased after treatment with radiation alone, but phosphorylation is blocked by combined treatment with antireceptor antibody and radiation. This dysregulation of p21WAF1 in HER-2-overexpressing breast cells after treatment with rhuMAb HER-2 and radiation appears to be independent of p53 expression levels but does correlate with reduced levels of mdm2 protein. (ABSTRACT TRUNCATED)  (+info)

Differences in epitope accessibility of p53 monoclonal antibodies suggest at least three conformations or states of protein binding of p53 protein in human tumor cell lines. (3/1510)

The p53 tumor suppressor gene is deleted or mutated in over 50% of human tumors. Mutations frequently extend the half-life of the p53 protein; and a high level of nuclear p53 expression, detected by immunohistochemistry, has been used to predict the p53 status of tumors. We compared the sensitivity and reactivity of five frequently used, commercially available monoclonal antibodies (1801, DO1, DO7, BP53.12 and 421) in immunoblot and immunofluorescence assays, and found that results differed among the antibodies. Comparison of immunoblot analysis of denatured nuclear and cytoplasmic p53 protein were consistent with antibodies DO1, DO7 and BP53.12, each of which generated a strong specific signal in both cell fractions. However, in situ analysis demonstrated that although all antibodies recognized nuclear p53, only BP53.12 and 421 recognized p53 protein in the cytoplasm. In addition, 1801 produced a signal in p53-negative tumor cell lines. Differences in situ among the antibodies were probably due to the accessibility of their respective epitopes and suggested that nuclear and cytoplasmic p53 either have different three-dimensional conformations or are bound to different proteins. A third p53 protein conformation was also suggested by the observation that only two of the five antibodies (BP53.12 and DO7) detected induced levels of p53 in situ following exposure to ionizing radiation. In summary, except for the fact that DO7 does not recognize cytoplasmic p53 in situ, we found it to be the most specific, versatile, and reliable antibody. We conclude that the p53 antibody of choice depends upon the specific goal of a study and the method used to detect this protein.  (+info)

The mismatch repair protein, hMLH1, mediates 5-substituted halogenated thymidine analogue cytotoxicity, DNA incorporation, and radiosensitization in human colon cancer cells. (4/1510)

Deficiency in DNA mismatch repair (MMR) is found in some hereditary (hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer) and sporadic colon cancers as well as other common solid cancers. MMR deficiency has recently been shown to impart cellular resistance to multiple chemical agents, many of which are commonly used in cancer chemotherapy. It is therefore of interest to find an approach that selectively targets cells that have lost the ability to perform MMR. In this study, we examine the response of MMR-proficient (hMLH1+) and MMR-deficient (hMLH1-) colon carcinoma cell lines to the halogenated thymidine (dThd) analogues iododeoxyuridine (IdUrd) and bromodeoxyuridine (BrdUrd) before and after irradiation. These dThd analogues are used clinically as experimental sensitizing agents in radioresistant human cancers, and there is a direct correlation between the levels of dThd analogue DNA incorporation and tumor radiosensitization. In contrast to the well-characterized, marked increase in cytotoxicity (> 1 log cell kill) found with 6-thioguanine exposures in HCT116/3-6 (hMLH1+) cells compared to HCT116 (hMLH1-) cells, we found only modest cytotoxicity (10-20% cell kill) in both cell lines when treated with IdUrd or BrdUrd for 1 population doubling. Upon further analysis, the levels of halogenated dThd analogues in DNA were significantly lower (two to three times lower) in HCT116/3-6 cells than in HCT116 cells, and similar results were found in Mlh1+/+ spontaneously immortalized murine embryonic fibroblasts and fibroblasts from Mlh1 knockout mice. As a result of the higher levels of the dThd analogue in DNA, there was an increase in radiation sensitivity in HCT116 cells but not in HCT116/3-6 cells after pretreatment with IdUrd or BrdUrd when compared to treatment with radiation alone. Additionally, we found no differences in the cellular metabolic pathways for dThd analogue DNA incorporation because the enzyme activities of dThd kinase and thymidylate synthase, as well as the levels of triphosphate pools, were similar in HCT116 and HCT116/3-6 cells. These data suggest that the hMLH1 protein may participate in the recognition and subsequent removal of halogenated dThd analogues from DNA. Consequently, whereas MMR-deficient cells and tumor xenografts have shown intrinsic resistance to a large number of chemotherapeutic agents, the 5-halogenated dThd analogues appear to selectively target such cells for potential enhanced radiation sensitivity.  (+info)

Topoisomerase I is essential in Cryptococcus neoformans: role In pathobiology and as an antifungal target. (5/1510)

Topisomerase I is the target of several toxins and chemotherapy agents, and the enzyme is essential for viability in some organisms, including mice and drosophila. We have cloned the TOP1 gene encoding topoisomerase I from the opportunistic fungal pathogen Cryptococcus neoformans. The C. neoformans topoisomerase I contains a fungal insert also found in topoisomerase I from Candida albicans and Saccharomyces cerevisiae that is not present in the mammalian enzyme. We were unable to disrupt the topoisomerase I gene in this haploid organism by homologous recombination in over 8000 transformants analyzed. When a second functional copy of the TOP1 gene was introduced into the genome, the topoisomerase I gene could be readily disrupted by homologous recombination (at 7% efficiency). Thus, topoisomerase I is essential in C. neoformans. This new molecular strategy with C. neoformans may also be useful in identifying essential genes in other pathogenic fungi. To address the physiological and pathobiological functions of the enzyme, the TOP1 gene was fused to the GAL7 gene promoter. The resulting GAL7::TOP1 fusion gene was modestly regulated by carbon source in a serotype A strain of C. neoformans. Modest overexpression of topoisomerase I conferred sensitivity to heat shock, gamma-rays, and camptothecin. In contrast, alterations in topoisomerase I levels had no effect on the toxicity of a novel class of antifungal agents, the dicationic aromatic compounds (DACs), indicating that topoisomerase I is not the target of DACs. In an animal model of cryptococcal meningitis, topoisomerase I regulation was not critically important to established infection, but may impact on the initial stress response to infection. In summary, our studies reveal that topoisomerase I is essential in the human pathogen C. neoformans and represents a novel target for antifungal agents.  (+info)

Occupational cancer in Germany. (6/1510)

As in probably mostly all other European countries, the incidence of occupational cancer in Germany increased steadily after World War II. In 1994 about 1,600 cases of occupational cancer were compensated--more than ever before. More than half of these cases were lung cancer, most caused either by asbestos (n=545) or by ionizing radiation ((italic)n(/italic)=306). Other frequent target organs of asbestos were the pleura and the peritoneum with 495 cases of mesotheliomas. Asbestos was the single most important risk factor for occupational cancer, causing more than 1000 deaths per year. All other malignant diseases, such as bladder cancer, leukemia, angiosarcoma of the liver, adenocarcinoma of the nose or nasal sinuses, and skin cancer, were comparatively rare. Although primary exposure to ionizing radiation in uranium ore mining occurred in the 1950s and attributable lung cancers seem to be on the decline, this is not true for asbestos, where the peak incidence in lung cancer and mesothelioma has not been reached yet.  (+info)

Molecular mechanisms of ionizing radiation-induced apoptosis. (7/1510)

Ionizing radiation activates not only signalling pathways in the nucleus as a result of DNA damage, but also signalling pathways initiated at the level of the plasma membrane. Proteins involved in DNA damage recognition include poly(ADP ribose) polymerase (PARP), DNA-dependent protein kinase, p53 and ataxia- telangiectasia mutated (ATM). Many of these proteins are inactivated by caspases during the execution phase of apoptosis. Signalling pathways outside the nucleus involve tyrosine kinases such as stress-activated protein kinase (SAPK)/c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), protein kinase C, ceramide and reactive oxygen species. Recent evidence shows that tumour cells resistant to ionizing radiation-induced apoptosis have defective ceramide signalling. How these signalling pathways converge to activate the caspases is presently unknown, although in some cell types a role for calpain has been suggested.  (+info)

Cross-resistance to ionizing radiation in a murine leukemic cell line resistant to cis-dichlorodiammineplatinum(II): role of Ku autoantigen. (8/1510)

cis-Dichlorodiammineplatinum(II) (CDDP; cisplatin) is commonly used in combination with ionizing radiation (IR) in the treatment of various malignancies. In vitro, many observations suggest that acquisition of CDDP resistance in cell lines confers cross-resistance to IR, but the molecular mechanisms involved have not been well documented yet. We report here the selection and characterization of a murine CDDP-resistant L1210 cell line (L1210/3R) that exhibits cross-resistance to IR because of an increased capacity to repair double-strand breaks compared with parental cells (L1210/P). In resistant cells, electrophoretic mobility shift assays revealed an increased DNA-end binding activity that could be ascribed, by supershifting the retardation complexes with antibodies, to the autoantigen Ku. The heterodimeric Ku protein, composed of 86-kDa (Ku80) and 70-kDa (Ku70) subunits, is the DNA-targeting component of DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK), which plays a critical role in mammalian DNA double-strand breaks repair. The increased Ku-binding activity in resistant cells was associated with an overexpression affecting specifically the Ku80 subunit. These data strongly suggest that the increase in Ku activity is responsible for the phenotype of cross-resistance to IR. In addition, these observations, along with previous results from DNA-PK- mutant cells, provide evidence in favor of a role of Ku/DNA-PK in resistance to CDDP. These results suggest that Ku activity may be an important molecular target in cancer therapy at the crossroad between cellular responses to CDDP and IR.  (+info)

Ionizing radiation can kill or change the nature of living cells. The effects of the damage inflicted by the ionizing radiation may be severe and cause imm
Dr. Contreras Radiation approach combines Radiation cancer treatment and various other types of therapies all proven to increase the patients success rates up to 3x. Learn more about our Radiation treatment, visit our website today!
I came here for the Lifeline game too but there seems to be a few errors in the text which make distrust the info. here. 1: your instead of youre. 2: Gap between 100 and 150 rads. 3: No mention of exposure times. -20 degrees centigrade is cold enough to kill you but that depends on how long you have been exposed to the cold. In the game Killer is exposed to 150 rads which according to your list will means she will be dead within 30 days.. ReplyDelete ...
Ultraviolet (UV) radiation comprising the wavelength range from 100 nm to 400 nm is the most energetic part of optical radiation. It adjoins directly to the range of ionising radiation. In the short wavelength range UV radiation can have similar effects as ionising radiation. According to different biological effects UV radiation is subdivided into three wavelength ranges: UV-A radiation (400 - 315 nm), UV-B radiation (315 - 280 nm) and UV-C radiation (280 - 100 nm). UV radiation is not visible for humans and cannot be perceived by other sense organs. Depending on wavelength and intensity UV radiation can produce numerous health effects mainly to eye and skin.. ...
Ultraviolet (UV) radiation comprising the wavelength range from 100 nm to 400 nm is the most energetic part of optical radiation. It adjoins directly to the range of ionising radiation. In the short wavelength range UV radiation can have similar effects as ionising radiation. According to different biological effects UV radiation is subdivided into three wavelength ranges: UV-A radiation (400 - 315 nm), UV-B radiation (315 - 280 nm) and UV-C radiation (280 - 100 nm). UV radiation is not visible for humans and cannot be perceived by other sense organs. Depending on wavelength and intensity UV radiation can produce numerous health effects mainly to eye and skin.. ...
A radiation oncologist will plan your radiation treatment based on your medical history, a physical examination, pathology and laboratory reports, and previous mammograms and surgeries. Your chest area will be marked with ink that must stay on your skin for the course of your treatments. These markings assure that the radiation will be given to the exact area requiring treatment.. Radiation treatment is like having a standard X-ray, but the radiation is stronger. The treatment lasts only a few minutes and is painless. A typical course of radiation treatment of this type is treatment for five days per week over a six-week period. If chemotherapy is also to be given, radiation treatment may not be given until after chemotherapy has been completed.. ...
Radiation radicalizes elements and compounds in the body. Unchecked, these free radicals damage cells, killing them. When enough cells die, the organism succumbs. But a new therapy infused into the cells of mice offers protection against radiations effects, at least for a short while. Radiation oncologist Joel Greenberger of the University of Pittsburgh and his colleagues have been experimenting with a transgene--manganese superoxide dismutase plasmid liposome (MnSOD-PL)--that has shown the ability to protect cells from radiation in vitro. Tested in mice in specific organs, such as the lungs and bladder, the transgene conferred significant protection and is currently being tested in human lung cancer patients undergoing radiation therapy. The new work shows that mice intravenously infused with the transgene enjoy protection throughout their bodies when exposed to radiation at levels known to kill 50 percent of their normal peers. These are experiments in which mice are given total body ...
radiation - MedHelps radiation Center for Information, Symptoms, Resources, Treatments and Tools for radiation. Find radiation information, treatments for radiation and radiation symptoms.
Radiation therapy is becoming more and more common and as with many things that we have discussed here, the person to person variation in response to radiation exposure can be large. So what drives this difference in response to radiation dose. An answer is emerging from a series of studies that were undertaken using cells…
Information about radiation treatment. Radiation treatment treats cancer by using radiation (energy) to destroy cancer cells. The radiation is targeted to cancer sites in your body.
The radiation energy is transferred by energy- and material-dependent interactions. For photons, only the processes of absorption and scattering play a role in the low-energy range. Only the absorbed fraction of the radiation in a biological object can produce an effect. The most important changes that can be caused by ionizing radiation in a cell, are the changes in the genetic material contained in the deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA). As a consequence of the primary physical processes, a large number of chemical changes appear in the DNA. The most important breaks can occur in the sugar phosphate backbone, particularly if they arise in both strands in a close proximity to each other (double-strand breaks, dsb). They are reparable only to a certain extent and can lead to cell death, moreover, when not correctly repaired, are the starting point for chromosomal aberrations, mutations and neoplastic transformations.. One of the first measurable reactions of the mammalian cell to dsb induction is the ...
Article Documented optimum and threshold for ionising radiation. A concept of the complete dose-response curve of ionising radiation will allow us to live in harmony with this ubiquitous agent. Convincing data show ionising radiation is essential for...
When a person receives radiation cancer treatment, he or she is exposed to ionizing radiation; to prevent damaging healthy tissue, Dr. Guerda Massillon, researcher at the National University of Mexico (UNAM), studied the properties of various materials called dosimeters that measure radiation doses.
An explanation of the history of radiation dosing for cancer treatment and the limits of radiation treatment to different parts of the body.
Moffitt Cancer Center researchers hope to change this mindset for radiation treatment with the development of a genomically-based model that can optimize and personalize a radiation dose to match an individual patients needs.
Radiation therapy is delivered differently depending on the type of cancer and stage of treatment. The types of radiation treatment we provide are listed here.
Protect yourself from the greatest danger of all time: Man-made radiation Nuclear powerplant accidents, radiation therapy, X-rays, CAT-scans, and more-all are life threatening. Natural Cures for Radiation by Dr. Cass Ingram
Radiation is a loaded word. Believe it or not, not all radiation is bad for your health. Learn which radiation is deadly and which isnt deadly.
An expandable braid device attached to a guidewire acts to both house radiation and to expose a stenosis site to such radiation as a function of the braids collapsed or deployed configuration. The expandable braid device, in a closed configuration, shields a radioactive inner core of the braid as it is advanced to and located at a stenosis site and, in an expanded configuration, exposes the radioactive inner core to the stenosis site in order to irradiate such site.
Radiation units Radiation-induced chromosomal aberration radiation units See Gray (Gy), rad, rem, Roentgen (R), roentgen equivalent physical (rep), Sievert (Sv). radical scavenger a molecule with a high affinity for free ...
According to UT Southwestern Medical Center researchers, a real-time radiation monitor that alerts staff by beeping in response to radiation exposure durin
Radiation treatment for skin cancer is a good thing because it can destroy cancerous cells and prevent the spread of cancer to other parts of the body. Early
Researchers discovered that microscopic bubbles are safe and effective storage lockers for harmful isotopes that emit ionizing radiation for treating tumors. The findings can benefit patient health and advance radiation therapy used to treat cancer and other diseases.
Radiation for breast cancer is painless, but side effects vary from person to person-you may experience none or several. Regardless, most are temporary, controllable and disappear after your treatment has ended. Here are a few of the more common side effects of radiation and how to handle them.Fatigue: Youll feel like you dont have any energy and are tired all the time.
Radiation Induced Myelosuppression Treatment Market is anticipated to reach USD XX.X MN by 2027, this market report provides the growth, trends, key players & forecast of the market based on in-depth research by industry experts. The global market size, share along with dynamics are covered in the radiation induced myelosuppression treatment market report
This is a very readable review on the exciting, advancing technology of radiation curing. The principles upon which the technology is based, the equipment that is used and the materials which make up a radiation curable formulation are described.
This is a very readable review on the exciting, advancing technology of radiation curing. The principles upon which the technology is based, the equipment that is used and the materials which make up a radiation curable formulation are described.
If you fly frequently, youre exposed to terrestrial radiation. Learn the important details about the serious dangers of radiation when going through the clouds.
In the present study, the effect of combining radiation and AZD2171, a highly potent, orally active inhibitor of VEGF signaling, was investigated in vivo. Chronic administration of AZD2171 caused a dose-dependent reduction of tumor growth, consistent with previous studies (21). When combined with fractionated radiotherapy, a significant increase in growth delay was observed compared with either radiation or AZD2171 alone. This was observed whether AZD2171 was administered concomitantly or sequentially to radiation treatment. Tumor regrowth following combined treatment with AZD2171 and radiation was slowed when compared with tumors treated with either agent alone. In addition, the extent of tumor regression postradiotherapy was enhanced by the combined treatment, particularly when a dose of 6 mg/kg/d AZD2171 was used.. Several mechanisms have been postulated by which inhibitors of VEGF signaling could improve the therapeutic effects of radiation. These include a direct enhancement of the ...
Biological factors such as cell cycle and intracellular repair. During certain phases of mitotic division cells are much more susceptible to damage. Cells can also repair most damage caused by radiation unless the exposure causes too many effects in which case the cell may die or repair itself incorrectly (mutation ...
At Infusio, we encourage people with a cancer diagnosis to understand they have options for a cancer cure beyond chemotherapy and radiation.
Most side effects generally go away within a few weeks to 2 months of finishing treatment. But some side effects may continue after treatment is over because it takes time for healthy cells to recover from the effects of radiation therapy. Late side effects can happen months or years after treatment ...
Almost every hour of everyday we will be starring at a screen. Although having convenient benefits, could our techs radiation be damaging our health?
最高値を検出した汐入小の長谷川かほる校長は「もともと子どもが立ち入らない場所だが、専門家に測定してもらい、かえって安心した。保護者からの問い合わせには丁寧に答え、学校便りでも詳しく書く」と話す。. 同小女子児童の四十代の母親は二十三日、区ホームページで知った。二十四日は娘が登校したが、学校から説明はなかったという。「保育園では測定結果がすぐ周知されたと聞く。数値の意味、対策など知りたいことだらけ。説明会を開いてほしい」と求める。. 区は、基準を上回った五十カ所を立ち入り禁止とし、舗装部分は高圧洗浄、土は入れ替えるなどした。それでも一・〇マイクロシーベルトを下回らない場 ...
UPDATE: We will discontinue using quotation marks to identify parts of an article, but retain the capitalization; eg, This is discussed in the Methods section (not the
UPDATE: We will discontinue using quotation marks to identify parts of an article, but retain the capitalization; eg, This is discussed in the Methods section (not the
ایسکمی ـ بازخونرسانی بازگشت مجدد خون به بافت ایسکمیک می باشد. هدف از این مطالعه بررسی تاثیر تجویز اسید فولیک بر عملکرد بیضه متعاقب القا ایسکمی ـ بازخونرسانی در موش صحرایی بالغ می-باشد. این تحقیق روی 36 سر موش صحرایی نر بالغ نژاد ویستار در محدوده سنی 300-250 گرم صورت گرفت. موشها به طور تصادفی به 6 گروه 6تایی تقسیم شدند: گروه کنترل: که هیچ دارویی دریافت نکردند گروه شم: هیچ دارویی دریافت نکرده و هر روز به حجم مساوی سایر گروه‌ها آب مقطر به صورت خوراکی دریافت کردند. گروه IR: که تا زمان ایجاد IR هیچ دارویی دریافت نکرد و بعد از 1 هفته تحت عمل جراحی جهت ایجاد ایسکمی قرار گرفت.
Vilniaus universitetas - prestižinė Lietuvos mokslo ir studijų institucija, kurioje vystomas pasaulinio lygio mokslas ir plėtojamos mokslu grindžiamos tarptautinio lygio studijos.
目的 总结寰枢椎肿瘤手术显露和彻底切除的方法,评价异形钛网植骨融合内固定在寰枢椎肿瘤切除术后枕颈稳定性重建中的作用和价值.方法 2005年3月至2007年8月手术治疗6例寰枢椎肿瘤患者,男3例,女3例;年龄17~70岁,平均43.7岁;脊索瘤4例,骨巨细胞瘤1例,骨纤维异常增殖症1例.病变累及所有患者的椎体及侧块或后方结构.全部采用前方颌下颈动脉三角入路联合后方枕颈入路,按照无瘤操作的原则行病椎全脊椎切除,前路行异形钛网植骨融合内固定,后路行枕颈固定术,同时行Halo-vest架外固定,术后随访6~16个月.结果 C1.2切除1例,C2.3切除2例,C2切除3例.平均手术时间7.2h,平均术中出血量2400 ...
Expression of SMARCE1 (BAF57) in human tissue. Overview of the antibody staining with HPA003916 and CAB037318 in immunohistochemistry
Radiation can be harmful to living creatures. Radiation can harm living things directly by damaging their cells. The cells might stop functioning, or they might be unable to reproduce. Radiation can also cause cells to reproduce in an out-of-control fashion, causing cancer.. Radiation can also interfere with the reproduction of living things. It can cause sterility, making reproduction impossible. It can also cause mutations in offspring, which are usually detrimental or even fatal.. Animals (including humans) tend to be more susceptible to the harmful effects of radiation than plants. Some types of microbes are tolerant of high doses of radiation that would easily kill multicelled organisms.. Natural sources of radiation play a role in the long-term evolution of species. Some (a very, very tiny fraction) mutations caused by radiation turn out to be beneficial. They give certain organisms a better chance to survive. Sometimes mutations caused by radiation produce a more successful and ...
High-dose ionizing irradiation (IR) results in direct tumor cell death and augments tumor-specific immunity, which enhances tumor control both locally and distantly. Unfortunately, local relapses often occur following IR treatment, indicating that IR-induced responses are inadequate to maintain antitumor immunity. Therapeutic blockade of the T cell negative regulator programmed death-ligand 1 (PD-L1, also called B7-H1) can enhance T cell effector function when PD-L1 is expressed in chronically inflamed tissues and tumors. Here, we demonstrate that PD-L1 was upregulated in the tumor microenvironment after IR. Administration of anti-PD-L1 enhanced the efficacy of IR through a cytotoxic T cell-dependent mechanism. Concomitant with IR-mediated tumor regression, we observed that IR and anti-PD-L1 synergistically reduced the local accumulation of tumor-infiltrating myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs), which suppress T cells and alter the tumor immune microenvironment. Furthermore, activation of ...
The cellular response to genotoxic stress is mediated by a well-characterized network of DNA surveillance pathways. The contribution of posttranscriptional gene regulatory networks to the DNA damage response (DDR) has not been extensively studied. Here, we systematically identified RNA-binding proteins differentially interacting with polyadenylated transcripts upon exposure of human breast carcinoma cells to ionizing radiation (IR). Interestingly, more than 260 proteins including many nucleolar proteins showed increased binding to poly(A) RNA in IR-exposed cells. The functional analysis of DDX54, a candidate genotoxic stress responsive RNA helicase, revealed that this protein is an immediate-to-early DDR regulator required for the splicing efficacy of its target IR-induced pre-mRNAs. Upon IR exposure, DDX54 acts by increased interaction with a well-defined class of pre-mRNAs which harbor introns with weak acceptor splice sites, as well as by protein-protein contacts within components of U2 snRNP ...
Background:. - Radiation and chemotherapy treatments for anal cancer can cause irritation of the skin that can lead to redness and tenderness, and in some cases can be so severe that it results in blistering or peeling of the skin during treatment. These conditions cause discomfort and may require breaks from radiation treatment. Researchers are interested in determining whether MTS-01, a drug that protects cells and tissues from the effects of radiation, can be given before radiation treatment to prevent these side effects and reduce the irritation of the skin during chemotherapy and radiation for anal cancer.. Objectives:. - To determine the safety and effectiveness of topical MTS-01 given before radiation in the groin and gluteal cleft of patients receiving combined radiation and chemotherapy for anal cancer.. Eligibility:. - Individuals at least 18 years of age who have been diagnosed with cancer of the anal canal and are eligible to receive radiation and chemotherapy ...
In addition to the material, the secret of the new radiation detector lies in its really small scale. The nanowire running through the middle of the radiation detector is only about a micrometre long, two hundred nanometres wide and a few tens of nanometres thick, says Roope Kokkoniemi, who studied the bolometer at Aalto University.. A bolometer works by measuring the heating effect of radiation. When a bolometer heats up, its electrical characteristics change, and this can be measured with high precision. The smaller the bolometer, the less radiation is required to heat it.. A small radiation detector has a low heat capacity, so weak radiation provides a stronger signal, Kokkoniemi explains.. Better protection. Quantum computers operate in cryostats, extremely cold super-freezers, in which even the smallest amount of excess radiation causes a lot of disturbance. As nanobolometers are very sensitive, they could conveniently measure the level of excess radiation in the cryostat in order to ...
When we think of radiation we may immediately think of only dangerous and harmful things. In reality, the word radiation refers to any transfer of energy through space from a source. Some examples of radiation include sunlight, radio waves, x-rays, heat, alpha, beta, gamma ionizing radiation, and infrared, just to name a few. Not all of these types of radiation are harmful, in fact, in moderation, most radiation will not pose a health risk. Certain types of radiation, however, can be dangerous, even in small doses.
1. The difference in density/IR exposure between two adjacent areas on an image. One of the two properties that allow detail to be visualized on an image. 2. How do low contrast images differ from high contrast images? 2. Low contrast images have many shades of gray (more information on the image). Also referred to…
Directly inhibiting the activity of a key protein mediator of inflammation reduced radiation toxicity in zebrafish embryos, and may ultimately be of help to patients receiving radiation therapy, according to researchers from ...
At the beginning of your treatment you may attend a session called planning. You will be in a room with a technician, a nurse and one or two doctors. Other than the fact that there will be no radioactive source in the room, the planning session will be very similar to what will happen when you receive your radiation therapy. For this reason it is often called a simulation.. Prior to the radiation treatment, you will be carefully positioned on a treatment table, with the parts of the body not being treated protected. You must lie completely still during the treatment. Often a mould is created or certain props such as pillows or rolled blankets are used to minimize movement. Above the treatment table is the large machine which delivers the radiation. The actual treatment lasts only for a few minutes and causes no pain or discomfort.. Radiation therapy is most often given on an outpatient basis. You may have to visit the hospital as many as five times per week during a course of radiation therapy. ...
IONISING RADIATION is just one type of radiation. In physics, radiation describes any process in which energy travels through a medium or through, space, ultimately to be absorbed by another body. In discussing the nuclear industry, we are not talking about other forms of radiation, which are mainly non-ionising - e.g: acoustic radiation (sound, ultrasound,…
Given the complexity of the carcinogenic process and the lack of any mechanistic understanding of how ionizing radiation at low-level exposures affects the multistage, multimechanism processes of carcinogenesis, it is imperative that concepts and paradigms be reexamined when extrapolating from high dose to low dose. Any health effect directly linked to low-dose radiation exposure must have molecular/biochemical and biological bases. On the other hand, demonstrating some molecular/biochemical or cellular effect, using surrogate systems for the human being, does not necessarily imply a corresponding health effect. Given the general acceptance of an extrapolated LNT model, our current understanding of carcinogenesis cries out for a resolution of a real problem. How can a low-level acute, or even a chronic, exposure of ionizing radiation bring about all the different mechanisms (mutagenic, cytotoxic, and epigenetic) and genotypic/phenotypic changes needed to convert normal cells to an invasive, malignant
Hi Jayne,. I havent started radiation yet but was told by the doctor that 10 years down the road I could have heart trouble. Three months after I could have shortness of breath indicating lung damage which heals. Also he said I could get a broken rib - I said how does that occur - he said radiation can soften the ribs temporarily making a break more likely. A friend said to me - well, dont do any moving of furniture etc. that you like to do!. All risks are very small, he added, like 1%, but are higher for the left breast because the heart is on the left side.. Supposedly new machines are much better designed to only radiate -mostly- what should get radiation and not much elsewhere.. I guess trust and optimism are needed!!. Good Luck, Jean. ...
We have studied the effects of radiation on the performance characteristics of CCD devices. The CCDs were exposed to radiation of the continuous electron beam of the Lehigh University Van de Graaff Radiation Facility ...
A multilayer analytical element for detecting a ligand in or the ligand binding capacity of a liquid sample of the type having a reagent layer(s) incorporating reagents which are responsive to the ligand in or the ligand binding capacity of the sample to give a detectable response, a radiation reflecting layer, and a support layer, the improvement wherein the reagent layer(s) is a radiation diffusing layer and the radiation reflecting layer is a radiation nondiffusing reflecting layer which is (a) interposed between the reagent layer(s) and the support layer; (b) impermeable to the ligand, reagents of the reagent layer(s), and products of their interreaction; and (c) inert to the ligand, reagents of the reagent layer(s), and products of their interreaction.
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Radiation applicators comprise an elongate device having an antenna (240, 340) at their tip for coupling radiation into biological tissue and a dielectric body (250, 350) surrounding the antenna so as to encompass substantially the whole of the near-field region of the antenna and/or to enhance transmission of radiation in the forward direction. The body (250, 350) may be cylindrical with the antenna (240, 340) along its axis. The antenna may be λ/2 in length and λ/2 in radius. The tip (270) of the antenna (240) may be rounded hemispherical with radius λ/2 to enhance forward transmission of radiation. The dielectric constant (ε) of the body (250, 350) is as high as possible to reduce its diameter at a desired operating frequency but may be matched to the surrounding tissue by another layer of dielectric material (380) with a value (ε) intermediate that of the core (360) of the body (350) and the tissue.
Radiation therapy is one of the most common treatments for cancer, with about half of all cancer patients receiving some type of radiation. And youre responsible for deciding the best way to aim the radiation at the cancer and for positioning the patient precisely and consistently for every treatment. But more than that, you are with them every step of the way. You allay fears. You instill trust. You make a very difficult situation much easier and become an important part of their lives.. ...
Fluoroscopic system includes a frame, a radiation generator and radiation receiving unit, a photographing unit, a central processing unit and a display unit. Frame has a shape of a part ring-shaped or ring. A radiation generating unit comprises first and second radiation generator for each survey a first and a second radiation toward a first and a second surface of the treatment object. The radiation receiver comprises a first and a second radiation receiver for receiving radiation generated by each of the first and second radiation generator. Recording portion comprises a first and a second up camera for recording respective first and second surface of the treatment object. The central processing unit includes first and second generating perspective image, a first of the second photographed image and a second perspective taken from the first enhanced image and the second up camera combines the photographed image and the first perspective image taken from the first up camera to produce a second ...
Radiation therapy   Radiation therapy (or radiotherapy) is the medical use of ionizing radiation as part of cancer treatment to control malignant cells
Radiation monitoring is device which can identify the present and measure the radiation quantity. Radiation monitoring device are so sensitive that can pro
Hi Dave, first Id like to welcome you to CSN. Im sorry you had to come here but its a wonderful place filled with knowledgeable, caring people who will help you in any way they can.. I went through chemo and radiation 2 years ago and found the chemo was the worst because of the nausea. My worst side effect from the radiation was the fatigue but I learned to deal with it by not pushing myself. If I was tired I would rest, when I had energy I would get out and go for a walk or do something I enjoyed. The radiation nurse told me to make sure I got some exercise daily, she said walking was a wonderful exercise and it got me outside. I was lucky in the beginning if I could walk for 10 minutes a day but gradually built my strength back up and walked for longer each day. Another thing she recommended was to get outside in the sun each day, not for prolonged periods and definitely not enough to burn your skin (wear sun blocker) but for at least 15 minutes each day. She said the fresh air and sunshine ...
Hi gralestel,. The radiation thearapy (brachytherapy) in this case statisticly is every bit as sucessful as any of the surgical techniques. The difference is even if there is a very small chance that a surgical procedure was unsucessful there would always be radiation, or hormone therapy to have as back-up treatments. This may not be possible if a radiation technique is the first treatment. Although it would not entirerly exclude surgery as a fall back option; many surgeons believe that the tissue in and around the treated area would have been too greatly compromised. Then hormone therapy would be the remaining option.. I know swimom has done extensive research in this matter, and Im sure will soon explain in greater detail what I have left out or missed. Glen ...
Anaren Inc. announced that it has released a radiation hardened, isolated DC-to-DC converter for the high reliability space market. The MSK7010RH is a series of 10 W DC-to-DC converters that are radiation hardened by design to provide reduced sensitivity to space radiation including; total ionizing dose, single event effects and displacement damage. The use of magnetic isolation eliminates the risk associated with traditional opto-isolator feedback.
The radiation detectors page has been completely redone to include much more detailed information. A new table describes and illustrates various types of detectors and their optimal use. The key references section provides new information about radiation detection devices and estimating dose in large radiation incidents when adequate detection resources may be scarce ...
abstractNote = {Ionizing radiation has long been known tobe a powerful tool in modifying and controlled the properties, forms and eventually end-uses of polymeric materials for a variety of applications. Industrial applications are full of successful examples of macro scale, bulk property modifications by radiation. Extremely short wavelength of ionizing radiation however, makes it an important and useful tool in creating very small size structures in polymers ...
Minimize radiation exposure to ensure workplace and environmental safety. Get help with monitoring and managing radiation sources.
Could be your hypothalamus? I does help regulate things like that, and it is prone to radiation damage. Do you have thyroid problems? Are you taking medicine for it? That is the most likely culprit. Although getting a doctor to admit might be difficult, but if there are no other reasons for it, it must be from radiation. No different than any bodily function. The brainstem controls it all.. Doug ...
Researchers discovered that microscopic bubbles are safe and effective storage lockers for harmful isotopes that emit ionizing radiation for treating tumors. The findings can benefit patient health and advance radiation therapy used to treat cancer and other diseases.
Since medical therapy contributes significantly to the population burden of ionizing radiation (Figure 12.1), it is not surprising that workers who utilize sources of ionizing radiation, particu- larly radiologists, will ...
Health, ...MONDAY Oct. 29 (HealthDay News) -- Many people with incurable lung ca...This type of treatment is called palliative radiation therapy and can ...The researchers looked at data from nearly 400 patients over the age o...The investigators found that 78 percent of the patients believed that ...,Many,Mistakenly,Think,Radiation,Might,Cure,Terminal,Lung,Cancer,medicine,medical news today,latest medical news,medical newsletters,current medical news,latest medicine news
The study, published in the journal Cancer, had some limitations. It wasnt designed to look at cause and effect, nor did it have information on which women took hormonal therapy, which can reduce the risk for a recurrence by about 50 percent.. But at the very least, the study should help doctors figure out which older patients would benefit most from radiation.. I view this paper as adding a very nice layer of nuance on top of those guidelines, Dr. Smith says. In our practice group, well be more enthusiastic about radiation in high-grade tumors and less enthusiastic in low-grade tumors, particularly in older women.. Always talk with your health care provider to find out more information.. ...
1 Answer (question resolved) - Posted in: squamous cell carcinoma, cancer, doctor, radiation - Answer: The radiation is gone is effects arent. Using ...
Ever wondered what happens in the radio therapy room? Are you looking at radiation and chemotherapy for a brain tumour? Heres a terrific video taken by my husband of me getting set up for a treatment, featuring a couple of the terrific radiation technicians I see every day. Excellent people, doing excellent difficult work, making…
Ever wondered what happens in the radio therapy room? Are you looking at radiation and chemotherapy for a brain tumour? Heres a terrific video taken by my husband of me getting set up for a treatment, featuring a couple of the terrific radiation technicians I see every day. Excellent people, doing excellent difficult work, making…
Radiation: The Facts summarizes key information about ionizing radiation to promote better understanding for members of the general public
The EM Radiation Research Trust is an independent body. The aim of the organisation is to provide the facts about electro-magnetic radiation and our health to the public and the media.. Follow us on:. ...
The EM Radiation Research Trust is an independent body. The aim of the organisation is to provide the facts about electro-magnetic radiation and our health to the public and the media.. Follow us on:. ...
Likewise the same applies for ionizing radiation studies. Ionizing radiation is released when an unstable particle releases ... Ionizing radiation[edit]. See also: Radiation hormesis. Hormesis has been observed in a number of cases in humans and animals ... Evaluation of the Linear-Nonthreshold Dose-Response Model for Ionizing Radiation. National Council on Radiation Protection and ... and the United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Ionizing Radiation (UNSCEAR) all agree that radiation hormesis is ...
Non-ionizing radiation[edit]. Whether or not non-ionizing radiation causes leukemia has been studied for several decades. The ... Non-Ionizing Radiation, Part 1: Static and Extremely Low-Frequency (ELF) Electric and Magnetic Fields (IARC Monographs on the ... Among adults, the known causes are natural and artificial ionizing radiation, a few viruses such as human T-lymphotropic virus ... Smoking, family history, ionizing radiation, some chemicals, prior chemotherapy, Down syndrome.[3][4]. ...
"Ionizing Radiation". General Chemistry Topic Review: Nuclear Chemistry. Bodner Research Web. Retrieved 5 November 2011. " ... "Detection of a cosmic ray with measured energy well beyond the expected spectral cutoff due to cosmic microwave radiation". ...
Ionizing radiation. Curiosity rover measured levels on Mars similar to the interior of the International Space Station (ISS), ... Experiments show that a thin layer of dust is enough to protect microorganisms from UV radiation. Oxidizing surface. Mars has a ... cold and UV radiation with similarities to Mars conditions. Mars surface conditions are not reproduced anywhere on Earth, so ... and as a result of the thin atmosphere it has high levels of UV radiation, and large temperature swings from day to night. Also ...
... ionizing radiation, non-ionizing radiation and noise hazards. Laboratory workers are at risk for repetitive motion injuries ... Ionizing radiation sources are found in a wide range of occupational settings, including laboratories. These radiation sources ... "Ionizing Radiation". Retrieved 25 October 2015. "An OSHA QuickFacts entitled Laboratory Safety - Autoclaves/Sterilizers has ... The fundamental objectives of radiation protection measures are: 1. to limit entry of radionuclides into the human body (via ...
"Non-Ionizing Radiation". Retrieved March 8, 2012.[dead link] https://jnlwp.defense.gov/Portals/50/Documents/Future_Non-Lethal_ ... The radiation burns caused are similar to microwave burns, but only on the skin surface due to the decreased penetration of ... Reflective materials such as aluminum cooking foil should reflect this radiation and could be used to make clothing that would ... "Lack of effect of 94 GHz radio frequency radiation exposure in an animal model of skin carcinogenesis". Carcin.oxfordjournals. ...
"Ionizing radiation" (PDF). Archived from the original (PDF) on 2015-10-11. "Specific Ionization & LET". www.mun.ca. Retrieved ... "range , particle radiation". Encyclopædia Britannica. Retrieved 2016-06-21. Charged particle motion in E/B Field v t e. ... "α입자와 물질과의 상호작용". Radiation & biology & etc. Retrieved 2016-06-21. "7_1.3 The Bragg Curve". www.med.harvard.edu. Archived from ...
Short wavelength UV and the shorter wavelength radiation above it (X-rays and gamma rays) are called ionizing radiation, and ... and high ultraviolet are classified as ionizing radiation as their photons have enough energy to ionize atoms, causing chemical ... Ionizing. radiation γ Gamma rays 300 EHz 1 pm 1.24 MeV ... Terahertz radiation or sub-millimeter radiation is a region of ... UV is the longest wavelength radiation whose photons are energetic enough to ionize atoms, separating electrons from them, and ...
"Ionizing Radiation". General Chemistry Topic Review: Nuclear Chemistry. Bodner Research Web. Retrieved 5 November 2011.. ... Total solar radiation received from the Sun by 1 square meter at the altitude of Earth's orbit per second (solar constant)[82] ... "Detection of a cosmic ray with measured energy well beyond the expected spectral cutoff due to cosmic microwave radiation". ...
Hamm, R. N., Hunter, S. R., Hurst, G. S., Turner, J. E., & Wright, H. A. (5 June 1990). Ionizing radiation detector system. U.S ... Ionizing radiation detector system, 1990. HVAC system. Radon monitor and control system based upon alpha particle detection, ... Radiation Dosimetry for Human Exposures. Oak Ridge National Lab., Tennessee. Hurst, G. S., O'Kelly, L. B., Wagner, E. B., & ... Hurst and the team of L.J. Deal and H.H. Rossi performed gamma and neutron radiation measurements at the Nevada Test Site ...
Medical use of ionizing radiation is a small but growing source of radiation-induced cancers. Ionizing radiation may be used to ... Sources of ionizing radiation include medical imaging and radon gas. Ionizing radiation is not a particularly strong mutagen. ... Radiation therapy involves the use of ionizing radiation in an attempt to either cure or improve symptoms. It works by damaging ... radiation (both ionizing and non-ionizing, up to 10%), lack of physical activity, and pollution. Psychological stress does not ...
... protection from ionizing radiation; traffic and commerce in poisonous substances; the energy sector, excepting matters within ...
ISBN 978-0-7503-0224-1. Joarder, Ritam (22 February 2014). "History of ionizing radiation". SlideShare. Retrieved 27 November ... ISBN 3-89412-132-7. "Radiation Martyrs". The British Journal of Radiology. 29 (341): 273-273. 1956. doi:10.1259/0007-1285-29- ... CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link) Thomas, Adrian (3 November 2014). "The advent of radiation protection through WWI ... commemorating those who died due to their work with the use of radiation, particularly X-rays, in medicine. It was unveiled on ...
Ionizing radiation[39]. *Social and socioeconomic factors: Generally speaking, unmarried individuals and those in lower ... "Health Effects of Prenatal Radiation Exposure" (PDF). American Family Physician. 82 (5): 488-493. ...
Ionizing Radiation Exposure. *Fire Escape Plan. *Emergency Action Plan. *Electricity Safety. *Fire Safety Standard ...
Initial ionizing radiation. 5% Residual fallout radiation. 10% Enrico Fermi famously made a (very) rough calculation of the ... Reassessment of the Atomic Bomb Radiation Dosimetry for Hiroshima and Nagasaki - Dosimetry System 2002 (PDF). The Radiation ... "5 MeV" is released in prompt or initial gamma radiation, "5 MeV" in prompt neutron radiation (99.36% of total), "7 MeV" in ... and 1.93 ms before significant energy is lost by thermal radiation). Furthermore, he estimated a value for S numerically at 1. ...
The first is ionizing radiation. Since mammography uses low-energy x-rays to image the breast, the breast is exposed to ... It does not use ionizing radiation like in the case of Mammography, SPECT. It has higher sensitivity and specificity for ... ionizing radiation. Too much repeated exposure can elevate the risk of cancer down the road. The second drawback is inaccuracy ... It is fast, only taking 15-20 minutes per picture and it uses non-ionizing near-infrared light, which allows patients to take ...
... of energy from ionizing radiation, analogously to photosynthesis. Metabolism of ionizing radiation was theorized as early as ... They found that ionizing radiation increased the ability of melanin to support an important metabolic reaction, and that ... "Ionizing Radiation Changes the Electronic Properties of Melanin and Enhances the Growth of Melanized Fungi". PLOS ONE. 2 (5): ... "Ionizing radiation attracts soil fungi". Mycological Research. 108 (9): 1089-1096. doi:10.1017/S0953756204000966. PMID 15506020 ...
ISBN 1-58980-946-7. Ce4Rt (March 2014). Understanding Ionizing Radiation and Protection. p. 174. Otto Glasser (1934). Wilhelm ... His discovery prompted physicians to experiment with x-radiation as a method for hair removal - a method that became popular in ...
Non-Ionizing Radiation Exposure Guidelines.. ... to RF radiation giving concerns about mobile phone radiation ... Because mobile phones and their base stations are two-way radios, they produce radio-frequency (RF) radiation in order to ... Hand-held mobile telephones are relatively low power so the RF radiation exposures from them are generally low. The World ... Microcell Picocell Femtocell Access point base station Cell site Cellular repeater Mobile phone Mobile phone radiation and ...
The Effect of Ionizing Radiation on Domestic Animals; Development of symptoms in burros; radiation and physiological changes in ... nuclear radiation and ionizing effect; physical destruction; casualty effects (32 min; color). PMF 5059 - PMF 5060 - PMF 5061 ( ... explains the characteristics and properties of primary and secondary nuclear radiations in terms of their ionizing effect, (2) ... Live action and animation explain ionizing characteristics of alpha, beta, and gamma radiation from external and internal ...
... measuring parameters of ionizing radiation; and in a number of other areas. Research Department ″Main Metrological Center of ...
Medical use of ionizing radiation is a small but growing source of radiation-induced cancers. Ionizing radiation may be used to ... Sources of ionizing radiation include medical imaging and radon gas. Ionizing radiation is not a particularly strong mutagen.[ ... Radiation. Radiation therapy involves the use of ionizing radiation in an attempt to either cure or improve symptoms. It works ... Up to 10% of invasive cancers are related to radiation exposure, including both ionizing radiation and non-ionizing ultraviolet ...
The most widely accepted model of radiation-induced cancer posits that the incidence of cancers due to ionizing radiation ... Little JB (2000). "Chapter 14: Ionizing Radiation". In Kufe DW, Pollock RE, Weichselbaum RR, Bast RC Jr, Gansler TS, Holland JF ... Tripartite Conference on Radiation Protection recommends lowering the dose limits:[15] 0.3 rep/week (~0.3 r/week) for whole ... Vienna, Austria: International Radiation Protection Association. Retrieved 14 May 2012.. *^ Clarke, R. H.; Valentin, J. (2009 ...
Medical use of ionizing radiation is a small but growing source of radiation-induced cancers. Ionizing radiation may be used to ... Radiation. Radiation therapy involves the use of ionizing radiation in an attempt to either cure or improve symptoms. It works ... Radiation. Main article: Radiation-induced cancer. Radiation exposure such as ultraviolet radiation and radioactive material is ... Sources of ionizing radiation include medical imaging and radon gas.[56] Ionizing radiation is not a particularly strong ...
Sources and Effects of Ionizing Radiation. United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation (UNSCEAR) ( ... The estimated per-capita effective dose of ionizing radiation due to global fallout from atmospheric nuclear weapons testing ... World anthropogenic background radiation levels peaked at 0.11 mSv/yr above natural levels in 1963, the year that the Partial ... Low-background counting chambers are made from low-background steel with extremely heavy radiation shielding. They are used to ...
Sterilizing insects with ionizing radiation. pp. 233-268 In V. A. Dyck, J. Hendrichs, and A. S. Robinson (eds.), Sterile Insect ... LaChance, L.E. (1967). "The introduction of dominant lethal mutations by ionizing radiation and chemical as related to sterile- ... Inherited sterility in insects is induced by substerilizing doses of ionizing radiation. When partially sterile males mate with ... Compared with the high radiation required to achieve full sterility in Lepidoptera, the lower dose of radiation used to induce ...
Her research has assessed the biological effects of ionizing radiation at low dosage levels. From 1973 and until her retirement ... Much of her research concerned the areas of radiation contamination and the effect of low level radiation exposure, as well as ... "Ionizing radiation and chronic lymphocytic leukemia". Environmental Health Perspectives. 113 (1): 1-5. doi:10.1289/ehp.7433. ... She is also chairman of the European Committee on Radiation Risk, a group of scientists opposing nuclear power; she was elected ...
"SI units for ionizing radiation: becquerel". Resolutions of the 15th CGPM (Resolution 8). 1975. Retrieved 3 July 2015. CS1 ... The absorbed dose is the quantity important in assessing the effects of ionizing radiation on humans. Radioactivity is ... The amount of specific activity should not be confused with level of exposure to ionizing radiation and thus the exposure or ... Applied Radiation and Isotopes. 57 (5): 657-664. doi:10.1016/S0969-8043(02)00180-X. ISSN 0969-8043. PMID 12433039. Mausner, ...
Lung cancer in uranium miners as a function of radon exposure). Hala, J. and Navratil J.D., Radioactivity, Ionizing Radiation ... Hala, Jiri; Navratil, James (2003). Radioactivity, Ionizing Radiation, and Nuclear Energy. Konvoj. ISBN 9788073020538. "Man- ... The Natural Radiation Environment. 1034. pp. 149-152. Bibcode:2008AIPC.1034..149Y. doi:10.1063/1.2991194. Greenfield, M.B.; A. ... Watras set off the radiation alarms (see Geiger counter) on his way into work for two weeks straight while authorities searched ...
Learn more about ionizing radiation. Provided by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). ... Non-ionizing radiation is a form of radiation with less energy than ionizing radiation. Unlike ionizing radiation, non-ionizing ... Ionizing Radiation from Manmade Sources. Every day, we use Ionizing radiation to help us live healthy lives. Ionizing radiation ... Ionizing radiation can fall into two categories: natural and manmade. Ionizing Radiation from Natural Sources. Ionizing ...
At very high doses, ionizing radiation can cause illness or death. Any dose could possibly cause cancer, after a several-year ... many of the 1,517 National Priorities List sites identified by the Environmental Protection Agency give off ionizing radiation ... Ionizing radiation, like heat and light, is a form of energy. It includes particles and rays given off by radioactive material ... What happens to ionizing radiation when it enters the environment?. Ionizing radiation, which travels as fast as the speed of ...
Check standards are used by the NIST Ionizing Radiation Division to monitor the performance of the alanine dosimetry system ... the Photonic Dosimetry project is set to develop in-situ sub-micrometer ionizing-radiation dosimetry and calorimetry... ... Assessing Radiation Hardness of Silicon Photonic Sensors.. August 13, 2018 Author(s): Zeeshan Ahmed, Lonnie T. Cumberland, ... Photonic Radiation Sensors Survive Huge Doses Undamaged. November 27, 2018 Researchers at the National Institute of Standards ...
Learn more about non-ionizing radiation. Provided by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). ... How is non-ionizing radiation different from ionizing radiation?. Put simply, non-ionizing radiation differs from ionizing ... What is non-ionizing radiation?. Non-ionizing radiation exists all around us from many sources. It is to the left of ionizing ... ionizing and non-ionizing radiation.. Ionizing radiation is a form of energy that acts by removing electrons from atoms and ...
You may have had contact with ionizing radiation if you served in certain roles or locations or were part of nuclear weapons ... Find out if you can get VA disability pay and health care for illnesses linked to ionizing radiation exposure during military ... See the list of radiation-related illnesses.. And you must have had contact with ionizing radiation in one of these ways while ... Ionizing Radiation Exposure. Find out if you can get disability compensation or benefits for illnesses-including some cancers- ...
Source for information on radiation, non-ionizing: The Oxford Companion to the Body dictionary. ... non-ionizing Electromagnetic fields and radiation have, perhaps through their historical associations with magnetic lodestones ... radiation, non-ionizing Electromagnetic fields and radiation have, perhaps through their historical associations with magnetic ... Non-ionizing radiations are less energetic and are conventionally subdivided into electromagnetic fields and radiations and ...
2. Principles of Ionizing Radiationpdf icon[PDF - 1.05 MB]. 3. Summary of Health Effects of Ionizing Radiationpdf icon[PDF - ... Toxicological Profile for Ionizing Radiation September 1999. Toxicological Profile Information. The ATSDR toxicological profile ... Toxicological profile for ionizing radiation. Atlanta, GA: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Public Health Service. ... 6. Sources of Population Exposure to Ionizing Radiationpdf icon[PDF - 329 KB] ...
Population exposure to ionizing radiation mainly occurs from natural sources or from medical devices. Occupational exposure is ... Ionizing radiation Radiodermatitis Cancer Acute radiation syndrome Cutaneous radiation injury syndrome This is a preview of ... Vol 2. Sources and effects of ionizing radiation: annex I: epidemiological evaluation of radiation induced cancer. pp 328-330 ... Effects of ionizing radiation: annex A: epidemiological studies of radiation and cancer. pp 83-87Google Scholar ...
... radiation) Radiation hormesis Radiation physics Radiation protection Radiation Protection Convention, 1960 Radiation protection ... and radio waves are non-ionizing radiation. The boundary between ionizing and non-ionizing radiation in the ultraviolet area is ... Ionizing radiation may be grouped as directly or indirectly ionizing. Any charged particle with mass can ionize atoms directly ... Thus, X-ray radiation is always ionizing, but only extreme-ultraviolet radiation can be considered ionizing under all ...
Ionizing radiation - Radiation effects: The use of X-rays and radioactive materials in science, medicine, and industry led to ... It took somewhat longer for the carcinogenic potential of ionizing radiation to be recognized. Today, however, the relationship ... the recognition, documented by reports of radiation burns, that radiation exposure, although helpful for the diagnosis and ... and there is clear understanding of the relationship between radiation exposure, which is the energy impinging on an organism, ...
BackRadiationWhat is radiation? (Dutch only)Ionizing radiationNon ionizing radiationLasers ... electromagnetic radiation. Examples of particle radiation are: alpha radiation, beta radiation (of β− electrons en β+ positrons ... Ionizing radiation is a type of radiation which is sufficiently energetic to push an electron out of the outer shell of an atom ... Electromagnetic radiation consists of photons, depending on the frequency it is either X-radiation or gamma radiation. ...
Control of exposure to ionising radiation arising from the use of radioactive materials and radiation generators at the ... Ionising Radiation Policy. Control of exposure to ionising radiation arising from the use of radioactive materials and ... A suitable Radiation Protection Supervisor (RPS) is appointed where there is the potential for exposure to ionising radiation ... Ionising Radiations (Medical Exposure) Regulations 2000. Definitions. Radiation Protection Advisor (RPA) is an individual or ...
Non-ionizing (or non-ionising) radiation refers to any type of electromagnetic radiation that does not carry enough energy per ... In contrast, ionizing radiation has a higher frequency and shorter wavelength than non-ionizing radiation, and can be a serious ... which in general are not required with non-ionizing radiation. The region at which radiation is considered "ionizing" is not ... The light from the Sun that reaches the earth is largely composed of non-ionizing radiation, since the ionizing far-ultraviolet ...
We show that both beta and gamma radiation promote directional growth of hyphae towards the source of ionizing radiation. ... germinating hyphae to directional sources of ionizing radiation allowing us to measure fungal response to ionizing radiation ... Ionizing radiation attracts soil fungi.. Zhdanova NN1, Tugay T, Dighton J, Zheltonozhsky V, McDermott P. ...
Genetic effects of oxidative damage from ionizing radiation. Radiation-induced oxidation of guanine bases produces 8-oxo-7- ...
Concerned with the control of exposure to ionising radiation arising from the use of radioactive materials and radiation ... Ionising Radiation Safety Standard. Concerned with the control of exposure to ionising radiation arising from the use of ...
In construction and related activities involving the use of sources of ionizing radiation, the pertinent provisions of the ... relating to protection against occupational radiation exposure, shall apply. ... Nuclear Regulatory Commission Standards for Protection Against Radiation (10 CFR Part 20), ...
Ionizing radiation-induced damage in DNA includes deamination and ring scission of the purine and pyrimidine bases, base ... Ionizing Radiation-Induced DNA-Protein Cross-Linking. In: Smith K.C. (eds) Aging, Carcinogenesis, and Radiation Biology. ... Ionizing radiation-induced damage in DNA includes deamination and ring scission of the purine and pyrimidine bases, base ... Butler, J.A.V., 1959, Changes induced in nucleic acids by ionizing radiation and chemicals, Radiat. Res. Suppl. 1: 403-416. ...
... radiation shielding, gamma ray, sealed source, radioisotope, ionizing radiation, cancer, 60cobalt, genag711, external radiation ... Gamma Radiation: Ionizing Radiation, Part 6 This 26 minute YouTube film examines exposures to gamma rays that are emitted from ... Gamma Radiation: Ionizing Radiation, Part 6 is categorized in the following disciplines: * Science and Technology/Agriculture ... If you know the author of Gamma Radiation: Ionizing Radiation, Part 6, please help us out by filling out the form below and ...
Interaction of ionizing radiation with matter. o interaction mechanisms. o radiation biophysics. o detecting ionizing radiation ... Ionizing Radiation in Medicine. Leerdoelen. • The students are able to apply the basic knowledge of the interaction of ... The student can summarize and illustrate the biological effects of ionizing radiation.. • The student can explain the formalism ... Both imaging techniques in nuclear medicine and radiotherapy using ionizing radiation (photons, protons and ions) are based on ...
... alpha radiation, beta radiation, gamma radiation, x-radiation, decay chain, and half-life. This instructional film is from ... alpha radiation, beta radiation, gamma radiation, x-radiation, decay chain, and half-life. This instructional film is from ... Ionizing Radiation, health physics, x-ray, beta particle, alpha particle, half-life, beta radiation, decay chain, radioactive ... Ionizing Radiation, Part 2: Radioactive Decay GENAG 711 This film examines the process of radioactive decay as part of an ...
... heterozygosity in the pro-apoptotic gene hid significantly reduces apoptosis that is induced by ionizing radiation (IR). ... Modulation of ionizing radiation-induced apoptosis by bantam microRNA in Drosophila. *Jaklevic B ... heterozygosity in the pro-apoptotic gene hid significantly reduces apoptosis that is induced by ionizing radiation (IR). ... miRNAs have been shown previously to be induced by radiation but this is the first report that a miRNA is functionally ...
Radilex™: Rx for Ionizing Radiation. August 31st, 2006 Editors Nuclear Medicine, Public Health ... The drug is thought to be a possible treatment of the effects of acute radiation exposure. Radilex™ is an analog of Substance P ...
Significance analysis of microarrays applied to the ionizing radiation response. Virginia Goss Tusher, Robert Tibshirani, ... Significance analysis of microarrays applied to the ionizing radiation response. Virginia Goss Tusher, Robert Tibshirani, ... Significance analysis of microarrays applied to the ionizing radiation response Message Subject (Your Name) has sent you a ... Significance analysis of microarrays applied to the ionizing radiation response. Virginia Goss Tusher, Robert Tibshirani, and ...
Make research projects and school reports about ionizing radiation easy with credible articles from our FREE, online ... and pictures about ionizing radiation at Encyclopedia.com. ... Early radiation effects. The effects of ionizing radiation soon ... ionizing radiation Electromagnetic radiation that ionizes the air or water through which it passes, e.g. X‐rays and γ‐rays. ... ionizing radiation Radiation of sufficiently high energy to cause ionization in the medium through which it passes. It may ...
... is energetic particles or waves that have the potential to ionize an atom or molecule through atomic ... Uses of ionizing radiation Ionizing radiation has many uses. An X-ray is ionizing radiation, and ionizing radiation can be used ... 2 Uses of ionizing radiation *2.1 Technical uses of ionizing radiation. *2.2 Biological and medical applications of ionizing ... Main article: Radiation hormesis. Radiation hormesis is the unproven theory that a low level of ionizing radiation (i.e. near ...
and �/i>-particles are forms of ionizing radiation. The dividing line between ionizing and non-ionizing radiation in the ... Ionizing Versus Non-Ionizing Radiation We live in a sea of radiation. In recent years, people have learned to fear the effects ... Radiation that carries less energy can only excite the water molecule. It is therefore called non-ionizing radiation. Radiation ... Ionizing radiation is much more dangerous. A dose of only 300 joules of x-ray or -ray radiation is fatal for the average human ...
Exposure to low-dose ionizing radiation from medical imaging procedures.. Fazel R1, Krumholz HM, Wang Y, Ross JS, Chen J, Ting ... The growing use of imaging procedures in the United States has raised concerns about exposure to low-dose ionizing radiation in ... Imaging procedures are an important source of exposure to ionizing radiation in the United States and can result in high ... Radiation exposure from medical imaging procedures. [N Engl J Med. 2009]. *Radiation exposure from medical imaging procedures. ...
Fundamentals of Ionizing Radiation Dosimetry. Pedro Andreo, David T. Burns, Alan E. Nahum, Jan Seuntjens, Frank Herbert Attix ... radiation quantities, macroscopic behaviour and the characterization of radiation fields and beams are covered in detail. A ... 8 The Monte Carlo Simulation of the Transport of Radiation Through Matter 349 ... 4 Field and Dosimetric Quantities, Radiation Equilibrium - Definitions and Inter-Relations 215 ...
... magnetic resonance enteroscopy are useful in managing patients with inflammatory bowel disease and avoiding ionizing radiation. ... and avoiding ionizing radiation. IBD Patients Exposed to Significant Ionizing Radiation Radiographic imaging is an important ... Americans get small amounts of ionizing radiation each year from natural sources, according to the U.S. Food and Drug ... Diagnostic techniques help IBD patients avoid ionizing radiation exposure. American College of Gastroenterology ...
  • Natural sources of ionizing radiation usually release ionizing radiation at low levels, which also means the amounts of radiation absorbed by our bodies (doses) is usually small. (cdc.gov)
  • At very high doses, ionizing radiation can cause illness or death. (cdc.gov)
  • Increased psychological stress has been shown in large populations exposed to small doses of radiation from nuclear accidents. (cdc.gov)
  • Mental function has been affected in people exposed before birth to high doses of ionizing radiation. (cdc.gov)
  • Brenner DJ, Doll R, Goodhead DT et al (2003) Cancer risks attributable to low doses of ionising radiation: assessing what we really know. (springer.com)
  • Cardis E, Vrijheid M, Blettner M et al (2005) Risk of cancer after low doses of ionising radiation: retrospective cohort study in 15 countries. (springer.com)
  • Experimental studies of radiation effects such as cell inactivation, mutation , and cancer have taken advantage of the experimenters' ability to regulate, with precision, radiation doses to target cells or tissues. (britannica.com)
  • Similarly, epidemiological investigations of exposed populations have benefited from the ability of scientists to reconstruct individual, and even organ-specific, radiation doses. (britannica.com)
  • Exposure to ionizing radiation causes cell damage to living tissue and in high acute doses will result in radiation burns and radiation sickness, and lower level doses over a protracted time can cause cancer. (wikipedia.org)
  • Within just a few years it was realized that high radiation doses from X-rays could cause severe skin burns, cancer in exposed tissues, and even death. (encyclopedia.com)
  • This resulted in steps being taken to reduce exposures, although in the early years after their discovery it was assumed that only high radiation doses from X-rays could cause cancer. (encyclopedia.com)
  • By the late 1920s it had become apparent, from the studies of Müller on the fruit fly, Drosophila , that radiation damage from X-rays could cause effects in future generations, and through to the 1950s this was the principle cause for concern at lower radiation doses. (encyclopedia.com)
  • The principle long-term effect of exposure to low doses of ionizing radiation is now considered to be the induction of cancer. (encyclopedia.com)
  • Extensive doses of ionizing radiation have been shown to have a mutating effect to future generations of the individual receiving the dose. (bionity.com)
  • Overall, moderate effective doses of radiation were incurred in 193.8 enrollees per 1000 per year, whereas high and very high doses were incurred in 18.6 and 1.9 enrollees per 1000 per year, respectively. (nih.gov)
  • In general, cumulative effective doses of radiation from imaging procedures increased with advancing age and were higher in women than in men. (nih.gov)
  • Imaging procedures are an important source of exposure to ionizing radiation in the United States and can result in high cumulative effective doses of radiation. (nih.gov)
  • The aim of the study was to estimate cancer risk from small doses of ionizing radiation from various sources, including both external and internal exposure. (osti.gov)
  • The discussion below largely relates to lower radiation doses and dose rates which can cause non-deterministic effects and which are more relatable to radiation exposure from NPL sites. (cdc.gov)
  • Bone sarcoma is known to be associated with high doses of ionizing radiation for therapeutic use and from accidental exposure. (rainbow.coop)
  • Absorbed and equivalent radiation doses can not be directly converted as the conversion depends on the type of radiation. (convert-me.com)
  • High doses of carbon ion radiation caused irreversible attenuation of mitochondrial DNA. (mdpi.com)
  • Low-dose hyper-radiosensitivity (HRS) describes the increased radiosensitivity of cells to doses of ionizing radiation less than ∼0.5 Gy. (aacrjournals.org)
  • Pure cultures and environmental greywater samples were exposed to different radiation doses from both UV sources with the germicidal effect comparative at equivalent doses. (environmental-expert.com)
  • It required estimation of radiation doses based on realistic scenarios and atmospheric dispersion modelling. (environmental-expert.com)
  • The Oak Ridge Associated Universities (ORAU) Team Dose Reconstruction Project assists the US National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health by reconstructing the radiation doses received by workers at various Department of Energy and Atomic Weapons Employer facilities. (environmental-expert.com)
  • Polymorphisms of DNA repair genes can determine individual sensitivity and DNA damage response to low doses of ionising radiation. (srce.hr)
  • The study found that E. coli could withstand doses radiation that would otherwise doom a microbe after only a handful of genetic mutations. (foodsafetynews.com)
  • Laboratory experiments have shown that humans and other animals can adapt to radiation, and that prolonged exposure to low doses of radiation increases organisms' resistance to larger, subsequent doses. (phys.org)
  • For example, in populations exposed to far lower doses of radiation, including those undergoing CAT scans, radiotherapy, the astronaut pool, atomic bomb survivors, residents of radioactively contaminated buildings, interventional physicians and medical workers and the Chernobyl accident "Liquidators", dose-related lens opacification at significantly lower exposures was reported. (dur.ac.uk)
  • My understanding of the way radiation therapy works is that they carefully target only the abnormal cells, delivering precise doses of radiation designed not just to disrupt cell division but to destroy the cells completely by trashing their DNA until it is completely nonfunctional. (biology-online.org)
  • We estimated the average cumulative effective radiation dose during a single admission for AMI per patient admitted in 2008, based on typical effective radiation doses for imaging procedures published in a recent science advisory by the AHA Committee on Cardiac Imaging. (ahajournals.org)
  • Adjuvant agents that augment the response of tumors to radiation might allow for the use of lower doses of ionizing radiation, thereby maintaining efficacy while decreasing toxicity. (aacrjournals.org)
  • Ionizing radiation is a form of energy that acts by removing electrons from atoms and molecules of materials that include air, water, and living tissue. (cdc.gov)
  • The fundamental photon and charged particle interaction data and the radiation transport methods, pioneered and developed at NIST to calculate the penetration. (nist.gov)
  • Any charged particle with mass can ionize atoms directly by fundamental interaction through the Coulomb force if it carries sufficient kinetic energy. (wikipedia.org)
  • As the radiation is emitted from a source, it detaches a charged particle from an atom or molecule , leaving the atom or molecule with an excess charge. (jrank.org)
  • Unlike ionizing radiation, non-ionizing radiation does not remove electrons from atoms or molecules of materials that include air, water, and living tissue. (cdc.gov)
  • Ionizing radiation (ionising radiation) consists of subatomic particles or electromagnetic waves that have sufficient energy to ionize atoms or molecules by detaching electrons from them. (wikipedia.org)
  • Non-ionizing (or non-ionising) radiation refers to any type of electromagnetic radiation that does not carry enough energy per quantum (photon energy) to ionize atoms or molecules-that is, to completely remove an electron from an atom or molecule. (wikipedia.org)
  • An intense flood of particles or waves will not cause ionization if these particles or waves do not carry enough energy to be ionizing, unless they raise the temperature of a body to a point high enough to ionize small fractions of atoms or molecules by the process of thermal-ionization. (wikipedia.org)
  • Once removed from an atom, an electron may in turn ionize other atoms or molecules. (encyclopedia.com)
  • Excitation occurs when the radiation excites the motion of the atoms or molecules, or excites an electron from an occupied orbital into an empty, higher-energy orbital. (purdue.edu)
  • Intense exposures to ionizing radiation may produce skin or tissue damage. (cdc.gov)
  • 4.3%), maternal answers concerning possible exposures to medical and occupational ionizing radiation were available. (biomedsearch.com)
  • Whereas annual exposures for ground based radiation workers have been successfully reduced, airline flight crew exposures remain at levels substantially above those of other radiation-exposed workers and are increasing with modern flight operations. (ifalpa.org)
  • Andrew Thatcher, MS is a former nuclear engineer, board certified health physicist and public health professional with over 25 years of experience in the evaluation of both ionizing and non-ionizing radiation exposures. (ishn.com)
  • A New Model for Biological Dose Assessment in Cases of Heterogeneous Exposures to Ionizing Radiation. (sigmaaldrich.com)
  • Higher frequencies extend to infra-red, visible, and ultraviolet optical radiations and to X-rays and gamma radiation . (encyclopedia.com)
  • Electromagnetic radiation consists of photons, depending on the frequency it is either X-radiation or gamma radiation. (utwente.nl)
  • We show that both beta and gamma radiation promote directional growth of hyphae towards the source of ionizing radiation. (nih.gov)
  • You just viewed Gamma Radiation: Ionizing Radiation,... . (merlot.org)
  • If you know the author of Gamma Radiation: Ionizing Radiation, Part 6 , please help us out by filling out the form below and clicking Send. (merlot.org)
  • 1993. Protective effects of chlorogenic acid, curcumin and beta-carotene against gamma-radiation-induced in vivo chromosomal damage. (cdc.gov)
  • Gamma radiation, consisting of energetic photons , is eventually absorbed as it penetrates a dense material. (statemaster.com)
  • Examples of particle radiation are: alpha radiation, beta radiation (of β− electrons en β+ positrons), neutrons, protons. (utwente.nl)
  • Both imaging techniques in nuclear medicine and radiotherapy using ionizing radiation (photons, protons and ions) are based on physics and technical principles largely originating in nuclear and particle physics. (rug.nl)
  • Ionizing radiation is produced by radioactive decay, nuclear fission and nuclear fusion, by extremely hot objects (the hot sun, e.g., produces ultraviolet), and by particle accelerators that may produce, e.g., fast electrons or protons or bremsstrahlung or synchrotron radiation. (bionity.com)
  • However, fast neutrons will interact with the protons in hydrogen (in the manner of a billiard ball hitting another, sending it away with all of the first ball's energy of motion), and this mechanism produces proton radiation (fast protons). (bionity.com)
  • A Monte Carlo calculation provides a realistic simulation of radiation transport, i.e. the scattering and absorption processes undergone by ionising radiation (photons, electrons, neutrons, protons, light ions, etc.) as it passes through different materials and geometries. (npl.co.uk)
  • In addition to X rays and gamma rays, densely ionizing particles -neutrons, protons, mesons, alpha particles, and heavy ions, for example-have been used increasingly to treat cancer and other lesions. (britannica.com)
  • Some common ionizing charged species are electrons, positrons, protons, and β particles (Helium nuclei). (jrank.org)
  • Typical ionizing subatomic particles due to radioactive decay include alpha particles, beta particles and neutrons and almost all are energetic enough to be ionizing. (wikipedia.org)
  • Examples of ionizing radiation are energetic Beta particles, neutrons, alpha particles and energetic photons (UV and above). (bionity.com)
  • Neutrons, on the other hand, do not interact strongly with electrons, and so they cannot directly ionize atoms by this mechanism. (bionity.com)
  • Radiation which is capable of causing ionisation, either directly (e.g. radiation in the form of gamma rays and charged particles) or indirectly (e.g. radiation in the form of neutrons). (edu.au)
  • Photons interact strongly with charged particles, so photons of sufficiently high energy are ionizing. (bionity.com)
  • On this page we provide conversion for radiation of electrons, muons and photons. (convert-me.com)
  • The majority of skin cancers are caused by exposure to ultraviolet radiation. (cdc.gov)
  • The remaining ultraviolet radiation from the Sun causes molecular damage (for example, sunburn) by photochemical and free-radical-producing means. (wikipedia.org)
  • Near ultraviolet radiation, although technically non-ionizing, may still excite and cause photochemical reactions in some molecules. (wikipedia.org)
  • Ultraviolet radiation ("Wood's" light) is used diagnostically to detect fluorescent materials that are present in certain disorders- e.g., some fungal diseases of the skin. (britannica.com)
  • In this approach, known as PUVA therapy, the entire surface of the skin is bathed repeatedly with ultraviolet radiation. (britannica.com)
  • Unlike non- ionizing radiation (such as microwaves and ultraviolet radiation), which has insufficient energy to eject molecular electrons, ionizing radiation deposits sufficient energy to remove electrons from atomic orbits and create molecular ion pairs along particle tracks. (cdc.gov)
  • Ionizing radiation, but not ultraviolet radiation, rapidly enhanced this p53-directed kinase activity of endogenous ATM. (sciencemag.org)
  • Ionizing radiation is any one of several types of particles and rays given off by radioactive material, high-voltage equipment, nuclear reactions, and stars. (cdc.gov)
  • These radiation particles and rays carry enough energy to knock out electrons from atoms and molecules (such as water, protein, and DNA) that they hit or pass near. (cdc.gov)
  • Charged particles originate in this reaction, which then ionize other atoms. (utwente.nl)
  • When moving at relativistic speeds (near the speed of light, c) these particles have enough kinetic energy to be ionizing, but there is considerable speed variation. (wikipedia.org)
  • Two of the first types of directly ionizing radiation to be discovered are alpha particles which are helium nuclei ejected from the nucleus of an atom during radioactive decay, and energetic electrons, which are called beta particles. (wikipedia.org)
  • In the atmosphere such particles are often stopped by air molecules, and this produces short-lived charged pions, which soon decay to muons, a primary type of cosmic ray radiation that reaches the surface of the earth. (wikipedia.org)
  • Alpha particles are a strongly ionizing form of radiation, but when emitted by radioactive decay they have low penetration power and can be absorbed by a few centimeters of air, or by the top layer of human skin. (wikipedia.org)
  • The energy of particles of non-ionizing radiation is low, and instead of producing charged ions when passing through matter, non-ionizing electromagnetic radiation has only sufficient energy to change the rotational, vibrational or electronic valence configurations of molecules and atoms. (wikipedia.org)
  • Ionizing radiation is energetic particles or waves that have the potential to ionize an atom or molecule through atomic interactions. (bionity.com)
  • In order for radiation to be ionizing, the particles must both have a high enough energy and interact with the atom. (bionity.com)
  • Gamma quanta do not ionize all along their path like alpha or beta particles (see particle radiation. (bionity.com)
  • particles are forms of ionizing radiation. (purdue.edu)
  • Radiation is energy transmitted in the form of electromagnetic waves or energetic particles. (medscape.com)
  • Ionizing radiation can also be in the form of particulate radiation, which includes subatomic l charged or neutral particles traveling near the speed of light and therefore with high very high kinetic energy. (medscape.com)
  • To remove an electron from an atom or molecule, the ionizing particles must have a kinetic energy exceeding the binding energy of the target species , typically a few electron volts. (jrank.org)
  • Particle radiation is the radiation of energy by means of small fast-moving particles that have energy and mass. (statemaster.com)
  • An alpha particle is deflected by a magnetic field Alpha particles or alpha rays are a form of particle radiation which are highly ionizing and have low penetration. (statemaster.com)
  • Hi, I have not quite fully understood about the harm due to the ionizing affect of alpha particles in medical physics. (edaboard.com)
  • Ionising radiation, such as gamma rays, X-rays and radioactive particles can cause cancer by damaging DNA. (biologynews.net)
  • Everyone receives some exposure to natural background radiation and much of the population also has the occasional medical or dental X-ray. (bath.ac.uk)
  • Cosmic rays and the decay of radioactive isotopes are the primary sources of natural ionizing radiation on Earth contributing to background radiation. (wikipedia.org)
  • The provisions of the Act do not apply to naturally occurring radioactive material, background radiation, and their exposure herein. (gov.tw)
  • We found the opposite - that antioxidant levels increased and oxidative stress decreased with increasing background radiation. (phys.org)
  • They measured background radiation levels at each site, and took feather and blood samples before releasing the birds. (phys.org)
  • The results revealed that with increasing background radiation , the birds' body condition and glutathione levels increased and oxidative stress and DNA damage decreased. (phys.org)
  • This represents over five and half times the annual US background radiation (3 mSv, 150 CXRs) and over one-third of the 50 mSv (2500 CXRs) annual limit for radiation workers. (ahajournals.org)
  • Kalpana Mujoo , E. Brian Butler , Raj K. Pandita , Clayton R. Hunt , and Tej K. Pandita "Pluripotent Stem Cells and DNA Damage Response to Ionizing Radiations," Radiation Research 186(1), 17-26, (22 June 2016). (bioone.org)
  • 1999. Toxicological profile for ionizing radiation. (cdc.gov)
  • GB Parliament (1999) Ionising radiation regulations, 1999, SI 1999. (springer.com)
  • A person who is the holder of an Accreditation Certificate issued under the Radiation Safety Act 1999. (edu.au)
  • A holder of a user license under the Radiation Safety Act 1999 or a person who is exempt from holding a user license, which is stated in the practice Radiation Safety and Protection Plan (RSPP). (edu.au)
  • We say that x-rays are "ionizing," meaning that they have the unique capability to remove electrons from atoms and molecules in the matter through which they pass. (cdc.gov)
  • Ionizing activity can alter molecules within the cells of our body. (cdc.gov)
  • Ionizing radiation, which travels as fast as the speed of light, hits atoms and molecules in its path and loses some of its energy with each hit. (cdc.gov)
  • Unlike x-rays and other forms of ionizing radiation, non-ionizing radiation does not have enough energy to remove electrons from atoms and molecules. (cdc.gov)
  • The boundary between ionizing and non-ionizing radiation in the ultraviolet area is not sharply defined, since different molecules and atoms ionize at different energies, but is between 10 electronvolts (eV) and 33 eV. (wikipedia.org)
  • The region at which radiation is considered "ionizing" is not well defined, since different molecules and atoms ionize at different energies. (wikipedia.org)
  • Another suggested threshold is 33 electronvolts, which is the energy needed to ionize water molecules. (wikipedia.org)
  • When ionizing radiation passes through cellular tissue, it produces charged water molecules. (encyclopedia.com)
  • Visible light is so ubiquitous that molecules that are ionized by it will often react nearly spontaneously unless protected by materials that block the visible spectrum. (bionity.com)
  • When ionizing radiation passes through living tissue, electrons are removed from neutral water molecules to produce H 2 O + ions. (purdue.edu)
  • Between three and four water molecules are ionized for every 1.6 x 10 -17 joules of energy absorbed in the form of ionizing radiation. (purdue.edu)
  • Radiation at the low-energy end of the electromagnetic spectrum, such as radio waves and microwaves, excites the movement of atoms and molecules, which is equivalent to heating the sample. (purdue.edu)
  • Their research was based on the fact that antioxidants exert their effect by scavenging hazardous free radicals that are created by the interaction between ionizing radiation and water molecules before the free radicals can interact with and damage DNA. (appliedradiology.com)
  • This proposal requests funds to determine the protective role of minerals on adsorbed organic molecules against radiation effect under conditions that simulate Mars environments. (seti.org)
  • Medical diagnostic exams are the main manmade source of ionizing radiation exposure in the U.S. The goal of medical diagnostic imaging is for the benefits to far outweigh the risks. (cdc.gov)
  • Ionization smoke detectors use an ionization chamber and a source of ionizing radiation to detect smoke. (howstuffworks.com)
  • You are exposed to low levels of ionizing radiation from the sun, rocks, soil, natural sources in your body, fallout from past nuclear weapons tests, some consumer products, and radioactive materials released from hospitals and from nuclear and coal power plants. (cdc.gov)
  • Ionizing radiation is also generated artificially by such as X-ray tubes, particle accelerators, and nuclear fission. (wikipedia.org)
  • Ionizing radiation is used in a wide variety of fields such as medicine, nuclear power, research, and industrial manufacturing, but presents a health hazard if proper measures against excessive exposure are not taken. (wikipedia.org)
  • radiation is also present in the environment as a result of nuclear weapons testing and as a consequence of discharges from nuclear sites and from nuclear accidents. (encyclopedia.com)
  • Generally, that means that 37 billion atoms in the sample are decaying and emitting a particle of nuclear radiation (such as an alpha particle) per second. (howstuffworks.com)
  • For an extensive explanation of nuclear materials and nuclear radiation, see How Nuclear Radiation Works . (howstuffworks.com)
  • Although most GBMs occur sporadically, there is a known association with therapeutic radiation exposure and with work in nuclear disaster cleanup. (hindawi.com)
  • An association with high-dose IR and all brain tumors has been observed in atomic bomb survivor studies, nuclear-test fallout data, therapeutic radiation for cancer or for benign conditions, and occupational and environmental studies [ 1 , 10 - 12 ]. (hindawi.com)
  • 3)Radioactive material refers to material that may emit ionizing radiation by spontaneous nuclear transformation. (gov.tw)
  • 4)Equipment capable of producing ionizing radiation refers to the equipment apart from nuclear reactor facilities capable of producing ionizing radiation by such means as electromagnetic fields, or nuclear reactions. (gov.tw)
  • 6)Radiation source refers to a source that produces or is capable of producing ionizing radiation, including radioactive material, equipment capable of producing ionizing radiation, nuclear reactors, and other material or apparatus designated or announced by the Competent Authority. (gov.tw)
  • and (d)ionizing radiation emitted by global fallout containing radioactive material arising from nuclear testing or other reasons. (gov.tw)
  • For every patient presenting in 2008 with an acute myocardial infarction (AMI) to one of 55 US academic hospitals enrolled in the University HealthSystem Consortium (UHC), we examined the number of each of the following diagnostic procedures involving ionizing radiation that were performed: Chest radiograph, CT chest, CT body, CT head, nuclear rest/stress perfusion, nuclear MUGA, nuclear ventilation/perfusion scan and cardiac catheterization. (ahajournals.org)
  • More recent interest stems from a need to provide countermeasures against accidental or intentional exposure to radiation through nuclear devices. (springer.com)
  • Non-ionizing radiations are less energetic and are conventionally subdivided into electromagnetic fields and radiations and optical radiations. (encyclopedia.com)
  • Ionizing radiation is a type of radiation which is sufficiently energetic to push an electron out of the outer shell of an atom. (utwente.nl)
  • Ionizing radiation can penetrate the human body and the radiation energy can be absorbed in tissue. (cdc.gov)
  • Exposure to intense, direct amounts of non-ionizing radiation may result in damage to tissue due to heat. (cdc.gov)
  • Intense, direct exposure to radiofrequency (RF) or microwave radiation may result in damage to tissue due to heat. (cdc.gov)
  • Today, however, the relationship between radiation dose and cancer risk is well characterized and well quantified, and there is clear understanding of the relationship between radiation exposure, which is the energy impinging on an organism, and radiation dose, which is the amount per unit mass absorbed by a selected bit of tissue. (britannica.com)
  • Thus, compared to a chemical dose to a given tissue, which requires understanding of the pathways by which a given intake of the chemical carcinogen results in absorption of the chemical by the tissue of interest, radiation dose is readily estimated. (britannica.com)
  • The possible non-thermal effects of non-ionizing forms of radiation on living tissue have only recently been studied. (wikipedia.org)
  • The negatively charged electrons and positively charged ions created by ionizing radiation may cause damage in living tissue. (bionity.com)
  • Because living tissue is 70-90% water by weight, the dividing line between radiation that excites electrons and radiation that forms ions is often assumed to be equal to the ionization of water: 1216 kJ/mol. (purdue.edu)
  • Such high-LET radiations (see above The passage of matter rays: Linear energy transfer and track structure ) offer potential advantages over conventional X rays and gamma rays in that they have per given dose greater capacity to damage tumours, particularly deep-seated ones, and can be applied more precisely to the lesion under treatment, causing less injury to surrounding tissue. (britannica.com)
  • This approach, termed diathermy, is also being explored as a means of inducing hyperthermia in tumour tissue as an adjunct to radiation therapy (or chemotherapy) in the treatment of certain types of cancer. (britannica.com)
  • We found that LDHA expression is increased in human and animal lung tissue exposed to ionizing radiation. (nih.gov)
  • Visual inspection, gait analysis, and tissue histology were used to determine the extent of damage caused by the radiation. (hindawi.com)
  • Ionizing radiation is more damaging to human tissue than non-ionizing thermal-type radiation, as it is more likely to be localized and have a higher intensity (energy deposited per area per second). (jrank.org)
  • Thus, the lens provides a unique model system in which to study the effects of low dose ionizing radiation exposure in a complex, highly organized tissue. (dur.ac.uk)
  • Unfortunately, as with most treatments, ionizing radiation also produces dose-related side effects to surrounding normal tissue. (aacrjournals.org)
  • When ionizing radiation from outer space hits the upper atmosphere, it produces a shower of cosmic rays that constantly expose everything on earth. (cdc.gov)
  • Cosmic rays may also produce radioisotopes on Earth (for example, carbon-14), which in turn decays and emits ionizing radiation. (wikipedia.org)
  • Ambient levels of ionising radiation (about 2 mSv/y without medical and cosmic radiation) are adequate for life but insufficient for abundant health. (environmental-expert.com)
  • Instead of producing charged ions when passing through matter, non-ionizing electromagnetic radiation has sufficient energy only for excitation, the movement of an electron to a higher energy state. (wikipedia.org)
  • Second, to enable the study of plasma transport and line radiation interactions, PIP, a partially ionized plasma transport model that includes the charge-exchange coupling of ions with neutral atoms, the transport of potential energy, the effects of resonance line radiation interactions on atomic rates, and the transport of an arbitrary number of atomic levels, is developed and coupled with an existing NLTE radiation transport model. (mit.edu)
  • Radiation in the ultraviolet band and at lower energies (to the left of ultraviolet) is called non-ionizing radiation, while at the higher energies to the right of the ultraviolet band is called ionizing radiation. (cdc.gov)
  • The usual definitions have suggested that radiation with particle or photon energies less than 10 electronvolts (eV) be considered non-ionizing. (wikipedia.org)
  • The upper frequencies of non-ionizing radiation near these energies (much of the spectrum of UV light and some visible light) are capable of non-thermal biological damage, similar to ionizing radiation. (wikipedia.org)
  • In such cases, even "non-ionizing radiation" is capable of causing thermal-ionization if it deposits enough heat to raise temperatures to ionization energies. (wikipedia.org)
  • These reactions occur at far higher energies than with ionizing radiation, which requires only a single particle to ionize. (wikipedia.org)
  • The table below contains estimates of the energies of various kinds of radiation. (purdue.edu)
  • Silicon carbide (SiC) provides an alternate solution as a radiation hard material, because of its wide bandgap and higher atomic displacement energies, for devices intended for radiation environment applications. (diva-portal.org)
  • Extremely short wavelength of ionizing radiation however, makes it an important and useful tool in creating very small size structures in polymers. (osti.gov)
  • In the NATO phonetic alphabet, X-ray represents the letter X. An X-ray picture (radiograph) taken by Röntgen An X-ray is a form of electromagnetic radiation with a wavelength approximately in the range of 5 pm to 10 nanometers (corresponding to frequencies in the range 30 PHz. (statemaster.com)
  • Too much UV radiation can cause skin burns, premature aging of the skin, eye damage, and skin cancer. (cdc.gov)
  • Ionizing radiation-induced damage in DNA includes deamination and ring scission of the purine and pyrimidine bases, base elimination by scission of the glycoside bond, and strand breaks produced by scission of the ester bond between sugar and phosphate groups or by scission of the sugar moiety. (springer.com)
  • One molecule of particular importance in relation to radiation damage is deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA), found in the nucleus of the cell. (encyclopedia.com)
  • The gray can be multiplied by a 'weighting factor' to take account of the effectiveness of different radiations in causing damage to tissues. (encyclopedia.com)
  • Radiation-induced DNA damage, ultraviolet light, genotoxic stress and other intrinsic and extrinsic factors triggers a series of biochemical reactions known as DNA damage response. (bioone.org)
  • A number of direct and indirect radiation interaction pathways can produce damage to the DNA of irradiated cells. (cdc.gov)
  • Direct macromolecule damage by radiation involves partial or complete energy transfer to one or more electrons on the molecule. (cdc.gov)
  • Radiation therapy and most chemotherapies elicit cancer cell death through the induction of excessive DNA damage. (plos.org)
  • We found that this complex normally represses radiation-induced cell death by inhibiting the expression of the p53 gene, a critical mediator of DNA damage-induced cell death. (plos.org)
  • The damage is initialized by the ionizing particle when it knocks an electron off an atom or molecule in a living system, leaving an unpaired electron behind. (jrank.org)
  • Dose-dependent ionizing radiation induced damage to the initial mtDNA. (mdpi.com)
  • CONCLUSIONS: Lipoprotein modifications that appeared following radiation exposure may result from an induced inflammatory state and may further contribute to vascular damage. (irsn.fr)
  • Overall, the data remain consistent with the hypothesis that overcoming HRS is related to the control of a specific G2 checkpoint that responds to radiation-mediated DNA damage. (aacrjournals.org)
  • Our current working model suggests that HRS is a consequence of radiation damaged G2 phase cells entering mitosis with unrepaired DNA damage after failing to activate checkpoint delays that otherwise would have initiated DNA repair mechanisms and improved overall cell survival. (aacrjournals.org)
  • Endothelial cells play a crucial role both in the inflammatory process and in radiation damage. (irsn.fr)
  • Furthermore, we show that this increased radiation-induced DNA damage in late generation mTR −/ − mice does not seem to be the direct consequence of a defect in a known DNA DSB repair pathway. (rupress.org)
  • Increasing exposure to ionising radiation raises a great concern about potential DNA damage in occupationally exposed individuals. (srce.hr)
  • The study enrolled 40 healthy subjects (20 controls and 20 occupationally exposed subjects), whose leukocytes were exposed to ionising radiation and tested for DNA damage (tail length, percentage od DNA in comet tail, and tail moment) using the alkaline version of the comet assay. (srce.hr)
  • Our body's cells can repair a minor amount of damage from radiation. (edaboard.com)
  • Antioxidants ingested before exposure to radiation from imaging protects cells from DNA damage, according to findings from a proof-of-principle study published in the Journal of Vascular and Interventional Radiology . (appliedradiology.com)
  • The authors suggest that the use of antioxidants could prevent long-term sustained DNA damage in patients who undergo repeated screening imaging studies with ionizing radiation. (appliedradiology.com)
  • Authors of the study said their findings provide understanding of how organisms can resist radiation damage to cells and repair damaged DNA. (foodsafetynews.com)
  • According to lead author Dr Ismael Galván of the Spanish National Research Council (CSIC): "Previous studies of wildlife at Chernobyl showed that chronic radiation exposure depleted antioxidants and increased oxidative damage. (phys.org)
  • The body protects itself against free radicals using antioxidants, but if the level of antioxidants is too low, radiation produces oxidative stress and genetic damage, which leads to ageing and death. (phys.org)
  • Tibiae submitted to radiation dose of 30Gy have shown more damage to bone cells than tibiae that received secondary radiation dose of 7Gy, especially observed on 14th, 56th and 84th postoperative days. (scielo.br)
  • For the first time, researchers from the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute and their collaborators have been able to identify in human cancers two characteristic patterns of DNA damage caused by ionising radiation. (biologynews.net)
  • However, how this happens, or how many tumours are caused by radiation damage has not been known. (biologynews.net)
  • By comparing the DNA sequences we found two mutational signatures for radiation damage that were independent of cancer type. (biologynews.net)
  • Dr Sam Behjati, clinician researcher at the Sanger Institute and the Department of Paediatrics, University of Cambridge, said: "Ionising radiation probably causes all types of mutational damage, but here we can see two specific types of damage and get a sense of what is happening to the DNA. (biologynews.net)
  • Showers of radiation chop up the genome causing lots of damage simultaneously. (biologynews.net)
  • Professor Adrienne Flanagan, a collaborating cancer researcher from University College London and Royal National Orthopaedic hospital, said: "This is the first time that scientists have been able to define the damage caused to DNA by ionising radiation. (biologynews.net)
  • It has been suggested that individuals haplo-insufficient for one or more genes involved in DNA damage repair and/or cell cycle checkpoint control may be especially susceptible to the cataractogenic effects of ionizing radiation. (dur.ac.uk)
  • While the health hazards from ionizing radiation are well-established and include radiation sickness, cancer and genetic damage, the evidence of health risks to humans from non-ionizing radiation remains limited, said De-Kun Li, MD, PhD, principal investigator of the study and a reproductive and perinatal epidemiologist at the Kaiser Permanente Division of Research in Oakland, California. (stopumts.nl)
  • IR can damage cellular components through direct deposition of radiation energy into biomolecules and also indirectly by generating reactive oxygen species (ROS). (asm.org)
  • This chapter provides an overview of the biological effects of radiation and highlights models used to study radiation-induced damage and repair. (springer.com)
  • The rapidly increasing usage of non-ionizing radiations--microwaves, ultrasound, ultra-violet, and lasers--for diagnostic and therapeutic applications demands an awareness of their energy levels, their potential hazards and safety thresholds. (spie.org)
  • These radioactive materials give off their ionizing radiation over time until all of the radioactive atoms have decayed. (cdc.gov)
  • The use of X-rays and radioactive materials in science , medicine , and industry led to the recognition, documented by reports of radiation burns, that radiation exposure, although helpful for the diagnosis and treatment of disease, might also be harmful, and protective measures were taken to limit exposure. (britannica.com)
  • Control of exposure to ionising radiation arising from the use of radioactive materials and radiation generators at the University. (bath.ac.uk)
  • Hematopoietic injury is a major cause of mortality in radiation accidents and a primary side effect in patients undergoing radiotherapy. (mdpi.com)
  • None of these patients had had any ionizing imaging procedures in the past seven days or chemotherapy/radiotherapy within the prior six months. (appliedradiology.com)
  • Comparing the ionizing radiation effects on bone neoformation of rats tibiae previously submitted to radiotherapy with a single dosage of 30Gy with the contralateral tibiae that have received secondary radiation. (scielo.br)
  • These observations have clear implications for radiotherapy, diagnostic procedures and for those occupationally exposed to ionizing radiation, such as interventional medical personnel or the astronaut core and may aid in determining future national terrestrial and space radiation risk policies. (dur.ac.uk)
  • WASHINGTON -- The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) invites the public to participate in its final two informal stakeholder meetings on Occupational Exposure to Ionizing Radiation in a Federal Register Notice published March 30, 2007. (osha.gov)
  • OSHA requests the public be prepared to discuss the following issues regarding occupational exposure to ionizing radiation in their industry/occupation: uses of ionizing radiation, controls utilized to minimize exposure and available exposure data and training. (osha.gov)
  • Maternal occupational exposure to ionizing radiation and birth defects. (biomedsearch.com)
  • So far, only a few studies investigated occupational exposure to ionizing radiation in pregnancy to cause birth defects (BDs). (biomedsearch.com)
  • Additionally, a study-specific questionnaire distributed among all becoming mothers in the surveyed regions included questions on maternal occupational exposure to ionizing radiation within the first trimester of pregnancy. (biomedsearch.com)
  • Relative risk (RR) estimates in mothers surveyed for occupational exposure to ionizing radiation (wearing a radiation dosimeter) and BDs in the offspring were calculated exploratively. (biomedsearch.com)
  • In this article, we present a case of GBM with lung metastasis occurring in a 51-year-old Caucasian male, whose history is significant for occupational exposure to ionizing radiation, and review the literature on GBM risk factors and potential mechanisms of metastasis. (hindawi.com)
  • These records normally include but may not be limited to the veteran 's Record of Occupational Exposure to Ionizing Radiation (DD Form 1141), if maintained, service medical records, and other records which may contain information pertaining to the veteran 's radiation dose in service. (cornell.edu)
  • Exposure to low-dose ionizing radiation from medical imaging procedures. (nih.gov)
  • The growing use of imaging procedures in the United States has raised concerns about exposure to low-dose ionizing radiation in the general population. (nih.gov)
  • The recommendations of Research on Health Effects of Low-Level Ionizing Radiation Exposure will provide guidance for AFRRI to build on its strengths and advance its mission while contributing to the body of scientific knowledge on the health effects of exposure to low-dose ionizing radiation. (nap.edu)
  • Our main exposure to ionizing radiation in manmade sources is through the use of diagnostic medical exams. (cdc.gov)
  • Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRIs) and ultrasound technology are examples of diagnostic exams that do not involve exposure to ionizing radiation. (cdc.gov)
  • San Antonio, Texas, October 18, 2010 - At the American College of Gastroenterology's (ACG) 75th Annual Scientific meeting in San Antonio, Texas, several studies of the effectiveness of non‐X‐ray techniques to evaluate Crohn's disease revealed that diagnostic strategies such as capsule endoscopy (CE) and magnetic resonance enteroscopy (MRE) are useful in managing patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and avoiding ionizing radiation. (eurekalert.org)
  • Assessing Crohn's disease activity in the small bowel is challenging as direct visualization is difficult and traditional radiographic studies can result in large cumulative radiation disease," according to Siobhan Byrne, M.D. and Helen Fasanya‐Uptagraft, M.D. MR enteroscopy is a diagnostic technique performed without ionizing radiation. (eurekalert.org)
  • In addition, since the solution of the radiation field is an integral part of the calculation, several spectroscopic diagnostic techniques are developed. (mit.edu)
  • By contrast, far ultraviolet light, X-rays, gamma-rays, and all particle radiation from radioactive decay are ionizing. (wikipedia.org)
  • Ataxia telangiectasia (A-T) is a rare autosomal recessive disorder characterized by clinical manifestations that include progressive cerebellar ataxia, neuronal degeneration, hypersensitivity to ionizing radiation (IR), premature aging, hypogonadism, growth retardation, immune deficiency, and an increased risk for cancer ( 1 ). (sciencemag.org)
  • Finally, RAD-51 depletion is also seen to affect the soma , resulting in hypersensitivity to ionizing radiation in late embryogenesis. (genetics.org)
  • This article is about the type of Electromagnetic radiation. (statemaster.com)
  • Radiation of sufficient energy for this process to occur is commonly produced in nature. (jrank.org)
  • radiation, non-ionizing Electromagnetic fields and radiation have, perhaps through their historical associations with magnetic lodestones and electrical storms, been linked to forces of nature that are not readily understood. (encyclopedia.com)
  • The airline pilot operates in an environment with exposure to circadian dysrhythmia, chronic fatigue, reduced atmospheric pressure, mild hypoxia, low humidity, and exposure to sound, vibration, radiation (both ionizing and non-ionizing), and electromagnetic fields. (ifalpa.org)
  • Anno GH, Young RW, Bloom RM et al (2003) Dose response relationships for acute ionizing-radiation lethality. (springer.com)
  • Barabanova AV (2002) Acute radiation syndrome with cutaneous syndrome. (springer.com)
  • Fliedner TM, Friescke I, Beyrer K (2001) Medical management of radiation accidents: manual on the acute radiation syndrome. (springer.com)
  • The drug is thought to be a possible treatment of the effects of acute radiation exposure. (medgadget.com)
  • A very large radiation dose received in a short enough period of time to preclude significant repair can cause cellular walls to collapse and disrupt organ systems, producing deterministic effects such as acute radiation syndrome, cataracts, and teratogenesis (mental retardation, IQ reduction, microencephaly, stunted growth). (cdc.gov)
  • These effects can be caused by acute exposure to sources of high intensity radiation, such as can be found in hospitals, government, and industry. (cdc.gov)
  • The second one is from Acute Radiation Syndrome . (convert-me.com)
  • 60% of the irradiated G5 mTR −/ − mice die of acute radiation toxicity in the gastrointestinal tract, lymphoid organs, and kidney. (rupress.org)
  • This process is called ionization, which is why this radiation is called "ionizing radiation. (cdc.gov)
  • A familiar example of thermal ionization is the flame-ionization of a common fire, and the browning reactions in common food items induced by infrared radiation, during broiling-type cooking. (wikipedia.org)
  • In general, two things can happen when radiation is absorbed by matter: excitation or ionization. (purdue.edu)
  • Ionization occurs when the radiation carries enough energy to remove an electron from an atom or molecule. (purdue.edu)
  • this process, called "ionization," is the source of the term "ionizing radiation" (see Chapter 2). (cdc.gov)
  • Ionizing radiation is any energy that causes the ionization of the substance through which it passes. (jrank.org)
  • Bodies survive extreme exposure to ionization radiation in certain species of Rotifers of class Bdelloidea by repairing DNA. (asknature.org)
  • Scientists, Gladyshev and Meselson, tested their survival by exposing the species to ionization radiation (IR) and made a comparison of these species to a species of bacteria that avoids desiccation. (asknature.org)
  • 1)Ionizing radiation refers to electromagnetic or corpuscular radiation that directly or indirectly causes ionization of any material. (gov.tw)
  • They reported a significantly higher number of gamma-H2AX foci/cell after ionization radiation in the control group compared with the antioxidant group. (appliedradiology.com)
  • For example, hydrogen requires a photon with an energy of 13.6 eV (one electron volt = 1.602 10-19 joule) to be ionized, meaning radiation with a frequency of about 3.28 1015Hz, which corresponds with the frequency of ultraviolet light. (utwente.nl)
  • For example, a typical alpha particle moves at about 5% of c, but an electron with 33 eV (just enough to ionize) moves at about 1% of c. (wikipedia.org)
  • So in all cases, these radiations ultimately produce electrical interactions in the material and this can give rise to ionizations when a neutral atom or molecule becomes charged as a result of a loss of an electron. (encyclopedia.com)
  • Radiation that carries more energy than 1216 kJ/mol can remove an electron from a water molecule, and is therefore called ionizing radiation . (purdue.edu)
  • Industrial radiation processing such as medical device irradiations with electron beams or gamma-rays from cobalt-60. (npl.co.uk)
  • The present invention is to provide a novel composite for paint curable in the air by high energy ionizing radiation (electron beams of energy as of several hundred KeV), whereby a paint film having excellent film properties can be obtained. (google.es)
  • Ionized, all you need is the electron back (if it wasn't a bonding one, and the bond got broken). (edaboard.com)
  • Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (2005) Cutaneous radiation injury: fact sheet for physicians. (springer.com)
  • In: Medical effects of ionizing radiation. (springer.com)
  • The student can summarize and illustrate the biological effects of ionizing radiation. (rug.nl)
  • This film examines the process of radioactive decay as part of an educational unit on the health effects of ionizing radiation (radioactivity). (merlot.org)
  • The effects of ionizing radiation soon appear if a person receives a sufficient radiation dose. (encyclopedia.com)
  • Re: Which rapidly dividing cells can show the effects of ionizing radiation? (madsci.org)
  • PURPOSE: The investigation of the effects of ionizing radiation on hepatic cholesterol metabolism and the concentration and composition of plasma lipoproteins in the male Syrian hamster. (irsn.fr)
  • The combination of IFN-β and ionizing radiation showed synergy against ARMS by sensitizing tumor cells to the cytotoxic effects of ionizing radiation and by altering tumor vasculature, thereby improving oxygenation. (aacrjournals.org)
  • Hypoxia has been shown to interfere with the cytotoxic effects of ionizing radiation as well as contribute to the emergence of radiation-resistant tumor cells ( 13 , 14 ). (aacrjournals.org)
  • Radiation-induced oxidation of guanine bases produces 8-oxo-7-hydro-guanine ( GO ). (mun.ca)
  • Neutron interaction with nuclei in this manner often produces radioactive nuclei, which produce ionizing radiation when they decay. (bionity.com)
  • It produces intense ionizing radiation in that it can kill animal lifeform within hours and ionize ordinary drinking water in a bottle. (abovetopsecret.com)
  • 8)Exposure refers to the process whereby the human body is exposed to irradiation by ionizing radiation, or contact with, or the intake of radioactive material. (gov.tw)
  • The time dependent and dose rate effects of the ionizing radiation can be determined by comparing pre- and post-irradiation voltage shifts, Δ V ot and Δ V it . (astm.org)
  • Leukemia was the first human cancer for which risk was unequivocally demonstrated to increase with dose of ionizing radiation. (britannica.com)
  • A unit called the rem (roentgen equivalent man) is used to measure the absorbed dose of ionizing radiation in living systems. (jrank.org)
  • Gamma rays, X-rays and the higher ultraviolet part of the electromagnetic spectrum are ionizing radiation, whereas the lower energy ultraviolet, visible light, nearly all types of laser light, infrared, microwaves, and radio waves are non-ionizing radiation. (wikipedia.org)
  • microwaves and radio waves are non-ionizing radiation. (bionity.com)
  • Radio waves, microwaves, infrared radiation, and visible light are all forms of non-ionizing radiation. (purdue.edu)
  • Non-ionizing radiation is a form of radiation with less energy than ionizing radiation. (cdc.gov)
  • If the dose is sufficient, the effect may be seen almost immediately, in the form of radiation poisoning . (bionity.com)
  • We also demonstrate that genetic and pharmacologic inhibition of LDHA protects against radiation-induced myofibroblast differentiation. (nih.gov)
  • Evolution of extreme resistance to ionizing radiation via genetic adaptation of DNA repair" is the name of the study by a 12-member research team from the University of Wisconsin-Madison, the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Louisiana State University and A&M College. (foodsafetynews.com)
  • According to the University of Wisconsin, the scientists involved in the study "coaxed the model bacterium Escherichia coli to dramatically resist ionizing radiation and, in the process, reveal the genetic mechanisms that make the feat possible. (foodsafetynews.com)
  • Other educational concepts include external radiation hazard, internal radiation hazard, and shielding. (merlot.org)
  • Radiation hazard symbol. (statemaster.com)
  • Ionizing radiation hazard symbol (recently introduced). (statemaster.com)
  • Studies have demonstrated that zebrafish are powerful tools for monitoring environmental toxicity, including radiation hazard. (diva-portal.org)
  • The results show that only the hydroxylated derivatives (NMHE and 9-hydroxyellipticinium), which covalently bind to nucleic acids, increase the cellular sensitivity to ionizing radiations, whereas the non-hydroxylated derivative, 2N-methyl-ellipticinium, has no influence on cell radiosensitivity. (biomedsearch.com)
  • In the figure, the neutron collides with a proton of the material which then becomes a fast recoil proton that ionizes in turn. (bionity.com)
  • The types of radiation included alpha, gamma, and neutron radiation. (osti.gov)
  • Why is a neutron ionizing radiation? (physicsforums.com)
  • A familiar example of ionizing radiation is that of x-rays, which can penetrate our body and reveal pictures of our bones. (cdc.gov)
  • X rays and gamma rays are types of electromagnetic radiation. (cdc.gov)
  • Some ionizing radiation is made on demand, such as when doctors take x rays. (cdc.gov)
  • The light from the Sun that reaches the earth is largely composed of non-ionizing radiation, since the ionizing far-ultraviolet rays have been filtered out by the gases in the atmosphere, particularly oxygen. (wikipedia.org)
  • radiation, ionizing X-rays were discovered by Röntgen in Germany in November 1895. (encyclopedia.com)
  • How Radiation rays ionize the air? (physicsforums.com)
  • Treatment of msh-5 hermaphrodites with γ-rays does not induce chiasma formation, and therefore radiation-induced breaks do not bypass the requirement for msh-5 in chiasma formation. (genetics.org)
  • Internal exposure to radon and its decay products is associated with an increased risk of lung cancer , while bone sarcoma risk is associated with radiation dose from ingested or injected radium . (britannica.com)
  • Bone sarcoma has a poor prognosis, especially radiation-induced sarcoma. (rainbow.coop)
  • The risk of ionizing radiation and bone sarcoma was recognized by physicist, A. Beck, in 1922. (rainbow.coop)
  • Ionizing radiation that comes from natural sources is typically at low levels. (cdc.gov)
  • This means that the usual amount of ionizing radiation from natural sources absorbed by our bodies (dose) is small. (cdc.gov)
  • Natural sources of ionizing radiation include radioactive elements that are naturally in our body. (cdc.gov)
  • The results of the testing of radiation detection instruments with radionuclide identification capabilities will depended on the sources used for the tests. (nist.gov)
  • Non-ionizing radiation exists all around us from many sources. (cdc.gov)
  • This is not common and mainly of concern in the workplace for those who work on large sources of non-ionizing radiation devices and instruments. (cdc.gov)
  • Population exposure to ionizing radiation mainly occurs from natural sources or from medical devices. (springer.com)
  • IAEA (1996) IAEA safety series: international basic safety standards for protection against ionizing radiation and for the safety of radiation sources. (springer.com)
  • In our experiments, we eliminated the confounding effects of carbon as a fungal resource, by developing experimental protocols that expose fungal spores and their germinating hyphae to directional sources of ionizing radiation allowing us to measure fungal response to ionizing radiation per se. (nih.gov)
  • Exposure to ionizing radiation comes from a variety of sources. (encyclopedia.com)
  • These meetings are an exceptional opportunity for us to hear from stakeholders and exchange data, share ideas and varying points of view on how to work safely with sources of ionizing radiation," said Assistant Secretary of Labor for OSHA, Edwin G. Foulke, Jr. (osha.gov)
  • To document and communicate James Cook University's (JCU) legal requirements for radiation safety at JCU and provide a framework for possession licensees, Radiation Safety Officers and users of radiation sources to meet their obligations. (edu.au)
  • This Procedure applies to all JCU workers, students, volunteers and visitors using ionising radiation sources for JCU activities. (edu.au)
  • This Procedure excludes non-ionising radiation sources activities. (edu.au)
  • Possession licensees have responsibilities in setting the conditions under which the radiation sources are used. (edu.au)
  • The facts suggest that radiobiologists and governments should abandon the 'linear no threshold' (LNT) paradigm and accept natural and industrial low level sources of ionising radiation in order to promote abundant health. (environmental-expert.com)
  • 12)Practice refers to any human activity that introduces new radiation sources or exposure pathways, or enlarges the scope of worker exposure, or changes the exposure pathways of existing radiation sources, thereby leading to either exposure of people or an increase in the number of people subject to exposure, for the purpose of obtaining a net benefit. (gov.tw)
  • 13)Intervention refers to the measures that are taken to affect exposure pathways between existing radiation sources and the persons exposed, for the purpose of reducing individual or collective exposure. (gov.tw)
  • International Basic Safety Standards for Protection Against Ionizing Radiation and for the Safety of Radiation Sources. (ilo.org)
  • The purpose of the Standards is to establish basic requirements for protection against the risks associated with exposure to ionizing radiation and for the safety of radiation sources that may deliver such exposure. (ilo.org)
  • control of radiation sources, including notification and authorization, and criteria for exemption. (ilo.org)
  • Research on Health Effects of Low-Level Ionizing Radiation Exposure examines recent scientific knowledge about the human effects of exposure to low-dose radiation from medical, occupational, and environmental ionizing-radiation sources. (nap.edu)
  • 10)Medical exposure refers to the exposure of patients and their helpers to ionizing radiation in the course of diagnosis or treatment. (gov.tw)
  • Radon, however, is a natural radioactive gas found in rock formations that can release higher levels of radiation that can pose health risks. (cdc.gov)
  • Thousands of people have lived for generations with 2?20 times the ambient levels of radiation without showing ill health. (environmental-expert.com)
  • Levels of radiation in the study area ranged from 0.02 to 92.90 micro Sieverts per hour. (phys.org)
  • Check standards are used by the NIST Ionizing Radiation Division to monitor the performance of the alanine dosimetry system that is central to its high-dose. (nist.gov)
  • Chronic changes can be a result of long-term low-level exposure or the sequelae of a single episode of high-dose radiation. (springer.com)
  • No association between BDs and ionizing radiation, although described for high-dose exposure, could ever be confirmed for employees, or specific job titles. (biomedsearch.com)
  • Visualization and machine learning techniques were again deployed to hunt and identify a unique set of serum biomarkers to discriminate high dose-volume radiation exposure (n = 32) from low dose-volume (n = 36). (aacrjournals.org)
  • Additionally, treatment with high-dose IFN-β followed by radiation significantly reduced tumor size compared with radiation treatment followed by IFN-β. (aacrjournals.org)
  • 2)Radioactivity refers to the phenomenon of emitting ionizing radiation when a radionuclide spontaneously disintegrates. (gov.tw)
  • Dr Peter Campbell from the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute who led the study, said: "To find out how radiation could cause cancer, we studied the genomes of cancers caused by radiation in comparison to tumours that arose spontaneously. (biologynews.net)
  • It took somewhat longer for the carcinogenic potential of ionizing radiation to be recognized. (britannica.com)
  • 1986. Carcinogenic effects of radiation on the human skin. (cdc.gov)
  • In particular, exposure to ionizing radiation and its carcinogenic/mutagenic potential has received considerable attention. (ifalpa.org)
  • The latter underpins our present understanding of the interaction between electromagnetic radiation and matter, and the subdivision of the electromagnetic spectrum into ionizing and non-ionizing regions. (encyclopedia.com)
  • The students are able to apply the basic knowledge of the interaction of radiation with matter in practical situations. (rug.nl)
  • These are ionizing because of the strong interaction of the charged proton with the electrons in matter. (bionity.com)
  • Interaction between 2N-methyl-9-hydroxyellipticinium and ionizing radiation in CHO cells. (biomedsearch.com)
  • His technical work involves studies on the interaction of non-ionizing radiation and biological systems, ranging from biophysical principles of interaction to dosimetry and exposure assessment. (ishn.com)
  • By the early 1950s, however, follow-up studies of the A-bomb survivors in Japan and other exposed populations were showing that radiation-induced leukaemia and other cancers could arise even at low levels of exposure. (encyclopedia.com)
  • This suggests that immediate radiation-mediated DNA events may not have a prominent role in determining HRS, although this result needs to be confirmed with pure G2-phase cell populations. (aacrjournals.org)
  • At the same time, recent epidemiological studies suggest the existence of radiosensitive human sub-populations, which further complicates assessment of a putative threshold radiation cataract dose. (dur.ac.uk)
  • During the study period, 655,613 enrollees (68.8%) underwent at least one imaging procedure associated with radiation exposure. (nih.gov)

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