Calcium Pyrophosphate: An inorganic pyrophosphate which affects calcium metabolism in mammals. Abnormalities in its metabolism occur in some human diseases, notably HYPOPHOSPHATASIA and pseudogout (CHONDROCALCINOSIS).Chondrocalcinosis: Presence of calcium salts, especially calcium pyrophosphate, in the cartilaginous structures of one or more joints. When accompanied by attacks of goutlike symptoms, it is called pseudogout. (Dorland, 27th ed)Diphosphates: Inorganic salts of phosphoric acid that contain two phosphate groups.Arthropathy, Neurogenic: Chronic progressive degeneration of the stress-bearing portion of a joint, with bizarre hypertrophic changes at the periphery. It is probably a complication of a variety of neurologic disorders, particularly TABES DORSALIS, involving loss of sensation, which leads to relaxation of supporting structures and chronic instability of the joint. (Dorland, 27th ed)Microscopy, Polarization: Microscopy using polarized light in which phenomena due to the preferential orientation of optical properties with respect to the vibration plane of the polarized light are made visible and correlated parameters are made measurable.Crystallization: The formation of crystalline substances from solutions or melts. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)Scleral Diseases: General disorders of the sclera or white of the eye. They may include anatomic, embryologic, degenerative, or pigmentation defects.Joint DiseasesSynovial Fluid: The clear, viscous fluid secreted by the SYNOVIAL MEMBRANE. It contains mucin, albumin, fat, and mineral salts and serves to lubricate joints.Calcium Phosphates: Calcium salts of phosphoric acid. These compounds are frequently used as calcium supplements.Gout: Hereditary metabolic disorder characterized by recurrent acute arthritis, hyperuricemia and deposition of sodium urate in and around the joints, sometimes with formation of uric acid calculi.Phosphate Transport Proteins: Membrane proteins that are involved in the active transport of phosphate.Pyrophosphatases: A group of enzymes within the class EC 3.6.1.- that catalyze the hydrolysis of diphosphate bonds, chiefly in nucleoside di- and triphosphates. They may liberate either a mono- or diphosphate. EC 3.6.1.-.Thiamine Pyrophosphate: The coenzyme form of Vitamin B1 present in many animal tissues. It is a required intermediate in the PYRUVATE DEHYDROGENASE COMPLEX and the KETOGLUTARATE DEHYDROGENASE COMPLEX.Technetium Tc 99m Pyrophosphate: A radionuclide imaging agent used primarily in scintigraphy or tomography of the heart to evaluate the extent of the necrotic myocardial process. It has also been used in noninvasive tests for the distribution of organ involvement in different types of amyloidosis and for the evaluation of muscle necrosis in the extremities.ArthritisUric Acid: An oxidation product, via XANTHINE OXIDASE, of oxypurines such as XANTHINE and HYPOXANTHINE. It is the final oxidation product of purine catabolism in humans and primates, whereas in most other mammals URATE OXIDASE further oxidizes it to ALLANTOIN.Polyisoprenyl Phosphates: Phosphoric or pyrophosphoric acid esters of polyisoprenoids.Hemarthrosis: Bleeding into the joints. It may arise from trauma or spontaneously in patients with hemophilia.Phosphoribosyl Pyrophosphate: The key substance in the biosynthesis of histidine, tryptophan, and purine and pyrimidine nucleotides.Osteoarthritis: A progressive, degenerative joint disease, the most common form of arthritis, especially in older persons. The disease is thought to result not from the aging process but from biochemical changes and biomechanical stresses affecting articular cartilage. In the foreign literature it is often called osteoarthrosis deformans.TetramisoleKnee Joint: A synovial hinge connection formed between the bones of the FEMUR; TIBIA; and PATELLA.Calcinosis: Pathologic deposition of calcium salts in tissues.Cartilage, Articular: A protective layer of firm, flexible cartilage over the articulating ends of bones. It provides a smooth surface for joint movement, protecting the ends of long bones from wear at points of contact.Durapatite: The mineral component of bones and teeth; it has been used therapeutically as a prosthetic aid and in the prevention and treatment of osteoporosis.Hydroxyapatites: A group of compounds with the general formula M10(PO4)6(OH)2, where M is barium, strontium, or calcium. The compounds are the principal mineral in phosphorite deposits, biological tissue, human bones, and teeth. They are also used as an anticaking agent and polymer catalysts. (Grant & Hackh's Chemical Dictionary, 5th ed)Dimethylallyltranstransferase: An enzyme that, in the pathway of cholesterol biosynthesis, catalyzes the condensation of isopentenyl pyrophosphate and dimethylallylpyrophosphate to yield pyrophosphate and geranylpyrophosphate. The enzyme then catalyzes the condensation of the latter compound with another molecule of isopentenyl pyrophosphate to yield pyrophosphate and farnesylpyrophosphate. EC 2.5.1.1.Calcium Signaling: Signal transduction mechanisms whereby calcium mobilization (from outside the cell or from intracellular storage pools) to the cytoplasm is triggered by external stimuli. Calcium signals are often seen to propagate as waves, oscillations, spikes, sparks, or puffs. The calcium acts as an intracellular messenger by activating calcium-responsive proteins.Arthritis, Gouty: Arthritis, especially of the great toe, as a result of gout. Acute gouty arthritis often is precipitated by trauma, infection, surgery, etc. The initial attacks are usually monoarticular but later attacks are often polyarticular.Radiology: A specialty concerned with the use of x-ray and other forms of radiant energy in the diagnosis and treatment of disease.Temporomandibular Joint Disorders: A variety of conditions affecting the anatomic and functional characteristics of the temporomandibular joint. Factors contributing to the complexity of temporomandibular diseases are its relation to dentition and mastication and the symptomatic effects in other areas which account for referred pain to the joint and the difficulties in applying traditional diagnostic procedures to temporomandibular joint pathology where tissue is rarely obtained and x-rays are often inadequate or nonspecific. Common diseases are developmental abnormalities, trauma, subluxation, luxation, arthritis, and neoplasia. (From Thoma's Oral Pathology, 6th ed, pp577-600)Radiography: Examination of any part of the body for diagnostic purposes by means of X-RAYS or GAMMA RAYS, recording the image on a sensitized surface (such as photographic film).BooksHand Deformities, Acquired: Deformities of the hand, or a part of the hand, acquired after birth as the result of injury or disease.Radiology Information Systems: Information systems, usually computer-assisted, designed to store, manipulate, and retrieve information for planning, organizing, directing, and controlling administrative activities associated with the provision and utilization of radiology services and facilities.Osteophyte: Bony outgrowth usually found around joints and often seen in conditions such as ARTHRITIS.Menisci, Tibial: The interarticular fibrocartilages of the superior surface of the tibia.Arthroscopy: Endoscopic examination, therapy and surgery of the joint.Knee Injuries: Injuries to the knee or the knee joint.Rotator Cuff: The musculotendinous sheath formed by the supraspinatus, infraspinatus, subscapularis, and teres minor muscles. These help stabilize the head of the HUMERUS in the glenoid fossa and allow for rotation of the SHOULDER JOINT about its longitudinal axis.Tears: The fluid secreted by the lacrimal glands. This fluid moistens the CONJUNCTIVA and CORNEA.Anterior Cruciate Ligament: A strong ligament of the knee that originates from the posteromedial portion of the lateral condyle of the femur, passes anteriorly and inferiorly between the condyles, and attaches to the depression in front of the intercondylar eminence of the tibia.Fractures, Cartilage: Breaks in CARTILAGE.Bursa, Synovial: A fluid-filled sac lined with SYNOVIAL MEMBRANE that provides a cushion between bones, tendons and/or muscles around a joint.Ankle Joint: The joint that is formed by the inferior articular and malleolar articular surfaces of the TIBIA; the malleolar articular surface of the FIBULA; and the medial malleolar, lateral malleolar, and superior surfaces of the TALUS.Ankle: The region of the lower limb between the FOOT and the LEG.Ankle Injuries: Harm or hurt to the ankle or ankle joint usually inflicted by an external source.Mobility Limitation: Difficulty in walking from place to place.Walking: An activity in which the body advances at a slow to moderate pace by moving the feet in a coordinated fashion. This includes recreational walking, walking for fitness, and competitive race-walking.Talus: The second largest of the TARSAL BONES. It articulates with the TIBIA and FIBULA to form the ANKLE JOINT.Sprains and Strains: A collective term for muscle and ligament injuries without dislocation or fracture. A sprain is a joint injury in which some of the fibers of a supporting ligament are ruptured but the continuity of the ligament remains intact. A strain is an overstretching or overexertion of some part of the musculature.
In some cases, a build-up of calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate (CPPD) crystals in the joint can cause pseudogout. Perinatal and ... These patients may also suffer articular cartilage degeneration and pyrophosphate arthropathy. Radiographs reveal ... Some patients suffer from calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate crystal depositions with occasional attacks of arthritis (pseudogout ... features of pyrophosphate arthropathy, and calcific periarthritis. Odontohypophosphatasia is present when dental disease is the ...
... calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate, calcium hydroxyapatite, and calcium oxalate. Types include: Obesity Kidney failure ... 2001). "Cross-sectional study of 50 patients with calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate crystal arthropathy". Clin. Rheumatol. 20 (2 ... Crystal arthropathy is a class of joint disorder (called arthropathy) that is characterized by accumulation of tiny crystals in ... Deposition of crystals in joints Calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate crystal formation: Increased production of inorganic ...
Calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate (CPPD) crystal deposition disease, also known as pseudogout and pyrophosphate arthropathy is a ... Pyrophosphate arthropathy refers to several of these situations. Rothschild, Bruce M Calcium Pyrophosphate Deposition Disease ( ... Rothschild, Bruce M Calcium Pyrophosphate Deposition Disease (rheumatology) at eMedicine Wright GD, Doherty M (1997). "Calcium ... Calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate crystals are associated with a range of clinical syndromes, which have been given various names ...
Calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate (CPPD) crystal deposition disease, also known as pseudogout and pyrophosphate arthropathy, is a ... a b c d e f g h i j k l m n Rothschild, Bruce M Calcium Pyrophosphate Deposition Disease (rheumatology) at eMedicine ... Calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate crystal deposition disease. From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. (Redirected from Calcium ... Pyrophosphate arthropathy refers to several of these situations.[14] References[edit]. *^ a b Wright GD, Doherty M (1997). " ...
In pseudogout/chondrocalcinosis/calcium pyrophosphate deposition disease, the crystal is calcium pyrophosphate. Diabetic ... An arthropathy is a disease of a joint. Arthritis is a form of arthropathy that involves inflammation of one or more joints, ... Spondylarthropathy is any form of arthropathy of the vertebral column. Arthropathy may also include joint conditions caused by ... See also Reactive arthritis) Enteropathic arthropathy (M07) is caused by colitis and related conditions. Crystal arthropathy ( ...
... there is a less common form of gout that is caused by the formation of rhomboidal-shaped crystals of calcium pyrophosphate. ... Further information: Arthropathy and Arthritis. Damaging the cartilage of joints (articular cartilage) or the bones and muscles ... Arthropathies are called polyarticular (multiarticular) when involving many joints and monoarticular when involving only a ... A joint disorder is termed arthropathy, and when involving inflammation of one or more joints the disorder is called arthritis ...
Calcium pyrophosphate crystals are seen in pseudogout (also known as calcium pyrophosphate deposition disease or, CPPD). These ... fever Chronic gout or pseudogout Scleroderma Polymyositis Systemic lupus erythematosus Erythema nodosum Neuropathic arthropathy ... Crystals include monosodium urate, calcium pyrophosphate, hydroxyapatite and corticosteroid crystals. Monosodium urate crystals ... Septic arthritis Hemorrhagic Trauma Tumors Hemophilia/coagulopathy Scurvy Ehlers-Danlos syndrome Neuropathic arthropathy ...
... there is a less common form of gout that is caused by the formation of rhomboidal-shaped crystals of calcium pyrophosphate. ... Arthropathies are called polyarticular (multiarticular) when involving many joints and monoarticular when involving only a ... A joint disorder is termed arthropathy, and when involving inflammation of one or more joints the disorder is called arthritis ...
... of cartilage intermediate-layer protein and ANK in articular hyaline cartilage from patients with calcium pyrophosphate ... 2004). "Characterisation of cartilage intermediate layer protein (CILP)-induced arthropathy in mice". Ann. Rheum. Dis. 63 (3): ...
When monoarthritis is caused by pseudogout (calcium pyrophosphate deposition disease, CPPD), the inflammation usually lasts ... crystal arthropathies). Gout Pseudogout Septic arthritis Osteoarthritis. ...
Calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate crystals are associated with a range of clinical syndromes, which have been given various names, based upon which clinical symptoms or radiographic findings are most prominent.[11] A task force of the European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR) made recommendations on preferred terminology.[5] Accordingly, calcium pyrophosphate deposition (CPPD) is an umbrella term for the various clinical subsets, whose naming reflects an emphasis on particular features. For example, pseudogout refers to the acute symptoms of joint inflammation or synovitis: red, tender, and swollen joints that may resemble gouty arthritis (a similar condition in which monosodium urate crystals are deposited within the joints). Chondrocalcinosis,[2][3] on the other hand, refers to the radiographic evidence of calcification in hyaline and/or fibrocartilage. "Osteoarthritis (OA) with CPPD" reflects a situation ...
... (apatite-associated destructive arthritis) is a rheumatological condition similar to calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate deposition disease (CPPD). It is associated with periarticular or intraarticular deposition of hydroxyapatite crystals. Crystal deposition in the joint causes the release of collagenases, serine proteases, elastases, and interleukin-1. This precipitates acute and rapid decline in joint function and degradation of joint anatomy. Subsequently disruption of the rotator cuff ensues. Along with symptomatology, the disease typically presents with positive radiologic findings, often showing marked erosion of the humeral head, cartilage, capsule, and bursae. Though rare, it is most often seen in females beginning in their 50s or 60s. Diagnosis is made with arthrocentesis and Alizarin Red staining along with clinical symptoms. Signs and symptoms may include the following: Limited active range of motion, usually unrestricted passive range of ...
... , also known as haemochromatosis, indicates accumulation of iron in the body from any cause. The most important causes are hereditary haemochromatosis (HHC), a genetic disorder, and transfusional iron overload, which can result from repeated blood transfusions. Play media Organs commonly affected by haemochromatosis are the liver, heart, and endocrine glands. Haemochromatosis may present with the following clinical syndromes: Cirrhosis of the liver: Varies from zonal iron deposition to fibrosis (cirrhosis). Diabetes due to selective iron deposition in pancreatic islet beta cells leading to functional failure and cell death. Cardiomyopathy Arthritis, from calcium pyrophosphate deposition in joints. The most commonly affected joints are those of the hands, particularly the knuckles of the second and third fingers. Testicular failure Bronzing of the skin. This deep tan color, in concert with insulin insufficiency due to pancreatic damage, is the source of a ...
As well as the anhydrous compound Co(NO3)2, several hydrates of cobalt(II) nitrate exist. These hydrates have the chemical formula Co(NO3)2·nH2O, where n = 0, 2, 4, 6. Anhydrous cobalt(II) nitrate adopts a three-dimensional polymeric network structure, with each cobalt(II) atom approximately octahedrally coordinated by six oxygen atoms, each from a different nitrate ion. Each nitrate ion coordinates to three cobalts.[3] The dihydrate is a two-dimensional polymer, with nitrate bridges between Co(II) centres and hydrogen bonding holding the layers together. The tetrahydrate consists of discrete, octahedral [(H2O)4Co(NO3)2] molecules. The hexahydrate is better described as hexaaquacobalt(II) nitrate, [Co(OH2)6][NO3]2, as it consists of discrete [Co(OH2)6]2+ and [NO3]− ions.[4] Above 55 °C, the hexahydrate converts to the trihydrate and at higher temperatures to the monohydrate.[2]. ...
Calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate crystals are associated with a range of clinical syndromes, which have been given various names, based upon which clinical symptoms or radiographic findings are most prominent.[11] A task force of the European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR) made recommendations on preferred terminology.[5] Accordingly, calcium pyrophosphate deposition (CPPD) is an umbrella term for the various clinical subsets, whose naming reflects an emphasis on particular features. For example, pseudogout refers to the acute symptoms of joint inflammation or synovitis: red, tender, and swollen joints that may resemble gouty arthritis (a similar condition in which monosodium urate crystals are deposited within the joints). Chondrocalcinosis,[2][3] on the other hand, refers to the radiographic evidence of calcification in hyaline and/or fibrocartilage. "Osteoarthritis (OA) with CPPD" reflects a situation ...
... (apatite-associated destructive arthritis) is a rheumatological condition similar to calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate deposition disease (CPPD). It is associated with periarticular or intraarticular deposition of hydroxyapatite crystals. Crystal deposition in the joint causes the release of collagenases, serine proteases, elastases, and interleukin-1. This precipitates acute and rapid decline in joint function and degradation of joint anatomy. Subsequently disruption of the rotator cuff ensues. Along with symptomatology, the disease typically presents with positive radiologic findings, often showing marked erosion of the humeral head, cartilage, capsule, and bursae. Though rare, it is most often seen in females beginning in their 50s or 60s. Diagnosis is made with arthrocentesis and Alizarin Red staining along with clinical symptoms. Signs and symptoms may include the following: Limited active range of motion, usually unrestricted passive range of ...
... , also known as haemochromatosis, indicates accumulation of iron in the body from any cause. The most important causes are hereditary haemochromatosis (HHC), a genetic disorder, and transfusional iron overload, which can result from repeated blood transfusions. Play media Organs commonly affected by haemochromatosis are the liver, heart, and endocrine glands. Haemochromatosis may present with the following clinical syndromes: Cirrhosis of the liver: Varies from zonal iron deposition to fibrosis (cirrhosis). Diabetes due to selective iron deposition in pancreatic islet beta cells leading to functional failure and cell death. Cardiomyopathy Arthritis, from calcium pyrophosphate deposition in joints. The most commonly affected joints are those of the hands, particularly the knuckles of the second and third fingers. Testicular failure Bronzing of the skin. This deep tan color, in concert with insulin insufficiency due to pancreatic damage, is the source of a ...
If the knee is swollen and red and warm to the touch when compared to the other knee, a doctor may be concerned about inflammation due to rheumatoid arthritis or a crystalline arthritis, such as gout or pseudogout, or joint infection. Besides sending the joint fluid to a laboratory for analysis, blood tests may requested to determine a white blood cell count, erythrocyte sedimentation rate, and perhaps the level of C-reactive protein or uric acid. If blood tests reveal Lyme disease antibodies forming, the condition may be attributed to it. ...
Calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate crystals are associated with a range of clinical syndromes, which have been given various names, based upon which clinical symptoms or radiographic findings are most prominent.[11] A task force of the European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR) made recommendations on preferred terminology.[5] Accordingly, calcium pyrophosphate deposition (CPPD) is an umbrella term for the various clinical subsets, whose naming reflects an emphasis on particular features. For example, pseudogout refers to the acute symptoms of joint inflammation or synovitis: red, tender, and swollen joints that may resemble gouty arthritis (a similar condition in which monosodium urate crystals are deposited within the joints). Chondrocalcinosis,[2][3] on the other hand, refers to the radiographic evidence of calcification in hyaline and/or fibrocartilage. "Osteoarthritis (OA) with CPPD" reflects a situation ...
... (FPP), also known as farnesyl diphosphate (FDP), is an intermediate in both the mevalonate and non-mevalonate pathways used by organisms in the biosynthesis of terpenes, terpenoids, and sterols. It is used in the synthesis of CoQ (part of the electron transport chain), as well as being the immediate precursor of squalene (via the enzyme squalene synthase), dehydrodolichol diphosphate (a precursor of dolichol, which transports proteins to the ER lumen for N-glycosylation), and geranylgeranyl pyrophosphate (GGPP). Farnesyl pyrophosphate synthase (a prenyl transferase) catalyzes sequential condensation reactions of dimethylallyl pyrophosphate with 2 units of 3-isopentenyl pyrophosphate to form farnesyl pyrophosphate, as is shown in the following two steps: Dimethylallyl pyrophosphate reacts with ...
Ectonucleotide pyrophosphatase/phosphodiesterase family member 1 is an enzyme that in humans is encoded by the ENPP1 gene. This gene is a member of the ecto-nucleotide pyrophosphatase/phosphodiesterase (ENPP) family. The encoded protein is a type II transmembrane glycoprotein comprising two identical disulfide-bonded subunits. This protein has broad specificity and cleaves a variety of substrates, including phosphodiester bonds of nucleotides and nucleotide sugars and pyrophosphate bonds of nucleotides and nucleotide sugars. This protein may function to hydrolyze nucleoside 5' triphosphates to their corresponding monophosphates and may also hydrolyze diadenosine polyphosphates. Mutations in this gene have been associated with Idiopathic infantile arterial calcification, ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament of the spine (OPLL), and insulin resistance. Ectonucleotide pyrophosphatase/phosphodiesterase 1 has been shown to interact with Insulin receptor. GRCh38: ...
... s are a class of terpenes that consist of two isoprene units and have the molecular formula C10H16. Monoterpenes may be linear (acyclic) or contain rings. Biochemical modifications such as oxidation or rearrangement produce the related monoterpenoids. Biosynthetically, isopentenyl pyrophosphate and dimethylallyl pyrophosphate are combined to form geranyl pyrophosphate. Elimination of the pyrophosphate group leads to the formation of acyclic monoterpenes such as ocimene and the myrcenes. Hydrolysis of the phosphate groups leads to the prototypical acyclic monoterpenoid geraniol. Additional rearrangements and oxidations provide compounds such as citral, citronellal, citronellol, linalool, and many others. Many monoterpenes found in marine organisms are halogenated, such as halomon. In addition to linear attachments, the isoprene units can make connections to form rings. ...
... (apatite-associated destructive arthritis) is a rheumatological condition similar to calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate deposition disease (CPPD). It is associated with periarticular or intraarticular deposition of hydroxyapatite crystals. Crystal deposition in the joint causes the release of collagenases, serine proteases, elastases, and interleukin-1. This precipitates acute and rapid decline in joint function and degradation of joint anatomy. Subsequently disruption of the rotator cuff ensues. Along with symptomatology, the disease typically presents with positive radiologic findings, often showing marked erosion of the humeral head, cartilage, capsule, and bursae. Though rare, it is most often seen in females beginning in their 50s or 60s. Diagnosis is made with arthrocentesis and Alizarin Red staining along with clinical symptoms. Signs and symptoms may include the following: Limited active range of motion, usually unrestricted passive range of ...
Calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate (CPPD) crystal deposition disease, also known as pseudogout and pyrophosphate arthropathy, is a ... a b c d e f g h i j k l m n Rothschild, Bruce M Calcium Pyrophosphate Deposition Disease (rheumatology) at eMedicine ... Calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate crystal deposition disease. From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. (Redirected from Calcium ... Pyrophosphate arthropathy refers to several of these situations.[14] References[edit]. *^ a b Wright GD, Doherty M (1997). " ...
Further observations on the arthropathy of calcium pyrophosphate crystal deposition disease. Radiology1981;141:1-15. ... Roentgenographic aspects of calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate crystal deposition disease (pseudogout). Arthitis Rheum1976;19:307- ... Calcium pyrophosphate crystal deposition disease, pseudogout and articular chondrocalcinosis. In: McCarty DJ, Koopman WJ, eds. ... Until now, the diagnosis of calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate (CPPD) crystal deposition disease has been based mainly on ...
Roentgenographic features of the arthropathy associated with CPPD crystal deposition disease. A comparative study with primary ... Calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate (CPPD) crystal deposition disease is slightly more prevalent in men. Chondrocalcinosis results ... Calcium deposition is often seen at the triangular fibrocartilage of the wrist. Subchondral sclerosis, joint space narrowing, ...
Precipitation of crystals of calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate (CPP) in connective tissues may be asymptomatic or may be ... Double blind, placebo controlled trial of magnesium carbonate in chronic pyrophosphate arthropathy. Ann Rheum Dis 1983; 42( ... Pathogenesis and etiology of calcium pyrophosphate crystal deposition (CPPD) disease. *Patient education: Calcium pyrophosphate ... Treatment of calcium pyrophosphate crystal deposition (CPPD) disease. Author. Michael A Becker, MD. Michael A Becker, MD ...
Doherty M. Calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate crystal-associated arthropathy. In: Hochberg MC, Silman AJ, Smolen JS, et al., eds. ... Synonyms: Pseudogout, chondrocalcinosis, pyrophosphate arthropathy.. ICD-9 Codes: Pseudogout, 712.2; CPPD crystal deposition ... Charcot-like arthropathy of the knee has been ascribed to CPPD crystal deposition disease in some patients. Rarely, a ... In chronic arthropathy, an elevated serum ferritin level and a mild anemia are not uncommon. Routine screening for metabolic ...
Announ N, Guerne PA: [Diagnosis and treatment of calcium pyrophosphate crystal-induced arthropathy]. Z Rheumatol. 2007, 66: 573 ... Chronic calcium pyrophosphate crystal inflammatory arthritis induced by extreme hypomagnesemia in short bowel syndrome. ... Despite the rarity of this condition, it is important to know that hypomagnesaemia may be associated with calcium pyrophosphate ... Chondrocalcinosis, is defined as the deposition of calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate in hyaline or fibrous cartilage [14]. In ...
Calcium pyrophosphate crystals were identified in the synovial fluid, and calcium pyrophosphate deposition disease was ... Recurrent Painful Calcium Pyrophosphate Arthropathy You will receive an email whenever this article is corrected, updated, or ... Recurrent Painful Calcium Pyrophosphate Arthropathy. The Journal of the American Osteopathic Association, March 2017, Vol. 117 ... Carpenter L, Juliano N, Herb R. Recurrent Painful Calcium Pyrophosphate Arthropathy. J Am Osteopath Assoc 2017;117(3):199. doi ...
Recurrent Painful Calcium Pyrophosphate Arthropathy PDF Lisa Carpenter, DO; Noelle Juliano, DO; Ronald Herb, DO. TOPICS: joint ... calcium pyrophosphate, pain The Journal of the American Osteopathic Association, March 2017, Vol. 117, 199-199. doi: 10.7556/ ...
Calcium Pyrophosphate Dihydrate Crystal Deposition Disease): Read more about Symptoms, Diagnosis, Treatment, Complications, ... Calcium pyrophosphate deposition disease. [emedicine.medscape.com] Gout or hyperuricemia in an adolescent or child is rare but ... Etiology The cause of calcium pyrophosphate arthritis is unknown. [merckmanuals.com] The most likely etiology of the patients ... Calcium pyrophosphate crystal deposition disease: diagnosis and treatment. Open Access Rheumatology : Research and Reviews. ...
Calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate (CPPD) arthritis is a joint disease that can cause attacks of arthritis. Like gout, crystals ... Pyrophosphate arthropathy; Chondrocalcinosis ... calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate and basic calcium phosphate. In ... Deposition of calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate (CPPD) causes this form of arthritis. The buildup of this chemical forms crystals ... Calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate (CPPD) arthritis is a joint disease that can cause attacks of arthritis. Like gout, crystals ...
Calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate arthropathy of the temporomandibular joint.. de Vos RA, Brants J, Kusen GJ, Becker AE. ...
Calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate (CPPD) crystal deposition disease, also known as pseudogout and pyrophosphate arthropathy is a ... Pyrophosphate arthropathy refers to several of these situations. Rothschild, Bruce M Calcium Pyrophosphate Deposition Disease ( ... Rothschild, Bruce M Calcium Pyrophosphate Deposition Disease (rheumatology) at eMedicine Wright GD, Doherty M (1997). "Calcium ... Calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate crystals are associated with a range of clinical syndromes, which have been given various names ...
Calcium pyrophosphate deposition disease: The arthropathy formerly known as "Pseudogout". A number of clinical syndromes are ... associated with the precipitation of calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate crystals in and around... View Article ...
5. Crystal-associated arthropathies a. Gout b. Calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate (CPPD) crystal deposition disease c. Calcium ...
Calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate crystal is the most common crystalline arthropathy. These intraarticular crystals are weakly ... Calcification of the menisci and/or articular cartilage due to the deposition of calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate crystal, ... This finding represents calcium in the triangular menisci, which represents chondrocalcinosis. A globular calcium opacity ( ... This finding represents calcium in the triangular menisci, which represents chondrocalcinosis. A globular calcium opacity ( ...
Calcium pyrophosphate deposition disease is the most common form of crystal-induced arthropathy. Radiography may reveal a ... Neuropathic arthropathy in patients with diabetes involves the forefoot (metatarsophalangeal and interphalangeal joints), ... 8 Fracture-dislocation of Lisfrancs joint is one of the most common features of neuropathic arthropathy in patients with ...
arthropathy. *behcets syndrome. *calcium pyrophosphate deposition disease. *cranial arteritis. *crest. *crystalline arthritis ...
arthropathy. *autoimmune disease. *behcets syndrome. *calcium pyrophosphate deposition disease. *cardiac sarcoidosis. *crest ...
Basic Calcium Phosphate and Other Crystalline Diseases. 48. Endocrine-associated Arthropathies. 49. Arthropathies Associated ... Calcium Pyrophosphate Deposition Disease. 47. ...
... calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate, calcium hydroxyapatite, and calcium oxalate. Types include: Obesity Kidney failure ... 2001). "Cross-sectional study of 50 patients with calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate crystal arthropathy". Clin. Rheumatol. 20 (2 ... Crystal arthropathy is a class of joint disorder (called arthropathy) that is characterized by accumulation of tiny crystals in ... Deposition of crystals in joints Calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate crystal formation: Increased production of inorganic ...
Abhishek A, Doherty M. Epidemiology of calcium pyrophosphate crystal arthritis and basic calcium phosphate crystal arthropathy ... Tophaceous pseudogout (tumoral calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate crystal deposition disease). Hum Pathol. 1995;26(6):587-93. ...
Charcot first described the relationship between loss of sensation and arthropathy in 1868. ... Neuropathic arthropathy (Charcot joint) can be defined as bone and joint changes that occur secondary to loss of sensation and ... Neuropathy-like arthropathy can be seen in patients with calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate deposition disease. ... Calcium pyrophosphate deposition disease and primary osteoarthritis are in the differential diagnosis. In addition, in the ...
Inflammatory arthropathies such as rheumatoid arthritis, lupus, or psoriatic arthritis.. *Episode of gout or calcium ... pyrophosphate (pseudogout) diseases within 6 months prior to Screening.. *IA or local peri-articular corticosteroid injections ...
Septic arthritis may develop in patients of any age, but crystal-induced inflammatory arthropathy is more likely in adults. ... In pseudogout, calcium pyrophosphate crystals are the causative agents.. On physical examination, the knee joint is ... In this arthropathy, sodium urate crystals precipitate in the knee joint and cause an intense inflammatory response. ... Diseases associated with deposition of calcium pyrophosphate or hydroxyapatite. In: Kelley WN, ed. Textbook of rheumatology. ...
Rheumatology: polymyalgia rheumatica, Sjogrens syndrome, psoriatic arthropathy, pseudogout (calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate), ...
  • This algorithm uses soft tissue as a baseline, and the differences in attenuation between low and high energy allows for accurate and specific characterization and separation of calcium and monosodium urate. (jaocr.org)
  • This atlas illustrates with radiographs and diagrams the common and not so common arthropathies of the hand. (gentili.net)
  • At bone, PTH acts to increase serum calcium by stimulating bone resorption via osteoclast-activating factors such as interleukin-6 from osteoblasts. (clinicaladvisor.com)