Garlic: One of the Liliaceae used as a spice (SPICES) and traditional remedy. It contains alliin lyase and alliin, which is converted by alliin lyase to allicin, the pungent ingredient responsible for the aroma of fresh cut garlic.Allyl CompoundsSulfinic Acids: Any of the monobasic inorganic or organic acids of sulfur with the general formula RSO(OH). (From McGraw Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)Plants, Medicinal: Plants whose roots, leaves, seeds, bark, or other constituent parts possess therapeutic, tonic, purgative, curative or other pharmacologic attributes, when administered to man or animals.Plant Extracts: Concentrated pharmaceutical preparations of plants obtained by removing active constituents with a suitable solvent, which is evaporated away, and adjusting the residue to a prescribed standard.Allium: A genus of the plant family Liliaceae (sometimes classified as Alliaceae) in the order Liliales. Many produce pungent, often bacteriostatic and physiologically active compounds and are used as VEGETABLES; CONDIMENTS; and medicament, the latter in traditional medicine.Sulfides: Chemical groups containing the covalent sulfur bonds -S-. The sulfur atom can be bound to inorganic or organic moieties.Sulfur Compounds: Inorganic or organic compounds that contain sulfur as an integral part of the molecule.Phytotherapy: Use of plants or herbs to treat diseases or to alleviate pain.Onions: Herbaceous biennial plants and their edible bulbs, belonging to the Liliaceae.France: A country in western Europe bordered by the Atlantic Ocean, the English Channel, the Mediterranean Sea, and the countries of Belgium, Germany, Italy, Spain, Switzerland, the principalities of Andorra and Monaco, and by the duchy of Luxembourg. Its capital is Paris.Cooking and Eating UtensilsGinger: Deciduous plant rich in volatile oil (OILS, VOLATILE). It is used as a flavoring agent and has many other uses both internally and topically.Shellfish: Aquatic invertebrates belonging to the phylum MOLLUSCA or the subphylum CRUSTACEA, and used as food.Fishes: A group of cold-blooded, aquatic vertebrates having gills, fins, a cartilaginous or bony endoskeleton, and elongated bodies covered with scales.Furunculosis: A persistent skin infection marked by the presence of furuncles, often chronic and recurrent. In humans, the causative agent is various species of STAPHYLOCOCCUS. In salmonid fish (SALMONIDS), the pathogen is AEROMONAS SALMONICIDA.Vegetables: A food group comprised of EDIBLE PLANTS or their parts.Powders: Substances made up of an aggregation of small particles, as that obtained by grinding or trituration of a solid drug. In pharmacy it is a form in which substances are administered. (From Dorland, 28th ed)Fraud: Exploitation through misrepresentation of the facts or concealment of the purposes of the exploiter.Flavoring Agents: Substances added to foods and medicine to improve the quality of taste.Counterfeit Drugs: Drugs manufactured and sold with the intent to misrepresent its origin, authenticity, chemical composition, and or efficacy. Counterfeit drugs may contain inappropriate quantities of ingredients not listed on the label or package. In order to further deceive the consumer, the packaging, container, or labeling, may be inaccurate, incorrect, or fake.China: A country spanning from central Asia to the Pacific Ocean.Taste: The ability to detect chemicals through gustatory receptors in the mouth, including those on the TONGUE; the PALATE; the PHARYNX; and the EPIGLOTTIS.Medicare Assignment: Concept referring to the standardized fees for services rendered by health care providers, e.g., laboratories and physicians, and reimbursement for those services under Medicare Part B. It includes acceptance by the physician.Food Preferences: The selection of one food over another.RestaurantsMenu PlanningBooksGuanine Nucleotide Exchange Factors: Protein factors that promote the exchange of GTP for GDP bound to GTP-BINDING PROTEINS.Fast Foods: Prepared food that is ready to eat or partially prepared food that has a final preparation time of a few minutes or less.Drosophila Proteins: Proteins that originate from insect species belonging to the genus DROSOPHILA. The proteins from the most intensely studied species of Drosophila, DROSOPHILA MELANOGASTER, are the subject of much interest in the area of MORPHOGENESIS and development.Drosophila: A genus of small, two-winged flies containing approximately 900 described species. These organisms are the most extensively studied of all genera from the standpoint of genetics and cytology.New YorkEarthquakes: Sudden slips on a fault, and the resulting ground shaking and radiated seismic energy caused by the slips, or by volcanic or magmatic activity, or other sudden stress changes in the earth. Faults are fractures along which the blocks of EARTH crust on either side have moved relative to one another parallel to the fracture.New York CityMateria Medica: Materials or substances used in the composition of traditional medical remedies. The use of this term in MeSH was formerly restricted to historical articles or those concerned with traditional medicine, but it can also refer to homeopathic remedies. Nosodes are specific types of homeopathic remedies prepared from causal agents or disease products.Ginkgo biloba: The only specie of the genus Ginkgo, family Ginkgoacea. It is the source of extracts of medicinal interest, especially Egb 761. Ginkgo may refer to the genus or species.Medicine, Chinese Traditional: A system of traditional medicine which is based on the beliefs and practices of the Chinese culture.Drugs, Chinese Herbal: Chinese herbal or plant extracts which are used as drugs to treat diseases or promote general well-being. The concept does not include synthesized compounds manufactured in China.Ginkgolides: DITERPENES with three LACTONES and a unique tert-butyl group, which are found in GINKGO plants along with BILOBALIDES.History, Medieval: The period of history from the year 500 through 1450 of the common era.Integrative Medicine: The discipline concerned with using the combination of conventional ALLOPATHIC MEDICINE and ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE to address the biological, psychological, social, and spiritual aspects of health and illness.Complementary Therapies: Therapeutic practices which are not currently considered an integral part of conventional allopathic medical practice. They may lack biomedical explanations but as they become better researched some (PHYSICAL THERAPY MODALITIES; DIET; ACUPUNCTURE) become widely accepted whereas others (humors, radium therapy) quietly fade away, yet are important historical footnotes. Therapies are termed as Complementary when used in addition to conventional treatments and as Alternative when used instead of conventional treatment.Health Status: The level of health of the individual, group, or population as subjectively assessed by the individual or by more objective measures.Holistic Nursing: A philosophy of nursing practice that takes into account total patient care, considering the physical, emotional, social, economic, and spiritual needs of patients, their response to their illnesses, and the effect of illness on patients' abilities to meet self-care needs. (From Mosby's Medical, Nursing, & Allied Health Dictionary, 4th ed, p745)Food Habits: Acquired or learned food preferences.Stress, Psychological: Stress wherein emotional factors predominate.Aromatherapy: The use of fragrances and essences from plants to affect or alter a person's mood or behavior and to facilitate physical, mental, and emotional well-being. The chemicals comprising essential oils in plants has a host of therapeutic properties and has been used historically in Africa, Asia, and India. Its greatest application is in the field of alternative medicine. (From Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed; from Dr. Atiba Vheir, Dove Center, Washington, D.C.)Reproductive Medicine: A medical-surgical specialty concerned with the morphology, physiology, biochemistry, and pathology of reproduction in man and other animals, and on the biological, medical, and veterinary problems of fertility and lactation. It includes ovulation induction, diagnosis of infertility and recurrent pregnancy loss, and assisted reproductive technologies such as embryo transfer, in vitro fertilization, and intrafallopian transfer of zygotes. (From Infertility and Reproductive Medicine Clinics of North America, Foreword 1990; Journal of Reproduction and Fertility, Notice to Contributors, Jan 1979)Reproductive Health Services: Health care services related to human REPRODUCTION and diseases of the reproductive system. Services are provided to both sexes and usually by physicians in the medical or the surgical specialties such as REPRODUCTIVE MEDICINE; ANDROLOGY; GYNECOLOGY; OBSTETRICS; and PERINATOLOGY.Reproductive Health: The physical condition of human reproductive systems.Anti-Inflammatory Agents: Substances that reduce or suppress INFLAMMATION.Anti-Inflammatory Agents, Non-Steroidal: Anti-inflammatory agents that are non-steroidal in nature. In addition to anti-inflammatory actions, they have analgesic, antipyretic, and platelet-inhibitory actions.They act by blocking the synthesis of prostaglandins by inhibiting cyclooxygenase, which converts arachidonic acid to cyclic endoperoxides, precursors of prostaglandins. Inhibition of prostaglandin synthesis accounts for their analgesic, antipyretic, and platelet-inhibitory actions; other mechanisms may contribute to their anti-inflammatory effects.Food: Any substances taken in by the body that provide nourishment.Eating Disorders: A group of disorders characterized by physiological and psychological disturbances in appetite or food intake.
  • Garlic can also protect against tumors and some types of cancer, and contains vitamins A and C, Potassium , Selenium , a variety of amino acids, as well as more than 70 sulfur compounds. (gordonsuperfoods.com)
  • Garlic can help reduce blood pressure through the actions of its sulfur compounds and its ability to reduce the fatty substances, such as cholesterol, found in the bloodstream. (encyclopedia.com)
  • While garlic ranks as an excellent source of manganese and vitamin B6, a very good source of vitamin C and copper, and a good source of selenium, phosphorus, vitamin B1, and calcium in our WHFoods rating system, it is the sulfur compounds in garlic that serve as its spotlight nutrients in terms of overall health benefits. (whfoods.com)
  • Some have even argued that since our ancestors ate a diet rich in a variety of plants and herbs now missing in modern diets, we should consider phytonutrient-rich plants such as garlic to be essential nutrients! (improvehomelife.com)
  • The herb itself is pungent and warm, with a hint of spice and a refreshing aftertaste distinctive of many herbs in the mint family. (professorshouse.com)
  • Garlic is one of the most potent and important medicinal herbs and superfoods, used worldwide for a wide variety of ailments. (earthclinic.com)
  • Such pungent herbs and foods are great for drying excess moisture and mucus, and stimulating metabolism. (pukkaherbs.com)
  • Belz's group (at the Center for Cardiovascular Pharmacology, Mainz, Germany), did a cross-sectional, observational study comparing 101 healthy, non-smoking adults, ranging in age from 50 to 80 years, who had taken a minimum of 300 mg/day of standardized garlic powder daily for at least two years against a similar sized age, health and gender-controlled group who did not use garlic. (encognitive.com)
  • amount of plaque in two major arteries measured, and then took garlic powder for 48 months. (improvehomelife.com)
  • Garlic powder size: 80-100mesh, 100-120mesh. (alibaba.com)
  • You should also take about 1 cup of plain yogurt and add Multidophilus powder to it, then eat it after you've used the powerful garlic oil as I suggested. (earthclinic.com)
  • When it comes to garlic powder, not all brands are created equal. (oregonlive.com)
  • Now that everyone is cooking at home, garlic powder has reemerged from the back of the cabinet to help get dinner on the table more easily and efficiently. (oregonlive.com)
  • Karla Vasquez, a food writer and online cooking instructor at SalviSoul, her website documenting Salvadoran foodways and recipes, said of garlic powder: "It's an ingredient that empowers people in the kitchen. (oregonlive.com)
  • Garlic powder helps people skip a few steps to simplify the process. (oregonlive.com)
  • As anyone familiar with TikTok will tell you, Tabitha Brown is the garlic powder queen. (oregonlive.com)
  • No matter what she's making, she seasons it with garlic powder, either by itself or as part of spice mixes. (oregonlive.com)
  • One is textural, while the second is pure economics: "You might rub garlic powder on meat and sear it, then you make your country stew or jambalaya. (oregonlive.com)
  • We learned how to use it because garlic powder is economical and stays around longer. (oregonlive.com)
  • The economics of garlic powder raise another question that's often glossed over when discussing the "fresh versus dried" dynamic in food media: Who has access to fresh? (oregonlive.com)
  • In Mexican stores, you see garlic powder and garlic salt in the big display by the produce next to dried chiles, tamales, spice blends and tamarindos. (oregonlive.com)
  • Indeed, because of its availability in certain markets, garlic powder has enjoyed wide use by predominantly Black and Latin communities for seasoning their food for generations. (oregonlive.com)
  • Fried catfish, chicken or okra, Caribbean-style roast pork: None would have the same depth without garlic powder. (oregonlive.com)
  • For many cooks, garlic powder - slightly sweeter and less pungent than fresh - builds on the familiar flavors of caramelized meat so much that the two are intertwined. (oregonlive.com)
  • Garlic powder, however, may retain some active components. (howstuffworks.com)
  • Add garlic paste to 4 ounces of 100% olive oil. (earthclinic.com)
  • Although described as a mayonnaise by some experts, aioli differs from mayonnaise in that it uses lots of garlic and olive oil, while mayonnaise uses more vegetable oils and eggs only. (ehow.com)
  • Hailing from France's Provence region, traditional aioli is made by grinding garlic cloves with salt and olive oil using a mortar and pestle. (ehow.com)
  • While garlic is cooling, heat two tablespoons olive oil and butter in a large Dutch oven over medium-low heat. (sheknows.com)
  • The skin is typically removed before cooking, though sometimes alternative approaches are used, such as slice garlic head crosswise, coat in olive oil, roast until the garlic is well cooked, and then the roasted garlic separates quite easily from the skins (by pulling it out, shaking it out, and/or squeezing it out). (wikibooks.org)
  • I like using the black garlic is raw (like in a bruschetta), roasted whole cloves and then smeared on toasted bread with a drizzle of olive oil or sliced and fried like in this recipe. (steamykitchen.com)
  • Proponents of garlic-as-medicine generally divide themselves into two camps: the garlic extract (or aged garlic) group, and the powdered garlic group. (encognitive.com)
  • Since these compounds are not destroyed by aging, the garlic extract group says that theirs is an equally viable medicine. (encognitive.com)
  • effects of garlic extract on learning and memory impairment in aging mice. (improvehomelife.com)
  • Ide N, Lau BH,"Aged garlic extract attenuates intracellular oxidative stress," Phytomedicine, 1999 May;6(2):125-31. (improvehomelife.com)
  • They found that freshly pressed garlic extract, even diluted to one part in 250, proved effective against all the organisms in the laboratory study, including drug-resistant strains of bacteria. (newscientist.com)
  • The garlic extract not only inhibited, but also killed the bacteria,' says Klein. (newscientist.com)
  • Every day they gave the subjects a placebo capsule or a capsule containing aged garlic extract (250 mg) plus Vitamin B12 (100 micrograms), folic acid (300 micrograms), Vitamin B6 (12.5 mg), and the amino acid l-arginine (100 mg). (greenmedinfo.com)
  • A study published in the International Journal Cardiology shows that aged garlic extract helps alter the ratio of brown fat to white fat surrounding the heart muscle. (greenmedinfo.com)
  • The study randomized 60 subjects to receive either a daily placebo or a supplement containing 250 mg of aged garlic-extract, 100 micrograms of vitamin-B12, 300 micrograms of folic-acid, 12.5mg of vitamin-B6, and 100 mg of l-arginine. (greenmedinfo.com)
  • Another randomized placebo-controlled study from UCLA looked at the effect of aged garlic extract in patients on statin drugs. (greenmedinfo.com)
  • For one year, patients took either a placebo or 4 ml of aged garlic extract. (greenmedinfo.com)
  • At the end of the year, the rate of coronary calcification was 3 times slower for those taking the aged garlic extract. (greenmedinfo.com)
  • Over the centuries, several ancient cultures and civilisations have used garlic for its medicinal properties, including in Ayurveda. (deccanherald.com)
  • 3) In the 21st century, garlic continues to be a common seasoning in foods and packaged goods, but its potential medicinal properties are also gaining more appreciation in Western cultures. (everydayhealth.com)
  • I was lucky enough to get a few heads to play with from my friend Chef David Eger of Earthy.com (and in exchange I let him use the photo of black garlic that I shot), where they sell four ounces of black garlic for $10.00. (steamykitchen.com)
  • The hot, moist/oily, light, spreading, penetrating, and pungent qualities of the summer season have settled into the body and mind for many of us, creating dis-ease. (kripalu.org)
  • Siegers CP, et al, "The effects of garlic preparations against human tumor cell proliferation," Phytomedicine, 1999 Mar;6(1):7-11. (improvehomelife.com)
  • heart-protective effects of garlic showed that garlic supplementation tended to decrease "bad" LDL cholesterol and raise "good" HDL, more recent research has conflicted with those results. (improvehomelife.com)
  • What are the scientifically confirmed effects of garlic? (iherb.com)
  • Adriana Janovich of the SR food section spotlights garlic today, posting: "Luscious, pungent and powerful, garlic is best in small doses. (spokesman.com)
  • Taking large doses of anticoagulants such as garlic can cause hyphema or worsen hyphema that has other causes. (livestrong.com)
  • It found that garlic in daily doses ranging from 300 to 1,500 mg significantly reduced systolic and diastolic blood pressure in hypertensive patients compared to atenolol and placebo. (greenmedinfo.com)
  • If you would like a great hands-on example of how to bring garlic into your weekly meal plan in a delicious and easy-to-follow way, you need to look no further than our World's Healthiest Foods Meal Plan . (whfoods.com)
  • While often known for its addition to Italian foods, garlic seems to be used in virtually all cuisines as a strong flavoring agent. (everydayhealth.com)
  • Garlic is winter hardy but please be aware that the plant can be damaged if the temperature gets very cold and there is minimal snow cover, in this case cover the Garlic with straw to insulate it. (wikibooks.org)
  • For every 100 grams of garlic , you may get about 150 calories, 33 g of carbs, and 6.36 g of protein. (naturalnews.com)
  • In terms of amount, approximately 20 grams of garlic (in food form) best describes the quantity needed, and in terms of frequency, 1-3 times per week translates into measurable benefits. (whfoods.com)