Chironomidae: A family of nonbiting midges, in the order DIPTERA. Salivary glands of the genus Chironomus are used in studies of cellular genetics and biochemistry.Diptera: An order of the class Insecta. Wings, when present, number two and distinguish Diptera from other so-called flies, while the halteres, or reduced hindwings, separate Diptera from other insects with one pair of wings. The order includes the families Calliphoridae, Oestridae, Phoridae, SARCOPHAGIDAE, Scatophagidae, Sciaridae, SIMULIIDAE, Tabanidae, Therevidae, Trypetidae, CERATOPOGONIDAE; CHIRONOMIDAE; CULICIDAE; DROSOPHILIDAE; GLOSSINIDAE; MUSCIDAE; TEPHRITIDAE; and PSYCHODIDAE. The larval form of Diptera species are called maggots (see LARVA).Bluetongue: A reovirus infection, chiefly of sheep, characterized by a swollen blue tongue, catarrhal inflammation of upper respiratory and gastrointestinal tracts, and often by inflammation of sensitive laminae of the feet and coronet.Larva: Wormlike or grublike stage, following the egg in the life cycle of insects, worms, and other metamorphosing animals.Entomology: A discipline or occupation concerned with the study of INSECTS, including the biology and the control of insects.Bluetongue virus: The type species of ORBIVIRUS causing a serious disease in sheep, especially lambs. It may also infect wild ruminants and other domestic animals.Insect Vectors: Insects that transmit infective organisms from one host to another or from an inanimate reservoir to an animate host.Hymenoptera: An extensive order of highly specialized insects including bees, wasps, and ants.Wind: The motion of air relative to the earth's surface.Bombyx: A genus of silkworm MOTHS in the family Bombycidae of the order LEPIDOPTERA. The family contains a single species, Bombyx mori from the Greek for silkworm + mulberry tree (on which it feeds). A native of Asia, it is sometimes reared in this country. It has long been raised for its SILK and after centuries of domestication it probably does not exist in nature. It is used extensively in experimental GENETICS. (From Borror et al., An Introduction to the Study of Insects, 4th ed, p519)Insect Proteins: Proteins found in any species of insect.Simbu virus: A species in the ORTHOBUNYAVIRUS genus of the family BUNYAVIRIDAE family. Previously a large group of serotypes, most are now considered separate species.African Horse Sickness: An insect-borne reovirus infection of horses, mules and donkeys in Africa and the Middle East; characterized by pulmonary edema, cardiac involvement, and edema of the head and neck.Antarctic Regions: The continent lying around the South Pole and the southern waters of the Atlantic, Pacific, and Indian Oceans. It includes the Falkland Islands Dependencies. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p55)Orthobunyavirus: A genus of the family BUNYAVIRIDAE containing over 150 viruses, most of which are transmitted by mosquitoes or flies. They are arranged in groups defined by serological criteria, each now named for the original reference species (previously called serogroups). Many species have multiple serotypes or strains.Disease Vectors: Invertebrates or non-human vertebrates which transmit infective organisms from one host to another.Metamorphosis, Biological: Profound physical changes during maturation of living organisms from the immature forms to the adult forms, such as from TADPOLES to frogs; caterpillars to BUTTERFLIES.Pest Control, Biological: Use of naturally-occuring or genetically-engineered organisms to reduce or eliminate populations of pests.Diapause, Insect: Seasonal suspension of insect growth development. It can be either induced by environmental cues (e.g., PHOTOPERIOD) or as a facultative part of the life cycle in order to time development with seasonal changes.Bunyaviridae Infections: Virus diseases caused by the BUNYAVIRIDAE.Trypanosomatina: A suborder of monoflagellate parasitic protozoa that lives in the blood and tissues of man and animals. Representative genera include: Blastocrithidia, Leptomonas, CRITHIDIA, Herpetomonas, LEISHMANIA, Phytomonas, and TRYPANOSOMA. Species of this suborder may exist in two or more morphologic stages formerly named after genera exemplifying these forms - amastigote (LEISHMANIA), choanomastigote (CRITHIDIA), promastigote (Leptomonas), opisthomastigote (Herpetomonas), epimastigote (Blastocrithidia), and trypomastigote (TRYPANOSOMA).Hemolymph: The blood/lymphlike nutrient fluid of some invertebrates.Lepidoptera: A large order of insects comprising the butterflies and moths.Moon: The natural satellite of the planet Earth. It includes the lunar cycles or phases, the lunar month, lunar landscapes, geography, and soil.Aedes: A genus of mosquitoes (CULICIDAE) frequently found in tropical and subtropical regions. YELLOW FEVER and DENGUE are two of the diseases that can be transmitted by species of this genus.Muscidae: A family of the order DIPTERA with over 700 species. Important species that may be mechanical vectors of disease include Musca domesticus (HOUSEFLIES), Musca autumnalis (face fly), Stomoxys calcitrans (stable fly), Haematobia irritans (horn fly) and Fannia spp.Erythroxylaceae: A plant family of the order Linales, subclass Rosidae, class Magnoliopsida best known for the coca plant.Animal Distribution: A process by which animals in various forms and stages of development are physically distributed through time and space.Houseflies: Flies of the species Musca domestica (family MUSCIDAE), which infest human habitations throughout the world and often act as carriers of pathogenic organisms.Freezing: Liquids transforming into solids by the removal of heat.Plant Tumors: A localized proliferation of plant tissue forming a swelling or outgrowth, commonly with a characteristic shape and unlike any organ of the normal plant. Plant tumors or galls usually form in response to the action of a pathogen or a pest. (Holliday, P., A Dictionary of Plant Pathology, 1989, p330)Insect Bites and Stings: Bites and stings inflicted by insects.Seasons: Divisions of the year according to some regularly recurrent phenomena usually astronomical or climatic. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)Predatory Behavior: Instinctual behavior pattern in which food is obtained by killing and consuming other species.Beetles: INSECTS of the order Coleoptera, containing over 350,000 species in 150 families. They possess hard bodies and their mouthparts are adapted for chewing.Life Cycle Stages: The continuous sequence of changes undergone by living organisms during the post-embryonic developmental process, such as metamorphosis in insects and amphibians. This includes the developmental stages of apicomplexans such as the malarial parasite, PLASMODIUM FALCIPARUM.Arboviruses: Arthropod-borne viruses. A non-taxonomic designation for viruses that can replicate in both vertebrate hosts and arthropod vectors. Included are some members of the following families: ARENAVIRIDAE; BUNYAVIRIDAE; REOVIRIDAE; TOGAVIRIDAE; and FLAVIVIRIDAE. (From Dictionary of Microbiology and Molecular Biology, 2nd ed)Simuliidae: Several species of the genus Simulium (family Simuliidae) that act as intermediate hosts (vectors) for the parasitic disease ONCHOCERCIASIS.Insect Hormones: Hormones secreted by insects. They influence their growth and development. Also synthetic substances that act like insect hormones.Hemorrhagic Disease Virus, Epizootic: A species of ORBIVIRUS causing a fatal disease in deer. It is transmitted by flies of the genus Culicoides.Dehydration: The condition that results from excessive loss of water from a living organism.Metarhizium: A mitosporic fungal genus in the family Clavicipitaceae. It has teleomorphs in the family Nectriaceae. Metarhizium anisopliae is used in PESTICIDES.Tenebrio: A genus of beetles which infests grain products. Its larva is called mealworm.Decapoda (Crustacea): The largest order of CRUSTACEA, comprising over 10,000 species. They are characterized by three pairs of thoracic appendages modified as maxillipeds, and five pairs of thoracic legs. The order includes the familiar shrimps, crayfish (ASTACOIDEA), true crabs (BRACHYURA), and lobsters (NEPHROPIDAE and PALINURIDAE), among others.Livestock: Domesticated farm animals raised for home use or profit but excluding POULTRY. Typically livestock includes CATTLE; SHEEP; HORSES; SWINE; GOATS; and others.Bees: Insect members of the superfamily Apoidea, found almost everywhere, particularly on flowers. About 3500 species occur in North America. They differ from most WASPS in that their young are fed honey and pollen rather than animal food.African horse sickness virus: A species of ORBIVIRUS that causes disease in horses, mules, and donkeys. Via its principal vector CULICOIDES, it can also infect dogs, elephants, camels, cattle, sheep, goats, and, in special circumstances, humans.Biological Control Agents: Organisms, biological agents, or biologically-derived agents used strategically for their positive or adverse effect on the physiology and/or reproductive health of other organisms.Oligochaeta: A class of annelid worms with few setae per segment. It includes the earthworms such as Lumbricus and Eisenia.Phylogeography: A field of study concerned with the principles and processes governing the geographic distributions of genealogical lineages, especially those within and among closely related species. (Avise, J.C., Phylogeography: The History and Formation of Species. Harvard University Press, 2000)Tribolium: A genus of small beetles of the family Tenebrionidae; T. confusum is the "confused flour beetle".Ruminants: A suborder of the order ARTIODACTYLA whose members have the distinguishing feature of a four-chambered stomach, including the capacious RUMEN. Horns or antlers are usually present, at least in males.Juvenile Hormones: Compounds, either natural or synthetic, which block development of the growing insect.Ecdysteroids: Steroids that bring about MOLTING or ecdysis in insects. Ecdysteroids include the endogenous insect hormones (ECDYSONE and ECDYSTERONE) and the insect-molting hormones found in plants, the phytoecdysteroids. Phytoecdysteroids are natural insecticides.Acclimatization: Adaptation to a new environment or to a change in the old.Household Articles: Various material objects and items in the home. It includes temporary or permanent machinery and appliances. It does not include furniture or interior furnishings (FURNITURE see INTERIOR DESIGN AND FURNISHINGS; INTERIOR FURNISHINGS see INTERIOR DESIGN AND FURNISHINGS).Oviposition: The process of laying or shedding fully developed eggs (OVA) from the female body. The term is usually used for certain INSECTS or FISHES with an organ called ovipositor where eggs are stored or deposited before expulsion from the body.Wasps: Any of numerous winged hymenopterous insects of social as well as solitary habits and having formidable stings.Chemosterilants: Compounds that cause reproductive sterility in organisms. They are sometimes used to control pest populations by sterilizing males within the population.Dengue: An acute febrile disease transmitted by the bite of AEDES mosquitoes infected with DENGUE VIRUS. It is self-limiting and characterized by fever, myalgia, headache, and rash. SEVERE DENGUE is a more virulent form of dengue.Drosophila melanogaster: A species of fruit fly much used in genetics because of the large size of its chromosomes.Ecdysone: A steroid hormone that regulates the processes of MOLTING or ecdysis in insects.Mosquito Control: The reduction or regulation of the population of mosquitoes through chemical, biological, or other means.Culicidae: A family of the order DIPTERA that comprises the mosquitoes. The larval stages are aquatic, and the adults can be recognized by the characteristic WINGS, ANIMAL venation, the scales along the wing veins, and the long proboscis. Many species are of particular medical importance.Insect Control: The reduction or regulation of the population of noxious, destructive, or dangerous insects through chemical, biological, or other means.Molecular Sequence Data: Descriptions of specific amino acid, carbohydrate, or nucleotide sequences which have appeared in the published literature and/or are deposited in and maintained by databanks such as GENBANK, European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), National Biomedical Research Foundation (NBRF), or other sequence repositories.Salivary Glands: Glands that secrete SALIVA in the MOUTH. There are three pairs of salivary glands (PAROTID GLAND; SUBLINGUAL GLAND; SUBMANDIBULAR GLAND).ArgentinaSkin Tests: Epicutaneous or intradermal application of a sensitizer for demonstration of either delayed or immediate hypersensitivity. Used in diagnosis of hypersensitivity or as a test for cellular immunity.Horses: Large, hoofed mammals of the family EQUIDAE. Horses are active day and night with most of the day spent seeking and consuming food. Feeding peaks occur in the early morning and late afternoon, and there are several daily periods of rest.Butterflies: Slender-bodies diurnal insects having large, broad wings often strikingly colored and patterned.Population Density: Number of individuals in a population relative to space.Varroidae: A family of MITES in the subclass ACARI. It includes the single genus Varroa.Ants: Insects of the family Formicidae, very common and widespread, probably the most successful of all the insect groups. All ants are social insects, and most colonies contain three castes, queens, males, and workers. Their habits are often very elaborate and a great many studies have been made of ant behavior. Ants produce a number of secretions that function in offense, defense, and communication. (From Borror, et al., An Introduction to the Study of Insects, 4th ed, p676)Genes, Insect: The functional hereditary units of INSECTS.Phylogeny: The relationships of groups of organisms as reflected by their genetic makeup.Methoprene: Juvenile hormone analog and insect growth regulator used to control insects by disrupting metamorphosis. Has been effective in controlling mosquito larvae.Mite Infestations: Infestations with arthropods of the subclass ACARI, superorder Acariformes.Host-Parasite Interactions: The relationship between an invertebrate and another organism (the host), one of which lives at the expense of the other. Traditionally excluded from definition of parasites are pathogenic BACTERIA; FUNGI; VIRUSES; and PLANTS; though they may live parasitically.Species Specificity: The restriction of a characteristic behavior, anatomical structure or physical system, such as immune response; metabolic response, or gene or gene variant to the members of one species. It refers to that property which differentiates one species from another but it is also used for phylogenetic levels higher or lower than the species.Tephritidae: A large family of fruit flies in the order DIPTERA, comprising over 4,500 species in about 100 genera. They have patterned wings and brightly colored bodies and are found predominantly in the tropical latitudes.Cannibalism: Eating other individuals of one's own species.Nyctaginaceae: A plant family of the order Caryophyllales, subclass Caryophyllidae, class Magnoliopsida.Birds: Warm-blooded VERTEBRATES possessing FEATHERS and belonging to the class Aves.Ecdysterone: A steroid hormone that regulates the processes of MOLTING or ecdysis in insects. Ecdysterone is the 20-hydroxylated ECDYSONE.Rain: Water particles that fall from the ATMOSPHERE.Fat Body: A nutritional reservoir of fatty tissue found mainly in insects and amphibians.Cattle Diseases: Diseases of domestic cattle of the genus Bos. It includes diseases of cows, yaks, and zebus.Feeding Behavior: Behavioral responses or sequences associated with eating including modes of feeding, rhythmic patterns of eating, and time intervals.Body Size: The physical measurements of a body.Immunoglobulin E: An immunoglobulin associated with MAST CELLS. Overexpression has been associated with allergic hypersensitivity (HYPERSENSITIVITY, IMMEDIATE).Sheep: Any of the ruminant mammals with curved horns in the genus Ovis, family Bovidae. They possess lachrymal grooves and interdigital glands, which are absent in GOATS.Molting: Periodic casting off FEATHERS; HAIR; or cuticle. Molting is a process of sloughing or desquamation, especially the shedding of an outer covering and the development of a new one. This phenomenon permits growth in ARTHROPODS, skin renewal in AMPHIBIANS and REPTILES, and the shedding of winter coats in BIRDS and MAMMALS.Triethylenephosphoramide: An insect chemosterilant and an antineoplastic agent.Sequence Analysis, DNA: A multistage process that includes cloning, physical mapping, subcloning, determination of the DNA SEQUENCE, and information analysis.Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Insecticides: Pesticides designed to control insects that are harmful to man. The insects may be directly harmful, as those acting as disease vectors, or indirectly harmful, as destroyers of crops, food products, or textile fabrics.Agriculture: The science, art or practice of cultivating soil, producing crops, and raising livestock.WingHeteroptera: A suborder of HEMIPTERA, called true bugs, characterized by the possession of two pairs of wings. It includes the medically important families CIMICIDAE and REDUVIIDAE. (From Dorland, 28th ed)Beauveria: A mitosporic fungal genus. Teleomorphs are found in the family Clavicipitaceae and include Cordyceps bassiana. The species Beauveria bassiana is a common pathogen of ARTHROPODS and is used in PEST CONTROL.Drosophila Proteins: Proteins that originate from insect species belonging to the genus DROSOPHILA. The proteins from the most intensely studied species of Drosophila, DROSOPHILA MELANOGASTER, are the subject of much interest in the area of MORPHOGENESIS and development.Corpora Allata: Paired or fused ganglion-like bodies in the head of insects. The bodies secrete hormones important in the regulation of metamorphosis and the development of some adult tissues.Anopheles: A genus of mosquitoes (CULICIDAE) that are known vectors of MALARIA.Manduca: A genus of sphinx or hawk moths of the family Sphingidae. These insects are used in molecular biology studies during all stages of their life cycle.Drosophila: A genus of small, two-winged flies containing approximately 900 described species. These organisms are the most extensively studied of all genera from the standpoint of genetics and cytology.Ovum: A mature haploid female germ cell extruded from the OVARY at OVULATION.Suburban Population: The inhabitants of peripheral or adjacent areas of a city or town.SwitzerlandSex Ratio: The number of males per 100 females.Gene Expression Regulation, Developmental: Any of the processes by which nuclear, cytoplasmic, or intercellular factors influence the differential control of gene action during the developmental stages of an organism.Insects: The class Insecta, in the phylum ARTHROPODA, whose members are characterized by division into three parts: head, thorax, and abdomen. They are the dominant group of animals on earth; several hundred thousand different kinds having been described. Three orders, HEMIPTERA; DIPTERA; and SIPHONAPTERA; are of medical interest in that they cause disease in humans and animals. (From Borror et al., An Introduction to the Study of Insects, 4th ed, p1)Ceratitis capitata: A species of fruit fly originating in sub-Saharan Africa but widely distributed worldwide. One of the most destructive fruit pests, its larvae feed and develop on many different fruits and some vegetables.Touch Perception: The process by which the nature and meaning of tactile stimuli are recognized and interpreted by the brain, such as realizing the characteristics or name of an object being touched.Videotape Recording: Recording of visual and sometimes sound signals on magnetic tape.Disease Outbreaks: Sudden increase in the incidence of a disease. The concept includes EPIDEMICS and PANDEMICS.Cattle: Domesticated bovine animals of the genus Bos, usually kept on a farm or ranch and used for the production of meat or dairy products or for heavy labor.BrazilHydrocarbonsAnimal Communication: Communication between animals involving the giving off by one individual of some chemical or physical signal, that, on being received by another, influences its behavior.Sugar Alcohols: Polyhydric alcohols having no more than one hydroxy group attached to each carbon atom. They are formed by the reduction of the carbonyl group of a sugar to a hydroxyl group.(From Dorland, 28th ed)Temperature: The property of objects that determines the direction of heat flow when they are placed in direct thermal contact. The temperature is the energy of microscopic motions (vibrational and translational) of the particles of atoms.Abdomen: That portion of the body that lies between the THORAX and the PELVIS.Pupa: An inactive stage between the larval and adult stages in the life cycle of insects.Amino Acid Sequence: The order of amino acids as they occur in a polypeptide chain. This is referred to as the primary structure of proteins. It is of fundamental importance in determining PROTEIN CONFORMATION.Baculoviridae: Family of INSECT VIRUSES containing two subfamilies: Eubaculovirinae (occluded baculoviruses) and Nudibaculovirinae (nonoccluded baculoviruses). The Eubaculovirinae, which contain polyhedron-shaped inclusion bodies, have two genera: NUCLEOPOLYHEDROVIRUS and GRANULOVIRUS. Baculovirus vectors are used for expression of foreign genes in insects.Flight, Animal: The use of wings or wing-like appendages to remain aloft and move through the air.Population Dynamics: The pattern of any process, or the interrelationship of phenomena, which affects growth or change within a population.Base Sequence: The sequence of PURINES and PYRIMIDINES in nucleic acids and polynucleotides. It is also called nucleotide sequence.Ecosystem: A functional system which includes the organisms of a natural community together with their environment. (McGraw Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)Reproduction: The total process by which organisms produce offspring. (Stedman, 25th ed)Biological Assay: A method of measuring the effects of a biologically active substance using an intermediate in vivo or in vitro tissue or cell model under controlled conditions. It includes virulence studies in animal fetuses in utero, mouse convulsion bioassay of insulin, quantitation of tumor-initiator systems in mouse skin, calculation of potentiating effects of a hormonal factor in an isolated strip of contracting stomach muscle, etc.Fluorine: A nonmetallic, diatomic gas that is a trace element and member of the halogen family. It is used in dentistry as flouride (FLUORIDES) to prevent dental caries.Insect Viruses: Viruses infecting insects, the largest family being BACULOVIRIDAE.Anopheles gambiae: A species of mosquito in the genus Anopheles and the principle vector of MALARIA in Africa.Dengue Virus: A species of the genus FLAVIVIRUS which causes an acute febrile and sometimes hemorrhagic disease in man. Dengue is mosquito-borne and four serotypes are known.Housing: Living facilities for humans.Water Supply: Means or process of supplying water (as for a community) usually including reservoirs, tunnels, and pipelines and often the watershed from which the water is ultimately drawn. (Webster, 3d ed)Puerto Rico: An island in the Greater Antilles in the West Indies. Its capital is San Juan. It is a self-governing commonwealth in union with the United States. It was discovered by Columbus in 1493 but no colonization was attempted until 1508. It belonged to Spain until ceded to the United States in 1898. It became a commonwealth with autonomy in internal affairs in 1952. Columbus named the island San Juan for St. John's Day, the Monday he arrived, and the bay Puerto Rico, rich harbor. The island became Puerto Rico officially in 1932. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p987 & Room, Brewer's Dictionary of Names, 1992, p436)GluconatesCloning, Molecular: The insertion of recombinant DNA molecules from prokaryotic and/or eukaryotic sources into a replicating vehicle, such as a plasmid or virus vector, and the introduction of the resultant hybrid molecules into recipient cells without altering the viability of those cells.Disease Reservoirs: Animate or inanimate sources which normally harbor disease-causing organisms and thus serve as potential sources of disease outbreaks. Reservoirs are distinguished from vectors (DISEASE VECTORS) and carriers, which are agents of disease transmission rather than continuing sources of potential disease outbreaks.Molecular Sequence Annotation: The addition of descriptive information about the function or structure of a molecular sequence to its MOLECULAR SEQUENCE DATA record.Longevity: The normal length of time of an organism's life.Behavior, Animal: The observable response an animal makes to any situation.Phenotype: The outward appearance of the individual. It is the product of interactions between genes, and between the GENOTYPE and the environment.Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry: A microanalytical technique combining mass spectrometry and gas chromatography for the qualitative as well as quantitative determinations of compounds.RNA, Messenger: RNA sequences that serve as templates for protein synthesis. Bacterial mRNAs are generally primary transcripts in that they do not require post-transcriptional processing. Eukaryotic mRNA is synthesized in the nucleus and must be exported to the cytoplasm for translation. Most eukaryotic mRNAs have a sequence of polyadenylic acid at the 3' end, referred to as the poly(A) tail. The function of this tail is not known for certain, but it may play a role in the export of mature mRNA from the nucleus as well as in helping stabilize some mRNA molecules by retarding their degradation in the cytoplasm.Chromatography, Thin Layer: Chromatography on thin layers of adsorbents rather than in columns. The adsorbent can be alumina, silica gel, silicates, charcoals, or cellulose. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)Water: A clear, odorless, tasteless liquid that is essential for most animal and plant life and is an excellent solvent for many substances. The chemical formula is hydrogen oxide (H2O). (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)DNA, Complementary: Single-stranded complementary DNA synthesized from an RNA template by the action of RNA-dependent DNA polymerase. cDNA (i.e., complementary DNA, not circular DNA, not C-DNA) is used in a variety of molecular cloning experiments as well as serving as a specific hybridization probe.Extremities: The farthest or outermost projections of the body, such as the HAND and FOOT.Gene Expression Profiling: The determination of the pattern of genes expressed at the level of GENETIC TRANSCRIPTION, under specific circumstances or in a specific cell.Spodoptera: A genus of owlet moths of the family Noctuidae. These insects are used in molecular biology studies during all stages of their life cycle.
  • Whether it's a little simple midge, a flashy nymph, or a complex streamer that doesn't have a name, it's usually something the fish have never seen and might be the game changer. (vaildaily.com)
  • My nymph rig includes three flies: One attractor (red midge larva, egg pattern, etc.) and two droppers. (bluequillangler.com)
  • This attractor style nymph works as a general searching pattern, but can also be effective in rivers with high densities of sow bugs, scuds, and midge pupae. (slideinn.com)
  • Or, when you feel the slightest tick of the bottom, knowing it's the bottom, we're all to quick to lift our rod tips too fast to save our beloved nymph/pupa/scud/midge from getting hung up, and there goes our perfect drift. (jsflyfishing.com)
  • Great paired with a second midge or other smaller nymph under an indicator. (mimicflyfishing.com)
  • For adult emergence, the pupa moves through the larval chamber and breaks the gall surface until its head and thorax are completely outside. (ufl.edu)
  • A broccoli plant growing blind from swede midge larval feeding. (msu.edu)
  • A Brussels sprout plant growing multiple stalks, caused by swede midge larval feeding. (msu.edu)
  • According to Leonard C. Ferrington, Jr., a professor at the Department of Entomology at the University of Minnesota, "Midge larval densities depend on month of year, productivity of stream, and kinds of stream bottom substrates. (bluequillangler.com)
  • If exarate, the pupa is concealed inside the hardened skin (puparium) of the last larval instar. (tolweb.org)
  • Metamorphosis complete, larvae eruciform and apodous, frequently with the head reduced and retracted: tracheal system variable, most often amphipneustic, pupa either free or enclosed in the hardened larval cuticle or puparium, adecticous, primitively obtect but in higher forms exarate: wing-tracheation reduced. (springer.com)
  • Polytene chromosomes were originally observed in the larval salivary glands of Chironomus midges by Balbiani in 1881. (wikipedia.org)
  • It is evident when a female biting midge has landed on your arm, leg, neck or face, as this insect is capable of producing a very noticeable bite. (adirondackalmanack.com)
  • I must admit I'm not convinced about the insect angle as I only ever have these worms when the fish have spawned and I have fry, certainly have not seen anything like the pupae you described. (wetwebmedia.com)
  • Representing the most common of trout food sources, the midges. (bigyflyco.com)
  • 7 P.M. but alas the weather may defeat my purpose as the wind and light rain continues to keep the creek quiet with no midges, spinners, or even caddis are presently moving and thus the trout are moving and feeding but rarely. (flyanglersonline.com)
  • During the rain I did manage to take three trout on a small black midge pupa but now the trout are feeding only on occasion but with no rhythm. (flyanglersonline.com)
  • Once again the trout were feeding on midges, and I can't stress the importance of midges on spring creeks enough. (flyanglersonline.com)
  • There isn't a month of the year whene trout are not feeding on one stage of midge or another. (flyanglersonline.com)
  • Secondly when dealing with midge worm imitations, I seldom found that the trout keyed to the size and seldom were the midge worms found in the stomach samples all one sizes. (flyanglersonline.com)
  • There are times and places where you can encounter some true size sixteen midges and on occasion you will also encounter some true twenty four or even twenty six size midges, however these smaller midges are mixed in with larger midges and seldom have I found the trout that selective during midge emergences. (flyanglersonline.com)
  • Midge larvae are an important food source for trout year-round because they get knocked loose from the substrate and drift continuously in the water column, a phenomenon referred to as constant drift. (bluequillangler.com)
  • In most cases, opportunistic trout do not waste any time grabbing a midge larva that is floating helpless in the current. (bluequillangler.com)
  • Egg-midge combos are effective a large percentage of the winter because there are always a few trout spawning in our streams. (bluequillangler.com)
  • They look like 'skeeters but aren't, and despite their huge numbers on the surface, many trout will still hold tight to the river bottom, living large on midge larva trying to worm-wiggle their way to pupa status. (drakemag.com)
  • To witness the delicate beauty of a thick trout rising to a size 24 midge often means you're alone. (drakemag.com)
  • Trout Unlimited founder George Griffith is often given credit for this simple, peacock herl-and-grizzly hackle concoction-by far the most popular midge pattern. (drakemag.com)
  • After they reach the end of this cycle they pupate which and the pupa atge lasts for up to 3 days where they emerge to the surface by actively swimming and stay on the surface for several hours until the adult form emerges. (wikipedia.org)
  • Swede midge pupate in the top 0.75 inches of soil , but if buried below 2 inches, their pupae can persist for two years and can emerge if tillage brings them back to a favorable depth. (msu.edu)
  • The midge often breeds in swarms in areas of lakes and stagnant water which suits pupae and larvae to breed. (wikipedia.org)
  • Other invertebrates such as arthropods are known to prey on midges, this is usually through chance due to swarms landing/ getting caught in their webs. (wikipedia.org)
  • Here, we show that laboratory midge swarms have emergent continuum mechanical properties, displaying a collective viscoelastic response to applied oscillatory visual stimuli that allows us to extract storage and loss moduli for the swarm. (sciencemag.org)
  • Thus, unlike bird flocks, which appear to use collective behavior to promote lossless information flow through the group, our results suggest that midge swarms use it to stabilize themselves against environmental perturbations. (sciencemag.org)
  • Our results suggest that collective behavior in midge swarms serves to provide stability and robustness against environmental perturbations, consistent with their biological function and in contrast to other collective systems such as bird flocks and fish schools. (sciencemag.org)
  • Adult male midges are famous for joining together in swarms, "dancing" together in the air. (mo.gov)
  • Tying Note: The hackle is trimmed off of the bottom so that the pattern floats flush in the film, and by mixing and matching the colors of the thread and the hackle you can imitate any midge found on the waters that you fish. (flyanglersonline.com)
  • Schwiebert's theory was that when it was awash in the film, the herl and halo of hackle suggested the loosening pupal shuck around the dark body of the emerging midge. (troutnut.com)
  • The predatory gall midge, Feltiella acarisuga (Vallot), is one of the most effective and widespread natural enemies of spider mites (Tetranychidae) (Gagné 1995). (ufl.edu)
  • The pupae are obtect (wings and appendages are appressed to the body ) and bright orange. (ufl.edu)
  • The swede midge is about 2 millimeters in length, with hairy wings and a light brown or orange body. (msu.edu)
  • They emerge from overwintering pupae in May, and fly for one to five days looking for mates and host plants. (msu.edu)
  • The aquatic larvae of many midges are called bloodworms, for they are red from the hemoglobin molecules within their narrow bodies. (mo.gov)
  • With this diversity in food selection it is able to get sources of nutirents from algae, detritus, associated microorganism, macrophytes, woody debri and invertabrites The midge from the larva, pupa and adult form is predated on by river fish and other aquatic vertebrates such as indigenous minnows. (wikipedia.org)
  • Midge larvae often abound in fresh water habitats generally living on the bottoms of ponds, lakes, and streams, often amid sunken leaves and other detritus. (mo.gov)
  • The forcipomyia taiwana, a biting midge native to Taiwan, is an ecological problem, not a health problem, according to the local government, which says that without a natural enemy, the best preventative method is taking away the food source of both the larvae and the pupae. (taipeitimes.com)