Rabbits: The species Oryctolagus cuniculus, in the family Leporidae, order LAGOMORPHA. Rabbits are born in burrows, furless, and with eyes and ears closed. In contrast with HARES, rabbits have 22 chromosome pairs.Cottontail rabbit papillomavirus: The type species of KAPPAPAPILLOMAVIRUS. It is reported to occur naturally in cottontail rabbits in North America.Hemorrhagic Disease Virus, Rabbit: A species in the genus LAGOVIRUS which causes hemorrhagic disease, including hemorrhagic septicemia, in rabbits.Immune Sera: Serum that contains antibodies. It is obtained from an animal that has been immunized either by ANTIGEN injection or infection with microorganisms containing the antigen.Disease Models, Animal: Naturally occurring or experimentally induced animal diseases with pathological processes sufficiently similar to those of human diseases. They are used as study models for human diseases.Cornea: The transparent anterior portion of the fibrous coat of the eye consisting of five layers: stratified squamous CORNEAL EPITHELIUM; BOWMAN MEMBRANE; CORNEAL STROMA; DESCEMET MEMBRANE; and mesenchymal CORNEAL ENDOTHELIUM. It serves as the first refracting medium of the eye. It is structurally continuous with the SCLERA, avascular, receiving its nourishment by permeation through spaces between the lamellae, and is innervated by the ophthalmic division of the TRIGEMINAL NERVE via the ciliary nerves and those of the surrounding conjunctiva which together form plexuses. (Cline et al., Dictionary of Visual Science, 4th ed)Cholesterol, Dietary: Cholesterol present in food, especially in animal products.Reticulocytes: Immature ERYTHROCYTES. In humans, these are ERYTHROID CELLS that have just undergone extrusion of their CELL NUCLEUS. They still contain some organelles that gradually decrease in number as the cells mature. RIBOSOMES are last to disappear. Certain staining techniques cause components of the ribosomes to precipitate into characteristic "reticulum" (not the same as the ENDOPLASMIC RETICULUM), hence the name reticulocytes.Kinetics: The rate dynamics in chemical or physical systems.Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Muscles: Contractile tissue that produces movement in animals.Species Specificity: The restriction of a characteristic behavior, anatomical structure or physical system, such as immune response; metabolic response, or gene or gene variant to the members of one species. It refers to that property which differentiates one species from another but it is also used for phylogenetic levels higher or lower than the species.Molecular Sequence Data: Descriptions of specific amino acid, carbohydrate, or nucleotide sequences which have appeared in the published literature and/or are deposited in and maintained by databanks such as GENBANK, European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), National Biomedical Research Foundation (NBRF), or other sequence repositories.Amino Acid Sequence: The order of amino acids as they occur in a polypeptide chain. This is referred to as the primary structure of proteins. It is of fundamental importance in determining PROTEIN CONFORMATION.Molecular Weight: The sum of the weight of all the atoms in a molecule.Antibodies: Immunoglobulin molecules having a specific amino acid sequence by virtue of which they interact only with the ANTIGEN (or a very similar shape) that induced their synthesis in cells of the lymphoid series (especially PLASMA CELLS).Cross Reactions: Serological reactions in which an antiserum against one antigen reacts with a non-identical but closely related antigen.Electrophoresis, Polyacrylamide Gel: Electrophoresis in which a polyacrylamide gel is used as the diffusion medium.Muscle Contraction: A process leading to shortening and/or development of tension in muscle tissue. Muscle contraction occurs by a sliding filament mechanism whereby actin filaments slide inward among the myosin filaments.Calcium: A basic element found in nearly all organized tissues. It is a member of the alkaline earth family of metals with the atomic symbol Ca, atomic number 20, and atomic weight 40. Calcium is the most abundant mineral in the body and combines with phosphorus to form calcium phosphate in the bones and teeth. It is essential for the normal functioning of nerves and muscles and plays a role in blood coagulation (as factor IV) and in many enzymatic processes.Liver: A large lobed glandular organ in the abdomen of vertebrates that is responsible for detoxification, metabolism, synthesis and storage of various substances.Aqueous Humor: The clear, watery fluid which fills the anterior and posterior chambers of the eye. It has a refractive index lower than the crystalline lens, which it surrounds, and is involved in the metabolism of the cornea and the crystalline lens. (Cline et al., Dictionary of Visual Science, 4th ed, p319)Immunodiffusion: Technique involving the diffusion of antigen or antibody through a semisolid medium, usually agar or agarose gel, with the result being a precipitin reaction.Hypercholesterolemia: A condition with abnormally high levels of CHOLESTEROL in the blood. It is defined as a cholesterol value exceeding the 95th percentile for the population.Dose-Response Relationship, Drug: The relationship between the dose of an administered drug and the response of the organism to the drug.Microscopy, Electron: Microscopy using an electron beam, instead of light, to visualize the sample, thereby allowing much greater magnification. The interactions of ELECTRONS with specimens are used to provide information about the fine structure of that specimen. In TRANSMISSION ELECTRON MICROSCOPY the reactions of the electrons that are transmitted through the specimen are imaged. In SCANNING ELECTRON MICROSCOPY an electron beam falls at a non-normal angle on the specimen and the image is derived from the reactions occurring above the plane of the specimen.Injections: Introduction of substances into the body using a needle and syringe.Vitreous Body: The transparent, semigelatinous substance that fills the cavity behind the CRYSTALLINE LENS of the EYE and in front of the RETINA. It is contained in a thin hyaloid membrane and forms about four fifths of the optic globe.Ileum: The distal and narrowest portion of the SMALL INTESTINE, between the JEJUNUM and the ILEOCECAL VALVE of the LARGE INTESTINE.Muscle, Smooth, Vascular: The nonstriated involuntary muscle tissue of blood vessels.Diet, Atherogenic: A diet that contributes to the development and acceleration of ATHEROGENESIS.Antibody Specificity: The property of antibodies which enables them to react with some ANTIGENIC DETERMINANTS and not with others. Specificity is dependent on chemical composition, physical forces, and molecular structure at the binding site.Myocardium: The muscle tissue of the HEART. It is composed of striated, involuntary muscle cells (MYOCYTES, CARDIAC) connected to form the contractile pump to generate blood flow.Ciliary Body: A ring of tissue extending from the scleral spur to the ora serrata of the RETINA. It consists of the uveal portion and the epithelial portion. The ciliary muscle is in the uveal portion and the ciliary processes are in the epithelial portion.Aorta, Thoracic: The portion of the descending aorta proceeding from the arch of the aorta and extending to the DIAPHRAGM, eventually connecting to the ABDOMINAL AORTA.Cells, Cultured: Cells propagated in vitro in special media conducive to their growth. Cultured cells are used to study developmental, morphologic, metabolic, physiologic, and genetic processes, among others.Immunoglobulin G: The major immunoglobulin isotype class in normal human serum. There are several isotype subclasses of IgG, for example, IgG1, IgG2A, and IgG2B.Iris: The most anterior portion of the uveal layer, separating the anterior chamber from the posterior. It consists of two layers - the stroma and the pigmented epithelium. Color of the iris depends on the amount of melanin in the stroma on reflection from the pigmented epithelium.Antigen-Antibody Reactions: The processes triggered by interactions of ANTIBODIES with their ANTIGENS.Pseudopregnancy: An acyclic state that resembles PREGNANCY in that there is no ovarian cycle, ESTROUS CYCLE, or MENSTRUAL CYCLE. Unlike pregnancy, there is no EMBRYO IMPLANTATION. Pseudopregnancy can be experimentally induced to form DECIDUOMA in the UTERUS.Base Sequence: The sequence of PURINES and PYRIMIDINES in nucleic acids and polynucleotides. It is also called nucleotide sequence.RNA, Messenger: RNA sequences that serve as templates for protein synthesis. Bacterial mRNAs are generally primary transcripts in that they do not require post-transcriptional processing. Eukaryotic mRNA is synthesized in the nucleus and must be exported to the cytoplasm for translation. Most eukaryotic mRNAs have a sequence of polyadenylic acid at the 3' end, referred to as the poly(A) tail. The function of this tail is not known for certain, but it may play a role in the export of mature mRNA from the nucleus as well as in helping stabilize some mRNA molecules by retarding their degradation in the cytoplasm.Models, Animal: Non-human animals, selected because of specific characteristics, for use in experimental research, teaching, or testing.Guinea Pigs: A common name used for the genus Cavia. The most common species is Cavia porcellus which is the domesticated guinea pig used for pets and biomedical research.Ear: The hearing and equilibrium system of the body. It consists of three parts: the EXTERNAL EAR, the MIDDLE EAR, and the INNER EAR. Sound waves are transmitted through this organ where vibration is transduced to nerve signals that pass through the ACOUSTIC NERVE to the CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM. The inner ear also contains the vestibular organ that maintains equilibrium by transducing signals to the VESTIBULAR NERVE.Kidney: Body organ that filters blood for the secretion of URINE and that regulates ion concentrations.Norepinephrine: Precursor of epinephrine that is secreted by the adrenal medulla and is a widespread central and autonomic neurotransmitter. Norepinephrine is the principal transmitter of most postganglionic sympathetic fibers and of the diffuse projection system in the brain arising from the locus ceruleus. It is also found in plants and is used pharmacologically as a sympathomimetic.Immunoelectrophoresis: A technique that combines protein electrophoresis and double immunodiffusion. In this procedure proteins are first separated by gel electrophoresis (usually agarose), then made visible by immunodiffusion of specific antibodies. A distinct elliptical precipitin arc results for each protein detectable by the antisera.Administration, Topical: The application of drug preparations to the surfaces of the body, especially the skin (ADMINISTRATION, CUTANEOUS) or mucous membranes. This method of treatment is used to avoid systemic side effects when high doses are required at a localized area or as an alternative systemic administration route, to avoid hepatic processing for example.Fluorescent Antibody Technique: Test for tissue antigen using either a direct method, by conjugation of antibody with fluorescent dye (FLUORESCENT ANTIBODY TECHNIQUE, DIRECT) or an indirect method, by formation of antigen-antibody complex which is then labeled with fluorescein-conjugated anti-immunoglobulin antibody (FLUORESCENT ANTIBODY TECHNIQUE, INDIRECT). The tissue is then examined by fluorescence microscopy.Cholesterol: The principal sterol of all higher animals, distributed in body tissues, especially the brain and spinal cord, and in animal fats and oils.Conjunctiva: The mucous membrane that covers the posterior surface of the eyelids and the anterior pericorneal surface of the eyeball.Immunization: Deliberate stimulation of the host's immune response. ACTIVE IMMUNIZATION involves administration of ANTIGENS or IMMUNOLOGIC ADJUVANTS. PASSIVE IMMUNIZATION involves administration of IMMUNE SERA or LYMPHOCYTES or their extracts (e.g., transfer factor, immune RNA) or transplantation of immunocompetent cell producing tissue (thymus or bone marrow).Cloning, Molecular: The insertion of recombinant DNA molecules from prokaryotic and/or eukaryotic sources into a replicating vehicle, such as a plasmid or virus vector, and the introduction of the resultant hybrid molecules into recipient cells without altering the viability of those cells.Kidney Cortex: The outer zone of the KIDNEY, beneath the capsule, consisting of KIDNEY GLOMERULUS; KIDNEY TUBULES, DISTAL; and KIDNEY TUBULES, PROXIMAL.Cattle: Domesticated bovine animals of the genus Bos, usually kept on a farm or ranch and used for the production of meat or dairy products or for heavy labor.Arteries: The vessels carrying blood away from the heart.Tissue Distribution: Accumulation of a drug or chemical substance in various organs (including those not relevant to its pharmacologic or therapeutic action). This distribution depends on the blood flow or perfusion rate of the organ, the ability of the drug to penetrate organ membranes, tissue specificity, protein binding. The distribution is usually expressed as tissue to plasma ratios.Epitopes: Sites on an antigen that interact with specific antibodies.Sodium: A member of the alkali group of metals. It has the atomic symbol Na, atomic number 11, and atomic weight 23.Lung: Either of the pair of organs occupying the cavity of the thorax that effect the aeration of the blood.Injections, Intravenous: Injections made into a vein for therapeutic or experimental purposes.Epithelium: One or more layers of EPITHELIAL CELLS, supported by the basal lamina, which covers the inner or outer surfaces of the body.Acetylcholine: A neurotransmitter found at neuromuscular junctions, autonomic ganglia, parasympathetic effector junctions, a subset of sympathetic effector junctions, and at many sites in the central nervous system.Chromatography, Gel: Chromatography on non-ionic gels without regard to the mechanism of solute discrimination.Hydrogen-Ion Concentration: The normality of a solution with respect to HYDROGEN ions; H+. It is related to acidity measurements in most cases by pH = log 1/2[1/(H+)], where (H+) is the hydrogen ion concentration in gram equivalents per liter of solution. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)Muscle, Smooth: Unstriated and unstriped muscle, one of the muscles of the internal organs, blood vessels, hair follicles, etc. Contractile elements are elongated, usually spindle-shaped cells with centrally located nuclei. Smooth muscle fibers are bound together into sheets or bundles by reticular fibers and frequently elastic nets are also abundant. (From Stedman, 25th ed)Antigen-Antibody Complex: The complex formed by the binding of antigen and antibody molecules. The deposition of large antigen-antibody complexes leading to tissue damage causes IMMUNE COMPLEX DISEASES.gamma-Globulins: Serum globulins that migrate to the gamma region (most positively charged) upon ELECTROPHORESIS. At one time, gamma-globulins came to be used as a synonym for immunoglobulins since most immunoglobulins are gamma globulins and conversely most gamma globulins are immunoglobulins. But since some immunoglobulins exhibit an alpha or beta electrophoretic mobility, that usage is in decline.Heart: The hollow, muscular organ that maintains the circulation of the blood.Potassium: An element in the alkali group of metals with an atomic symbol K, atomic number 19, and atomic weight 39.10. It is the chief cation in the intracellular fluid of muscle and other cells. Potassium ion is a strong electrolyte that plays a significant role in the regulation of fluid volume and maintenance of the WATER-ELECTROLYTE BALANCE.Sinoatrial Node: The small mass of modified cardiac muscle fibers located at the junction of the superior vena cava (VENA CAVA, SUPERIOR) and right atrium. Contraction impulses probably start in this node, spread over the atrium (HEART ATRIUM) and are then transmitted by the atrioventricular bundle (BUNDLE OF HIS) to the ventricle (HEART VENTRICLE).Electric Stimulation: Use of electric potential or currents to elicit biological responses.Antibodies, Monoclonal: Antibodies produced by a single clone of cells.Wound Healing: Restoration of integrity to traumatized tissue.Antigens: Substances that are recognized by the immune system and induce an immune reaction.Eye: The organ of sight constituting a pair of globular organs made up of a three-layered roughly spherical structure specialized for receiving and responding to light.Fibroma Virus, Rabbit: A species of LEPORIPOXVIRUS causing subcutaneous localized swellings in rabbits, usually on the feet.Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay: An immunoassay utilizing an antibody labeled with an enzyme marker such as horseradish peroxidase. While either the enzyme or the antibody is bound to an immunosorbent substrate, they both retain their biologic activity; the change in enzyme activity as a result of the enzyme-antibody-antigen reaction is proportional to the concentration of the antigen and can be measured spectrophotometrically or with the naked eye. Many variations of the method have been developed.Myosins: A diverse superfamily of proteins that function as translocating proteins. They share the common characteristics of being able to bind ACTINS and hydrolyze MgATP. Myosins generally consist of heavy chains which are involved in locomotion, and light chains which are involved in regulation. Within the structure of myosin heavy chain are three domains: the head, the neck and the tail. The head region of the heavy chain contains the actin binding domain and MgATPase domain which provides energy for locomotion. The neck region is involved in binding the light-chains. The tail region provides the anchoring point that maintains the position of the heavy chain. The superfamily of myosins is organized into structural classes based upon the type and arrangement of the subunits they contain.Psoas Muscles: A powerful flexor of the thigh at the hip joint (psoas major) and a weak flexor of the trunk and lumbar spinal column (psoas minor). Psoas is derived from the Greek "psoa", the plural meaning "muscles of the loin". It is a common site of infection manifesting as abscess (PSOAS ABSCESS). The psoas muscles and their fibers are also used frequently in experiments in muscle physiology.Microscopy, Electron, Scanning: Microscopy in which the object is examined directly by an electron beam scanning the specimen point-by-point. The image is constructed by detecting the products of specimen interactions that are projected above the plane of the sample, such as backscattered electrons. Although SCANNING TRANSMISSION ELECTRON MICROSCOPY also scans the specimen point by point with the electron beam, the image is constructed by detecting the electrons, or their interaction products that are transmitted through the sample plane, so that is a form of TRANSMISSION ELECTRON MICROSCOPY.Treponema pallidum: The causative agent of venereal and non-venereal syphilis as well as yaws.Microvilli: Minute projections of cell membranes which greatly increase the surface area of the cell.Indomethacin: A non-steroidal anti-inflammatory agent (NSAID) that inhibits the enzyme cyclooxygenase necessary for the formation of prostaglandins and other autacoids. It also inhibits the motility of polymorphonuclear leukocytes.Immunohistochemistry: Histochemical localization of immunoreactive substances using labeled antibodies as reagents.Action Potentials: Abrupt changes in the membrane potential that sweep along the CELL MEMBRANE of excitable cells in response to excitation stimuli.Muscle Relaxation: That phase of a muscle twitch during which a muscle returns to a resting position.Ophthalmic Solutions: Sterile solutions that are intended for instillation into the eye. It does not include solutions for cleaning eyeglasses or CONTACT LENS SOLUTIONS.Radioimmunoassay: Classic quantitative assay for detection of antigen-antibody reactions using a radioactively labeled substance (radioligand) either directly or indirectly to measure the binding of the unlabeled substance to a specific antibody or other receptor system. Non-immunogenic substances (e.g., haptens) can be measured if coupled to larger carrier proteins (e.g., bovine gamma-globulin or human serum albumin) capable of inducing antibody formation.Animals, Newborn: Refers to animals in the period of time just after birth.Protein Biosynthesis: The biosynthesis of PEPTIDES and PROTEINS on RIBOSOMES, directed by MESSENGER RNA, via TRANSFER RNA that is charged with standard proteinogenic AMINO ACIDS.Amino Acids: Organic compounds that generally contain an amino (-NH2) and a carboxyl (-COOH) group. Twenty alpha-amino acids are the subunits which are polymerized to form proteins.Prostaglandins E: (11 alpha,13E,15S)-11,15-Dihydroxy-9-oxoprost-13-en-1-oic acid (PGE(1)); (5Z,11 alpha,13E,15S)-11,15-dihydroxy-9-oxoprosta-5,13-dien-1-oic acid (PGE(2)); and (5Z,11 alpha,13E,15S,17Z)-11,15-dihydroxy-9-oxoprosta-5,13,17-trien-1-oic acid (PGE(3)). Three of the six naturally occurring prostaglandins. They are considered primary in that no one is derived from another in living organisms. Originally isolated from sheep seminal fluid and vesicles, they are found in many organs and tissues and play a major role in mediating various physiological activities.Erythrocytes: Red blood cells. Mature erythrocytes are non-nucleated, biconcave disks containing HEMOGLOBIN whose function is to transport OXYGEN.Peptide Fragments: Partial proteins formed by partial hydrolysis of complete proteins or generated through PROTEIN ENGINEERING techniques.Random Allocation: A process involving chance used in therapeutic trials or other research endeavor for allocating experimental subjects, human or animal, between treatment and control groups, or among treatment groups. It may also apply to experiments on inanimate objects.Endothelium: A layer of epithelium that lines the heart, blood vessels (ENDOTHELIUM, VASCULAR), lymph vessels (ENDOTHELIUM, LYMPHATIC), and the serous cavities of the body.Keratitis, Dendritic: A form of herpetic keratitis characterized by the formation of small vesicles which break down and coalesce to form recurring dendritic ulcers, characteristically irregular, linear, branching, and ending in knoblike extremities. (Dictionary of Visual Science, 3d ed)Serum Albumin, Bovine: Serum albumin from cows, commonly used in in vitro biological studies. (From Stedman, 25th ed)Prostaglandins: A group of compounds derived from unsaturated 20-carbon fatty acids, primarily arachidonic acid, via the cyclooxygenase pathway. They are extremely potent mediators of a diverse group of physiological processes.Adenosine Triphosphate: An adenine nucleotide containing three phosphate groups esterified to the sugar moiety. In addition to its crucial roles in metabolism adenosine triphosphate is a neurotransmitter.Blotting, Western: Identification of proteins or peptides that have been electrophoretically separated by blot transferring from the electrophoresis gel to strips of nitrocellulose paper, followed by labeling with antibody probes.Immunoglobulin Allotypes: Allelic variants of the immunoglobulin light chains (IMMUNOGLOBULIN LIGHT CHAINS) or heavy chains (IMMUNOGLOBULIN HEAVY CHAINS) encoded by ALLELES of IMMUNOGLOBULIN GENES.Retina: The ten-layered nervous tissue membrane of the eye. It is continuous with the OPTIC NERVE and receives images of external objects and transmits visual impulses to the brain. Its outer surface is in contact with the CHOROID and the inner surface with the VITREOUS BODY. The outer-most layer is pigmented, whereas the inner nine layers are transparent.Membrane Potentials: The voltage differences across a membrane. For cellular membranes they are computed by subtracting the voltage measured outside the membrane from the voltage measured inside the membrane. They result from differences of inside versus outside concentration of potassium, sodium, chloride, and other ions across cells' or ORGANELLES membranes. For excitable cells, the resting membrane potentials range between -30 and -100 millivolts. Physical, chemical, or electrical stimuli can make a membrane potential more negative (hyperpolarization), or less negative (depolarization).Recombinant Proteins: Proteins prepared by recombinant DNA technology.Histocytochemistry: Study of intracellular distribution of chemicals, reaction sites, enzymes, etc., by means of staining reactions, radioactive isotope uptake, selective metal distribution in electron microscopy, or other methods.Antigens, Bacterial: Substances elaborated by bacteria that have antigenic activity.Endothelium, Vascular: Single pavement layer of cells which line the luminal surface of the entire vascular system and regulate the transport of macromolecules and blood components.Vasoconstriction: The physiological narrowing of BLOOD VESSELS by contraction of the VASCULAR SMOOTH MUSCLE.Blood Pressure: PRESSURE of the BLOOD on the ARTERIES and other BLOOD VESSELS.Biological Transport: The movement of materials (including biochemical substances and drugs) through a biological system at the cellular level. The transport can be across cell membranes and epithelial layers. It also can occur within intracellular compartments and extracellular compartments.Nitric Oxide: A free radical gas produced endogenously by a variety of mammalian cells, synthesized from ARGININE by NITRIC OXIDE SYNTHASE. Nitric oxide is one of the ENDOTHELIUM-DEPENDENT RELAXING FACTORS released by the vascular endothelium and mediates VASODILATION. It also inhibits platelet aggregation, induces disaggregation of aggregated platelets, and inhibits platelet adhesion to the vascular endothelium. Nitric oxide activates cytosolic GUANYLATE CYCLASE and thus elevates intracellular levels of CYCLIC GMP.Blood Proteins: Proteins that are present in blood serum, including SERUM ALBUMIN; BLOOD COAGULATION FACTORS; and many other types of proteins.Intraocular Pressure: The pressure of the fluids in the eye.Lacrimal Apparatus: The tear-forming and tear-conducting system which includes the lacrimal glands, eyelid margins, conjunctival sac, and the tear drainage system.Chromatography, High Pressure Liquid: Liquid chromatographic techniques which feature high inlet pressures, high sensitivity, and high speed.Endothelium, Corneal: Single layer of large flattened cells covering the surface of the cornea.Blood Platelets: Non-nucleated disk-shaped cells formed in the megakaryocyte and found in the blood of all mammals. They are mainly involved in blood coagulation.Chromatography: Techniques used to separate mixtures of substances based on differences in the relative affinities of the substances for mobile and stationary phases. A mobile phase (fluid or gas) passes through a column containing a stationary phase of porous solid or liquid coated on a solid support. Usage is both analytical for small amounts and preparative for bulk amounts.Cell Membrane: The lipid- and protein-containing, selectively permeable membrane that surrounds the cytoplasm in prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells.Pregnancy: The status during which female mammals carry their developing young (EMBRYOS or FETUSES) in utero before birth, beginning from FERTILIZATION to BIRTH.Endotoxins: Toxins closely associated with the living cytoplasm or cell wall of certain microorganisms, which do not readily diffuse into the culture medium, but are released upon lysis of the cells.Leukocytes: White blood cells. These include granular leukocytes (BASOPHILS; EOSINOPHILS; and NEUTROPHILS) as well as non-granular leukocytes (LYMPHOCYTES and MONOCYTES).Cell Line: Established cell cultures that have the potential to propagate indefinitely.Neutrophils: Granular leukocytes having a nucleus with three to five lobes connected by slender threads of chromatin, and cytoplasm containing fine inconspicuous granules and stainable by neutral dyes.Cartilage, Articular: A protective layer of firm, flexible cartilage over the articulating ends of bones. It provides a smooth surface for joint movement, protecting the ends of long bones from wear at points of contact.Chromatography, Affinity: A chromatographic technique that utilizes the ability of biological molecules to bind to certain ligands specifically and reversibly. It is used in protein biochemistry. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)DNA: A deoxyribonucleotide polymer that is the primary genetic material of all cells. Eukaryotic and prokaryotic organisms normally contain DNA in a double-stranded state, yet several important biological processes transiently involve single-stranded regions. DNA, which consists of a polysugar-phosphate backbone possessing projections of purines (adenine and guanine) and pyrimidines (thymine and cytosine), forms a double helix that is held together by hydrogen bonds between these purines and pyrimidines (adenine to thymine and guanine to cytosine).Enzyme Inhibitors: Compounds or agents that combine with an enzyme in such a manner as to prevent the normal substrate-enzyme combination and the catalytic reaction.Dogs: The domestic dog, Canis familiaris, comprising about 400 breeds, of the carnivore family CANIDAE. They are worldwide in distribution and live in association with people. (Walker's Mammals of the World, 5th ed, p1065)Culture Techniques: Methods of maintaining or growing biological materials in controlled laboratory conditions. These include the cultures of CELLS; TISSUES; organs; or embryo in vitro. Both animal and plant tissues may be cultured by a variety of methods. Cultures may derive from normal or abnormal tissues, and consist of a single cell type or mixed cell types.Antibodies, Anti-Idiotypic: Antibodies which react with the individual structural determinants (idiotopes) on the variable region of other antibodies.

Fitzgerald factor (high molecular weight kininogen) clotting activity in human plasma in health and disease in various animal plasmas. (1/50569)

Fitzgerald factor (high molecular weight kininogen) is an agent in normal human plasma that corrects the impaired in vitro surface-mediated plasma reactions of blood coagulation, fibrinolysis, and kinin generation observed in Fitzgerald trait plasma. To assess the possible pathophysiologic role of Fitzgerald factor, its titer was measured by a functional clot-promoting assay. Mean +/- SD in 42 normal adults was 0.99+/-0.25 units/ml, one unit being the activity in 1 ml of normal pooled plasma. No difference in titer was noted between normal men and women, during pregnancy, or after physical exercise. Fitzgerald factor activity was significantly reduced in the plasmas of eight patients with advanced hepatic cirrhosis (0.40+/-0.09 units/ml) and of ten patients with disseminated intravascular coagulation (0.60+/-0.30 units/ml), but was normal in plasmas of patients with other congenital clotting factor deficiencies, nephrotic syndrome, rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, or sarcoidosis, or under treatment with warfarin. The plasmas of 21 mammalian species tested appeared to contain Fitzgerald factor activity, but those of two avian, two repitilian, and one amphibian species did not correct the coagulant defect in Fitzgerald trait plasmas.  (+info)

Evidence suggesting the regulation of a coagulation factor levels in rabbits by a transferable plasma agent. (2/50569)

New Zealand white rabbits were given 30 ml of goat serum intravenously. This procedure resulted in an immediate decrease in platelet count, fibrinogen, and levels of coagulation factors II, V, VII, and X, due to consumption coagulopathy. These factors returned toward baseline levels approximately 12 hr after the injection. Plasma from rabbits who had received goat serum 48 hr previously (donor rabbits) was injected into recipient rabbits. This procedure resulted in a slight rise in the level of coagulation factor II (range, 20%-30%) and a significant rise in factors V (35%-75%), VII (35%-235%), and X (35%-75%) in the recipients. When plasma from control donor rabbits who had not received goat serum was injected into recipients, there was no change in these coagulation factors. It is postulated that the reduction in coagulation factor levels in donor rabbits induces a "coagulopoietin" for each factor or one "coagulopoietin" for all factors which stimulates increased synthesis and/or release of these factors in recipient rabbits.  (+info)

The indirect hemagglutination test for the detection of antibodies in cattle naturally infected mycoplasmas. (3/50569)

Stable mycoplasma antigens for the indirect hemagglutination test (IHA) were prepared employing glutaraldehyde treated sheep erythrocytes sensitized with Mycoplasma agalactiae subsp. bovis and Mycoplasma bovigenitalium antigens. Employing these antigens mycoplasma antibodies were detected in sera from cattle which had mastitic symptoms due to natural infection with either M. agalactiae subsp. bovis or M. bovigenitalium. A total of 200 cows from four herds were examined at varying intervals for the presence of M. agalactiae subsp. bovis and for the detection of antibody using growth inhibition and IHA tests. Mycoplasmas were isolated from 37 animals. Growth inhibiting antibody was detected from 56 of the 200 animals. In the IHA tests, antibody titer greater than or equal to 1:80 were detected in 148 animals, 76 of these having antibody titers greater than or equal to 1:160, while sera of 116 normal control animals had no growth inhibiting antibody and none had IHA antibody titers greater than 1:40. M. bovigenitalium was isolated from the milk of three of 26 animals in a fifth herd during an outbreak of mastitis. Growth inhibiting antibodies were demonstrated in the sera of ten of the 26 animals. However, the IHA test detected antibody titers of greater than or equal to 1:160 in 13 animals and of 1:80 in one of the 26 animals. To determine the specificity of the IHA tests, M. agalactiae subsp. bovis and M. bovigenitalium antigens were reacted with rabbit hyperimmune typing sera produced against 12 species of bovine mycoplasmatales. Homologous antisera showed IHA antibody titers of 1:1280 and 1:2560 against M. agalactiae subsp. bovis and M. bovigenitalium respectively, whereas heterologous antisera showed IHA antibody titers of less than or equal to 1:20. Also eight type-specific bovine antisera were reacted with M agalactiae subsp. bovis and M. bovigenitalium antigens in homologous and heterologous tests. Homoogous reactions showed IHA antibody titers greater than or equal to 1:320, whereas heterologous reactions showed IHA titers of less than or equal to 1:20. This IHA test promises to be useful for the detection of bovine mycoplasma antibodies in sera from cattle infected with M. agalactiae subsp. bovis or M. bovigenitalium. Thes test is sensitive, reproducible and specific and the technique is relatively simple and rapid. The antigens were stable for at least seven months.  (+info)

The effect of route of immunization on the lapine immune response to killed Pasteurella haemolytica and the influence of aerosol challenge with the live organism. (4/50569)

Appearance of anti-Pasteurella haemolytica antibody in the serum and broncho-alveolar washings of rabbits is independent of the route of immunization and is similar in both locations. The most influential factor in development of a humoral response is exposure to live P. haemolytica and prior exposure to the killed bacterium has no significant effect upon titre determined following aerosol challenge with live organisms.  (+info)

New perspectives on biliary atresia. (5/50569)

An investigation into the aetiology, diagnosis, and treatment of biliary atresia was carried out because the prognosis remains so poor.In an electron microscopical study no viral particles or viral inclusion bodies were seen, nor were any specific ultrastructural features observed. An animal experiment suggested that obstruction within the biliary tract of newborn rabbits could be produced by maternal intravenous injection of the bile acid lithocholic acid.A simple and atraumatic method of diagnosis was developed using(99) (m)Tc-labelled compounds which are excreted into bile. Two compounds, (99m)Tc-pyridoxylidene glutamate ((99m)Tc-PG) and (99m)Tc-dihydrothioctic acid ((99m)Tc-DHT) were first assessed in normal piglets and piglets with complete biliary obstruction. Intestinal imaging correlated with biliary tract patency, and the same correlation was found in jaundiced human adults, in whom the (99m)Tc-PG scan correctly determined biliary patency in 21 out of 24 cases. The (99m)Tc-PG scan compared well with liver biopsy and (131)I-Rose Bengal in the diagnosis of 11 infants with prolonged jaundice.A model of extrahepatic biliary atresia was developed in the newborn piglet so that different methods of bile drainage could be assessed. Priorities in biliary atresia lie in a better understanding of the aetiology and early diagnosis rather than in devising new bile drainage procedures.  (+info)

Reduction in baroreflex cardiovascular responses due to venous infusion in the rabbit. (6/50569)

We studied reflex bradycardia and depression of mean arterial blood pressure (MAP) during left aortic nerve (LAN) stimulation before and after volume infusion in the anesthetized rabbit. Step increases in mean right atrial pressure (MRAP) to 10 mm Hg did not result in a significant change in heart rate or MAP. After volume loading, responses to LAN stimulation were not as great and the degree of attenuation was propoetional to the level of increased MRAP. A change in responsiveness was observed after elevation of MRAP by only 1 mm Hg, corresponding to less than a 10% increase in average calculated blood volume. after an increase in MRAP of 10 mm Hg, peak responses were attenuated by 44% (heart rate) and 52% (MAP), and the initial slopes (rate of change) were reduced by 46% (heart rate) and 66% (MAP). Comparison of the responses after infusion with blood and dextran solutions indicated that hemodilution was an unlikely explanation for the attenuation of the reflex responses. Total arterial baroreceptor denervation (ABD) abolished the volume-related attenuation was still present following bilateral aortic nerve section or vagotomy. It thus appears that the carotid sinus responds to changes inblood volume and influences the reflex cardiovascular responses to afferent stimulation of the LAN. On the other hand, cardiopulmonary receptors subserved by vagal afferents do not appear to be involved.  (+info)

Stimulation of renin release from rabbit renal cortex by arachidonic acid and prostaglandin endoperoxides. (7/50569)

The mechanism by which renal prostaglandins stimulate renin secretion in vivo is unknown. In this in vitro study we measured the effects of activation of the prostaglandin (PG) system on renin release from slices of rabbit renal cortex. The PG precursor arachidonic acid (C20:4), a natural PG endoperoxide (PGG2), two stable synthetic PG endoperoxide analogues (EPA I and II), PGE2, PGF2alpha, and two different PG synthesis inhibitors [indomethacin and 5,8,11,14-eicosatetraynoic acid (ETA)] were used to evaluate the possibility of a direct action of the cortical PG system on renin secretion. Renin release increased significantly with time after addition of C20:4, PGG2, EPA I, and EPA II to the incubation medium. Stimulation of renin release was se-related for C20:4 in concentrations of 0.6 to 4.5 X 10(-6) M, for EPA I in concentrations of 0.7 to 2.8 X 10(-6) M, and for EPA II in concentrations of 1.4 to 14.0 X 10(-6) M. Indomethacin (10(-4) M) and ETA (10(-4) M) significantly decreased basal renin release as well as the renin release stimulated by C20:4 and EPA I. PGE2(10(-12) to 10(-6) M) had no effect on renin release, whereas PGF2alpha (10(-12) to 10(-6) M) decreased renin release in a dose-dependent manner. These data raise the possibility of a direct action of the renal cortical PG system on renin secretion. The results further indicate that stimulation of renin release by C20:4 may depend more specifically on the action of PG endoperoxides than on the primary prostaglandins.  (+info)

Acute renal failure caused by nephrotoxins. (8/50569)

Renal micropuncture studies have greatly changed our views on the pathophysiology of acute renal failure caused by nephrotoxins. Formerly, this type of renal insufficiency was attributed to a direct effect of the nephrotoxins on tubule epithelial permeability. According to that theory, glomerular filtration was not greatly diminished, the filtrate formed being absorbed almost quantitatively and nonselectively across damaged tubule epithelium. Studies in a wide variety of rat models have now shown glomerular filtration to be reduced to a level which will inevitably cause renal failure in and of itself. Passive backflow of filtrate across tubular epithelium is either of minor degree or nonexistent even in models where frank tubular necrosis has occurred. This failure of filtration cannot be attributed to tubular obstruction since proximal tubule pressure is distinctly subnormal in most models studied. Instead, filtration failure appears best attributed to intrarenal hemodynamic alterations. While certain facts tend to incriminate the renin-angiotensin system as the cause of the hemodynamic aberrations, others argue to the contrary. The issue is underactive investigation.  (+info)

  • Variations between individual rabbits, as well as between breeds, must be considered when interpreting behaviors. (ohio4h.org)
  • The more you cater to their natural tendencies (sniffing, nudging, chewing, digging) the more fulfilled your rabbit will be and she'll be less willing to chew on your furniture. (mercurynews.com)
  • But for some reason, these rabbits survived to do what their species does best: Reproduce, again and again and again. (opb.org)
  • The brush rabbit does not dig its own burrow or den, but uses the burrow of other species, brush piles, or forms. (ovlc.org)
  • That's when Chenevert started treating the rabbits near her home like pets. (opb.org)
  • She said some of her neighbors are treating the rabbits as pets, and pets need to be kept on leashes when they're outdoors. (opb.org)
  • They are part of the look of Southwold and I know that my grandchildren when they come here think the rabbits are very cute. (lowestoftjournal.co.uk)
  • Since winning the Good Design Award and IDEA Bronze in 2001, the Rabbit Corkscrew has brought oenophiles closer to that flavorful first sip. (fab.com)
  • In 2001 animal lovers opposing plans to cull rabbits in Southwold handed in a 1,225 signature petition to the chief executive of Waveney District Council urging it to reconsider its plans for the creatures. (lowestoftjournal.co.uk)
  • One of the first things a visitor will notice is that the Cannon Beach rabbits aren't afraid of humans. (opb.org)
  • The rabbits are apparently protecting two baby bunnies. (neatorama.com)
  • Bunnies have long been a favorite subject of writers - think Beatrix Potter and Lewis Carroll - and don't forget American folklore's Br'er Rabbit of the Uncle Remus stories. (latimes.com)
  • To create the small Arizona town battling thousands of humongous carnivorous killer bunnies, domestic rabbits were filmed against miniature models, but for the attack scenes, the filmmaker used actors in rabbit costumes. (latimes.com)
  • The latter group has larger ears and hind legs than their rabbit kin, and give birth to children called leverets rather than bunnies. (bellaonline.com)
  • through education, we seek to reduce the number of unwanted rabbits -- and to improve bunnies' lives -- by helping people better understand these often misunderstood companion animals. (idealist.org)
  • Your generousity allowed us to take in many rabbits and provide medical care for those bunnies who came to us in need. (constantcontact.com)
  • Place the rabbits you select in separate cages. (angelfire.com)
  • In these unspeakably brutal systems, rabbits are packed into wire cages with barely enough space to stretch, turn around or lie down, let alone hop, run or socialise. (thepetitionsite.com)
  • However, I don't believe one can solve the White Rabbit problem by defining it away. (mail-archive.com)
  • Play like Alice at this Wonderland-themed tea room which features kaleidoscopic floor tiles, a mural of the White Rabbit and gigantic tree in the center of the room. (timeout.com)
  • Jimmy Stewart earned a lead actor Oscar nomination for this comedy based on Mary Chase's Broadway play as Elwood P. Dowd, a sweet, slightly tipsy middle-aged man whose best friend is Harvey, a 6-foot-31/2 -inch white rabbit who nobody else can see. (latimes.com)
  • The White Rabbit is a pivotal character in Carroll's classic book, which has been adapted many times for film and TV, including Disney's 1951 animated film and Tim Burton's more recent extravaganza. (latimes.com)
  • Dressed in a waistcoat, it is the White Rabbit who launches Alice on a series of wondrous adventures with the Mad Hatter, the Red Queen and others as she follows the scurrying (and apparently, very late) creature down a rabbit hole. (latimes.com)
  • On Wednesday, his Interior secretary, Gale Norton, and four environmental groups bypassed a set of costly and time-wasting lawsuits and agreed on a quick action plan to protect 29 vanishing animal and plant species, such as the pygmy rabbit of Washington State and the Carson wandering skipper butterfly of California. (csmonitor.com)
  • The Columbia Basin Pygmy Rabbit, or Brachylagus idahoensis, is listed as endangered by the United States Fish and Wildlife Service. (bartleby.com)
  • This Pygmy Rabbit is the smallest species of its kind in North America, and it is also one of the only two species of rabbit in the world that digs its own burrow. (bartleby.com)
  • Unlike other cottontails, the Pygmy rabbit ( Brachylagus idahoensis ) digs its own burrow rather than relying on those left by other mammals. (bellaonline.com)
  • Chris Warren, federal coordinator of the pygmy rabbit program, likens the effort to the reintroduction of the California condor. (latimes.com)
  • The offspring are genetically 75% Columbia Basin pygmy rabbit, a percentage that has been deemed high enough to count as a survival of the species. (latimes.com)
  • Despite earlier claims, Rabbit Junk returned in 2018 with another album, their fifth full-length, titled Rabbit Junk Will Die: Meditations on Mortality. (apple.com)
  • You can see where rabbits live in Utah, and learn more about them, on pages 38 and 48 of the 2018-2019 Utah Upland Game Guidebook. (utah.gov)
  • The rabbit on the United flight was a continental rabbit, which is a breed recognized in Europe, but not by ARBA in the United States. (usatoday.com)
  • There are individuals that have harnesses, leashes and take their rabbits on walks and with ARBA we have competition for rabbit hopping with course jumps," he said. (usatoday.com)
  • The current American Rabbit Breeders Association (ARBA) Standard of Perfection calls for a 3 part frontal alternation. (wikipedia.org)
  • however, they estimate that only one in ten people who own or raise rabbits are members of ARBA. (usda.gov)
  • Approximately 90% of ARBA members breed rabbits for exhibition or are commercial raisers with up to several thousand animals. (usda.gov)
  • Rabbits are animals with needs different than other house pets. (google.com)
  • Gotland rabbit breeders strive to produce animals that can consist on natural types of feed, mainly a good quality hay, which may be replaced with fresh grass and other non-toxic plants during summertime. (wikipedia.org)
  • Has the rabbit lived with other animals successfully? (petfinder.com)
  • How did the rabbit react to animals met at the shelter? (petfinder.com)
  • Rabbit is a good friend of A.A. Milne's beloved bear and the self-appointed leader of the band of animals living in the Hundred Acre Wood who have appeared in numerous Disney movies, including one releasing this summer. (latimes.com)
  • Today, domesticated rabbits are kept as companion animals. (hubpages.com)
  • That's another way they differ from rabbits, which the American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals describes as ' delightful companion animals . (nationalgeographic.com)
  • As prey animals, rabbits have a strong reaction to the presence of predators in their areas. (ehow.com)
  • Dr Tanja Strive from CSIRO's Biosecurity Flagship and the Invasive Animals CRC has found that some rabbits in cool, high-rainfall areas carry a benign virus that gives them immunity to calicivirus. (www.csiro.au)
  • Habitat encroachment threatens most wild animals in the state, including two of the three rabbit species. (bellaonline.com)
  • The animals were inoculated with a thousand times the dose needed to infect rabbits. (newscientist.com)
  • Unlike dogs or cats, rabbits are prey animals. (change.org)
  • Keeping chickens in such a way could lead to prosecution, yet it is still, unbelievably, perfectly legal to keep rabbits, animals as intelligent, sociable and sensitive as cats or dogs, in battery-style units. (thepetitionsite.com)
  • Neanderthals did not learn how to hunt small animals such as rabbits (pictured, a group of animals Portugal). (nationalgeographic.com)
  • The authors speculate that over the course of thousands of years, as climate change or human hunting pressure whittled down populations of Iberian large animals such as woolly mammoths, rabbits would have become an increasingly important food resource. (nationalgeographic.com)
  • Keeping local predators in the area can help keep rabbits at bay. (ehow.com)
  • What Do You Use to Keep Rabbits From Eating Plants? (reference.com)
  • Learn how to find good condition on young rabbits, as well. (angelfire.com)
  • While questions are still swirling about what caused the rabbit's death, on social media many are wondering about giant rabbits and where they can get their hands on one. (usatoday.com)
  • The giant rabbits may not always be the first rabbit someone thinks of for companion animal, but they actually have some of best temperaments and have a very docile nature. (usatoday.com)
  • Giant rabbits are bred for size," Stewart said. (usatoday.com)
  • Stewart said some giant rabbits, which can run from $30 from backyard breeders to $400 or more for purebred rabbits, can compete in competitions much like dog agility courses. (usatoday.com)
  • In 1995, as a result of a laboratory accident in southern Australia, the virus escaped and killed 10 million rabbits in 8 weeks. (usda.gov)
  • A single female rabbit can have 45 offspring in a year, producing a litter of four or five kittens every six weeks. (teara.govt.nz)
  • Learn about topics such as How to Train a Rabbit , How to Litter Train a Rabbit , How to Teach Your Rabbit to Come when Called , and more with our helpful step-by-step instructions with photos and videos. (wikihow.com)
  • Rabbits graze a wide range of plants and can cause sufficient damage to kill young trees, shrubs and herbaceous plants. (rhs.org.uk)
  • There are no major rabbit slaughter plants in Iowa, nor are there substantial numbers of research facilities using rabbits. (usda.gov)
  • Although rabbits will eat numerous plants in the garden and landscape, they particularly enjoy beans, peas (Pisum sativum) and carrots (Daucus carota). (ehow.com)
  • Placing a fence around your garden will always be the most effective way of keeping your beans and other plants safe from rabbits. (ehow.com)
  • Letting your pooch have free roam around your beans can also help scare rabbits away from eating your bean plants. (ehow.com)
  • Do Rabbits Eat Strawberry Plants? (ehow.com)
  • Wild rabbits eat grass, flowers and other readily available plants in the summer and switch to eating twigs and bark along with any green vegetation they can find in the winter. (reference.com)
  • Always ensure that your rabbits' environment is free from these plants at all times. (rspca.org.uk)
  • Additionally, glyphosate, a substance found in many herbicides (used to treat weeds and plants) is poisonous to rabbits and should be kept far away. (rspca.org.uk)
  • Rabbits may become exposed to herbicides if they access weeds/plants that have been recently sprayed/treated. (rspca.org.uk)
  • Warrens were not destroyed systematically when the myxomatosis virus was released in Australia forty years ago, which is one reason why rabbits survived. (newscientist.com)
  • The women and children 'may have specialized in hunting rabbits, by surrounding warrens with nets or smoking the rabbits out of the warren,' Fa said. (nationalgeographic.com)
  • All rabbits and cavies are entered and shown at the risk of the owners and/or exhibitors, and while show sponsors are expected to exercise all reasonable care in the handling and protection of the exhibits, show sponsors will not be liable. (google.com)
  • I know a lot of people don't know that something as simple as a cold can be lethal to both rabbits and cavies (guinea pigs), they just don't have very good immunities against human diseases. (hubpages.com)
  • Wonder why people love rabbits? (petfinder.com)
  • Read the top nine myths about rabbits that many people believe to be true. (petfinder.com)
  • There is no moral difference between the rabbits that people consider friends or family and the rabbit that was killed to produce the unappetizing photo accompanying the article. (washingtonpost.com)
  • Rabbit) is still learning that people are not scary. (petfinder.com)
  • Rabbit) has probably not been handled much in her past and is still learning that good things can happen when people pick her up. (petfinder.com)
  • It may not be a rabbit-themed tale, but what's the only scene people remember nearly 25 years later? (latimes.com)
  • Edwards, who raised both rabbits in rural Worcestershire, England, says the trick is to expose them to people early and often. (huffingtonpost.com)
  • Rabbit Hole, directed with grace and surprising humor by John Cameron Mitchell, is a delicate tale that shares a great deal of the hurt of Robert Redford's Ordinary People. (rottentomatoes.com)
  • People who don't know much about rabbits don't have any idea about the characteristics of these amazing creatures. (rabbit.org)
  • People use craigslist to purchase rabbits to feed to snakes. (change.org)
  • People purchase rabbits for their children without comprehending the magnitude of the responsibility. (change.org)
  • People surrender rabbits out of inconvenience at the expense of the animal's wellbeing. (change.org)
  • Most people are not aware of the benefits of free-roaming rabbits, nor the harms of caging rabbits. (change.org)
  • Two rabbits, one from the Oregon Zoo in Portland and one from Washington State University, were introduced to about 45 people, including representatives from state and federal agencies, private conservation groups, local landowners and reporters. (latimes.com)
  • The RSPCA reports that rabbits are often kept crammed together with less space per rabbit than would be covered by an A4 sheet of paper. (thepetitionsite.com)
  • August 1999 was the last time rabbits left the farm and returned. (usda.gov)
  • There are some health and behaviour benefits from the neutering of male rabbits as well. (mcgill.ca)
  • MANKATO, Minn. (AP) - A southern Minnesota college student's spoof video of an apparently tumorous rabbit that he dubbed "Frankenstein" has attracted hundreds of thousands of Internet viewers. (yahoo.com)
  • Australia's biocontrol programs using Myxoma virus in 1950 and the Rabbit Calicivirus in 1995 have been extremely successful in drastically reducing pest rabbit numbers in Australia. (www.csiro.au)
  • The virus was brought to Australia in 1991 and was extensively assessed for its suitability as Australia's second rabbit biocontrol agent. (www.csiro.au)
  • Nevertheless, biological control is by far the most cost effective large-scale control option, and keeping rabbit numbers low is essential for Australia's biodiversity and rural industries. (www.csiro.au)
  • A VIRUS that could wipe out most of Australia's rabbits will be deliberately spread across the country by the end of the month. (newscientist.com)
  • About 5 per cent of adult rabbits and 10 per cent of rabbits under six weeks old survived the onslaught of the escaped virus, says Brian Cooke, an epidemiologist with the Division of Wildlife and Ecology of the CSIRO, Australia's national research organisation. (newscientist.com)
  • If your rabbits eat it and produce offspring that that grow well, don't change. (angelfire.com)
  • How Big Do Mini Lop Rabbits Grow? (reference.com)
  • if this doesn't give pause, consider that, without rabbits, the grasses they eat will grow unchecked, creating even greater fire danger. (bellaonline.com)
  • Rabbit teeth grow constantly, eliminating the possibility of teeth destruction. (hubpages.com)
  • I have 9+ years of experience working with rabbits. (google.com)
  • The average life span for the Harlequin rabbit is 5 years or more. (wikipedia.org)
  • Rabbits can live eight to 10 years with proper care. (petsmart.com)
  • There have been no introductions of rabbits onto the premises in the last two years. (usda.gov)
  • Rabbits generally live for about 4-10 years. (mcgill.ca)
  • A healthy indoor pet rabbit can live 6-12 years or longer. (mcgill.ca)
  • And almost exactly two years on, the success of The Shed has enabled the boys to open Rabbit on the King's Road along similar lines. (telegraph.co.uk)
  • I had a lot of rabbits in my home a few years ago.I loved them. (hubpages.com)
  • Anyway, I've dreamed of having a rabbit for many years and it finally came true for Christmas. (hubpages.com)
  • Two years after the release of Fort Nightly , White Rabbits just released It's Frightening , produced by former tourmate Britt Daniel of Spoon. (npr.org)
  • The natural life span of a rabbit is about 10 years. (garden.org)
  • To record their first album in nearly three years, Brooklyn's White Rabbits decamped to Austin, Texas and spent a few months enjoying the suburban life. (stereogum.com)
  • Though many athletes and race promoters have used rabbits to lower finish times, probably one of the most successful uses of the pacer was 50 years ago, when Roger Bannister engaged pacemakers Chris Brasher and Chris Chataway through three laps of his famed sub-4 performance. (washingtontimes.com)