Helicobacter pylori: A spiral bacterium active as a human gastric pathogen. It is a gram-negative, urease-positive, curved or slightly spiral organism initially isolated in 1982 from patients with lesions of gastritis or peptic ulcers in Western Australia. Helicobacter pylori was originally classified in the genus CAMPYLOBACTER, but RNA sequencing, cellular fatty acid profiles, growth patterns, and other taxonomic characteristics indicate that the micro-organism should be included in the genus HELICOBACTER. It has been officially transferred to Helicobacter gen. nov. (see Int J Syst Bacteriol 1989 Oct;39(4):297-405).Helicobacter Infections: Infections with organisms of the genus HELICOBACTER, particularly, in humans, HELICOBACTER PYLORI. The clinical manifestations are focused in the stomach, usually the gastric mucosa and antrum, and the upper duodenum. This infection plays a major role in the pathogenesis of type B gastritis and peptic ulcer disease.Amoxicillin: A broad-spectrum semisynthetic antibiotic similar to AMPICILLIN except that its resistance to gastric acid permits higher serum levels with oral administration.Clarithromycin: A semisynthetic macrolide antibiotic derived from ERYTHROMYCIN that is active against a variety of microorganisms. It can inhibit PROTEIN SYNTHESIS in BACTERIA by reversibly binding to the 50S ribosomal subunits. This inhibits the translocation of aminoacyl transfer-RNA and prevents peptide chain elongation.Omeprazole: A 4-methoxy-3,5-dimethylpyridyl, 5-methoxybenzimidazole derivative of timoprazole that is used in the therapy of STOMACH ULCERS and ZOLLINGER-ELLISON SYNDROME. The drug inhibits an H(+)-K(+)-EXCHANGING ATPASE which is found in GASTRIC PARIETAL CELLS.Anti-Ulcer Agents: Various agents with different action mechanisms used to treat or ameliorate PEPTIC ULCER or irritation of the gastrointestinal tract. This has included ANTIBIOTICS to treat HELICOBACTER INFECTIONS; HISTAMINE H2 ANTAGONISTS to reduce GASTRIC ACID secretion; and ANTACIDS for symptomatic relief.Bismuth: A metallic element that has the atomic symbol Bi, atomic number 83 and atomic weight 208.98.Metronidazole: A nitroimidazole used to treat AMEBIASIS; VAGINITIS; TRICHOMONAS INFECTIONS; GIARDIASIS; ANAEROBIC BACTERIA; and TREPONEMAL INFECTIONS. It has also been proposed as a radiation sensitizer for hypoxic cells. According to the Fourth Annual Report on Carcinogens (NTP 85-002, 1985, p133), this substance may reasonably be anticipated to be a carcinogen (Merck, 11th ed).2-Pyridinylmethylsulfinylbenzimidazoles: Compounds that contain benzimidazole joined to a 2-methylpyridine via a sulfoxide linkage. Several of the compounds in this class are ANTI-ULCER AGENTS that act by inhibiting the POTASSIUM HYDROGEN ATPASE found in the PROTON PUMP of GASTRIC PARIETAL CELLS.Tinidazole: A nitroimidazole antitrichomonal agent effective against Trichomonas vaginalis, Entamoeba histolytica, and Giardia lamblia infections.Lansoprazole: A 2,2,2-trifluoroethoxypyridyl derivative of timoprazole that is used in the therapy of STOMACH ULCERS and ZOLLINGER-ELLISON SYNDROME. The drug inhibits H(+)-K(+)-EXCHANGING ATPASE which is found in GASTRIC PARIETAL CELLS. Lansoprazole is a racemic mixture of (R)- and (S)-isomers.Drug Therapy, Combination: Therapy with two or more separate preparations given for a combined effect.Duodenal Ulcer: A PEPTIC ULCER located in the DUODENUM.Dyspepsia: Impaired digestion, especially after eating.Anti-Bacterial Agents: Substances that reduce the growth or reproduction of BACTERIA.Proton Pump Inhibitors: Compounds that inhibit H(+)-K(+)-EXCHANGING ATPASE. They are used as ANTI-ULCER AGENTS and sometimes in place of HISTAMINE H2 ANTAGONISTS for GASTROESOPHAGEAL REFLUX.Peptic Ulcer: Ulcer that occurs in the regions of the GASTROINTESTINAL TRACT which come into contact with GASTRIC JUICE containing PEPSIN and GASTRIC ACID. It occurs when there are defects in the MUCOSA barrier. The common forms of peptic ulcers are associated with HELICOBACTER PYLORI and the consumption of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDS).Ranitidine: A non-imidazole blocker of those histamine receptors that mediate gastric secretion (H2 receptors). It is used to treat gastrointestinal ulcers.Gastritis: Inflammation of the GASTRIC MUCOSA, a lesion observed in a number of unrelated disorders.Furazolidone: A nitrofuran derivative with antiprotozoal and antibacterial activity. Furazolidone acts by gradual inhibition of monoamine oxidase. (From Martindale, The Extra Pharmacopoeia, 30th ed, p514)Gastric Mucosa: Lining of the STOMACH, consisting of an inner EPITHELIUM, a middle LAMINA PROPRIA, and an outer MUSCULARIS MUCOSAE. The surface cells produce MUCUS that protects the stomach from attack by digestive acid and enzymes. When the epithelium invaginates into the LAMINA PROPRIA at various region of the stomach (CARDIA; GASTRIC FUNDUS; and PYLORUS), different tubular gastric glands are formed. These glands consist of cells that secrete mucus, enzymes, HYDROCHLORIC ACID, or hormones.Antacids: Substances that counteract or neutralize acidity of the GASTROINTESTINAL TRACT.Breath Tests: Any tests done on exhaled air.Rabeprazole: A 4-(3-methoxypropoxy)-3-methylpyridinyl derivative of timoprazole that is used in the therapy of STOMACH ULCERS and ZOLLINGER-ELLISON SYNDROME. The drug inhibits H(+)-K(+)-EXCHANGING ATPASE which is found in GASTRIC PARIETAL CELLS.Antitrichomonal Agents: Agents used to treat trichomonas infections.Disease Eradication: Termination of all transmission of infection by global extermination of the infectious agent through surveillance and containment (From Porta, A Dictionary of Epidemiology, 5th ed).Sulfoxides: Organic compounds that have the general formula R-SO-R. They are obtained by oxidation of mercaptans (analogous to the ketones). (From Hackh's Chemical Dictionary, 4th ed)Penicillins: A group of antibiotics that contain 6-aminopenicillanic acid with a side chain attached to the 6-amino group. The penicillin nucleus is the chief structural requirement for biological activity. The side-chain structure determines many of the antibacterial and pharmacological characteristics. (Goodman and Gilman's The Pharmacological Basis of Therapeutics, 8th ed, p1065)Stomach Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the STOMACH.Gastroscopy: Endoscopic examination, therapy or surgery of the interior of the stomach.Lymphoma, B-Cell, Marginal Zone: Extranodal lymphoma of lymphoid tissue associated with mucosa that is in contact with exogenous antigens. Many of the sites of these lymphomas, such as the stomach, salivary gland, and thyroid, are normally devoid of lymphoid tissue. They acquire mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) type as a result of an immunologically mediated disorder.Stomach Ulcer: Ulceration of the GASTRIC MUCOSA due to contact with GASTRIC JUICE. It is often associated with HELICOBACTER PYLORI infection or consumption of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDS).Tetracycline: A naphthacene antibiotic that inhibits AMINO ACYL TRNA binding during protein synthesis.Gastritis, Atrophic: GASTRITIS with atrophy of the GASTRIC MUCOSA, the GASTRIC PARIETAL CELLS, and the mucosal glands leading to ACHLORHYDRIA. Atrophic gastritis usually progresses from chronic gastritis.Metaplasia: A condition in which there is a change of one adult cell type to another similar adult cell type.Urease: An enzyme that catalyzes the conversion of urea and water to carbon dioxide and ammonia. EC 3.5.1.5.Histamine H2 Antagonists: Drugs that selectively bind to but do not activate histamine H2 receptors, thereby blocking the actions of histamine. Their clinically most important action is the inhibition of acid secretion in the treatment of gastrointestinal ulcers. Smooth muscle may also be affected. Some drugs in this class have strong effects in the central nervous system, but these actions are not well understood.Pyloric Antrum: The region between the sharp indentation at the lower third of the STOMACH (incisura angularis) and the junction of the PYLORUS with the DUODENUM. Pyloric antral glands contain mucus-secreting cells and gastrin-secreting endocrine cells (G CELLS).Treatment Outcome: Evaluation undertaken to assess the results or consequences of management and procedures used in combating disease in order to determine the efficacy, effectiveness, safety, and practicability of these interventions in individual cases or series.Benzimidazoles: Compounds with a BENZENE fused to IMIDAZOLES.Gastric Acid: Hydrochloric acid present in GASTRIC JUICE.Organometallic Compounds: A class of compounds of the type R-M, where a C atom is joined directly to any other element except H, C, N, O, F, Cl, Br, I, or At. (Grant & Hackh's Chemical Dictionary, 5th ed)Endoscopy, Gastrointestinal: Endoscopic examination, therapy or surgery of the gastrointestinal tract.Esomeprazole: The S-isomer of omeprazole.Esophagitis, Peptic: INFLAMMATION of the ESOPHAGUS that is caused by the reflux of GASTRIC JUICE with contents of the STOMACH and DUODENUM.Stomach: An organ of digestion situated in the left upper quadrant of the abdomen between the termination of the ESOPHAGUS and the beginning of the DUODENUM.Gastroesophageal Reflux: Retrograde flow of gastric juice (GASTRIC ACID) and/or duodenal contents (BILE ACIDS; PANCREATIC JUICE) into the distal ESOPHAGUS, commonly due to incompetence of the LOWER ESOPHAGEAL SPHINCTER.Levofloxacin: The L-isomer of Ofloxacin.Urea: A compound formed in the liver from ammonia produced by the deamination of amino acids. It is the principal end product of protein catabolism and constitutes about one half of the total urinary solids.Anti-Infective Agents: Substances that prevent infectious agents or organisms from spreading or kill infectious agents in order to prevent the spread of infection.Pepsinogen A: This is one of 2 related pepsinogen systems in humans and is also known as pepsinogen. (The other is PEPSINOGEN C.) This includes isozymogens Pg1-Pg5 (pepsinogens 1-5, group I or products of PGA1-PGA5 genes). This is the main pepsinogen found in urine.Yogurt: A slightly acid milk food produced by fermentation due to the combined action of Lactobacillus acidophilus and Streptococcus thermophilus.Prospective Studies: Observation of a population for a sufficient number of persons over a sufficient number of years to generate incidence or mortality rates subsequent to the selection of the study group.Ofloxacin: A synthetic fluoroquinolone antibacterial agent that inhibits the supercoiling activity of bacterial DNA GYRASE, halting DNA REPLICATION.Duodenitis: Inflammation of the DUODENUM section of the small intestine (INTESTINE, SMALL). Erosive duodenitis may cause bleeding in the UPPER GI TRACT and PEPTIC ULCER.Esophagitis: INFLAMMATION, acute or chronic, of the ESOPHAGUS caused by BACTERIA, chemicals, or TRAUMA.Peptic Ulcer Hemorrhage: Bleeding from a PEPTIC ULCER that can be located in any segment of the GASTROINTESTINAL TRACT.Drug Administration Schedule: Time schedule for administration of a drug in order to achieve optimum effectiveness and convenience.Treatment Failure: A measure of the quality of health care by assessment of unsuccessful results of management and procedures used in combating disease, in individual cases or series.Poliomyelitis: An acute infectious disease of humans, particularly children, caused by any of three serotypes of human poliovirus (POLIOVIRUS). Usually the infection is limited to the gastrointestinal tract and nasopharynx, and is often asymptomatic. The central nervous system, primarily the spinal cord, may be affected, leading to rapidly progressive paralysis, coarse FASCICULATION and hyporeflexia. Motor neurons are primarily affected. Encephalitis may also occur. The virus replicates in the nervous system, and may cause significant neuronal loss, most notably in the spinal cord. A rare related condition, nonpoliovirus poliomyelitis, may result from infections with nonpoliovirus enteroviruses. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, pp764-5)Stomach Diseases: Pathological processes involving the STOMACH.Azithromycin: A semi-synthetic macrolide antibiotic structurally related to ERYTHROMYCIN. It has been used in the treatment of Mycobacterium avium intracellulare infections, toxoplasmosis, and cryptosporidiosis.Nifuratel: Local antiprotozoal and antifungal agent that may also be given orally.Danazol: A synthetic steroid with antigonadotropic and anti-estrogenic activities that acts as an anterior pituitary suppressant by inhibiting the pituitary output of gonadotropins. It possesses some androgenic properties. Danazol has been used in the treatment of endometriosis and some benign breast disorders.Rifabutin: A broad-spectrum antibiotic that is being used as prophylaxis against disseminated Mycobacterium avium complex infection in HIV-positive patients.Hypoproteinemia: A condition in which total serum protein level is below the normal range. Hypoproteinemia can be caused by protein malabsorption in the gastrointestinal tract, EDEMA, or PROTEINURIA.Endoscopy: Procedures of applying ENDOSCOPES for disease diagnosis and treatment. Endoscopy involves passing an optical instrument through a small incision in the skin i.e., percutaneous; or through a natural orifice and along natural body pathways such as the digestive tract; and/or through an incision in the wall of a tubular structure or organ, i.e. transluminal, to examine or perform surgery on the interior parts of the body.Purpura, Thrombocytopenic, Idiopathic: Thrombocytopenia occurring in the absence of toxic exposure or a disease associated with decreased platelets. It is mediated by immune mechanisms, in most cases IMMUNOGLOBULIN G autoantibodies which attach to platelets and subsequently undergo destruction by macrophages. The disease is seen in acute (affecting children) and chronic (adult) forms.Double-Blind Method: A method of studying a drug or procedure in which both the subjects and investigators are kept unaware of who is actually getting which specific treatment.Pylorus: The region of the STOMACH at the junction with the DUODENUM. It is marked by the thickening of circular muscle layers forming the pyloric sphincter to control the opening and closure of the lumen.Drug Resistance, Bacterial: The ability of bacteria to resist or to become tolerant to chemotherapeutic agents, antimicrobial agents, or antibiotics. This resistance may be acquired through gene mutation or foreign DNA in transmissible plasmids (R FACTORS).Gastrins: A family of gastrointestinal peptide hormones that excite the secretion of GASTRIC JUICE. They may also occur in the central nervous system where they are presumed to be neurotransmitters.Sucralfate: A basic aluminum complex of sulfated sucrose.Follow-Up Studies: Studies in which individuals or populations are followed to assess the outcome of exposures, procedures, or effects of a characteristic, e.g., occurrence of disease.Probiotics: Live microbial DIETARY SUPPLEMENTS which beneficially affect the host animal by improving its intestinal microbial balance. Antibiotics and other related compounds are not included in this definition. In humans, lactobacilli are commonly used as probiotics, either as single species or in mixed culture with other bacteria. Other genera that have been used are bifidobacteria and streptococci. (J. Nutr. 1995;125:1401-12)Tetragastrin: L-Tryptophyl-L-methionyl-L-aspartyl-L-phenylalaninamide. The C-terminal tetrapeptide of gastrin. It is the smallest peptide fragment of gastrin which has the same physiological and pharmacological activity as gastrin.Rosacea: A cutaneous disorder primarily of convexities of the central part of the FACE, such as FOREHEAD; CHEEK; NOSE; and CHIN. It is characterized by FLUSHING; ERYTHEMA; EDEMA; RHINOPHYMA; papules; and ocular symptoms. It may occur at any age but typically after age 30. There are various subtypes of rosacea: erythematotelangiectatic, papulopustular, phymatous, and ocular (National Rosacea Society's Expert Committee on the Classification and Staging of Rosacea, J Am Acad Dermatol 2002; 46:584-7).Recurrence: The return of a sign, symptom, or disease after a remission.Patient Compliance: Voluntary cooperation of the patient in following a prescribed regimen.Antibodies, Bacterial: Immunoglobulins produced in a response to BACTERIAL ANTIGENS.Biopsy: Removal and pathologic examination of specimens in the form of small pieces of tissue from the living body.Precancerous Conditions: Pathological processes that tend eventually to become malignant. (From Dorland, 27th ed)Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic: Works about clinical trials that involve at least one test treatment and one control treatment, concurrent enrollment and follow-up of the test- and control-treated groups, and in which the treatments to be administered are selected by a random process, such as the use of a random-numbers table.Gastric Juice: The liquid secretion of the stomach mucosa consisting of hydrochloric acid (GASTRIC ACID); PEPSINOGENS; INTRINSIC FACTOR; GASTRIN; MUCUS; and the bicarbonate ion (BICARBONATES). (From Best & Taylor's Physiological Basis of Medical Practice, 12th ed, p651)Parietal Cells, Gastric: Rounded or pyramidal cells of the GASTRIC GLANDS. They secrete HYDROCHLORIC ACID and produce gastric intrinsic factor, a glycoprotein that binds VITAMIN B12.Gastrointestinal Diseases: Diseases in any segment of the GASTROINTESTINAL TRACT from ESOPHAGUS to RECTUM.Bacterial Proteins: Proteins found in any species of bacterium.NitroimidazolesLithostathine: The proteinaceous component of the pancreatic stone in patients with PANCREATITIS.Anti-Inflammatory Agents, Non-Steroidal: Anti-inflammatory agents that are non-steroidal in nature. In addition to anti-inflammatory actions, they have analgesic, antipyretic, and platelet-inhibitory actions.They act by blocking the synthesis of prostaglandins by inhibiting cyclooxygenase, which converts arachidonic acid to cyclic endoperoxides, precursors of prostaglandins. Inhibition of prostaglandin synthesis accounts for their analgesic, antipyretic, and platelet-inhibitory actions; other mechanisms may contribute to their anti-inflammatory effects.Poliovirus Vaccine, Oral: A live vaccine containing attenuated poliovirus, types I, II, and III, grown in monkey kidney cell tissue culture, used for routine immunization of children against polio. This vaccine induces long-lasting intestinal and humoral immunity. Killed vaccine induces only humoral immunity. Oral poliovirus vaccine should not be administered to immunocompromised individuals or their household contacts. (Dorland, 28th ed)Anti-Infective Agents, Local: Substances used on humans and other animals that destroy harmful microorganisms or inhibit their activity. They are distinguished from DISINFECTANTS, which are used on inanimate objects.Polyps: Discrete abnormal tissue masses that protrude into the lumen of the DIGESTIVE TRACT or the RESPIRATORY TRACT. Polyps can be spheroidal, hemispheroidal, or irregular mound-shaped structures attached to the MUCOUS MEMBRANE of the lumen wall either by a stalk, pedunculus, or by a broad base.Poliovirus Vaccines: Vaccines used to prevent POLIOMYELITIS. They include inactivated (POLIOVIRUS VACCINE, INACTIVATED) and oral vaccines (POLIOVIRUS VACCINE, ORAL).Immunologic Tests: Immunologic techniques involved in diagnosis.Diterpenes, Abietane: A group of DITERPENES cyclized into 3-ring PHENANTHRENES.Dracunculiasis: Infection with nematodes of the genus Dracunculus. One or more worms may be seen at a time, with the legs and feet being the most commonly infected areas. Symptoms include pruritus, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, or asthmatic attacks.Microbial Sensitivity Tests: Any tests that demonstrate the relative efficacy of different chemotherapeutic agents against specific microorganisms (i.e., bacteria, fungi, viruses).Anemia, Iron-Deficiency: Anemia characterized by decreased or absent iron stores, low serum iron concentration, low transferrin saturation, and low hemoglobin concentration or hematocrit value. The erythrocytes are hypochromic and microcytic and the iron binding capacity is increased.Smallpox: An acute, highly contagious, often fatal infectious disease caused by an orthopoxvirus characterized by a biphasic febrile course and distinctive progressive skin eruptions. Vaccination has succeeded in eradicating smallpox worldwide. (Dorland, 28th ed)Drug Resistance, Microbial: The ability of microorganisms, especially bacteria, to resist or to become tolerant to chemotherapeutic agents, antimicrobial agents, or antibiotics. This resistance may be acquired through gene mutation or foreign DNA in transmissible plasmids (R FACTORS).Lactobacillus acidophilus: A species of gram-positive, rod-shaped bacteria isolated from the intestinal tract of humans and animals, the human mouth, and vagina. This organism produces the fermented product, acidophilus milk.Chronic Disease: Diseases which have one or more of the following characteristics: they are permanent, leave residual disability, are caused by nonreversible pathological alteration, require special training of the patient for rehabilitation, or may be expected to require a long period of supervision, observation, or care. (Dictionary of Health Services Management, 2d ed)Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Drug Costs: The amount that a health care institution or organization pays for its drugs. It is one component of the final price that is charged to the consumer (FEES, PHARMACEUTICAL or PRESCRIPTION FEES).Sensitivity and Specificity: Binary classification measures to assess test results. Sensitivity or recall rate is the proportion of true positives. Specificity is the probability of correctly determining the absence of a condition. (From Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 2d ed)Controlled Clinical Trials as Topic: Works about clinical trials involving one or more test treatments, at least one control treatment, specified outcome measures for evaluating the studied intervention, and a bias-free method for assigning patients to the test treatment. The treatment may be drugs, devices, or procedures studied for diagnostic, therapeutic, or prophylactic effectiveness. Control measures include placebos, active medicines, no-treatment, dosage forms and regimens, historical comparisons, etc. When randomization using mathematical techniques, such as the use of a random numbers table, is employed to assign patients to test or control treatments, the trials are characterized as RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED TRIALS AS TOPIC.Single-Blind Method: A method in which either the observer(s) or the subject(s) is kept ignorant of the group to which the subjects are assigned.Feces: Excrement from the INTESTINES, containing unabsorbed solids, waste products, secretions, and BACTERIA of the DIGESTIVE SYSTEM.World Health: The concept pertaining to the health status of inhabitants of the world.Drug Combinations: Single preparations containing two or more active agents, for the purpose of their concurrent administration as a fixed dose mixture.RNA, Ribosomal, 23S: Constituent of 50S subunit of prokaryotic ribosomes containing about 3200 nucleotides. 23S rRNA is involved in the initiation of polypeptide synthesis.Polymerase Chain Reaction: In vitro method for producing large amounts of specific DNA or RNA fragments of defined length and sequence from small amounts of short oligonucleotide flanking sequences (primers). The essential steps include thermal denaturation of the double-stranded target molecules, annealing of the primers to their complementary sequences, and extension of the annealed primers by enzymatic synthesis with DNA polymerase. The reaction is efficient, specific, and extremely sensitive. Uses for the reaction include disease diagnosis, detection of difficult-to-isolate pathogens, mutation analysis, genetic testing, DNA sequencing, and analyzing evolutionary relationships.Cost-Benefit Analysis: A method of comparing the cost of a program with its expected benefits in dollars (or other currency). The benefit-to-cost ratio is a measure of total return expected per unit of money spent. This analysis generally excludes consideration of factors that are not measured ultimately in economic terms. Cost effectiveness compares alternative ways to achieve a specific set of results.Ghrelin: A 28-amino acid, acylated, orexigenic peptide that is a ligand for GROWTH HORMONE SECRETAGOGUE RECEPTORS. Ghrelin is widely expressed but primarily in the stomach in the adults. Ghrelin acts centrally to stimulate growth hormone secretion and food intake, and peripherally to regulate energy homeostasis. Its large precursor protein, known as appetite-regulating hormone or motilin-related peptide, contains ghrelin and obestatin.Immunization Programs: Organized services to administer immunization procedures in the prevention of various diseases. The programs are made available over a wide range of sites: schools, hospitals, public health agencies, voluntary health agencies, etc. They are administered to an equally wide range of population groups or on various administrative levels: community, municipal, state, national, international.Prevalence: The total number of cases of a given disease in a specified population at a designated time. It is differentiated from INCIDENCE, which refers to the number of new cases in the population at a given time.Lactobacillus: A genus of gram-positive, microaerophilic, rod-shaped bacteria occurring widely in nature. Its species are also part of the many normal flora of the mouth, intestinal tract, and vagina of many mammals, including humans. Pathogenicity from this genus is rare.Platelet Count: The number of PLATELETS per unit volume in a sample of venous BLOOD.Chromosomes, Human, Pair 18: A specific pair of GROUP E CHROMOSOMES of the human chromosome classification.IranDracunculus Nematode: A genus of nematode parasites which inhabit the body cavity, serous membranes, and connective tissues of vertebrates. The parasitic species in humans is Dracunculus medinensis.Retrospective Studies: Studies used to test etiologic hypotheses in which inferences about an exposure to putative causal factors are derived from data relating to characteristics of persons under study or to events or experiences in their past. The essential feature is that some of the persons under study have the disease or outcome of interest and their characteristics are compared with those of unaffected persons.Chi-Square Distribution: A distribution in which a variable is distributed like the sum of the squares of any given independent random variable, each of which has a normal distribution with mean of zero and variance of one. The chi-square test is a statistical test based on comparison of a test statistic to a chi-square distribution. The oldest of these tests are used to detect whether two or more population distributions differ from one another.JapanDrug Resistance: Diminished or failed response of an organism, disease or tissue to the intended effectiveness of a chemical or drug. It should be differentiated from DRUG TOLERANCE which is the progressive diminution of the susceptibility of a human or animal to the effects of a drug, as a result of continued administration.Remission Induction: Therapeutic act or process that initiates a response to a complete or partial remission level.Carbon Isotopes: Stable carbon atoms that have the same atomic number as the element carbon, but differ in atomic weight. C-13 is a stable carbon isotope.Enzyme Inhibitors: Compounds or agents that combine with an enzyme in such a manner as to prevent the normal substrate-enzyme combination and the catalytic reaction.Administration, Oral: The giving of drugs, chemicals, or other substances by mouth.Gerbillinae: A subfamily of the Muridae consisting of several genera including Gerbillus, Rhombomys, Tatera, Meriones, and Psammomys.Genotype: The genetic constitution of the individual, comprising the ALLELES present at each GENETIC LOCUS.Case-Control Studies: Studies which start with the identification of persons with a disease of interest and a control (comparison, referent) group without the disease. The relationship of an attribute to the disease is examined by comparing diseased and non-diseased persons with regard to the frequency or levels of the attribute in each group.Republic of Korea: The capital is Seoul. The country, established September 9, 1948, is located on the southern part of the Korean Peninsula. Its northern border is shared with the Democratic People's Republic of Korea.Pilot Projects: Small-scale tests of methods and procedures to be used on a larger scale if the pilot study demonstrates that these methods and procedures can work.Poliovirus: A species of ENTEROVIRUS which is the causal agent of POLIOMYELITIS in humans. Three serotypes (strains) exist. Transmission is by the fecal-oral route, pharyngeal secretions, or mechanical vector (flies). Vaccines with both inactivated and live attenuated virus have proven effective in immunizing against the infection.Hydrogen-Ion Concentration: The normality of a solution with respect to HYDROGEN ions; H+. It is related to acidity measurements in most cases by pH = log 1/2[1/(H+)], where (H+) is the hydrogen ion concentration in gram equivalents per liter of solution. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)Lewis Blood-Group System: A group of dominantly and independently inherited antigens associated with the ABO blood factors. They are glycolipids present in plasma and secretions that may adhere to the erythrocytes. The phenotype Le(b) is the result of the interaction of the Le gene Le(a) with the genes for the ABO blood groups.Antigens, Bacterial: Substances elaborated by bacteria that have antigenic activity.Pepsinogens: Proenzymes secreted by chief cells, mucous neck cells, and pyloric gland cells, which are converted into pepsin in the presence of gastric acid or pepsin itself. (Dorland, 28th ed) In humans there are 2 related pepsinogen systems: PEPSINOGEN A (formerly pepsinogen I or pepsinogen) and PEPSINOGEN C (formerly pepsinogen II or progastricsin). Pepsinogen B is the name of a pepsinogen from pigs.Americas: The general name for NORTH AMERICA; CENTRAL AMERICA; and SOUTH AMERICA unspecified or combined.Risk Factors: An aspect of personal behavior or lifestyle, environmental exposure, or inborn or inherited characteristic, which, on the basis of epidemiologic evidence, is known to be associated with a health-related condition considered important to prevent.Helicobacter: A genus of gram-negative, spiral-shaped bacteria that has been isolated from the intestinal tract of mammals, including humans. It has been associated with PEPTIC ULCER.Poliovirus Vaccine, Inactivated: A suspension of formalin-inactivated poliovirus grown in monkey kidney cell tissue culture and used to prevent POLIOMYELITIS.DNA, Bacterial: Deoxyribonucleic acid that makes up the genetic material of bacteria.Combined Modality Therapy: The treatment of a disease or condition by several different means simultaneously or sequentially. Chemoimmunotherapy, RADIOIMMUNOTHERAPY, chemoradiotherapy, cryochemotherapy, and SALVAGE THERAPY are seen most frequently, but their combinations with each other and surgery are also used.Dose-Response Relationship, Drug: The relationship between the dose of an administered drug and the response of the organism to the drug.Immunoglobulin G: The major immunoglobulin isotype class in normal human serum. There are several isotype subclasses of IgG, for example, IgG1, IgG2A, and IgG2B.Campylobacter: A genus of bacteria found in the reproductive organs, intestinal tract, and oral cavity of animals and man. Some species are pathogenic.Pepsinogen C: This is one of the 2 related pepsinogen systems in humans. It is found in prostate and seminal fluid whereas PEPSINOGEN A is not.Endoscopy, Digestive System: Endoscopic examination, therapy or surgery of the digestive tract.Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay: An immunoassay utilizing an antibody labeled with an enzyme marker such as horseradish peroxidase. While either the enzyme or the antibody is bound to an immunosorbent substrate, they both retain their biologic activity; the change in enzyme activity as a result of the enzyme-antibody-antigen reaction is proportional to the concentration of the antigen and can be measured spectrophotometrically or with the naked eye. Many variations of the method have been developed.Serologic Tests: Diagnostic procedures involving immunoglobulin reactions.Achlorhydria: A lack of HYDROCHLORIC ACID in GASTRIC JUICE despite stimulation of gastric secretion.Molecular Sequence Data: Descriptions of specific amino acid, carbohydrate, or nucleotide sequences which have appeared in the published literature and/or are deposited in and maintained by databanks such as GENBANK, European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), National Biomedical Research Foundation (NBRF), or other sequence repositories.Measles: A highly contagious infectious disease caused by MORBILLIVIRUS, common among children but also seen in the nonimmune of any age, in which the virus enters the respiratory tract via droplet nuclei and multiplies in the epithelial cells, spreading throughout the MONONUCLEAR PHAGOCYTE SYSTEM.
Cheung TK, Xia HH, Wong BC (January 2007). "Helicobacter pylori eradication for gastric cancer prevention". Journal of ... Over half of the world's population is colonized with H. pylori and it is estimated that H. pylori-positive patients have a 1-2 ... Barry Marshall Clonally transmissible cancer Harald zur Hausen Helicobacter pylori eradication protocols J. Robin Warren List ... pylori, especially if the H. pylori are cagA positive. The increase in 8-OHdG likely increases mutation. In addition, oxidative ...
Dyspepsia Peptic ulcer disease including after endoscopic treatment for bleeding As part of Helicobacter pylori eradication ... "Optimum duration of regimens for Helicobacter pylori eradication". Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews. 12: CD008337. doi: ...
"Regression of autoimmune thrombocytopenia after eradication of Helicobacter pylori". Lancet. 352 (9131): 878. doi:10.1016/S0140 ... studies of the role of Helicobacter pylori in autoimmune thrombocytopenia; research on the pathogenesis of biliary tract stones ...
Goggin N, Rowland M, Imrie C, Walsh D, Clyne M, Drumm B (1998). "Effect of Helicobacter pylori eradication on the natural ... It is also used to find Helicobacter pylori. Intestinal mucins also take up the stain although not as strongly as campylobacter ...
... a low-cost alternative for Helicobacter pylori eradication in children". Jornal de pediatria. 84 (2): 160-5. doi:10.2223/JPED. ... Use in treating Helicobacter pylori infections has also been proposed. Furazolidone is also used for giardiasis (due to Giardia ...
The supplement also significantly decreased usual side effects of H. pylori eradication therapy including diarrhea and nausea. ... Saccharomyces boulardii supplementation and eradication of Helicobacter pylori infection". Alimentary Pharmacology & ... The addition of S. boulardii to the standard triple medication protocol for elimination of Helicobacter pylori infection showed ... a significant increase in eradication rates in a meta-analysis, though eradication rates were still not exceptional. ...
"Duodenal bicarbonate secretion: Eradication of Helicobacter pylori and duodenal structure and function in humans". ... In patients with duodenal ulcers, Helicobacter pylori eradication can restore mucosal bicarbonate secretion, and reduce the ...
Helicobacter pylori eradication protocols "P/74/2009: European Medicines Agency decision of 20 April 2009 on the granting of a ... "Update on triple therapy for eradication of Helicobacter pylori: current status of the art". Clinical and Experimental ... is a bismuth salt used in combination with antibiotics and a proton pump inhibitor for the treatment of Helicobacter pylori ...
... and proton-pump inhibitor-based triple regimens for the eradication of Helicobacter pylori in Chinese patients with gastritis ... Treatment for esophagitis Part of a multidrug regimen for Helicobacter pylori eradication, although omeprazole may be somewhat ... "Proton-pump inhibitors versus H2-receptor antagonists in triple therapy for Helicobacter pylori eradication". Nihon rinsho. ... "Omeprazole enhances efficacy of triple therapy in eradicating Helicobacter pylori". Gut. 37 (4): 477-81. doi:10.1136/gut.37.4. ...
... pylori eradication as compared with controls. Systematic reviews of eradication have been conducted, with varying results. A ... Controlled trials disagree about whether or not H. pylori eradication is beneficial in functional dyspepsia, with roughly half ... Moayyedi, P; Deeks, J; Talley, NJ (2003). "An update of the Cochrane systematic review of Helicobacter pylori eradication ... eradication of H. pylori, duodenal and gastric ulcers, and NSAID-induced ulcer healing and prevention, but not functional ...
Duration of first-line proton-pump inhibitor based triple therapy for Helicobacter pylori eradication". Annals of Internal ... Treatment of H. pylori infection can be completed by taking a triple therapy combination of omeprazole, amoxicillin, and ... "Current concepts in the management of Helicobacter pylori infection: the Maastricht III Consensus Report". Gut. 56 (6): 772-81 ...
2002). "mRNA expression of EGF receptor ligands in atrophic gastritis before and after Helicobacter pylori eradication". ...
... associated with Helicobacter pylori infection may respond to H pylori eradication therapy, although resumption of ... "Long-term effect of Helicobacter pylori eradication on the reversibility of acid secretion in profound hypochlorhydria". ... Bacterial overgrowth may cause false positive H. Pylori test results due to the change in pH from urease activity. Small bowel ... 1997). "Helicobacter pylori infection and chronic gastric acid hyposecretion". Gastroenterology. 113 (1): 15-24. doi:10.1016/ ...
About 60% of MALT lymphomas completely regress with eradication therapy. Radiation treatment for H. pylori negative gastric ... May 1994). "Helicobacter pylori infection and gastric lymphoma". N. Engl. J. Med. 330 (18): 1267-71. doi:10.1056/ ... Risk factors for gastric lymphoma include the following: Helicobacter pylori Long-term immunosuppressant drug therapy HIV ... "Regression of primary gastric lymphoma of mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue type after cure of Helicobacter pylori infection. ...
... pylori eradication, which is now the mainstay of therapy. Fifty to 95% of cases achieve complete response (CR) with H. pylori ... "Most patients with minimal histological residuals of gastric MALT lymphoma after successful eradication of Helicobacter pylori ... positive gastric mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma to Helicobacter pylori eradication therapy". Lancet. 357 (9249): 39 ... of primary low-grade B-cell gastric lymphoma of mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue type after eradication of Helicobacter pylori ...
... eradication of Heliobacter pylori show marked decreases in ammonia levels. Urease in peptic ulcers Helicobacter pylori is also ... "Role of Helicobacter pylori infection in the pathogenesis of minimal hepatic encephalopathy and effect of its eradication". ... Heliobacter pylori are microbial ureases found in the stomach. As ureases they hydrolyze urea to produce ammonia and carbonic ... Helicobacter pylori: Physiology and Genetics. Washington (DC): ASM Press. ISBN 1-55581-213-9. PMID 21290719. Molecular and ...
Ermis F, Akyuz F, Mungan Z. Recurrence of Helicobacter pylori after eradication in patient with peptic ulcer. South Med J. 105: ... After eradication of Helicobacter pylori infection relapse is a serious problem in Turkey. J Clin Gastroenterol, 28:241-244, ( ... Second-line levofloxacin-based triple therapy's efficiency for Helicobacter pylori eradication in patients with peptic ulcer. ... Besısık F, Sürücü F, Mungan Z, Dinçer D, Kapran Y, Kaymakoglu S, Çevikbaş U. Helicobacter pylori eredication lowers esophageal ...
Helicobacter pylori is linked to cancer, and antibiotic resistance impedes the success of current antibiotic-based eradication ... Ruggiero, Paolo (November 15, 2014). "Use of Probiotics in the fight against Helicobacter pylori". NCBI. 5 (4): 384-391. doi: ... species can be administered as probiotics during cases of infection by the ulcer-causing bacterium Helicobacter pylori. ...
Pimanov SI, Makarenko EV, Voropaeva AV, Matveenko ME, Voropaev EV (2008). "Helicobacter pylori eradication improves gastric ... "Barrett's esophagus is characterized by the absence of Helicobacter pylori infection and high levels of serum pepsinogen I ...
... eradication of H. pylori infection and reduction of side effects from standard H. pylori treatment, amelioration of gingivitis ... 2008). "Inhibition of Helicobacter pylori infection in humans by Lactobacillus reuteri ATCC 55730 and effect on eradication ... "Lactobacillus reuteri therapy to reduce side-effects during anti-Helicobacter pylori treatment in children: A randomized ... "Lactobacillus reuteri tablets suppress Helicobacter pylori infection--a double-blind randomised placebo-controlled cross-over ...
In 2006 the results of a Phase II study of Heliconda in around 130 patients with resistant H. pylori infection was published. ... This study demonstrated an eradication of the infection in 90.9% of patients treated with Heliconda. Ibaconda is a product for ... Heliconda, a product for the treatment of drug-resistant Helicobacter pylori, is a combination of the antibiotics rifabutin and ... for resistant Helicobacter pylori infection". Pubmed. 26 June 2006. Retrieved 6 June 2006. WO application 9850043 - US Patent ...
"Helicobacter pylori eradication therapy to prevent gastric cancer in healthy asymptomatic infected individuals: systematic ... Epidemiology of Helicobacter pylori and gastric cancer… Hatakeyama, M. & Higashi, H; Higashi (2005). "Helicobacter pylori CagA ... The mechanism by which H. pylori induces stomach cancer potentially involves chronic inflammation, or the action of H. pylori ... Helicobacter pylori infection is an essential risk factor in 65-80% of gastric cancers, but only 2% of people with Helicobacter ...
Part of a multidrug regimen for Helicobacter pylori eradication to reduce the risk of duodenal ulcer recurrence ...
As part of Helicobacter pylori eradication therapy[8]. *Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD or GORD) including symptomatic ... "Optimum duration of regimens for Helicobacter pylori eradication". Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews. 12: CD008337. doi: ...
Helicobacter pylori infection, alongside antibiotics (adjunctive treatment), treatment to kill H. pylori causing ulcers or ... See also: Helicobacter pylori eradication protocols. *#WHO-EM. *‡Withdrawn from market. *Clinical trials: *†Phase III ...
Part of a multidrug regimen for Helicobacter pylori eradication to reduce the risk of duodenal ulcer recurrence ...
RESULTS: By intention to treat analysis, Helicobacter pylori (H pylori) was eradicated in 73% and 76% of patients, respectively ... Eradication of the infection was considered when both the histologic examination and the urease test were negative for the ... One-week dual therapy with ranitidine bismuth citrate and clarithromycin for the treatment of Helicobacter pylori infection in ... well tolerated and effective for treatment of H pylori infection, and appears to be comparable to the 2-wk regimen in terms of ...
... pylori eradication rate and reduced the risk of overall H. pylori therapy-related adverse effects. In a cohort of patients in ... Achieving optimal eradication of H. pylori has proven difficult. Combination regimens that use two or three antibiotics with a ... Helicobacter pylori eradication protocols is a standard name for all treatment protocols for peptic ulcers and gastritis; the ... Patients with MALT lymphoma should also be tested and treated for H. pylori since eradication of this infection can induce ...
... pylori regimens that have a per-protocol eradication rate ≥90%. However, the eradication rate of the standard triple therapy ... In the paper entitled "Helicobacter pylori eradication therapies in the era of increasing antibiotic resistance: a paradigm ... In the paper entitled "7-day nonbismuth-containing concomitant therapy achieves a high eradication rate for Helicobacter pylori ... In the paper entitled "Recent insights into antibiotic resistance in Helicobacter pylori eradication," W. Wu et al. present the ...
... Guest Editors: Ping-I Hsu, Yoshio Yamaoka, Javier P. Gisbert, and Deng-Chyang Wu *H. pylori ... Helicobacter pylori Eradication Therapies in the Era of Increasing Antibiotic Resistance: A Paradigm Shift to Improved Efficacy ... Recent Insights into Antibiotic Resistance in Helicobacter pylori Eradication, Wenming Wu, Yunsheng Yang, and Gang Sun Volume ... 7-Day Nonbismuth-Containing Concomitant Therapy Achieves a High Eradication Rate for Helicobacter pylori in Taiwan, Sung-Shuo ...
New research suggests that eradication of Helicobacter pylori infection in the developed world may, at least in part, have ... The researchers explain that previous controlled trials have shown that, following successful H pylori eradication, patients ... Cite this: Does H pylori Eradication Explain Rising Obesity? - Medscape - Jun 09, 2014. ... with the latter unlikely to be driven by the eradication of H pylori. ...
Peptic Ulcer Duodenal Ulcer Pylorus Infection Dyspepsia Peptic Ulcer Disease These keywords were added by machine and not by ...
... pylori disease as adults? This new study explores the efficacy of bismuth-based therapy for children. ... a All children included in the analysis had apparently no history of previous treatment with H. pylori eradication therapy.. b ... a All children included in the analysis had apparently no history of previous treatment with H. pylori eradication therapy.. b ... a All children included in the analysis had apparently no history of previous treatment with H. pylori eradication therapy.. b ...
... pylori eradication. The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of pretreatment on cure rates of H. pylori ... The influence of pretreatment on cure rates of Helicobacter pylori eradication.. Janssen MJ1, Laheij RJ, Jansen JB, de Boer WA. ... pylori eradication. Three-day pretreatment with a proton pump inhibitor may decrease cure rates of this two-day quadruple ... pylori eradication than smokers and patients with functional dyspepsia, respectively (adjusted odds ratios: 4.79 (1.2-19) and ...
Will eradication of Helicobacter pylori improve symptoms of non-ulcer dyspepsia? BMJ 2000; 320 :1208 ... Will eradication of Helicobacter pylori improve symptoms of non-ulcer dyspepsia?. BMJ 2000; 320 doi: https://doi.org/10.1136/ ... these trials showed a much smaller summary estimate of eradication, which barely reaches significance (odds ratio 1.4, 95% ... that an improvement in dyspeptic symptoms occurred among patients with non-ulcer dyspepsia in whom Helicobacter pylori was ...
Helicobacter pylori / metabolism*. Hemorrhage. Humans. Infusions, Intravenous*. Male. Metronidazole / administration & dosage. ...
Levofloxacin-based triple therapy in first-line treatment for Helicobacter pylori eradication.. Nista EC1, Candelli M, Zocco MA ... A 7-day levofloxacin-based triple therapy can achieve higher H. pylori eradication rates than standard regimens. These data ... Recent studies suggested levofloxacin as an alternative option for both first-and second-line H. pylori eradication treatment. ... The standard first-line therapies for Helicobacter pylori eradication are based on clarithromycin and amoxicillin or ...
... pylori in an offshore island (Matsu) with a high prevalence of gastric cancer as well as premalignant gastric les ... Helicobacter pylori. (H. pylori) infection triggers this carcinogenic cascade and its eradication is currently. the most ... Community-based Helicobacter Pylori Eradication With Two Sequential Antibiotic Regimens for the Residents and Migrants From a ... Community-based Helicobacter Pylori Eradication With Two Sequential Antibiotic Regimens for the Residents and Migrants From a ...
Ideal length of treatment for Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) eradication. *Antibiotics for people with peptic ulcers caused by ... Optimum antibiotic doses for Helicobacter pylori eradication. Primary objective To assess the effectiveness of different doses ... To compare the incidence of adverse effects associated with different doses of antibiotics for H. pylori eradication. ... Dental hygiene in addition to drug treatment for Helicobacter pylori eradication. *What is the best regimen of proton pump ...
Background The risk stratification of healthy individuals after Helicobacter pylorieradication is an urgent issue. The ... Changes in aberrant DNA methylation after Helicobacter pylori eradication: a long-term follow-up study. Int J Cancer. 2013;133: ... 1 Effects of H. pylori eradication on methylation levels of the nine candidate methylation markers. Methylation levels (upper ... The risk stratification of healthy individuals after Helicobacter pylori eradication is an urgent issue. The assessment of ...
Aizthromycin or Clarithromycin in H-pylori Eradication Regimen (H-pylori). The safety and scientific validity of this study is ... h-pylori eradication confirmation [ Time Frame: two months after completion of 14 days standard treatment ]. confirmation of ... Eradication of helicobacter pylori is important for treatment of GU but ideal regimen is not available. ... Comparison of Azithromycin or Clarithromycin in 3drugs Protocol of H-pylori Eradication Regimen. ...
... org/an-adaptive-evolution-of-helicobacter-pylori-role-of-the-caga-presence-in-the-outcome-of-h-pylori-eradication-in-children- ... Eradication of Helicobacter pylori in Children. Meta Description: A resistance to antibacterial drugs is a classic ... There is an evidence that Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) has been colonizing humans for more than ten millions years or longer ...
Helicobacter Pylori Eradication and Motor Fluctuations in Parkinsons Disease. Clinical Intervention Awards, 2007. ... We will also verify H. pylori eradication at study completion. Relevance to Diagnosis/Treatment of Parkinsons Disease:. ... pylori infection with routine blood testing for antibodies to the bacterium. Those with evidence of H. pylori infection will be ... Treatment of H. pylori in patients with Parkinsons disease has been shown to improve clinical response to standard doses of ...
Aizthromycin or Clarithromycin in H-pylori Eradication Regimen (H-pylori). The safety and scientific validity of this study is ...
... pylori cure rate of standard 7-day clarithromycin-amoxycillin based triple therapy in non-ulcer dyspepsia patients. ... Results: H. pylori eradication following standard triple therapy was achieved in 53/68 (77.9%; 95% CI = 68-88) and in 53/66 ( ... Quadruple therapy with lactoferrin for Helicobacter pylori eradication: a randomised, multicentre study Dig Liver Dis. 2005 Jul ... Background: Helicobacter pylori eradication rate with standard triple therapies is decreasing. Recently, lactoferrin ...
... and allicin in HP eradication were evaluated. 210 patients who are HP positive in biopsy were involved in this study. The ... Helicobacter pylori eradication with beta carotene, ascorbic acid and allicin Acta Medica (Hradec Kralove). 2001;44(3):97-100. ... The eradication was achieved in 20 (66.6%) in group I, 15 (50%) in group II, 3 (10%) in group III, 15 (50%) in group IV, 0 (0 ... In this study, in vivo effectiveness of ascorbic acid (AA), beta carotene (BC) and allicin in HP eradication were evaluated. ...
"Helicobacter pylori", "H. pylori", "H pylori", "Campylobacter pylori", "C. pylori", "C pylori", "infection", "dyspepsia", " ... Global eradication.... *Global eradication rates for Helicobacter pylori infection: systematic review and meta-analysis of ... Results were expressed as relative risk for success of H pylori eradication and as difference in eradication rates among ... Global eradication rates for Helicobacter pylori infection: systematic review and meta-analysis of sequential therapy. BMJ 2013 ...
Helicobacter pylori eradication for premalignant lesions of the gastric mucosa. To assess the effect of Helicobacter pylori ... Ideal length of treatment for Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) eradication. *First-line sequential versus standard triple ... Dental hygiene in addition to drug treatment for Helicobacter pylori eradication. *Effect of the long-term use of proton pump ... Helicobacter pylori eradication for premalignant lesions of the gastric mucosa. Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews 2007, ...
... after Helicobacter pylori (HP) eradication. Methods: This is a prospective study over a period of 68 months (May 2009 - January ... HP eradication control was made after: 3 months, 6 months and one year of treatment. Results: During the study period, 1190 ... The eradication of HP was obtained in 98.41% with sequential treatment versus 88.73% with standard triple therapy (p = 0.026). ... The prevalence of infection with Helicobacter pylori (HP) in patients with functional dyspepsia is about 30% - 70%. The aim of ...
The possible link between IHD and Helicobacter pylori (H.pylori) inf ... CONCLUSIONS: H.pylori eradication is associated with modification of some clinical and biochemical parameters related to IHD ... The possible link between IHD and Helicobacter pylori (H.pylori) infection has been reported. However, the precise mechanism of ... Helicobacter pylori / pathogenicity*. Humans. Italy. Male. Middle Aged. Remission Induction. Risk Assessment. Risk Factors. ...
  • This means that at least 3 out of 10 people fail in their attempt to eradicate H-pylori, and in the process might suffer some nasty side-effects from taking the antibiotics. (h-pylori-symptoms.com)
  • CONCLUSIONS: These data provide limited, moderate quality evidence that searching for and eradicating H pylori reduces the incidence of gastric cancer in healthy asymptomatic infected Asian individuals, but these data cannot necessarily be extrapolated to other populations. (whiterose.ac.uk)
  • At entrance and two weeks after successful H. pylori eradication they filled in a questionnaire examining the intensity of dyspeptic symptoms and underwent measurement of GE of a 378 kcal solid test meal labelled with 75 μl of 13 C-octanoic acid. (termedia.pl)
  • They searched the literature for studies reporting on H pylori and obesity prevalence rates in random population samples of more than 100 subjects and discovered there was an inverse correlation between prevalence of the bacteria and rate of overweight/obesity in countries of the developed world. (medscape.com)
  • In comparative studies, H. pylori eradication rates ranged between 69% and 85% according to ITT and between 74% and 96% PP. Side effects included dark stools, urine discoloration, black tongue, burning tongue, and marked darkness of the gums. (medscape.com)
  • The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of pretreatment on cure rates of H. pylori eradication. (nih.gov)
  • On a per- protocol basis (results in full accordance with the protocol established for the study), the eradication rates observed were 92 percent for the group treated with Helicide vs. 87 percent for the group treated with OAC. (infectioncontroltoday.com)
  • Selective staining of gastric biopsies for H. pylori does not affect detection rates or turnaround time and improves cost compared to reflexive staining. (semanticscholar.org)
  • The eradication rates as determined by per-protocol and intention-to-treat analyses were 65.9% and 63.0%,respectively. (elsevier.com)
  • From the seven studies included in a recent meta-analysis(5) in which 534 patients received pantoprazole and 603 patients were given other PPIs, the mean H pylori eradication rates were 83% and 81%, respectively, indicating the equivalence of all PPIs. (hospitalpharmacyeurope.com)
  • A placebo-controlled randomized trial of eradication of Helicobacter pylori in the general population: study design and response rates of the Bristol Helicobacter Project. (acponline.org)
  • Diabetes status and insulin use in patients with type 2 diabetes before 2005 were the main exposures of interest and the first event of HP eradication in 2005 was the main outcome evaluated. (springer.com)
  • Intervention studies are now in progress to test the hypothesis that prevention of gastric malignancy is an outcome of H. pylori eradication. (eurekaselect.com)