Pathological processes which result in the partial or complete obstruction of ARTERIES. They are characterized by greatly reduced or absence of blood flow through these vessels. They are also known as arterial insufficiency.
Either of two large arteries originating from the abdominal aorta; they supply blood to the pelvis, abdominal wall and legs.
The main artery of the thigh, a continuation of the external iliac artery.
The degree to which BLOOD VESSELS are not blocked or obstructed.
The aorta from the DIAPHRAGM to the bifurcation into the right and left common iliac arteries.
Pathological processes involving any one of the BLOOD VESSELS in the vasculature outside the HEART.
Pathological processes involving any part of the AORTA.
The continuation of the femoral artery coursing through the popliteal fossa; it divides into the anterior and posterior tibial arteries.
Material, usually gauze or absorbent cotton, used to cover and protect wounds, to seal them from contact with air or bacteria. (From Dorland, 27th ed)
The condition of an anatomical structure's being constricted beyond normal dimensions.
A symptom complex characterized by pain and weakness in SKELETAL MUSCLE group associated with exercise, such as leg pain and weakness brought on by walking. Such muscle limpness disappears after a brief rest and is often relates to arterial STENOSIS; muscle ISCHEMIA; and accumulation of LACTATE.
A hypoperfusion of the BLOOD through an organ or tissue caused by a PATHOLOGIC CONSTRICTION or obstruction of its BLOOD VESSELS, or an absence of BLOOD CIRCULATION.
Use of a balloon catheter for dilation of an occluded artery. It is used in treatment of arterial occlusive diseases, including renal artery stenosis and arterial occlusions in the leg. For the specific technique of BALLOON DILATION in coronary arteries, ANGIOPLASTY, BALLOON, CORONARY is available.
The inferior part of the lower extremity between the KNEE and the ANKLE.
Operative procedures for the treatment of vascular disorders.
The anterior and posterior arteries created at the bifurcation of the popliteal artery. The anterior tibial artery begins at the lower border of the popliteus muscle and lies along the tibia at the distal part of the leg to surface superficially anterior to the ankle joint. Its branches are distributed throughout the leg, ankle, and foot. The posterior tibial artery begins at the lower border of the popliteus muscle, lies behind the tibia in the lower part of its course, and is found situated between the medial malleolus and the medial process of the calcaneal tuberosity. Its branches are distributed throughout the leg and foot.
An alternative to amputation in patients with neoplasms, ischemia, fractures, and other limb-threatening conditions. Generally, sophisticated surgical procedures such as vascular surgery and reconstruction are used to salvage diseased limbs.
Radiography of blood vessels after injection of a contrast medium.
Surgical excision, performed under general anesthesia, of the atheromatous tunica intima of an artery. When reconstruction of an artery is performed as an endovascular procedure through a catheter, it is called ATHERECTOMY.
Pathological conditions involving ARTERIES in the skull, such as arteries supplying the CEREBRUM, the CEREBELLUM, the BRAIN STEM, and associated structures. They include atherosclerotic, congenital, traumatic, infectious, inflammatory, and other pathological processes.
Devices that provide support for tubular structures that are being anastomosed or for body cavities during skin grafting.
Homopolymer of tetrafluoroethylene. Nonflammable, tough, inert plastic tubing or sheeting; used to line vessels, insulate, protect or lubricate apparatus; also as filter, coating for surgical implants or as prosthetic material. Synonyms: Fluoroflex; Fluoroplast; Ftoroplast; Halon; Polyfene; PTFE; Tetron.
Surgical insertion of BLOOD VESSEL PROSTHESES to repair injured or diseased blood vessels.
Device constructed of either synthetic or biological material that is used for the repair of injured or diseased blood vessels.
Polyester polymers formed from terephthalic acid or its esters and ethylene glycol. They can be formed into tapes, films or pulled into fibers that are pressed into meshes or woven into fabrics.
Lack of perfusion in the EXTREMITIES resulting from atherosclerosis. It is characterized by INTERMITTENT CLAUDICATION, and an ANKLE BRACHIAL INDEX of 0.9 or less.
Ultrasonography applying the Doppler effect combined with real-time imaging. The real-time image is created by rapid movement of the ultrasound beam. A powerful advantage of this technique is the ability to estimate the velocity of flow from the Doppler shift frequency.
Reconstruction or repair of a blood vessel, which includes the widening of a pathological narrowing of an artery or vein by the removal of atheromatous plaque material and/or the endothelial lining as well, or by dilatation (BALLOON ANGIOPLASTY) to compress an ATHEROMA. Except for ENDARTERECTOMY, usually these procedures are performed via catheterization as minimally invasive ENDOVASCULAR PROCEDURES.
Pathological conditions of intracranial ARTERIES supplying the CEREBRUM. These diseases often are due to abnormalities or pathological processes in the ANTERIOR CEREBRAL ARTERY; MIDDLE CEREBRAL ARTERY; and POSTERIOR CEREBRAL ARTERY.
Narrowing or stricture of any part of the CAROTID ARTERIES, most often due to atherosclerotic plaque formation. Ulcerations may form in atherosclerotic plaques and induce THROMBUS formation. Platelet or cholesterol emboli may arise from stenotic carotid lesions and induce a TRANSIENT ISCHEMIC ATTACK; CEREBROVASCULAR ACCIDENT; or temporary blindness (AMAUROSIS FUGAX). (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, pp 822-3)
Evaluation undertaken to assess the results or consequences of management and procedures used in combating disease in order to determine the efficacy, effectiveness, safety, and practicability of these interventions in individual cases or series.
Branch of the common carotid artery which supplies the anterior part of the brain, the eye and its appendages, the forehead and nose.
One of the CARBONIC ANHYDRASE INHIBITORS that is sometimes effective against absence seizures. It is sometimes useful also as an adjunct in the treatment of tonic-clonic, myoclonic, and atonic seizures, particularly in women whose seizures occur or are exacerbated at specific times in the menstrual cycle. However, its usefulness is transient often because of rapid development of tolerance. Its antiepileptic effect may be due to its inhibitory effect on brain carbonic anhydrase, which leads to an increased transneuronal chloride gradient, increased chloride current, and increased inhibition. (From Smith and Reynard, Textbook of Pharmacology, 1991, p337)
An abnormal balloon- or sac-like dilatation in the wall of the ABDOMINAL AORTA which gives rise to the visceral, the parietal, and the terminal (iliac) branches below the aortic hiatus at the diaphragm.
Pathological conditions involving the CAROTID ARTERIES, including the common, internal, and external carotid arteries. ATHEROSCLEROSIS and TRAUMA are relatively frequent causes of carotid artery pathology.
The removal of a limb or other appendage or outgrowth of the body. (Dorland, 28th ed)
The region of the lower limb between the FOOT and the LEG.
Summarizing techniques used to describe the pattern of mortality and survival in populations. These methods can be applied to the study not only of death, but also of any defined endpoint such as the onset of disease or the occurrence of disease complications.
The region of the lower limb in animals, extending from the gluteal region to the FOOT, and including the BUTTOCKS; HIP; and LEG.
The continuation of the subclavian artery; it distributes over the upper limb, axilla, chest and shoulder.
Obstruction of the flow in the SPLANCHNIC CIRCULATION by ATHEROSCLEROSIS; EMBOLISM; THROMBOSIS; STENOSIS; TRAUMA; and compression or intrinsic pressure from adjacent tumors. Rare causes are drugs, intestinal parasites, and vascular immunoinflammatory diseases such as PERIARTERITIS NODOSA and THROMBOANGIITIS OBLITERANS. (From Juergens et al., Peripheral Vascular Diseases, 5th ed, pp295-6)
The tunnel in the lower anterior ABDOMINAL WALL through which the SPERMATIC CORD, in the male; ROUND LIGAMENT, in the female; nerves; and vessels pass. Its internal end is at the deep inguinal ring and its external end is at the superficial inguinal ring.
Surgical union or shunt between ducts, tubes or vessels. It may be end-to-end, end-to-side, side-to-end, or side-to-side.
Thickening and loss of elasticity of the walls of ARTERIES of all sizes. There are many forms classified by the types of lesions and arteries involved, such as ATHEROSCLEROSIS with fatty lesions in the ARTERIAL INTIMA of medium and large muscular arteries.
A method of delineating blood vessels by subtracting a tissue background image from an image of tissue plus intravascular contrast material that attenuates the X-ray photons. The background image is determined from a digitized image taken a few moments before injection of the contrast material. The resulting angiogram is a high-contrast image of the vessel. This subtraction technique allows extraction of a high-intensity signal from the superimposed background information. The image is thus the result of the differential absorption of X-rays by different tissues.
Studies in which individuals or populations are followed to assess the outcome of exposures, procedures, or effects of a characteristic, e.g., occurrence of disease.
Studies used to test etiologic hypotheses in which inferences about an exposure to putative causal factors are derived from data relating to characteristics of persons under study or to events or experiences in their past. The essential feature is that some of the persons under study have the disease or outcome of interest and their characteristics are compared with those of unaffected persons.
A non-atherosclerotic, inflammatory thrombotic disease that commonly involves small and medium-sized arteries or veins in the extremities. It is characterized by occlusive THROMBOSIS and FIBROSIS in the vascular wall leading to digital and limb ISCHEMIA and ulcerations. Thromboangiitis obliterans is highly associated with tobacco smoking.
A spectrum of pathological conditions of impaired blood flow in the brain. They can involve vessels (ARTERIES or VEINS) in the CEREBRUM, the CEREBELLUM, and the BRAIN STEM. Major categories include INTRACRANIAL ARTERIOVENOUS MALFORMATIONS; BRAIN ISCHEMIA; CEREBRAL HEMORRHAGE; and others.
The first and largest artery branching from the aortic arch. It distributes blood to the right side of the head and neck and to the right arm.
The arterial trunk that arises from the abdominal aorta and after a short course divides into the left gastric, common hepatic and splenic arteries.
Artery arising from the brachiocephalic trunk on the right side and from the arch of the aorta on the left side. It distributes to the neck, thoracic wall, spinal cord, brain, meninges, and upper limb.
Endovascular procedure in which atheromatous plaque is excised by a cutting or rotating catheter. It differs from balloon and laser angioplasty procedures which enlarge vessels by dilation but frequently do not remove much plaque. If the plaque is removed by surgical excision under general anesthesia rather than by an endovascular procedure through a catheter, it is called ENDARTERECTOMY.
Pathologic processes that affect patients after a surgical procedure. They may or may not be related to the disease for which the surgery was done, and they may or may not be direct results of the surgery.
Maintenance of blood flow to an organ despite obstruction of a principal vessel. Blood flow is maintained through small vessels.
An amphetamine analog that is rapidly taken up by the lungs and from there redistributed primarily to the brain and liver. It is used in brain radionuclide scanning with I-123.
Obstruction of flow in biological or prosthetic vascular grafts.
Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.
Non-invasive method of vascular imaging and determination of internal anatomy without injection of contrast media or radiation exposure. The technique is used especially in CEREBRAL ANGIOGRAPHY as well as for studies of other vascular structures.
Surgical insertion of BLOOD VESSEL PROSTHESES, or transplanted BLOOD VESSELS, or other biological material to repair injured or diseased blood vessels.
Radiography of the vascular system of the brain after injection of a contrast medium.
Localized or diffuse reduction in blood flow through the vertebrobasilar arterial system, which supplies the BRAIN STEM; CEREBELLUM; OCCIPITAL LOBE; medial TEMPORAL LOBE; and THALAMUS. Characteristic clinical features include SYNCOPE; lightheadedness; visual disturbances; and VERTIGO. BRAIN STEM INFARCTIONS or other BRAIN INFARCTION may be associated.
Comparison of the BLOOD PRESSURE between the BRACHIAL ARTERY and the POSTERIOR TIBIAL ARTERY. It is a predictor of PERIPHERAL ARTERIAL DISEASE.
A noninflammatory, progressive occlusion of the intracranial CAROTID ARTERIES and the formation of netlike collateral arteries arising from the CIRCLE OF WILLIS. Cerebral angiogram shows the puff-of-smoke (moyamoya) collaterals at the base of the brain. It is characterized by endothelial HYPERPLASIA and FIBROSIS with thickening of arterial walls. This disease primarily affects children but can also occur in adults.
An aspect of personal behavior or lifestyle, environmental exposure, or inborn or inherited characteristic, which, on the basis of epidemiologic evidence, is known to be associated with a health-related condition considered important to prevent.
Death and putrefaction of tissue usually due to a loss of blood supply.
Sudden ISCHEMIA in the RETINA due to blocked blood flow through the CENTRAL RETINAL ARTERY or its branches leading to sudden complete or partial loss of vision, respectively, in the eye.
Brief reversible episodes of focal, nonconvulsive ischemic dysfunction of the brain having a duration of less than 24 hours, and usually less than one hour, caused by transient thrombotic or embolic blood vessel occlusion or stenosis. Events may be classified by arterial distribution, temporal pattern, or etiology (e.g., embolic vs. thrombotic). (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, pp814-6)
The circulation of blood through the BLOOD VESSELS of the BRAIN.
Protrusion of tissue, structure, or part of an organ through the bone, muscular tissue, or the membrane by which it is normally contained. Hernia may involve tissues such as the ABDOMINAL WALL or the respiratory DIAPHRAGM. Hernias may be internal, external, congenital, or acquired.
Observation of a population for a sufficient number of persons over a sufficient number of years to generate incidence or mortality rates subsequent to the selection of the study group.
Transient complete or partial monocular blindness due to retinal ischemia. This may be caused by emboli from the CAROTID ARTERY (usually in association with CAROTID STENOSIS) and other locations that enter the central RETINAL ARTERY. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p245)
The vessels carrying blood away from the capillary beds.
Levels within a diagnostic group which are established by various measurement criteria applied to the seriousness of a patient's disorder.
A vein on either side of the body which is formed by the union of the external and internal iliac veins and passes upward to join with its fellow of the opposite side to form the inferior vena cava.
The return of a sign, symptom, or disease after a remission.
Recording changes in electrical impedance between electrodes placed on opposite sides of a part of the body, as a measure of volume changes in the path of the current. (Stedman, 25th ed)
Vascular diseases characterized by thickening and hardening of the walls of ARTERIES inside the SKULL. There are three subtypes: (1) atherosclerosis with fatty deposits in the ARTERIAL INTIMA; (2) Monckeberg's sclerosis with calcium deposits in the media and (3) arteriolosclerosis involving the small caliber arteries. Clinical signs include HEADACHE; CONFUSION; transient blindness (AMAUROSIS FUGAX); speech impairment; and HEMIPARESIS.
Radiographic visualization of the aorta and its branches by injection of contrast media, using percutaneous puncture or catheterization procedures.
A mixture of metallic elements or compounds with other metallic or metalloid elements in varying proportions.
A repeat operation for the same condition in the same patient due to disease progression or recurrence, or as followup to failed previous surgery.
The first branch of the SUBCLAVIAN ARTERY with distribution to muscles of the NECK; VERTEBRAE; SPINAL CORD; CEREBELLUM; and interior of the CEREBRUM.
The qualitative or quantitative estimation of the likelihood of adverse effects that may result from exposure to specified health hazards or from the absence of beneficial influences. (Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 1988)
A pathological condition caused by impaired blood flow in the basal regions of cerebral hemispheres (BASAL GANGLIA), such as INFARCTION; HEMORRHAGE; or ISCHEMIA in vessels of this brain region including the lateral lenticulostriate arteries. Primary clinical manifestations include involuntary movements (DYSKINESIAS) and muscle weakness (HEMIPARESIS).
The arterial blood vessels supplying the CEREBRUM.
Minimally invasive procedures, diagnostic or therapeutic, performed within the BLOOD VESSELS. They may be perfomed via ANGIOSCOPY; INTERVENTIONAL MAGNETIC RESONANCE IMAGING; INTERVENTIONAL RADIOGRAPHY; or INTERVENTIONAL ULTRASONOGRAPHY.
Pathological outpouching or sac-like dilatation in the wall of any blood vessel (ARTERIES or VEINS) or the heart (HEART ANEURYSM). It indicates a thin and weakened area in the wall which may later rupture. Aneurysms are classified by location, etiology, or other characteristics.
Formation and development of a thrombus or blood clot in the blood vessel.
Ultrasonography applying the Doppler effect, with the superposition of flow information as colors on a gray scale in a real-time image. This type of ultrasonography is well-suited to identifying the location of high-velocity flow (such as in a stenosis) or of mapping the extent of flow in a certain region.
Traumatic injuries to the TROCHLEAR NERVE.
The plan and delineation of prostheses in general or a specific prosthesis.
The artery supplying nearly all the left half of the transverse colon, the whole of the descending colon, the sigmoid colon, and the greater part of the rectum. It is smaller than the superior mesenteric artery (MESENTERIC ARTERY, SUPERIOR) and arises from the aorta above its bifurcation into the common iliac arteries.
The vein accompanying the femoral artery in the same sheath; it is a continuation of the popliteal vein and becomes the external iliac vein.
Pathological processes involving any of the BLOOD VESSELS in the cardiac or peripheral circulation. They include diseases of ARTERIES; VEINS; and rest of the vasculature system in the body.
Inflammation of the inner ear (LABYRINTH).
The noninvasive measurement or determination of the partial pressure (tension) of oxygen and/or carbon dioxide locally in the capillaries of a tissue by the application to the skin of a special set of electrodes. These electrodes contain photoelectric sensors capable of picking up the specific wavelengths of radiation emitted by oxygenated versus reduced hemoglobin.
A value equal to the total volume flow divided by the cross-sectional area of the vascular bed.
Arteries arising from the external carotid or the maxillary artery and distributing to the temporal region.
An abnormal balloon- or sac-like dilatation in the wall of AORTA.
The formation of an area of NECROSIS in the CEREBRUM caused by an insufficiency of arterial or venous blood flow. Infarcts of the cerebrum are generally classified by hemisphere (i.e., left vs. right), lobe (e.g., frontal lobe infarction), arterial distribution (e.g., INFARCTION, ANTERIOR CEREBRAL ARTERY), and etiology (e.g., embolic infarction).
Changes in the observed frequency of waves (as sound, light, or radio waves) due to the relative motion of source and observer. The effect was named for the 19th century Austrian physicist Johann Christian Doppler.
The therapy of the same disease in a patient, with the same agent or procedure repeated after initial treatment, or with an additional or alternate measure or follow-up. It does not include therapy which requires more than one administration of a therapeutic agent or regimen. Retreatment is often used with reference to a different modality when the original one was inadequate, harmful, or unsuccessful.
Incision into the side of the abdomen between the ribs and pelvis.
A clinically significant reduction in blood supply to the BRAIN STEM and CEREBELLUM (i.e., VERTEBROBASILAR INSUFFICIENCY) resulting from reversal of blood flow through the VERTEBRAL ARTERY from occlusion or stenosis of the proximal subclavian or brachiocephalic artery. Common symptoms include VERTIGO; SYNCOPE; and INTERMITTENT CLAUDICATION of the involved upper extremity. Subclavian steal may also occur in asymptomatic individuals. (From J Cardiovasc Surg 1994;35(1):11-4; Acta Neurol Scand 1994;90(3):174-8)
The larger of the two terminal branches of the brachial artery, beginning about one centimeter distal to the bend of the elbow. Like the RADIAL ARTERY, its branches may be divided into three groups corresponding to their locations in the forearm, wrist, and hand.
Branch of the common carotid artery which supplies the exterior of the head, the face, and the greater part of the neck.
Tomography using x-ray transmission and a computer algorithm to reconstruct the image.
The excision of the thickened, atheromatous tunica intima of a carotid artery.
The continuation of the axillary artery; it branches into the radial and ulnar arteries.
Blockage of the RETINAL VEIN. Those at high risk for this condition include patients with HYPERTENSION; DIABETES MELLITUS; ATHEROSCLEROSIS; and other CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASES.
A procedure in which a laparoscope (LAPAROSCOPES) is inserted through a small incision near the navel to examine the abdominal and pelvic organs in the PERITONEAL CAVITY. If appropriate, biopsy or surgery can be performed during laparoscopy.
Microsurgical revascularization to improve intracranial circulation. It usually involves joining the extracranial circulation to the intracranial circulation but may include extracranial revascularization (e.g., subclavian-vertebral artery bypass, subclavian-external carotid artery bypass). It is performed by joining two arteries (direct anastomosis or use of graft) or by free autologous transplantation of highly vascularized tissue to the surface of the brain.
The visualization of deep structures of the body by recording the reflections or echoes of ultrasonic pulses directed into the tissues. Use of ultrasound for imaging or diagnostic purposes employs frequencies ranging from 1.6 to 10 megahertz.
Studies to determine the advantages or disadvantages, practicability, or capability of accomplishing a projected plan, study, or project.
Surgical removal of an obstructing clot or foreign material from a blood vessel at the point of its formation. Removal of a clot arising from a distant site is called EMBOLECTOMY.
Either of two fleshy protuberances at the lower posterior section of the trunk or HIP in humans and primate on which a person or animal sits, consisting of gluteal MUSCLES and fat.
A nonparametric method of compiling LIFE TABLES or survival tables. It combines calculated probabilities of survival and estimates to allow for observations occurring beyond a measurement threshold, which are assumed to occur randomly. Time intervals are defined as ending each time an event occurs and are therefore unequal. (From Last, A Dictionary of Epidemiology, 1995)
The two principal arteries supplying the structures of the head and neck. They ascend in the neck, one on each side, and at the level of the upper border of the thyroid cartilage, each divides into two branches, the external (CAROTID ARTERY, EXTERNAL) and internal (CAROTID ARTERY, INTERNAL) carotid arteries.
A chronic inflammatory process that affects the AORTA and its primary branches, such as the brachiocephalic artery (BRACHIOCEPHALIC TRUNK) and CAROTID ARTERIES. It results in progressive arterial stenosis, occlusion, and aneurysm formation. The pulse in the arm is hard to detect. Patients with aortitis syndrome often exhibit retinopathy.
The flow of BLOOD through or around an organ or region of the body.
A potent benzodiazepine receptor antagonist. Since it reverses the sedative and other actions of benzodiazepines, it has been suggested as an antidote to benzodiazepine overdoses.
A large vessel supplying the whole length of the small intestine except the superior part of the duodenum. It also supplies the cecum and the ascending part of the colon and about half the transverse part of the colon. It arises from the anterior surface of the aorta below the celiac artery at the level of the first lumbar vertebra.
In screening and diagnostic tests, the probability that a person with a positive test is a true positive (i.e., has the disease), is referred to as the predictive value of a positive test; whereas, the predictive value of a negative test is the probability that the person with a negative test does not have the disease. Predictive value is related to the sensitivity and specificity of the test.
Radiographic visualization or recording of a vein after the injection of contrast medium.
Artery originating from the internal carotid artery and distributing to the eye, orbit and adjacent facial structures.
The farthest or outermost projections of the body, such as the HAND and FOOT.
Abnormal balloon- or sac-like dilatation in the wall of any one of the iliac arteries including the common, the internal, or the external ILIAC ARTERY.
The vein which drains the foot and leg.
Either of the two principal arteries on both sides of the neck that supply blood to the head and neck; each divides into two branches, the internal carotid artery and the external carotid artery.
A thiol-containing amino acid formed by a demethylation of METHIONINE.
A group of pathological conditions characterized by sudden, non-convulsive loss of neurological function due to BRAIN ISCHEMIA or INTRACRANIAL HEMORRHAGES. Stroke is classified by the type of tissue NECROSIS, such as the anatomic location, vasculature involved, etiology, age of the affected individual, and hemorrhagic vs. non-hemorrhagic nature. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, pp777-810)
A non-invasive technique using ultrasound for the measurement of cerebrovascular hemodynamics, particularly cerebral blood flow velocity and cerebral collateral flow. With a high-intensity, low-frequency pulse probe, the intracranial arteries may be studied transtemporally, transorbitally, or from below the foramen magnum.
Embolism or thrombosis involving blood vessels which supply intracranial structures. Emboli may originate from extracranial or intracranial sources. Thrombosis may occur in arterial or venous structures.
Localized reduction of blood flow to brain tissue due to arterial obstruction or systemic hypoperfusion. This frequently occurs in conjunction with brain hypoxia (HYPOXIA, BRAIN). Prolonged ischemia is associated with BRAIN INFARCTION.
A noble gas with the atomic symbol Xe, atomic number 54, and atomic weight 131.30. It is found in the earth's atmosphere and has been used as an anesthetic.
A technique for assisting the circulation by decreasing the afterload of the left ventricle and augmenting the diastolic pressure. It may be achieved by intra-aortic balloon, or by implanting a special pumping device in the chest, or externally by applying a negative pressure to the lower extremities during cardiac systole.
Recording of change in the size of a part as modified by the circulation in it.
Use or insertion of a tubular device into a duct, blood vessel, hollow organ, or body cavity for injecting or withdrawing fluids for diagnostic or therapeutic purposes. It differs from INTUBATION in that the tube here is used to restore or maintain patency in obstructions.
The artery formed by the union of the right and left vertebral arteries; it runs from the lower to the upper border of the pons, where it bifurcates into the two posterior cerebral arteries.
Complications that affect patients during surgery. They may or may not be associated with the disease for which the surgery is done, or within the same surgical procedure.
Surgical removal of an obstructing clot or foreign material which has been transported from a distant vessel by the bloodstream. Removal of a clot at its original site is called THROMBECTOMY.
Criteria and standards used for the determination of the appropriateness of the inclusion of patients with specific conditions in proposed treatment plans and the criteria used for the inclusion of subjects in various clinical trials and other research protocols.
The main trunk of the systemic arteries.
The period of confinement of a patient to a hospital or other health facility.
Tomography using radioactive emissions from injected RADIONUCLIDES and computer ALGORITHMS to reconstruct an image.
The expenses incurred by a hospital in providing care. The hospital costs attributed to a particular patient care episode include the direct costs plus an appropriate proportion of the overhead for administration, personnel, building maintenance, equipment, etc. Hospital costs are one of the factors which determine HOSPITAL CHARGES (the price the hospital sets for its services).
Techniques using laser energy in combination with a balloon catheter to perform angioplasty. These procedures can take several forms including: 1, laser fiber delivering the energy while the inflated balloon centers the fiber and occludes the blood flow; 2, balloon angioplasty immediately following laser angioplasty; or 3, laser energy transmitted through angioplasty balloons that contain an internal fiber.
Diseases of the BASAL GANGLIA including the PUTAMEN; GLOBUS PALLIDUS; claustrum; AMYGDALA; and CAUDATE NUCLEUS. DYSKINESIAS (most notably involuntary movements and alterations of the rate of movement) represent the primary clinical manifestations of these disorders. Common etiologies include CEREBROVASCULAR DISORDERS; NEURODEGENERATIVE DISEASES; and CRANIOCEREBRAL TRAUMA.
Blocking of a blood vessel by an embolus which can be a blood clot or other undissolved material in the blood stream.
Diseases which have one or more of the following characteristics: they are permanent, leave residual disability, are caused by nonreversible pathological alteration, require special training of the patient for rehabilitation, or may be expected to require a long period of supervision, observation, or care. (Dictionary of Health Services Management, 2d ed)
A subfield of acoustics dealing in the radio frequency range higher than acoustic SOUND waves (approximately above 20 kilohertz). Ultrasonic radiation is used therapeutically (DIATHERMY and ULTRASONIC THERAPY) to generate HEAT and to selectively destroy tissues. It is also used in diagnostics, for example, ULTRASONOGRAPHY; ECHOENCEPHALOGRAPHY; and ECHOCARDIOGRAPHY, to visually display echoes received from irradiated tissues.
Studies which start with the identification of persons with a disease of interest and a control (comparison, referent) group without the disease. The relationship of an attribute to the disease is examined by comparing diseased and non-diseased persons with regard to the frequency or levels of the attribute in each group.
Formerly a constituent republic of Yugoslavia, comprising the Yugoslav section of the region of Macedonia. It was made a constituent republic in the 1946 constitution. It became independent on 8 February 1994 and was recognized as The Former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia by the United States Board on Geographic Names 16 February 1994.
The vessels carrying blood away from the heart.
Blood clot formation in any part of the CAROTID ARTERIES. This may produce CAROTID STENOSIS or occlusion of the vessel, leading to TRANSIENT ISCHEMIC ATTACK; CEREBRAL INFARCTION; or AMAUROSIS FUGAX.
Procedures that avoid use of open, invasive surgery in favor of closed or local surgery. These generally involve use of laparoscopic devices and remote-control manipulation of instruments with indirect observation of the surgical field through an endoscope or similar device.
Statistical models used in survival analysis that assert that the effect of the study factors on the hazard rate in the study population is multiplicative and does not change over time.
Loss of blood during a surgical procedure.
PRESSURE of the BLOOD on the ARTERIES and other BLOOD VESSELS.
Conditions or pathological processes associated with the disease of diabetes mellitus. Due to the impaired control of BLOOD GLUCOSE level in diabetic patients, pathological processes develop in numerous tissues and organs including the EYE, the KIDNEY, the BLOOD VESSELS, and the NERVE TISSUE.
A method of computed tomography that uses radionuclides which emit a single photon of a given energy. The camera is rotated 180 or 360 degrees around the patient to capture images at multiple positions along the arc. The computer is then used to reconstruct the transaxial, sagittal, and coronal images from the 3-dimensional distribution of radionuclides in the organ. The advantages of SPECT are that it can be used to observe biochemical and physiological processes as well as size and volume of the organ. The disadvantage is that, unlike positron-emission tomography where the positron-electron annihilation results in the emission of 2 photons at 180 degrees from each other, SPECT requires physical collimation to line up the photons, which results in the loss of many available photons and hence degrades the image.
An imbalance between myocardial functional requirements and the capacity of the CORONARY VESSELS to supply sufficient blood flow. It is a form of MYOCARDIAL ISCHEMIA (insufficient blood supply to the heart muscle) caused by a decreased capacity of the coronary vessels.
Substances used to allow enhanced visualization of tissues.
Binary classification measures to assess test results. Sensitivity or recall rate is the proportion of true positives. Specificity is the probability of correctly determining the absence of a condition. (From Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 2d ed)
Non-invasive method of demonstrating internal anatomy based on the principle that atomic nuclei in a strong magnetic field absorb pulses of radiofrequency energy and emit them as radiowaves which can be reconstructed into computerized images. The concept includes proton spin tomographic techniques.
A branch of the abdominal aorta which supplies the kidneys, adrenal glands and ureters.
Surgery which could be postponed or not done at all without danger to the patient. Elective surgery includes procedures to correct non-life-threatening medical problems as well as to alleviate conditions causing psychological stress or other potential risk to patients, e.g., cosmetic or contraceptive surgery.
Narrowing or occlusion of the RENAL ARTERY or arteries. It is due usually to ATHEROSCLEROSIS; FIBROMUSCULAR DYSPLASIA; THROMBOSIS; EMBOLISM, or external pressure. The reduced renal perfusion can lead to renovascular hypertension (HYPERTENSION, RENOVASCULAR).
NECROSIS occurring in the MIDDLE CEREBRAL ARTERY distribution system which brings blood to the entire lateral aspects of each CEREBRAL HEMISPHERE. Clinical signs include impaired cognition; APHASIA; AGRAPHIA; weak and numbness in the face and arms, contralaterally or bilaterally depending on the infarction.
VASCULAR DISEASES that are associated with DIABETES MELLITUS.
The application of electronic, computerized control systems to mechanical devices designed to perform human functions. Formerly restricted to industry, but nowadays applied to artificial organs controlled by bionic (bioelectronic) devices, like automated insulin pumps and other prostheses.
Ultrasonography applying the Doppler effect, with frequency-shifted ultrasound reflections produced by moving targets (usually red blood cells) in the bloodstream along the ultrasound axis in direct proportion to the velocity of movement of the targets, to determine both direction and velocity of blood flow. (Stedman, 25th ed)
The innermost layer of an artery or vein, made up of one layer of endothelial cells and supported by an internal elastic lamina.
A complex of gadolinium with a chelating agent, diethylenetriamine penta-acetic acid (DTPA see PENTETIC ACID), that is given to enhance the image in cranial and spinal MRIs. (From Martindale, The Extra Pharmacopoeia, 30th ed, p706)
A thickening and loss of elasticity of the walls of ARTERIES that occurs with formation of ATHEROSCLEROTIC PLAQUES within the ARTERIAL INTIMA.
Studies determining the effectiveness or value of processes, personnel, and equipment, or the material on conducting such studies. For drugs and devices, CLINICAL TRIALS AS TOPIC; DRUG EVALUATION; and DRUG EVALUATION, PRECLINICAL are available.
Surgical shunt allowing direct passage of blood from an artery to a vein. (From Dorland, 28th ed)
The study of chance processes or the relative frequency characterizing a chance process.
The proportion of survivors in a group, e.g., of patients, studied and followed over a period, or the proportion of persons in a specified group alive at the beginning of a time interval who survive to the end of the interval. It is often studied using life table methods.
A distribution in which a variable is distributed like the sum of the squares of any given independent random variable, each of which has a normal distribution with mean of zero and variance of one. The chi-square test is a statistical test based on comparison of a test statistic to a chi-square distribution. The oldest of these tests are used to detect whether two or more population distributions differ from one another.
The presence of co-existing or additional diseases with reference to an initial diagnosis or with reference to the index condition that is the subject of study. Comorbidity may affect the ability of affected individuals to function and also their survival; it may be used as a prognostic indicator for length of hospital stay, cost factors, and outcome or survival.
The portion of the descending aorta proceeding from the arch of the aorta and extending to the DIAPHRAGM, eventually connecting to the ABDOMINAL AORTA.
The movement and the forces involved in the movement of the blood through the CARDIOVASCULAR SYSTEM.
Plasma glycoprotein clotted by thrombin, composed of a dimer of three non-identical pairs of polypeptide chains (alpha, beta, gamma) held together by disulfide bonds. Fibrinogen clotting is a sol-gel change involving complex molecular arrangements: whereas fibrinogen is cleaved by thrombin to form polypeptides A and B, the proteolytic action of other enzymes yields different fibrinogen degradation products.
Large subcortical nuclear masses derived from the telencephalon and located in the basal regions of the cerebral hemispheres.
Use of infusions of FIBRINOLYTIC AGENTS to destroy or dissolve thrombi in blood vessels or bypass grafts.
An activity in which the body advances at a slow to moderate pace by moving the feet in a coordinated fashion. This includes recreational walking, walking for fitness, and competitive race-walking.
The statistical reproducibility of measurements (often in a clinical context), including the testing of instrumentation or techniques to obtain reproducible results. The concept includes reproducibility of physiological measurements, which may be used to develop rules to assess probability or prognosis, or response to a stimulus; reproducibility of occurrence of a condition; and reproducibility of experimental results.
The ratio of two odds. The exposure-odds ratio for case control data is the ratio of the odds in favor of exposure among cases to the odds in favor of exposure among noncases. The disease-odds ratio for a cohort or cross section is the ratio of the odds in favor of disease among the exposed to the odds in favor of disease among the unexposed. The prevalence-odds ratio refers to an odds ratio derived cross-sectionally from studies of prevalent cases.
The part of CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM that is contained within the skull (CRANIUM). Arising from the NEURAL TUBE, the embryonic brain is comprised of three major parts including PROSENCEPHALON (the forebrain); MESENCEPHALON (the midbrain); and RHOMBENCEPHALON (the hindbrain). The developed brain consists of CEREBRUM; CEREBELLUM; and other structures in the BRAIN STEM.
An imaging technique using compounds labelled with short-lived positron-emitting radionuclides (such as carbon-11, nitrogen-13, oxygen-15 and fluorine-18) to measure cell metabolism. It has been useful in study of soft tissues such as CANCER; CARDIOVASCULAR SYSTEM; and brain. SINGLE-PHOTON EMISSION-COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHY is closely related to positron emission tomography, but uses isotopes with longer half-lives and resolution is lower.
Arteries which arise from the abdominal aorta and distribute to most of the intestines.
Transplantation of an individual's own tissue from one site to another site.
Organized collections of computer records, standardized in format and content, that are stored in any of a variety of computer-readable modes. They are the basic sets of data from which computer-readable files are created. (from ALA Glossary of Library and Information Science, 1983)
Care given during the period prior to undergoing surgery when psychological and physical preparations are made according to the special needs of the individual patient. This period spans the time between admission to the hospital to the time the surgery begins. (From Dictionary of Health Services Management, 2d ed)
Studies in which subsets of a defined population are identified. These groups may or may not be exposed to factors hypothesized to influence the probability of the occurrence of a particular disease or other outcome. Cohorts are defined populations which, as a whole, are followed in an attempt to determine distinguishing subgroup characteristics.
Country located in EUROPE. It is bordered by the NORTH SEA, BELGIUM, and GERMANY. Constituent areas are Aruba, Curacao, Sint Maarten, formerly included in the NETHERLANDS ANTILLES.
Age as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or the effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from AGING, a physiological process, and TIME FACTORS which refers only to the passage of time.
A measure of the quality of health care by assessment of unsuccessful results of management and procedures used in combating disease, in individual cases or series.
The number of new cases of a given disease during a given period in a specified population. It also is used for the rate at which new events occur in a defined population. It is differentiated from PREVALENCE, which refers to all cases, new or old, in the population at a given time.
The rate at which oxygen is used by a tissue; microliters of oxygen STPD used per milligram of tissue per hour; the rate at which oxygen enters the blood from alveolar gas, equal in the steady state to the consumption of oxygen by tissue metabolism throughout the body. (Stedman, 25th ed, p346)
The total number of cases of a given disease in a specified population at a designated time. It is differentiated from INCIDENCE, which refers to the number of new cases in the population at a given time.

Venous and arterial changes in pulmonary veno-occlusive disease, mitral stenosis and fibrosing mediastinitis. (1/87)

The pathogenesis of pulmonary veno-occlusive disease (PVOD) is not known. The diagnosis of PVOD frequently relies on its histological changes since it is often difficult to distinguish clinically from primary pulmonary hypertension. This study carried out a systematic analysis of the pulmonary venous and arterial remodelling that occurs in PVOD (n=5) and compared these changes to two other diseases affecting the pulmonary veins, mitral stenosis (MS; n=6) and fibrosing mediastinitis (FM; n=2), using established morphometric techniques. In PVOD, pronounced intimal and adventitial thickening were noted in veins of all sizes and arterialization of veins >50 microm external diameter was found. Similar changes were evident in the arterial wall, but intimal thickening was less severe than in the veins and medial thickening was more pronounced in arteries <300 microm external diameter. Eccentric intimal fibrosis of the veins was also noted for the first time in PVOD, although this feature occurred less frequently (approximately one third) than in MS. Less pronounced structural remodelling was also encountered in the veins in cases of MS and FM. The severity of the venous changes in PVOD may aid its diagnosis and lend insight into its pathogenesis. However, the similarity of the vascular changes in each form of venous hypertension also suggests that pathology alone may not always differentiate between these disease states. The similarity of the vascular changes in the three forms of venous hypertension suggests that, as in pulmonary artery hypertension, pressure, per se, is one of the triggers to vascular remodelling.  (+info)

Pulmonary veno-occlusive disease in pulmonary Langerhans' cell granulomatosis. (2/87)

This report describes unusual clinical and pathological findings in a 29-yr-old female with pulmonary Langerhans' cell granulomatosis (LCG). During a 7-yr clinical course her condition deteriorated despite corticosteroid therapy, and she died of respiratory failure and pulmonary hypertension. At autopsy, there were widespread pulmonary veno-occlusive disease (PVOD) lesions as well as abundant advanced and healed lesions of pulmonary LCG composed of multiple cysts and stellate fibrosis. The present case demonstrates that pulmonary Langerhans' cell granulomatosis should be considered as a possible cause of pulmonary veno-occlusive disease.  (+info)

Early and intermediate-term complications of self-expanding stents limit its potential application in children with congenital heart disease. (3/87)

OBJECTIVES: We report on the early and intermediate-term follow-up results of self-expanding Wallstent (Schneider, Switzerland) implanted in children with congenital heart disease. BACKGROUND: The inherent shortcomings of balloon-expandable stents prompted the trial of an alternative stent. METHODS: Twenty patients underwent 22 implantations of 25 self-expanding Wallstents between December 1993 and June 1997 in two institutions. The mean age and weight were 10.8+/-4.5 years and 30.5+/-14.2 kg, respectively. The patients were divided into two groups: 1) Group I comprised 17 patients with pulmonary arterial stenoses, 2) Group II comprised four patients with venous stenoses (one belonged to both groups). Sixteen patients underwent recatheterization at a median of 5.8 months (range 0.5 to 31, mean 8.1 months) after stenting. Hemodynamic and angiographic changes after the interventional procedures and complications were documented. RESULTS: All the stents were successfully deployed in the intended position. In Group I, the narrowest diameter of the stented vessel increased from 4.1+/-1.5 to 8+/-2 mm (95% increase, p < 0.0001) while the systolic pressure gradient across decreased from 24.6+/-15.8 to 12.1+/-11.4 mm Hg (51% decrease, p = 0.001). In Group II, the dimensional changes of the narrowest segment increased from 4.3+/-0.5 to 7.5+/-0.4 mm (75% increase, p = 0.003), and the pressure gradient reduced from 5.0+/-2.9 to 0.9+/-1.0 mm Hg (82% decrease, p = 0.04) across the stented venous channel. Distal migration of two optimally positioned stents occurred within 24 h of implantation. At recatheterization, significant neointimal ingrowth (>30% of the expanded diameter) was noted in 7 (28%) of the 25 implanted stents. This responded poorly to balloon dilation. Predisposing factors for the neointimal ingrowth included stents of smaller diameter (<9 mm) and longer period after implantation. CONCLUSIONS: Self-expanding Wallstent could be deployed easily and safely to relieve vascular stenoses in children. The complications of distal migration, significant neointimal ingrowth and its unyielding design to overdilation limit its application to this patient group.  (+info)

Magnetic resonance phase-shift velocity mapping in pediatric patients with pulmonary venous obstruction. (4/87)

OBJECTIVES: This study evaluated the accuracy, advantages and clinical efficacy of magnetic resonance (MR) phase-shift velocity mapping, in delineating the site and the hemodynamic severity of pulmonary venous (PV) obstruction in patients with congenital heart disease (CHD). BACKGROUND: Magnetic resonance phase-shift velocity mapping of normal pulmonary veins and of obstructed PV pathways have been previously reported in a mainly adult population. METHODS: The study population (33 pts) underwent MR phase-shift velocity mapping of their PV pathways. These results were compared with cardiac catheterization and Doppler echocardiography data. RESULTS: The study population (0.4 to 19.5 years) consisted of a study group (PV pathway obstruction, n = 7) and a control group (no PV obstruction, n = 26). No patients had any left-to-right shunt lesions. The MR imaging displayed precise anatomical detail of the pulmonary veins. Phase velocities in the control group ranged from 20 to 71 cm/s, whereas velocities in the study group ranged from 100 to 250 cm/s (p = 0.002). The MR phase velocities (154 +/- 0.53 cm/s) compared favorably with Doppler echocardiography (147 +/- 0.54 cm/s), (r = 0.76; p = 0.05). The MR velocity mapping was 100% specific and 100% sensitive in detecting PV obstruction, although the absolute gradient measurements among MR phase mapping, echocardiographic Doppler and catheterization did not show statistically significant correlation. CONCLUSIONS: In the absence of any associated left-to-right shunt lesions, PV velocities of 100 cm/s and greater indicated significant obstruction. The MR phase-shift velocity mapping, together with MR spin echocardiography and MR angiography, provides comprehensive anatomic and physiologic data that may obviate the need for further invasive studies.  (+info)

Outcome of infants with right atrial isomerism: is prognosis better with normal pulmonary venous drainage? (5/87)

OBJECTIVE: To compare the outcome of infants and children who have right atrial isomerism and normal pulmonary venous drainage with those who have anomalous drainage, and to determine factors associated with poor outcome. DESIGN AND PATIENTS: Retrospective review of management and outcome of 116 infants and children determined to have right atrial isomerism between January 1980 and December 2000. SETTING: Tertiary paediatric cardiac centre. RESULTS: The 116 patients presented at a median of one day (range 1 day to 3.7 years) with cyanosis in the majority (96%). No interventions were planned in 31 (27%) patients, all of whom died. The early surgical mortality for pulmonary venous repair was 25% (2 of 8), Fontan procedure 26% (5 of 19), cavopulmonary shunting 7.7% (1 of 13), and systemic pulmonary arterial shunt insertion 1.9% (1 of 53). Late mortality was related to infection (n = 10), sudden death of unknown aetiology (n = 7, 5 with history of arrhythmia), and documented arrhythmia (n = 1). Patients with obstructed anomalous pulmonary venous drainage had the worst survival (p < 0.001). The mean (SEM) survival estimates for those with normal pulmonary venous drainage at 1, 5, 10, and 15 years was 81 (5.3)%, 67 (6.6)%, 60 (7.8)%, and 43 (12)%, respectively, similar to those for patients with non-obstructed anomalous drainage (p = 0.06). Independent risk factors for mortality included pulmonary venous obstruction (relative risk 3.8, p = 0.001) and a single ventricle (relative risk 2.9, p = 0.016). An analysis of only patients with normal pulmonary venous drainage identified no risk factors for mortality. CONCLUSIONS: The long term outcome of infants and children with right atrial isomerism in association with a normal pulmonary venous drainage remains unfavourable. Sepsis and sudden death that may potentially be related to cardiac arrhythmia are major causes of late mortality.  (+info)

Lack of evidence for pulmonary venous thrombosis in cryptogenic stroke: a magnetic resonance angiography study. (6/87)

BACKGROUND: Even after extensive evaluation, the etiology of ischemic stroke remains undefined in a considerable proportion of cases, suggesting that causes of stroke may exist that have not yet been established. We tested the hypothesis that pulmonary venous thrombosis (PVT) is a potential source of brain embolism in patients with cryptogenic stroke. SUMMARY OF REPORT: Within 7 days after mild to moderately severe ischemic stroke or transient ischemic attack, 18 patients (9 women, 9 men; mean age, 48 years) were studied in whom the etiology remained undefined despite complete workup. All patients received high-resolution pulmonary venography with the use of multiple-bolus, multiphase, 3-dimensional, gadolinium-enhanced MR angiography (MRA). Overall quality of the MRA was good in 14 and insufficient in 4 patients, mainly as a result of breathing artifacts. Visualization of the main and segmental veins and evaluability of their patency were good for most right pulmonary veins but often inadequate for left pulmonary veins, particularly for those in the left lower lobe. There was no evidence for PVT in any of the sufficiently visualized pulmonary veins. CONCLUSIONS: The results do not support the hypothesis of PVT as a contributor to the etiology of ischemic stroke. However, the study was limited regarding scan volume, spatial discrimination, patient selection, and delay between ischemia and MRA. Therefore, further investigations, including postmortem studies, are needed to resolve the question of whether PVT may contribute to ischemic stroke.  (+info)

Transoesophageal echocardiographic monitoring of pulmonary venous obstruction induced by sternotomy closure during infant heart transplantation. (7/87)

A case of an infant receiving orthotopic heart transplantation with over-sized donor heart was reported. Left lower pulmonary venous obstruction after sternotomy closure was detected by transoesophageal echocardiography (TOE) and the decision to delay sternal closure was made and the clinical outcome was very satisfactory. The usefulness of intraoperative TOE monitoring and postoperative TOE follow-up for infant heart transplantation, especially in those cases of size mismatch, was well demonstrated.  (+info)

Circular mapping and ablation of the pulmonary vein for treatment of atrial fibrillation: impact of different catheter technologies. (8/87)

OBJECTIVES: We conducted this study to compare the efficacy and safety of different catheter ablation technologies and of distal versus ostial pulmonary veins (PV) isolation using the circular mapping technique. BACKGROUND: Electrical isolation of the PVs in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) remains a technical challenge. METHODS: Two hundred eleven patients (163 men; mean age 53 +/- 11 years) with symptomatic AF were included in this study. In the first 21 patients (group 1), distal isolation (> or = 5 mm from the ostium) was achieved targeting veins triggering AF. In the remaining 190 patients (group 2), ostial isolation of all PVs was performed using 4-mm tip (47 patients), 8-mm tip (21 patients), or cooled-tip (122 patients) ablation catheters. RESULTS: Distal isolation was able to eliminate premature atrial contractions (PACs) and AF in six of 21 patients (29%) and 10 of 34 PVs. After a mean follow-up time of 6 +/- 4 months, no patients treated with the 8-mm tip catheter experienced recurrence of AF, whereas 21% (10 of 47 patients) and 15% (18 of 122 patients) of the patients ablated with the 4-mm tip and the cooled-tip ablation catheters experienced recurrence of AF after a mean follow-up of 10 +/- 3 and 4 +/- 2 months, respectively. Significant complications including stroke, tamponade, and severe stenosis occurred in 3.5% (8/211) of patients. CONCLUSIONS: Catheter technologies designed to achieve better lesion size appeared to have a positive impact on procedure time, fluoroscopy time, number of lesions, and overall efficacy. Although distal isolation can be achieved with fewer lesions, ostial isolation is required in the majority of patients to eliminate arrhythmogenic PACs and AF.  (+info)

Pulmonary veno-occlusive disease, a rare cause of pulmonary hypertension, is characterized by extensive and diffuse occlusion of pulmonary veins by fibrous tissue. Although the diagnosis can be suspected by the presence of the classic clinical triad of severe pulmonary arterial hypertension, radiographic evidence of pulmonary hypertension and edema, and normal pulmonary artery occlusion pressure, the definitive diagnosis is histopathologic. The prognosis of pulmonary veno-occlusive disease is poor with most described patients dying within 2 years of diagnosis. Although anti-coagulation, oxygen, and vasodilator therapies are effective temporarily, the definitive treatment is lung transplantation. We describe the recurrence of pulmonary veno-occlusive disease at 3 months after heart-lung transplantation in a 26-year-old man. Recurrence after transplantation for this disease has not been reported previously, and lung transplantation was thought to be definitive treatment. With this 1st report of ...
The bronchial circulation undergoes angiogenesis in several pathological conditions, such as lung neoplasm and bronchiectasis, but whether the pulmonary circulation can do this has been questioned. A woman treated with mitomycin C and 5-fluorouracil developed progressive, fatal pulmonary hypertension over 5 months. In addition to light and transmission electron microscopic examination of her lung, her pulmonary vasculature was cast and the casts were studied with scanning electron microscopy. Light microscopy showed that she had pulmonary veno-occlusive disease and angiomatoid capillary growth in the alveolar walls. Transmission electron microscopy confirmed the presence of pulmonary hypertension and showed thickened endothelial basement membrane. Scanning electron microscopy of the cast blood vessels showed distortion and destruction of alveolar capillaries prohibiting the passage of erythrocytes. Large new capillaries developed on top of, and were connected to, the shrivelled capillaries that ...
Pulmonary veno-occlusive disease (PVOD) is a disorder which causes progressive pulmonary hypertension, usually presenting with worsening dyspnoea and right heart failure. Pulmonary oedema induced by pulmonary vasodilator therapy to reduce pulmonary arterial pressure has been well described in PVOD, but here we describe a case of PVOD presenting with recurrent episodes of acute non-cardiogenic pulmonary oedema, in the absence of significant pulmonary hypertension. Concern over the risk of precipitating pulmonary oedema led us to use inhaled nitric oxide to predict the safety and efficacy of sildenafil.. ...
PVOD is a rare and incompletely understood cause of PAH with a grave prognosis. Lung transplantation is the only curative option, without which mortality is 72% at 1 year.1 Presentation is usually similar to PAH with progressive dyspnoea and pulmonary hypertension, but may be acute, even presenting with sudden death.2 The characteristic radiographic appearances are interlobular septal thickening, ground glass shadowing and mediastinal lymphadenopathy.. The cause of PVOD remains unclear, although associations with multiple conditions have been reported.1 The characteristic progressive and patchy narrowing and occlusion of the small postcapillary pulmonary veins causes heterogeneous areas of increased pulmonary capillary pressure, ultimately leading to pulmonary hypertension and oedema. This is in contrast with another cause of non-cardiogenic pulmonary oedema, high altitude pulmonary oedema, which induces pulmonary oedema and hypertension through exaggerated heterogeneous pulmonary arterial ...
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PubMed comprises more than 30 million citations for biomedical literature from MEDLINE, life science journals, and online books. Citations may include links to full-text content from PubMed Central and publisher web sites.
Pulmonary vascular disease is defined as a condition of blood flow to the lungs artery is blocked suddenly due to a blood clot somewhere in the body, including pulmonary embolism, chronic thromboembolic disease, pulmonary arterial hypertension, pulmonary veno-occlusive disease, pulmonary arteriovenous malformations, pulmonary edema, etc. Pulmonary arterial hypertension Pulmonary arterial hypertension is a subgroup of …. ...
Pulmonary vascular disease is defined as a condition of blood flow to the lungs artery is blocked suddenly due to a blood clot somewhere in the body, including pulmonary embolism, chronic thromboembolic disease, pulmonary arterial hypertension, pulmonary veno-occlusive disease, pulmonary arteriovenous malformations, pulmonary edema, etc. Pulmonary arterial hypertension Pulmonary arterial hypertension is a subgroup of …. ...
Pulmonary veno-occlusive disease is a rare subcategory of pulmonary arterial hypertension (WHO Group 1). The disease is poorly understood and difficult to diagnose; it has no definitive cure to date. These patients present with nonspecific symptoms, including dyspnea, exercise intolerance, and weakness. Chest x-rays sometimes differ from idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension and may demonstrate alveolar infiltrates and pleural effusions. High resolution computed tomography scans reveal ground glass opacities, interlobular septal thickening, and lymphadenopathy. Echocardiography can estimate the level of pulmonary artery pressures; right heart catheterization is needed for complete hemodynamic characterization of these patients. Lung biopsies demonstrate remodeling of the venules and small veins with intimal and adventitial fibrosis. This can result in total venous occlusion and subsequent recanalization. Similar changes occur in the small arteries and arterioles but are less pronounced than ...
Pulmonary veno-occlusive disease: not recommended. PAH secondary to sickle cell anemia (risk of vaso-occlusive crisis). Underlying conditions that could be affected by vasodilatory effects (eg, concomitant antihypertensive therapy, BP,90/50, fluid depletion, severe left ventricular outflow obstruction, autonomic dysfunction). Risk of non-arteritic anterior ischemic optic neuropathy; monitor for sudden vision loss. Retinitis pigmentosa. Anatomical penile deformation. Predisposition to priapism. Severe hepatic impairment. Active peptic ulcer. Bleeding disorders. Elderly. Pregnancy. Nursing mothers.. ...
Congenital Pulmonary Veins Atresia or Stenosis: Read more about Symptoms, Diagnosis, Treatment, Complications, Causes and Prognosis.
In the article by Fender et al, Severe Pulmonary Vein Stenosis Resulting From Ablation for Atrial Fibrillation: Presentation, Management, and Clinical Outcomes, which published online before print October 28, 2016, and appeared in the December 6, 2016, issue of Circulation (Circulation. 2016;134:1812-1821. DOI: 10.1161/CIRCULATIONAHA.116.021949), a correction is needed. The following statement contained a mathematical error:. Thirteen veins (12%) were taken to the catheterization laboratory but not intervened on as they were found to have ,50% narrowing on venography and only an insignificant pressure gradient was measured despite the pre-procedure CT showing ,75% narrowing.. The sentence should read as follows:. Thirteen veins (6%) were taken to the catheterization laboratory but not intervened on as they were found to have ,50% narrowing on venography and only an insignificant pressure gradient was measured despite the pre-procedure CT showing ,75% narrowing.. The correction has been made to ...
TY - JOUR. T1 - Endoscopic treatment of cerebrospinal fluid pathway obstructions. T2 - Commentary. AU - Komotar, Ricardo J.. AU - Connolly, E. Sander. PY - 2008/6/1. Y1 - 2008/6/1. UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=57049101803&partnerID=8YFLogxK. UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=57049101803&partnerID=8YFLogxK. U2 - 10.1227/01.NEU.0000249242.17805.E3. DO - 10.1227/01.NEU.0000249242.17805.E3. M3 - Comment/debate. AN - SCOPUS:57049101803. VL - 62. SP - SHC1091. JO - Neurosurgery. JF - Neurosurgery. SN - 0148-396X. IS - 6 SUPPL.. ER - ...
The left atrium and pulmonary veins initially develop separately in the 3- to 5-mm embryo (25 to 27 days gestation).1 The primordial pulmonary venous system is part of the splanchnic plexus, which initially connects to the cardinal and umbilicovitelline veins. At 27 to 29 days gestation, a small endothelial outgrowth from the posterior superior wall of the primordial left atrium develops just to the left of the developing septum primum. At 28 to 30 days gestation, this common pulmonary venous out-pouching engages the pulmonary venous portion of the splanchnic plexus and begins to drain blood from the pulmonary system. In normal development, the connections to the cardinal and umbilicovitelline systems atrophy, which results in complete separation between the pulmonary and systemic venous systems.. The sequence of connection of the out-pouching of the left atrium to the pulmonary venous plexus, followed by incorporation of the confluence of the common pulmonary venous system into the left atrium, ...
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Measurements were made of simultaneous pulmonary artery wedge (PAw) and left ventricular diastolic (LVed) pressures 39 times during 21 venous and left ventricular cardiac catheterization studies in eight animals with brisket disease. Each animal was studied during the acute phase of the disease. The remaining 13 studies were carried out in six animals at various intervals during spontaneous recovery from pulmonary hypertension and heart failure. A pressure gradient between PAw and LVed (δP) which averaged 14.6 ± 1.6 (SE) mm Hg was demonstrated in 12 measurements during seven studies in four animals (group A). The δP in 27 measurements during 14 studies in six animals averaged 2.4 ±0.8 mm Hg (group B). Venous resistance (Rv) represented 39±5% of the total resistance (RT) of pulmonary vessels in group A and 13±4% in group B studies. The δP and Rv/RT in group A animals are consistent with findings caused by pulmonary venous obstruction. The obstruction was interpreted to represent the effect ...
Doppler (A) and MR imaging (B: pre ablation, C: post ablation) of PV in patients with pulmonary vein stenosis that developed after PVI. The white arrow showed s
Northside Vascular Surgery offers services to treat vascular and peripheral vascular diseases, such as Carotid Artery Disease, Coronary Artery Disease, Carotid Artery Blockages, Peripheral Venous Disease, Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm and Pulmonary Vein Stenosis
Astfel, substantele din care se prepara remediile isi pierd eventuala toxicitate si potentialul de a produce reactii adverse. Patologia orbitară Stenturi şi catetere utilizate în obstrucţia căilor lacrimale Stents and intubation devices used in lacrimal pathway obstruction Alina Daniela Popa Cherecheanu1, Vlad Budu2 1. Aceasta inrautatire a simptomelor arata ca remediul a fost ales bine si ca isi face efectul.
Inflectra is an immunosuppressive drug and is commonly referred to as a biologic, which is chemically comparative to Remicade, with the active constituent being infliximab. This medication is a laboratory-synthesized antibody, specifically IgG1κ monoclonal antibody, which has the ability to bind strongly to a pro-inflammatory immune protein called tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNFα), and therefore functions to reduce inflammation particularly in cases of autoimmune conditions. Studies have shown that infliximab prevents the development of arthritis in mice. Even after the onset of diseases like arthritis, infliximab helps the healing process of joints. ...
BACKGROUND:Pulmonary capillary hemangiomatosis (PCH) and pulmonary veno-occlusive disease (PVOD) are rare diseases that share clinical, X-ray, and histological features. Most patients have poor prognosis due to severe respiratory impairment. Recently, EIF2AK4 mutations were found in some patients with PCH and PVOD, but the role of this mutation is still unknown. We report an autopsy case of PCH and discuss a mechanism of respiratory dysfunction based on an electron microscopy study. CASE REPORT:The patient was a Japanese man in his sixties. He suffered from acute exacerbation of dyspnea during treatment of COPD. Respiratory function testing revealed DLCO 32.1% and DLCO/VA 23.6%. Echocardiography demonstrated findings consistent with pulmonary hypertension. A CT scan showed mild emphysema and small ground-glass opacity in the lungs. However, we could not find the exact cause of his respiratory failure and he died 28 days after admission. At autopsy, the histology showed multilayering capillary
TY - JOUR. T1 - Revised diagnosis and severity criteria for sinusoidal obstruction syndrome/veno-occlusive disease in adult patients. T2 - A new classification from the European Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation. AU - Mohty, M.. AU - Malard, F.. AU - Abecassis, M.. AU - Aerts, E.. AU - Alaskar, A. S.. AU - Aljurf, M.. AU - Arat, M.. AU - Bader, P.. AU - Baron, F.. AU - Bazarbachi, A.. AU - Blaise, D.. AU - Ciceri, F.. AU - Corbacioglu, S.. AU - Dalle, J. H.. AU - Dignan, F.. AU - Fukuda, T.. AU - Huynh, A.. AU - Masszi, T.. AU - Michallet, M.. AU - Nagler, A.. AU - NiChonghaile, M.. AU - Okamoto, S.. AU - Pagliuca, A.. AU - Peters, C.. AU - Petersen, F. B.. AU - Richardson, P. G.. AU - Ruutu, T.. AU - Savani, B. N.. AU - Wallhult, E.. AU - Yakoub-Agha, I.. AU - Duarte, R. F.. AU - Carreras, E.. N1 - Publisher Copyright: © 2016 Macmillan Publishers Limited.. PY - 2016/7/1. Y1 - 2016/7/1. N2 - Sinusoidal obstruction syndrome, also known as veno-occlusive disease (SOS/VOD), is a ...
We present the case of a patient with colon cancer who, while receiving bevacizumab, developed sinusoidal obstruction syndrome (veno-occlusive disease) (SOSVOD). Certain antitumour agents such as 6-mercaptopurine and 6-thioguanine have also been reported to initiate hepatic SOSVOD in isolated cases. There have been no reports so far correlating bevacizumab with SOSVOD. A 77-year-old man was being treated with oxaliplatin and a modified de Gramont regimen of 5-fluorouracil for metastatic colon cancer. Bevacizumab (7.5 mg/kg) was added from the seventh cycle onwards. Protracted neutropenia and thrombocytopenia led to discontinuation of oxaliplatin after the ninth cycle. A computed tomography scan showed complete response and bevacizumab was continued for another 3 months, after which time the patient developed right hypochondrial pain, transudative ascites, splenomegaly and abnormal liver function tests. Upper gastrointestinal endoscopy showed oesophageal varices. Liver biopsy showed features considered
Veno-occlusive disease (VOD) remains a serious complication after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). Prophylactic use of defibrotide (DF) might further reduce VOD rates but has no impact on the incidence of severe VOD or VOD-associated mortality. We investigated the cost-effectiveness of prophylactic DF according to the British Committee for Standards in Haematology/British Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation guidelines in 348 children who underwent transplantation between 2001 and 2014 in our hospital, 138 of whom were at risk for VOD. The VOD incidence was 7.4% for the total cohort. Patients at risk had a higher incidence of VOD compared with patients without risk factors (15.2% versus 2.4%, P | .0001). VOD occurred more often in patients after busulfan-based myeloablative conditioning than in patients after total body irradiation (11.2% versus 3.5%, P = .001). Donor types or the transplantation-related mortality (TRM) risk score did not correlate with VOD incidence.
Veno-occlusive disease (VOD) occurs when the small blood vessels that lead into and are inside the liver become blocked. VOD is caused by chemotherapy and radiation therapy given during conditioning or intensive therapy before stem cell transplant. It develops in the first few weeks after a stem cel
CMS Grants New Technology Add-On Payment to Defitelio for the Treatment of Hepatic Veno-Occlusive Disease with Renal or Pulmonary Dysfunction Following Hematopoietic Stem-Cell ...
Funded by the NIH National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences through its Clinical and Translational Science Awards Program, grant number UL1TR002541 ...
Along with graft versus host disease (GVHD) and cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection, veno-occlusive disease (VOD) or Sinusoidal Obstruction Syndrome (SOS), is one of the most frequently encountered serious complications after stem cell transplantation. The reported overall incidence rate of veno-occlusive disease ranges from 5% to more than 60% i...
In this study, we present the results of 40 consecutive patients who underwent Senning procedure between September 1983 - March 1992. Mean age at operation was 28 months (range 4 months to 9 years). Early postoperative mortality was 9.5% (2/21, 70% confidence limit; 3,1% - 21%) in the patients with simple TGA. Seven of 19 patients with complex TGA (TGA + VSD + PH/PS) died in the early postoperative period. Persistant pulmonary hypertention was the main reason for early deaths in the patients with TGA + VSD + PH (5/9,55%, 70% CI:38%-75%). In the group of TGA + VSD + PS, 2 patients were died (20%, 70% CI; 7%-40%). Mean follow up is 44 months (2 to 102 months). Only one late death was happened due to endocarditis. All surviving 30 patients are doing well. Their periodical examinations and Doppler echocardiographic controls showed neither systemic nor pulmonary venous obstruction. They are in NYHA functional class I or II. Because of the decreased early mortality rates and the satisfying medium / ...
The first reported percutaneous angioplasty with self-apposing DES implantation for pulmonary vein stenosis: a one year follow- ...
The FDA took the action after Seattle Genetics disclosed six patients taking vadastuximab talirine had signs of liver toxicity including several cases of veno-occlusive disease, where blood flow is blocked in the liver. Four of the patients died.. Veno-occlusive disease most often occurs in patients undergoing blood cell transplantation, one of the treatments for AML, so it isnt clear if vadastuximab talirine is causing the problem. More than 300 patients have been treated with vadastuximab talirine to date, so its a fairly rare problem.. The FDA placed a full hold -- meaning no more treatments until its lifted -- on a phase 1/2 trial testing vadastuximab talirine in pre- and post-allogeneic transplant AML patients. Two other phase 1 trials for vadastuximab talirine are only on a partial hold, so no new patients can be enrolled but existing patients can continue treatment if they want to.. Interestingly, the FDA didnt place other clinical trials testing vadastuximab talirine on clinical ...
Learn about the causes, symptoms, diagnosis & treatment of Vascular Disorders of the Liver from the Professional Version of the Merck Manuals.
Paul G. Richardson, Marcie L. Riches, Nancy A. Kernan, Joel A. Brochstein, Shin Mineishi, Amanda M. Termuhlen, Sally Arai, Stephan A. Grupp, Eva C. Guinan, Paul L. Martin, Gideon Steinbach, Amrita Krishnan, Eneida R. Nemecek, Sergio Giralt, Tulio Rodriguez, Reggie Duerst, John Doyle, Joseph H. Antin, Angela Smith, Leslie ...
Press release - Future Market Insights - Veno-Occlusive Hepatic Disease Therapeutics Market Growth and Forecast 2017-2027 - published on openPR.com
Hepatic ischemia/reperfusion (We/R) injury is usually a major cause of morbidity and mortality after liver surgery. (I/R) injury is a frequently encountered problem 193022-04-7 IC50 in close association with a number of clinical conditions, including liver transplantation, Pringle maneuver during tumor resection, liver trauma, veno-occlusive disease, hemorrhagic shockCresuscitation, and heart failing1,2. Hepatocellular harm in hepatic […]. ...
Stem Cell or Bone Marrow Transplant Side EffectsMouth and throat pain. Mucositis (inflammation or sores in the mouth) is a short-term side effect that can happen with chemo and radiation. … Nausea and vomiting. … Infection. … Bleeding and transfusions. … Interstitial pneumonitis and other lung problems. … Graft-versus-host disease. … Hepatic veno-occlusive disease (VOD) … Graft failure.More items…•Mar 20, ...
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fatigue in MS patients correlated with autonomic dysfunction and postulated that that this was possibly due to lesions impacting on the a sympathetic vasomotor. However, while these investigators performed standard autonomic control tests on MS patients, none measured the changes in the extracranial venous flow rate that occur when subjects move from the supine to upright position. When supine, the IJVs generally act as the principle route by which blood drains from the brain, whereas when upright, their role becomes minimal, with the vast majority of the blood traveling either down the VVs or through other venous pathways [13, 14]. In Doepp et als study both cohorts conformed to this norm when supine, whereas only the healthy controls did when upright - a situation that is highly unusual. Doepp et als results therefore suggest that, rather than any autonomic cause, the rerouting of blood in MS patients occurs as a result of stenosis which primarily affects the venous pathways that are ...
Diagnosis of total anomalous pulmonary venous connection (TAPVC) (costs for program #187659) ✔ Multispecialty Medical Center Preventicum ✔ Department of Cardiology ✔ BookingHealth.com
Diagnosis of total anomalous pulmonary venous connection (TAPVC) (costs for program #194499) ✔ Academic Hospital Eichsfeld ✔ Department of Pediatric and Adolescent Medicine ✔ BookingHealth.com
Learn more about Total Anomalous Pulmonary Venous Connection -- Child at Medical City Dallas DefinitionCausesRisk FactorsSymptomsDiagnosisTreatmentPreventionrevision ...
Learn more about Total Anomalous Pulmonary Venous Connection -- Child at TriStar Centennial DefinitionCausesRisk FactorsSymptomsDiagnosisTreatmentPreventionrevision ...
Objective: To analyse the diagnostic value of multi-slice spiral CT and magnetic resonance imaging in treatment of Hepatic Veno-Occlusive Disease (HVO..
FDA Approves Defibrotide for Patients who Develop Hepatic Veno-Occlusive Disease After Transplant - Latest & Greatest, News - ASH Clinical News
M. McDermott wrote: , , If you have any information regarding this malady, it is desperately , needed. A friends baby is suffering from this and they are desperate , for information re: treatments, research, names of doctors involved in , research etc..... If you have access to this information please help , me..Can you post and/or email any info to Scubadyver at aol.com Thank you Before I send you off on a wild goose chase, I should mention a pulmonary form of this illness in newborns. Here is a brief outline: Pulmonary Lymphangiectasia Clinical Presentation: Respiratory distress in a newborn. Etiology/Pathophysiology: Complete pulmonary venous atresia leads to pulmonary venous obstruction which results in engorged pulmonary lymphatics and capillaries. Heart size is normal since flow through the left side of the heart is decreased. Usually is fatal. Classified into 3 types: (1) Pulmonary lymphangiectasia associated with congenital heart lesions characterized by obstruction of pulmonary venous ...
A condition in which the pulmonary veins that bring oxygen-rich blood from the lungs back to the heart are not connected to the left atrium, but instead, drain elsewhere.
This report studies the Global Veno-Occlusive Hepatic Disease Therapeutics Market 2017, analyzes and researches the Veno-Occlusive Hepatic Disease Therapeu
A diagnosis of congenital unilateral pulmonary vein atresia (CUPVA) was made. The patient experienced shortness of breath only after intense exercise and there was no pulmonary infection or recurrent haemoptysis. She was closely monitored, and light-intensity physical activity was permitted.. Unilateral diffuse pulmonary parenchymal lesions are clinically rare. The causes of these lesions include focal chronic inflammatory diseases, such as bronchiectasis and gastro-oesophageal reflux, radiation pneumonitis and mechanical ventilation of a unilateral lung.1 Unilateral diffuse pulmonary parenchymal lesions have also been reported in diseases, such as Sjogrens syndrome and systemic sclerosis.1 Additional rare causes of unilateral lesions include pulmonary circulatory diseases, such as proximal PA blockage (eg, PA sarcoma), venous thrombosis and unilateral pulmonary vein stenosis due to mediastinal fibrosis. In adult patients with CUPVA, long-term pulmonary circulation abnormalities can cause ...
Clinically significant uncontrolled acute bleeding, defined as hemorrhage requiring , 15 cc/kg of packed red blood cells (e.g., a pediatric patient weighing 20 kg and requiring , 300cc of packed red blood cells/24 hours, or an adult patient weighing 70 kg and requiring ,3 units of packed red blood cells/24 hours) to replace blood loss, OR bleeding from a site which in the Investigators opinion constitutes a potential life-threatening source (e.g. pulmonary hemorrhage or CNS bleeding), irrespective of amount of blood loss, at any point from the date of SCT through the date of severe VOD diagnosis ...
Clinically significant uncontrolled acute bleeding, defined as hemorrhage requiring , 15 cc/kg of packed red blood cells (e.g., a pediatric patient weighing 20 kg and requiring , 300cc of packed red blood cells/24 hours, or an adult patient weighing 70 kg and requiring ,3 units of packed red blood cells/24 hours) to replace blood loss, OR bleeding from a site which in the Investigators opinion constitutes a potential life-threatening source (e.g. pulmonary hemorrhage or CNS bleeding), irrespective of amount of blood loss, at any point from the date of SCT through the date of severe VOD diagnosis ...
Isolated stenosis of pulmonary veins, as they enter into the left atrium, is a rare congenital cardiac abnormality. It is a serious lesion that has significant impact on clinical outcome. Significant and progressive pulmonary hypertension leads to rapid deterioration and death often before infancy, hence early recognition is vital for optimum management. In our case, right heart failure was initially attributed to pulmonary hypertension secondary to chronic lung disease. With a background of early prematurity, extended periods of ventilation and prolonged oxygen support, a similar clinical scenario is not uncommon in current paediatric practice. A history of wheezing also prompts clinicians to think primarily of chronic lung disease.. Symptoms of pulmonary vein stenosis are also quite similar, i.e., respiratory distress and evolving cardiac failure. In the early neonatal period, the condition has increasingly been recognized as a cause of persistent pulmonary hypertension of the newborn1 in the ...
Paper: Veno-occlusive procedures for Control of Bleeding Oesophageal Varices Sclerotherapy Versus Surgery , Author: Shedid NM. FRCS; Kamal MA. MD; Nassar AK MD; Yehia A. MD; El-Soueni H. MD;El Samanody A. MD; El-Sayed El Kilany. MD. , Year: , Faculty of Medicine, Benha University
Other names: pulmonary congestion, congestion of blood in the lungs Pulmonary congestion is not a classic symptom of subjective, but rather a sign of a disease on chest radiograph, which alerts the clinician to either lung disease or heart. However, it may manifest dyspnea and bloody sputum secretion. Technically this phenomenon called pulmonary congestion (stasis of blood in the lungs). It may mean that the heart can not handle pump blood into the large circulation and it then accumulates in the small circulation - in pulmonary vessels. These radiographic appears to be widespread, highlighted. When judgment is advanced to pulmonary edema (pulmonary edema when the fluid passes from the blood vessels into the lung tissue). Such heart failure are often elderly people from various causes (degenerative valvular defects, heart attack, high blood pressure, …) or even small children from birth if they have some developmental heart defects often more serious nature. At other times, however, slight pulmonary
Introduction. Placement of the central vein catheterization (CVC) is a major risk factor for central vein stenosis (CVS). Repetitive endothelial exposures to the CVC results in inflammation, microthrombi formation, hyperplasia of the intima, fibrosis and thus development of CVS. The study aimed to find out the correlation between the duration and frequency of CVC in patients with CVS. Method. A matched case-control study was conducted in dr. Cipto Mangunkusumo General Hospital. Samples were taken from the medical record. Multivariate statistical comparisons were done using Chi-square tests. Results. Fifty-four out of 717 patients underwent CVC for hemodialysis had CVS. A total of 32 patients with CVS enrolled in the study with 128 non-CVS patients as a control. Duration of CVC |6 weeks does not increase the risk of CVS (p = 0.207), whilst the odds ratio of CVS on the frequency of CVC |2 times is 30 times compared to those underwent 2 times increased the risk of CVS. Longer duration of CVC for
Hepatic venous outflow block caused by short-length hepatic vein stenoses. - D Valla, A Hadengue, M el Younsi, N Azar, G Zeitoun, M J Boudet, G Molas, J Belghiti, S Erlinger, J M Hay, J P Benhamou
That sell-off would be warranted if the companys profits were about to plummet, but I think there are reasons to expect the opposite. Xyrem is currently being used by less than 10% of patients in the U.S. who are believed to have narcolepsy, which hints at there being plenty of room left for the drug to grow. Jazz also has a decent pipeline of drugs in late-stage trials that should help it extend its leadership position in the sleep market and also expand its presence in the hematology and oncology markets.. The FDA is also currently reviewing Jazzs Defitelio for approval. Defitelio was submitted as a potential treatment for severe hepatic veno-occlusive disease in adults and children undergoing hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation therapy. I think the chances are good for a regulatory thumbs-up since its already approved for sale in Europe, and the FDA has given it submission fast-track designation. We should have an answer by the end of March, with analysts forecasting that the drug ...
Defibrotide works by increasing the breakdown of clots in the blood. Defibrotide is used to treat severe veno-occlusive disease (VOD) in adults and children who have undergone chemotherapy and a stem-cell transplant. VOD happens when blood vessels in the liver become blocked, which decreases blood flow and can lead to...
Italian drugmaker Gentium has pulled its US marketing application for defibrotide, a drug for veno-occlusive disease (VOD), after it became clear that the Food and Drug Administration would not accept the filing. - News - PharmaTimes
Patients who have previously received a hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT) are at higher risk for veno-occlusive disease (VOD) of the liver following treatment with clofarabine (40 mg/m2) when used in combination with etoposide (100 mg/m2) and cyclophosphamide (440 mg/m2). Severe hepatotoxic events have been reported in a combination study of clofarabine in pediatric patients with relapsed or refractory acute leukemia. Two cases (2%) of VOD in the mono-therapy studies were considered related to study drug. Monitor for and discontinue Clolar if VOD is suspected ...
Late-onset hepatic veno-occlusive disease after allografting: report of two cases with atypical clinical features successfully treated with defibrotide.
Dr. Mark Milunski answered: Pulm edema: A matter of semantics to some physicians. The terms are often used interchangeably to describe fluid build-up in the l...
Lombard Medical Technologies (NSDQ:EVAR) said yesterday that its bailing out of the U.S. market after an FDA decision requiring a 50-patient clinical study of its Intelliflex low-profile delivery system for the Aorfix stent graft. Lombard said it eliminated its U.S. sales force and moved most of its commercial operations to its U.K. facility, significantly reducing its cash burn. Irvine, […]. ...
... pulmonary veno-occlusive disease; conditions which increase risk of bleeding. Common side effects: In clinical studies, common ... Iloprost has not been evaluated in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), severe asthma, or with acute ... Should signs of pulmonary edema occur when inhaled iloprost is administered in patients with pulmonary hypertension, the ... Iloprost should be stopped immediately if signs of pulmonary edema occur. This may be a sign of pulmonary venous hypertension. ...
She had been suffering from pulmonary veno-occlusive disease. She had recently moved to Dereham, Norfolk to live with her ...
Jo Pitt, 34, Scottish paralympic equestrian, pulmonary veno-occlusive disease. Bob Rafkin, 69, American singer songwriter, ... David Voelker, 60, American entrepreneur and philanthropist, pulmonary disease and failed lung transplant. Bill Austin, 84, ... Elmo's Fire), Parkinson's disease. Jack Makari, 95, Lebanese-American cancer immunologist. Sir Morgan Morgan-Giles, 98, British ... Laurence Haddon, 90, American actor (Mary Hartman, Mary Hartman, Dallas, Knots Landing), Lewy body disease. Brigitte Kiesler, ...
Ursodiol may be considered for prophylaxis of veno-occlusive disease. Antiemetics are often administered prior to busulfan to ... Toxicity may include interstitial pulmonary fibrosis ("busulfan lung"), hyperpigmentation, seizures, hepatic (veno-occlusive ... disease) (VOD) or sinusoidal obstruction syndrome (SOS), emesis, and wasting syndrome. Busulfan also induces thrombocytopenia, ...
WHO Group I' - Pulmonary veno-occlusive disease (PVOD), pulmonary capillary hemangiomatosis (PCH) ... "Pulmonary veno-occlusive disease". The European Respiratory Journal. 33 (1): 189-200. doi:10.1183/09031936.00090608. PMID ... Hematologic diseases: chronic hemolytic anemia (including sickle cell disease). *Systemic diseases: sarcoidosis, pulmonary ... Metabolic disorders: glycogen storage disease, Gaucher disease, thyroid diseases. *Others: pulmonary tumoral thrombotic ...
... pulmonary veno-occlusive disease, decreasing sperm counts, and decreases in hemoglobin and hematocrit. Very common adverse ... It was approved for pulmonary artery hypertension in the US in November 2001, and in the European Union in May 2002. By 2013, ... Under normal conditions, endothelin-1 binding of ET-A receptors causes constriction of the pulmonary blood vessels. Conversely ... June 2000). "Acute endothelin A receptor blockade causes selective pulmonary vasodilation in patients with chronic heart ...
Together with pulmonary veno-occlusive disease, PCH comprises WHO Group I' causes for pulmonary hypertension. Indeed, there is ... Chaisson NF, Dodson MW, Elliott CG (2016) Pulmonary Capillary Hemangiomatosis and Pulmonary Veno-occlusive Disease. Clin Chest ... the pulmonary arterial pressure is typically elevated. Pulmonary veno-occlusive disease This condition has been reported in ... "Pulmonary Veno-occlusive Disease and Pulmonary Capillary Hemangiomatosis". The American Journal of Surgical Pathology. 30 (7): ...
Pulmonary veno-occlusive disease (PVOD) is a rare form of pulmonary hypertension caused by progressive blockage of the small ... The pathophysiology of veno-occlusive disease culminates in occlusion of the pulmonary blood vessels. This could be due to ... The symptoms for pulmonary veno-occlusive disease are the following: Shortness of breath Fatigue Fainting Hemoptysis Difficulty ... Ye (2011). "Lengthy Diagnostic Challenge in a Rare Case of Pulmonary Veno-Occlusive Disease: Case Report and Review of the ...
"Entrez Gene: SP110 SP110 nuclear body protein". GeneReviews/NCBI/NIH/UW entry on Hepatic Veno-Occlusive Disease with ... Babb C, Keet EH, van Helden PD, Hoal EG (2007). "SP110 polymorphisms are not associated with pulmonary tuberculosis in a South ... 2007). "The first prenatal diagnosis for veno-occlusive disease and immunodeficiency syndrome, an autosomal recessive condition ... in the gene encoding the PML nuclear body protein Sp110 are associated with immunodeficiency and hepatic veno-occlusive disease ...
1995;154:112-6. Roulet, M., Laurini, R., Rivier, L., Calame, A.; "Hepatic veno-occlusive disease in newborn infant of a woman ... Coltsfoot as a potential cause of deep-vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism in a patient also consuming kava and blue vervain ... Interact., 83: 1, 1992 Sperl, W., Stuppner, H., Gassner, I.; "Reversible hepatic veno-occlusive disease in an infant after ... an infant developed liver disease and died because the mother drank tea originally believed to contain coltsfoot during her ...
Hepatic fibrosis renal cysts mental retardation Hepatic fibrosis Hepatic venoocclusive disease Hepatic veno-occlusive disease ... familial pulmonary capillary Hemangiopericytoma Hematocolpos Hemeralopia, congenital essential Hemeralopia, familial Hemi 3 ... Hirschsprung disease polydactyly heart disease Hirschsprung disease type 2 Hirschsprung disease type 3 Hirschsprung disease ... This is a list of diseases starting with the letter "H". Diseases Alphabetical list 0-9 A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T ...
... primary or secondary Pulmonary veno-occlusive disease Superior vena cava syndrome Obstruction of the airway Cancer of the ... Obstructive lung diseases Asthma Bronchitis Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease Cystic fibrosis Emphysema Hookworm disease ... pulmonary edema or acute respiratory distress syndrome Sarcoidosis Pulmonary vascular diseases Acute or recurrent pulmonary ... Constrictive pericarditis Pericardial effusion Pulmonary edema Pulmonary embolism Pulmonary hypertension Valvular heart disease ...
... of Pulmonary valve stenosis Pulmonary valves agenesis Pulmonary veins stenosis Pulmonary veno-occlusive disease Pulmonary ... ventricular septal defect Pulmonary blastoma Pulmonary branches stenosis Pulmonary cystic lymphangiectasis Pulmonary disease, ... Paget disease extramammary Paget disease juvenile type Paget's disease of bone Paget's disease of the breast Paget's disease, ... Pulmonary hypertension Pulmonary hypoplasia familial primary Pulmonary sequestration Pulmonary supravalvular stenosis Pulmonary ...
1990). "Hepatic veno-occlusive disease associated with comfrey ingestion". Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology. 5 (2): ... Miskelly, FG; Goodyer, LI (1992). "Hepatic and pulmonary complications of herbal medicines". Postgrad Med J. 68 (805): 935-936 ... or vascular diseases. Miranda, Kimberley (9 July 2010). "Symphytum". hortweek.com. Retrieved 23 April 2017. "Cynoglossum ...
... pulmonary veno-occlusive disease, lymphomatoid granulomatosis, pulmonary Langerhans cell histiocytosis, pulmonary epithelioid ... Liebow authored many of the seminal books on pulmonary diseases. He also published papers on sclerosing pneumocytoma, pulmonary ... Experimental pulmonary arterial hypertension (aorta to pulmonary artery shunt) and effects of hyperkinesis (total pulmonary ... Bloor, C. M., & Liebow, A. A. (1980). The pulmonary and bronchial circulations in congenital heart disease. New York: Plenum ...
... pulmonary alveolar proteinosis, sarcoidosis, pulmonary veno occlusive disease Upper lung predominance Pulmonary Langerhans cell ... Interstitial lung disease (ILD), or diffuse parenchymal lung disease (DPLD), is a group of respiratory diseases affecting the ... Lower lung predominance Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis, pulmonary fibrosis associated with connective tissue diseases, ... Pulmonary langerhans cell histiocytosis, pulmonary lymphangioleiomyomatosis, honeycomb lung caused by IPF or other diseases ...
MADH9 Pulmonary hypertension, primary, fenfluramine-associated; 178600; BMPR2 Pulmonary veno occlusive disease; 265450; BMPR2 ... RNF212 Refsum disease; 266500; PEX7 Refsum disease; 266500; PHYH Refsum disease, infantile form; 266510; PEX26 Refsum disease, ... PSEN1 Alzheimer disease-10; 104300; AD10 Alzheimer disease-2; 104310; APOE Alzheimer disease-4; 606889; PSEN2 Alzheimer disease ... RLBP1 Niemann-Pick disease, type A; 257200; SMPD1 Niemann-Pick disease, type B; 607616; SMPD1 Niemann-Pick disease, type C1; ...
Veno-occlusive disease[edit]. Severe liver injury can result from hepatic veno-occlusive disease (VOD). Elevated levels of ... The most common severe adverse reactions were pulmonary edema/deep vein thrombosis, splenic rupture, and myocardial infarction ... Major complications are veno-occlusive disease, mucositis, infections (sepsis), graft-versus-host disease and the development ... Graft-versus-host disease[edit]. Main article: Graft-versus-host disease. Graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) is an inflammatory ...
Veno-occlusive remodelling[edit]. This theory proposes how high pulmonary venous pressures may lead to the capillary rupture ... "Endoscopic evaluation of exercise-induced pulmonary hemorrhage and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in association with ... High pulmonary blood pressures[edit]. The most widely accepted theory is that high transmural pressures lead to pulmonary ... Wilkins, Pamela A. (2014). "Chapter 31: Diseases of the respiratory system: Exercise induced pulmonary hemorrhage". In Smith, ...
... hepatic veno-occlusive disease - hepatoblastoma - hepatocellular carcinoma - hepatocyte - hepatoma - hepatomegaly - HER1 - HER2 ... pulmonary sulcus tumor - PV701 - pyrazine diazohydroxide - pyrazoloacridine - pyroxamide Q10 - QS21 - quadrantectomy R- ... disease progression - disease-free survival - disease-specific survival - distal - distal pancreatectomy - distant cancer - ... Paget's disease of bone - Paget's disease of the nipple - PALA - palatine uvula - palliative care - palliative therapy - Palmar ...
Hepatic veno-occlusive disease. *Budd-Chiari syndrome. *May-Thurner syndrome. *Portal vein thrombosis ... Hypertensive kidney disease. Other names. Hypertensive nephrosclerosis (HN or HNS), hypertensive kidney disease, hypertensive ... "Epidemiology of Hypertensive Kidney Disease".. CS1 maint: uses authors parameter (link). *^ Rowe, D J; Bagga, H; Betts, P B ( ... Hypertensive kidney disease is a medical condition referring to damage to the kidney due to chronic high blood pressure. It ...
Hepatic veno-occlusive disease. *Budd-Chiari syndrome. *May-Thurner syndrome. *Portal vein thrombosis ... autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease and pseudoxanthoma elasticum,[1] α1 antitrypsin deficiency and hereditary ... "A career in cerebrovascular disease: a personal account". Stroke. 32 (11): 2719-24. doi:10.1161/hs1101.098765. PMID 11692045 ...
Hepatic veno-occlusive disease. *Budd-Chiari syndrome. *May-Thurner syndrome. *Portal vein thrombosis ... An embolism that lodges in the lungs is a pulmonary embolism (PE). A pulmonary embolism is a very serious condition that can be ... "Venous thromboembolic diseases: diagnosis, management and thrombophilia testing". www.nice.org.uk. National Institute for ... 2012). "Risk of pulmonary embolism in patients with autoimmune disorders: a nationwide follow-up study from Sweden". Lancet. ...
Hepatic veno-occlusive disease. *Budd-Chiari syndrome. *May-Thurner syndrome. *Portal vein thrombosis ... over time or patients can present acutely with acute heart failure or acute decompensated heart failure and pulmonary edema due ... Other diseases caused by high blood pressure include ischemic heart disease, stroke, peripheral arterial disease, aneurysms and ... "Hypertensive Heart Disease". Medscape Reference. Retrieved 17 February 2013.. *^ a b "WHO Disease and injury country estimates" ...
Hepatic veno-occlusive disease. *Budd-Chiari syndrome. *May-Thurner syndrome. *Portal vein thrombosis ... The independent contributions of diseases and factors other than hypertension versus effects of treatment are not clear in the ...
Hepatic veno-occlusive disease. *Budd-Chiari syndrome. *May-Thurner syndrome. *Portal vein thrombosis ... Vascular disease. Arterial. *aortic aneurysm (Cardarelli's sign, Oliver's sign). *pulmonary embolism (McConnell's sign) ... "Vascular Diseases: MedlinePlus". www.nlm.nih.gov. Retrieved 2015-06-23.. *^ a b "How Is Peripheral Arterial Disease Treated? - ... Vascular disease is a class of diseases of the blood vessels - the arteries and veins of the circulatory system of the body. It ...
Hepatic veno-occlusive disease. *Budd-Chiari syndrome. *May-Thurner syndrome. *Portal vein thrombosis ... When thrombophlebitis affects the greater veins, it can progress into the deep venous system, and may lead to pulmonary ... 2006). Andrews' Diseases of the Skin: clinical Dermatology. Saunders Elsevier. p. 827. ISBN 0-7216-2921-0.. ... Mondor's disease (also known as "Mondor's syndrome of superficial thrombophlebitis"[2]) is a rare condition which involves ...
Hepatic veno-occlusive disease. *Budd-Chiari syndrome. *May-Thurner syndrome. *Portal vein thrombosis ... An embolism that lodges in the lungs is a pulmonary embolism (PE). A pulmonary embolism is a very serious condition that can be ... 2012). "Risk of pulmonary embolism in patients with autoimmune disorders: a nationwide follow-up study from Sweden". Lancet. ... If the thrombus breaks off (embolizes) and flows towards the lungs, it can become a pulmonary embolism (PE), a blood clot in ...
Hepatic veno-occlusive disease. *Budd-Chiari syndrome. *May-Thurner syndrome. *Portal vein thrombosis ... Other uncommon causes are Trousseau disease,[medical citation needed] Beurger's disease (Thromboangiitis obliterans),[medical ... One in five of the middle-aged (65-75 years) population of the United Kingdom have evidence of peripheral arterial disease on ... It is classically associated with early-stage peripheral artery disease, and can progress to critical limb ischemia unless ...
Hepatic veno-occlusive disease. *Budd-Chiari syndrome. *May-Thurner syndrome. *Portal vein thrombosis ... The most common clinical presentations of hypertensive emergencies are cerebral infarction (24.5%), pulmonary edema (22.5%), ... The risks of developing a life-threatening disease affecting the heart or brain increase as the blood flow increases. Commonly ... Other common causes of hypertensive crises are autonomic hyperactivity such as pheochromocytoma, collagen-vascular diseases, ...
Hepatic veno-occlusive disease. *Budd-Chiari syndrome. *May-Thurner syndrome. *Portal vein thrombosis ... Other well known causes include diseases of the kidney. This includes diseases such as polycystic kidney disease which is a ... It has many different causes including endocrine diseases, kidney diseases, and tumors. It also can be a side effect of many ... Chronic kidney disease. *Kidney disease / renal artery stenosis - the normal physiological response to low blood pressure in ...
Hepatic veno-occlusive disease. *Budd-Chiari syndrome. *May-Thurner syndrome. *Portal vein thrombosis ... Intracranial aneurysms may result from diseases acquired during life, or from genetic conditions. Lifestyle diseases including ... 2005). Robbins and Cotran Pathologic Basis of Disease (7th ed.). China: Elsevier. ISBN 0-7216-0187-1.. ... This can be because of acquired disease or hereditary factors. The repeated trauma of blood flow against the vessel wall ...
Hepatic veno-occlusive disease. *Budd-Chiari syndrome. *May-Thurner syndrome. *Portal vein thrombosis ... after a complication of Addison's disease, the main cause of adrenal dysfunction and low cortisol levels).[1] The main problems ...
Hepatic venous occlusion: Budd-Chiari syndrome or veno-occlusive disease. *Constrictive pericarditis ... "Therapeutic advances in chronic disease. 6 (3): 124-37. doi:10.1177/2040622315580069. PMC 4416972. PMID 25954497.. ... Kumar & Clark's Clinical Medicine e.8 Chapter 7: Liver, biliary tract and pancreatic disease Pg. 335 ...
Hepatic veno-occlusive disease. *Budd-Chiari syndrome. *May-Thurner syndrome. *Portal vein thrombosis ... 2007). "Computed tomographic pulmonary angiography vs ventilation-perfusion lung scanning in patients with suspected pulmonary ... lung disease. Pneumoconiosis Asbestosis. Baritosis. Bauxite fibrosis. Berylliosis. Caplan's syndrome. Chalicosis. Coalworker's ... Goldhaber SZ (2004). "Pulmonary embolism". Lancet. 363 (9417): 1295-305. doi:10.1016/S0140-6736(04)16004-2. PMID 15094276.. ...
Hepatic veno-occlusive disease. *Budd-Chiari syndrome. *May-Thurner syndrome. *Portal vein thrombosis ... Complications can arise when a venous thromboembolism (commonly called a VTE) lodges in the lung as a pulmonary embolism. An ... Paget-Schroetter disease[edit]. Main article: Paget-Schroetter disease. Paget-Schroetter disease or upper extremity DVT (UEDVT ... Thrombotic stroke can be divided into two categories-large vessel disease and small vessel disease. The former affects vessels ...
1.5 (I26-I28) Pulmonary heart disease and diseases of pulmonary circulation. *1.6 (I30-I52) Other forms of heart disease *1.6.1 ... Hepatic veno-occlusive disease. *Budd-Chiari syndrome. *May-Thurner syndrome. *Portal vein thrombosis ... I26-I28) Pulmonary heart disease and diseases of pulmonary circulation[edit]. *(I26) Pulmonary embolism ... I28) Other diseases of pulmonary vessels *(I28.0) Arteriovenous fistula of pulmonary vessels ...
3] Ursodiol may be considered for prophylaxis of veno-occlusive disease. Antiemetics are often administered prior to busulfan ... Toxicity may include interstitial pulmonary fibrosis ("busulfan lung"), hyperpigmentation, seizures, hepatic (veno-occlusive ... disease) (VOD) or sinusoidal obstruction syndrome (SOS),[2][3] emesis, and wasting syndrome. Busulfan also induces ...
Hepatic veno-occlusive disease. *Portal hypertension. *Nutmeg liver. *Alcoholic liver disease. *Liver failure *Hepatic ... kidney or pulmonary abnormalities should be corrected. The affected person should then be taken to the operating room for ... Intestinal malrotation, enlarged colon, Hirschsprung disease, pregnancy, abdominal adhesions, chronic constipation[1][3]. ... Risk factors include a birth defect known as intestinal malrotation, an enlarged colon, Hirschsprung disease, pregnancy, and ...
Hepatic veno-occlusive disease. *Budd-Chiari syndrome. *May-Thurner syndrome. *Portal vein thrombosis ... 2006). Andrews' Diseases of the Skin: clinical Dermatology. Saunders Elsevier. ISBN 0-7216-2921-0.. .mw-parser-output cite. ... Roxburgh's Common Skin Diseases (17th ed.). p. 127. ISBN 978-0-340-76232-5.. ... often seen in people with end-stage kidney disease but may also occur with medications such as warfarin); cancers such as ...
Hepatic encephalopathy (T/ good article since 13 April 2010), Hepatic veno-occlusive disease, Hepatitis, Hepatitis C, Herpes ... Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (T), Churg-Strauss syndrome, Cirrhosis (T), Coeliac disease (T / featured since 26 March ... Pulmonary edema, Pulmonary embolism (T), Pulmonary hypertension, Pulseless electrical activity (Talk), Pyroluria, Purpura ... Valvular heart disease, Venous thrombosis (Talk:Venous thrombosis), Von Hippel-Lindau disease, Von Willebrand disease, ...
Hepatic veno-occlusive disease. *Budd-Chiari syndrome. *May-Thurner syndrome. *Portal vein thrombosis ... "Journal of Alzheimer's Disease. 14 (2): 133-45. doi:10.3233/JAD-2008-14202. PMC 2670571. PMID 18560126.. ... report Prevention of cardiovascular disease declared that 40,000 cardiovascular disease deaths in 2006 were "mostly preventable ... Coronary artery disease[edit]. The primary health risk identified for trans fat consumption is an elevated risk of coronary ...
Hepatic veno-occlusive disease. *Budd-Chiari syndrome. *May-Thurner syndrome. *Portal vein thrombosis ... Associated diseases[edit]. The disorder may be associated with Addison's disease, atherosclerosis (build-up of fatty deposits ... Such factors include low blood volume, diseases, and medications.[citation needed] Diagnosis[edit]. Orthostatic hypotension can ... Orthostatic hypotension may cause accidental falls.[23] It is also linked to an increased risk of cardiovascular disease, heart ...
Hepatic veno-occlusive disease. *Portal hypertension. *Nutmeg liver. *Alcoholic liver disease. *Liver failure *Hepatic ... Chronic disease is a risk factor for acute disease.[7] The best method of diagnosis is angiography, with computer tomography ( ... In non-occlusive mesenteric ischemia, where there is no blockage of the arteries supplying the bowel, the treatment is medical ... Creager, Mark A. (2013). Vascular medicine : a companion to Braunwald's heart disease (2nd ed.). Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier/ ...
Hepatic veno-occlusive disease. *Budd-Chiari syndrome. *May-Thurner syndrome. *Portal vein thrombosis ... In 2008, the US had an estimate of 16 million atherosclerotic heart disease and 5.8 million strokes. Cardiovascular diseases ... Diehm, C.; Allenberg, J.-R.; Nimura-Eckert, K.; Veith, F. J. (2013-11-11). Color Atlas of Vascular Diseases. Springer Science ... Atherosclerosis, the primary cause of coronary artery disease (CAD) and stroke, is a disorder with multiple genetic and ...
Pulmonary Venoocclusive Disease, also known as pulmonary veno-occlusive disease, is related to pulmonary venoocclusive disease ... Pulmonary Venoocclusive Disease family:. Pulmonary Venoocclusive Disease 2, Autosomal Recessive Pulmonary Venoocclusive Disease ... Pulmonary Venoocclusive Disease Categories: Cardiovascular diseases, Genetic diseases, Immune diseases, Rare diseases, ... Genetic tests related to Pulmonary Venoocclusive Disease:. #. Genetic test. Affiliating Genes. 1. Pulmonary Veno-Occlusive ...
... the pulmonary veins). The occlusion is caused by a buildup of abnormal fibrous tissue in the small veins in the lungs, which ... Pulmonary veno-occlusive disease (PVOD) is characterized by the blockage (occlusion) of the blood vessels that carry oxygen- ... medlineplus.gov/genetics/condition/pulmonary-veno-occlusive-disease/ Pulmonary veno-occlusive disease. ... EIF2AK4 mutations cause pulmonary veno-occlusive disease, a recessive form of pulmonary hypertension. Nat Genet. 2014 Jan;46(1 ...
Pulmonary Veno-Occlusive Disease*/diagnosis. *Pulmonary Veno-Occlusive Disease*/etiology. *Pulmonary Veno-Occlusive Disease*/ ... Pulmonary veno-occlusive disease.. Mandel J1, Mark EJ, Hales CA.. Author information. 1. Division of Pulmonary and Critical ...
... the pulmonary veins). Explore symptoms, inheritance, genetics of this condition. ... Pulmonary veno-occlusive disease (PVOD) is characterized by the blockage (occlusion) of the blood vessels that carry oxygen- ... medlineplus.gov/genetics/condition/pulmonary-veno-occlusive-disease/ Pulmonary veno-occlusive disease. ... EIF2AK4 mutations cause pulmonary veno-occlusive disease, a recessive form of pulmonary hypertension. Nat Genet. 2014 Jan;46(1 ...
Some reports suggest that PVOD accounts for 5-20% of cases classified as idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). ... is one of the less commonly encountered causes of pulmonary hypertension. ... encoded search term (Pulmonary Veno-Occlusive Disease) and Pulmonary Veno-Occlusive Disease What to Read Next on Medscape. ... Pulmonary veno-occlusive disease as a primary cause of pulmonary hypertension in a patient with mixed connective tissue disease ...
Pulmonary veno-occlusive disease (PVOD) is a rare form of pulmonary hypertension caused by progressive blockage of the small ... The pathophysiology of veno-occlusive disease culminates in occlusion of the pulmonary blood vessels. This could be due to ... The symptoms for pulmonary veno-occlusive disease are the following: Shortness of breath Fatigue Fainting Hemoptysis Difficulty ... Ye (2011). "Lengthy Diagnostic Challenge in a Rare Case of Pulmonary Veno-Occlusive Disease: Case Report and Review of the ...
Pulmonary Veno-Occlusive Disease/diagnostic imaging*. *Pulmonary Veno-Occlusive Disease/pathology. *Tomography, X-Ray Computed* ... Pulmonary venoocclusive disease: CT findings in eight patients.. Swensen SJ1, Tashjian JH, Myers JL, Engeler CE, Patz EF, ... Eight patients with CT scans of the thorax and a diagnosis of pulmonary venoocclusive disease were identified from three ... The most common CT findings in these eight patients with pulmonary venoocclusive disease were smooth interlobular septal ...
Diagram explaining why pulmonary capillary wedge pressure (Ppcw) is usually normal in pulmonary veno-occlusive disease (PVOD). ... Pulmonary veno-occlusive disease. D. Montani, L. C. Price, P. Dorfmuller, L. Achouh, X. Jaïs, A. Yaïci, O. Sitbon, D. Musset, G ... Pulmonary veno-occlusive disease. D. Montani, L. C. Price, P. Dorfmuller, L. Achouh, X. Jaïs, A. Yaïci, O. Sitbon, D. Musset, G ... Pulmonary veno-occlusive disease. D. Montani, L. C. Price, P. Dorfmuller, L. Achouh, X. Jaïs, A. Yaïci, O. Sitbon, D. Musset, G ...
Pulmonary Veno-Occlusive Disease Q&A What is the role of antithrombotic agents in the treatment of pulmonary veno-occlusive ... Pulmonary veno-occlusive disease as a primary cause of pulmonary hypertension in a patient with mixed connective tissue disease ... Pulmonary hypertension: CT findings in pulmonary veno-occlusive disease]. J Radiol. 2003 Nov. 84(11 Pt 1):1739-45. [Medline]. ... Massive pulmonary edema and death after prostacyclin infusion in a patient with pulmonary veno-occlusive disease. Chest. 1998 ...
Pulmonary Veno-Occlusive Disease / diagnosis* * Pulmonary Veno-Occlusive Disease / mortality * Pulmonary Veno-Occlusive Disease ... Pulmonary veno-occlusive disease: a case series and new observations Chest. 2000 Dec;118(6):1671-9. ... Study objectives: The aim of this study was to describe our experience at one institution with pulmonary veno-occlusive disease ... Results: All 11 patients in our series had at least one symptom or clinical finding that, in conjunction with known pulmonary ...
"Pulmonary Veno-Occlusive Disease" by people in Harvard Catalyst Profiles by year, and whether "Pulmonary Veno-Occlusive Disease ... Pulmonary Veno-Occlusive Disease*Pulmonary Veno-Occlusive Disease. *Diseases, Pulmonary Veno-Occlusive ... "Pulmonary Veno-Occlusive Disease" is a descriptor in the National Library of Medicines controlled vocabulary thesaurus, MeSH ( ... Below are the most recent publications written about "Pulmonary Veno-Occlusive Disease" by people in Profiles. ...
Twelve months later while in complete clinical remission, pulmonary hypertension and microangiopathic hemolytic anemia were ... At necropsy, minimal residual cancer and severe pulmonary veno-occlusive disease was found. Pulmonary veno-occlusive disease ... Pulmonary veno-occlusive disease associated with microangiopathic hemolytic anemia and chemotherapy of gastric adenocarcinoma ... Twelve months later while in complete clinical remission, pulmonary hypertension and microangiopathic hemolytic anemia were ...
Pulmonary veno-occlusive disease and pulmonary capillary hemangiomatosis: a clinicopathologic study of 35 cases. Am J Surg ... Wagenvoort CA, Wagenvoort N, Takahashi T. Pulmonary veno-occlusive disease: involvement of pulmonary arteries and review of the ... Possible role of imatinib in clinical pulmonary veno-occlusive disease. M. J. Overbeek, G. P. van Nieuw Amerongen, A. Boonstra ... Possible role of imatinib in clinical pulmonary veno-occlusive disease. M. J. Overbeek, G. P. van Nieuw Amerongen, A. Boonstra ...
Pulmonary veno-occlusive disease. Pulmonary vaso-occlusive disease Pulmonary veno-occlusive disease (PVOD) is a very rare ... Huertas A, Girerd B, Dorfmuller P, OCallaghan D, Humbert M, Montani D. Pulmonary veno-occlusive disease: advances in clinical ... Pulmonary hypertension. Pulmonary hypertension is high blood pressure in the arteries of the lungs. It makes the right side of ... Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is an autoimmune disease. In this disease, the bodys immune system mistakenly attacks ...
Pulmonary veno-occlusive disease (PVOD) is a rare and usually survival poor disorder. We report a patient with a long history ... This case highlights that PVOD is an under-recognised and often misdiagnosed disease, especially in its chronic form. ... Department of Respiratory Diseases, the Second Affiliated Hospital of Nanchang University, China ... Department of Respiratory Diseases, the Second Affiliated Hospital of Nanchang University, China ...
Massive pulmonary edema and death after prostacyclin infusion in a patient with pulmonary veno-occlusive disease. Chest 1998; ... Pulmonary veno-occlusive disease presenting with recurrent pulmonary oedema and the use of nitric oxide to predict response to ... Pulmonary veno-occlusive disease presenting with recurrent pulmonary oedema and the use of nitric oxide to predict response to ... Pulmonary veno-occlusive disease and pulmonary capillary hemangiomatosis: a clinicopathologic study of 35 cases. Am J Surg ...
Hereditary pulmonary veno-occlusive disease. Pulmonary arterial hypertension. EIF2AK4. Pulmonary vasodilators. Romani ethnicity ... Hereditary pulmonary veno-occlusive disease (PVOD) has been associated with biallelic mutations in EIF2AK4 with the recent ... Variable Expressivity of a Founder Mutation in the EIF2AK4 Gene in Hereditary Pulmonary Veno-occlusive Disease and Its Impact ... Observational study of Romani patients with familial PVOD included in the Spanish Registry of Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension. ...
... and pulmonary capillary hemangiomatosis (PCH) are rare causes of pulmonary hypertension, regarded by some as distinct entities ... PCH was identified in 24 (73%) cases diagnosed as PVOD, either as perivenular foci or diffuse involvement of the pulmonary ... but was also seen within walls of bronchi and pulmonary vessels. Our data suggest that in the majority of cases PCH represents ... a secondary angioproliferative process caused by postcapillary obstruction rather than a separate disease. The cause of the ...
pulmonary veno-occlusive disease. A 27-yr-old female was referred to the Pulmonary Vascular Diseases Centre of Bologna (Bologna ... Pulmonary veno-occlusive disease misdiagnosed as idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension. M. Palazzini, A. Manes ... Pulmonary veno-occlusive disease misdiagnosed as idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension Message Subject (Your Name) has ... Holcomb BW Jr, Loyd JE, Ely EW, et al. Pulmonary veno-occlusive disease: a case series and new observations. Chest 2000; 118: ...
Pulmonary veno-occlusive disease presenting with recurrent pulmonary oedema and the use of nitric oxide to predict response to ... Pulmonary veno-occlusive disease (PVOD) is a disorder which causes progressive pulmonary hypertension, usually presenting with ... Pulmonary veno-occlusive disease presenting with recurrent pulmonary oedema and the use of nitric oxide to predict response to ... Pulmonary oedema induced by pulmonary vasodilator therapy to reduce pulmonary arterial pressure has been well described in PVOD ...
Pulmonary venoocclusive disease: CT findings in eight patients. American Journal of Roentgenology. 1996 Jan 1;167(4):937-940. ... Pulmonary venoocclusive disease: CT findings in eight patients. Stephen J. Swensen, Joseph H. Tashjian, Jeffrey L. Myers, ... Pulmonary venoocclusive disease : CT findings in eight patients. / Swensen, Stephen J.; Tashjian, Joseph H.; Myers, Jeffrey L ... title = "Pulmonary venoocclusive disease: CT findings in eight patients",. abstract = "OBJECTIVE. The objective of the study ...
In dogs, information on the clinical presentation of PVOD is scarce and the cause and pathogenesis of this disease is still ... is a rare cause of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) in humans and can be classified in idiopathic, heritable, drug and ... segmental congestion of alveolar capillaries and foci of vascular changes similar to human pulmonary capillary hemangiomatosis ... congenital left-to right cardiovascular shunts or heartworm disease. However, recently, the pathologic features resembling ...
In contrast with iPAH, PVOD is characterized by an even poorer prognosis and the possibility of developing severe pulmonary ... Therefore, a noninvasive diagnostic approach using HRCT of the chest, arterial blood gases, pulmonary function tests, and ... is a rare disorder and can be misdiagnosed as idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension (iPAH). PVOD and iPAH often share a ... Pulmonary veno-occlusive disease (PVOD) is a rare disorder and can be misdiagnosed as idiopathic pulmonary arterial ...
... pulmonary veno-occlusive disease, pulmonary arteriovenous malformations, pulmonary edema, etc. Pulmonary veno-occlusive disease ... Most Common Diseases of Age 50+: Pulmonary vascular disease - Pulmonary veno-occlusive disease - The Causes. Posted on June 4, ... Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) *Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) Treatments In conventional medicine ... Restrictive lung diseases (Respiratory Disease) - The Preventions *Restrictive lung diseases (Respiratory Disease) - Treatments ...
Pulmonary veno-occlusive disease. *Definition. *. Pulmonary veno-occlusive disease (PVOD) is a very rare disease. It leads to ... Huertas A, Girerd B, Dorfmuller P, OCallaghan D, Humbert M, Montani D. Pulmonary veno-occlusive disease: advances in clinical ... Pulmonary hypertension. In: Broaddus VC, Mason RJ, Ernst JD, et al, eds. Murray and Nadels Textbook of Respiratory Medicine. ... The high blood pressure occurs in the pulmonary arteries. These lung arteries are directly connected to the right side of the ...
Pulmonary veno-occlusive disease, a rare cause of pulmonary hypertension, is characterized by extensive and diffuse occlusion ... Recurrence of Pulmonary Veno-occlusive Disease After Heart-Lung Transplantation Academic Article * ... The prognosis of pulmonary veno-occlusive disease is poor with most described patients dying within 2 years of diagnosis. ... We describe the recurrence of pulmonary veno-occlusive disease at 3 months after heart-lung transplantation in a 26-year-old ...
Pulmonary Edema With Pulmonary Veno-Occlusive Disease (PVOD). Should signs of pulmonary edema occur, consider the possibility ... Disease-associated maternal or embryo/fetal risk. In patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension, pregnancy is associated ... COPD (chronic obstructive pulmonary disease) is the same as adult-onset asthma. See Answer ... Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension. OPSUMIT is an endothelin receptor antagonist (ERA) indicated for the treatment of pulmonary ...
Pulmonary Veno-Occlusive Disease (PVOD) Associated with Connective Tissue Disease. In: Japanese Journal of Chest Diseases. 2014 ... title = "Pulmonary Veno-Occlusive Disease (PVOD) Associated with Connective Tissue Disease",. abstract = "Pulmonary arterial ... Pulmonary Veno-Occlusive Disease (PVOD) Associated with Connective Tissue Disease. Japanese Journal of Chest Diseases, 73(3), ... Pulmonary Veno-Occlusive Disease (PVOD) Associated with Connective Tissue Disease, Japanese Journal of Chest Diseases, vol. 73 ...
Pulmonary veno-occlusive disease. Genetics Home Reference provides information about pulmonary veno-occlusive disease. ... which is the chamber that pumps blood into the pulmonary artery. Signs and symptoms of pulmonary arterial hypertension occur ... Heritable Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension. 2002 Jul 18 [updated 2015 Jun 11]. In: Pagon RA, Adam MP, Ardinger HH, Wallace SE, ... Sporadic primary pulmonary hypertension is associated with germline mutations of the gene encoding BMPR-II, a receptor member ...
Full text: Available Index: IMSEAR (South-East Asia) Main subject: Autopsy / Pulmonary Veno-Occlusive Disease / Humans / Male ... Full text: Available Index: IMSEAR (South-East Asia) Main subject: Autopsy / Pulmonary Veno-Occlusive Disease / Humans / Male ... Autopsy , Child , Diagnosis, Differential , Echocardiography , Electrocardiography , Fatal Outcome , Humans , Male , Pulmonary ... Pulmonary veno-occlusive disease. Pulmonary veno-occlusive disease. Kothari, S S; Sharma, M; Singh, Z N; Bhatarai, S. ...
  • 77 Pulmonary veno-occlusive disease (PVOD) is a rare form of pulmonary hypertension caused by progressive. (malacards.org)
  • Pulmonary veno-occlusive disease (PVOD) is characterized by the blockage (occlusion) of the blood vessels that carry oxygen-rich (oxygenated) blood from the lungs to the heart (the pulmonary veins). (medlineplus.gov)
  • Research suggests that 5 to 25 percent of people diagnosed with idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension have PVOD. (medlineplus.gov)
  • however, it is unknown how absence of this protein's function leads to the pulmonary vessel abnormalities that underlie PVOD. (medlineplus.gov)
  • More common causes of pulmonary venous hypertension (eg, systolic or diastolic left-sided heart failure) and valvular heart disease (eg, mitral stenosis) should be considered as a part of the differential diagnosis before a diagnosis of pulmonary veno-occlusive disease (PVOD) is established. (medscape.com)
  • Vascular remodeling similar to PVOD occurs in both pulmonary veins and arteries in conditions such as mitral stenosis and fibrosing mediastinitis. (medscape.com)
  • However, the structural changes in the veins are more prominent in PVOD than in these other two conditions and may therefore provide a morphologic approach to differentiation of these diseases. (medscape.com)
  • In some cases of PVOD, advanced parenchymal lung diseases (eg, sarcoidosis, interstitial lung disease, pneumoconioses) may be considered as diagnostic possibilities because of prominent interstitial changes seen on chest radiographs. (medscape.com)
  • However, the distinction between most forms of advanced interstitial lung disease from PVOD is relatively straightforward for most experts upon review of chest CT scans. (medscape.com)
  • Pulmonary capillary hemangiomatosis should also be considered in the differential diagnosis of PVOD. (medscape.com)
  • Pulmonary veno-occlusive disease (PVOD) is a rare form of pulmonary hypertension caused by progressive blockage of the small veins in the lungs. (wikipedia.org)
  • Treatments for primary pulmonary hypertension such as prostacyclins and endothelin receptor antagonists can be fatal in people with PVOD due to the development of severe pulmonary edema, and worsening symptoms after initiation of these medications may be a clue to the diagnosis of pulmonary veno occlusive disease. (wikipedia.org)
  • PVOD may occur in patients with associated diseases such as HIV, bone marrow transplantation, and connective tissue diseases. (wikipedia.org)
  • Diagram explaining why pulmonary capillary wedge pressure ( P pcw ) is usually normal in pulmonary veno-occlusive disease (PVOD). (ersjournals.com)
  • PVOD mostly affects small pulmonary veins, leading to an elevation of pressure in this region ( P v ), as well as to an elevation in true pulmonary capillary pressure ( P c ) and pre-capillary pulmonary arterial pressure ( P a ). (ersjournals.com)
  • the static column of blood (hatched) occluded by pulmonary arterial catheter wedging or balloon inflation of a pulmonary arterial branch (balloon 1) reflects the pressure in a vein of similar diameter (balloon 2), usually of a larger size than those vessels affected by PVOD. (ersjournals.com)
  • Pulmonary function tests a) diffusing capacity of the lung for carbon monoxide ( D L,CO ) and b) arterial oxygen tension ( P a,O 2 ) at rest in patients with pulmonary veno-occlusive disease (PVOD) and pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). (ersjournals.com)
  • Management of pulmonary veno-occlusive disease (PVOD) at the French Reference Center for Pulmonary Hypertension. (ersjournals.com)
  • Patients with suspected PVOD receive basic pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) therapy including warfarin, diuretics and oxygen if needed. (ersjournals.com)
  • What is the role of antithrombotic agents in the treatment of pulmonary veno-occlusive disease (PVOD)? (medscape.com)
  • The aim of this study was to describe our experience at one institution with pulmonary veno-occlusive disease (PVOD) during the past 10 years, with particular reference to new findings and long-term outcome. (nih.gov)
  • All 11 patients in our series had at least one symptom or clinical finding that, in conjunction with known pulmonary hypertension, suggested the diagnosis of PVOD. (nih.gov)
  • The findings of the HRCT, together with the low D L,CO and oxygen content and the normal PCWP, are compatible with pulmonary veno-occlusive disease (PVOD), a rare variant of PAH. (ersjournals.com)
  • Pulmonary veno-occlusive disease (PVOD) is a very rare disease. (stlukes-stl.com)
  • Pulmonary veno-occlusive disease (PVOD) is a rare and usually survival poor disorder. (go.jp)
  • This case highlights that PVOD is an under-recognised and often misdiagnosed disease, especially in its chronic form. (go.jp)
  • Pulmonary veno-occlusive disease (PVOD) is a disorder which causes progressive pulmonary hypertension, usually presenting with worsening dyspnoea and right heart failure. (bmj.com)
  • Pulmonary oedema induced by pulmonary vasodilator therapy to reduce pulmonary arterial pressure has been well described in PVOD, but here we describe a case of PVOD presenting with recurrent episodes of acute non-cardiogenic pulmonary oedema, in the absence of significant pulmonary hypertension. (bmj.com)
  • Pulmonary veno-occlusive disease (PVOD) usually presents with worsening dyspnoea and right heart failure as a result of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). (bmj.com)
  • Here we describe a case of PVOD presenting with recurrent episodes of acute non-cardiogenic pulmonary oedema with only a borderline increase in pulmonary artery pressure, confounding the diagnosis until surgical lung biopsy was performed. (bmj.com)
  • Hereditary pulmonary veno-occlusive disease (PVOD) has been associated with biallelic mutations in EIF2AK4 with the recent discovery of a founder mutation in Iberian Romani patients with familial PVOD. (revespcardiol.org)
  • The aims of this study were phenotypical characterization and survival analysis of Iberian Romani patients with familial PVOD carrying the founder p.Pro1115Leu mutation in EIF2AK4 , according to their tolerance to pulmonary vasodilators (PVD). (revespcardiol.org)
  • Observational study of Romani patients with familial PVOD included in the Spanish Registry of Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension. (revespcardiol.org)
  • Pulmonary veno-occlusive disease (PVOD) and pulmonary capillary hemangiomatosis (PCH) are rare causes of pulmonary hypertension, regarded by some as distinct entities. (inserm.fr)
  • PCH was identified in 24 (73%) cases diagnosed as PVOD, either as perivenular foci or diffuse involvement of the pulmonary parenchyma. (inserm.fr)
  • Based on clinical and diagnostic findings, the patient was re-diagnosed with pulmonary veno-occlusive disease (PVOD). (ersjournals.com)
  • This case emphasises that PVOD is an under-recognised and often misdiagnosed form of pulmonary hypertension. (ersjournals.com)
  • Based on these findings a diagnosis of pulmonary veno-occlusive disease (PVOD) was hypothesised. (ersjournals.com)
  • Pulmonary veno-occlusive disease (PVOD) is a rare cause of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) in humans and can be classified in idiopathic, heritable, drug and radiation-induced, and associated with connective tissue disease or human immunodeficiency virus infection. (biomedcentral.com)
  • However, recently, the pathologic features resembling human PVOD were retrospectively described in post - mortem lung samples of dogs presenting with respiratory distress and idiopathic pulmonary hypertension (PH), which suggests that PVOD contributes to an unknown percentage of cases with unexplained PH. (biomedcentral.com)
  • In dogs, information on the clinical presentation of PVOD is scarce and the cause and pathogenesis of this disease is still unknown. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Histopathology of the lungs showed venous and arterial remodelling, segmental congestion of alveolar capillaries and foci of vascular changes similar to human pulmonary capillary hemangiomatosis, indicating that the dog suffered from PVOD. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Pulmonary veno-occlusive disease (PVOD) is a rare cause of pulmonary hypertension (PH) in humans. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Although PVOD is classified as belonging to the group of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) in the current classification systems of PH [ 3 ], PVOD has been given a separate subgroup. (biomedcentral.com)
  • In this subgroup PVOD is combined with pulmonary capillary haemangiomatosis (PCH), because PVOD and PCH are considered different expressions of the same disorder. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Histopathological abnormalities are seen in all three compartments of the pulmonary microcirculation in PVOD, although there is a preferential involvement of the pulmonary venous system. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Pulmonary veno-occlusive disease (PVOD) is a rare disorder and can be misdiagnosed as idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension (iPAH). (semanticscholar.org)
  • In cases of CTD-PAH, if pulmonary veins or venules are also affected, the condition is termed pulmonary veno-occlusive disease (PVOD). (elsevier.com)
  • Yasuoka, H & Kuwana, M 2014, ' Pulmonary Veno-Occlusive Disease (PVOD) Associated with Connective Tissue Disease ', Japanese Journal of Chest Diseases , vol. 73, no. 3, pp. 270-278. (elsevier.com)
  • Pulmonary veno-occlusive disease (PVOD) is a rare cause of group 1 PH (WHO Group 1′), and is difficult to distinguish clinically from IPAH [ 8 , 9 ]. (ersjournals.com)
  • Pulmonary veins and venules were examined for changes of PVOD: intimal thickening, obstructive fibrous luminal septa or recanalisation and arterialisation of pulmonary veins. (ersjournals.com)
  • At autopsy, the cause of her right heart failure was found to be due to PTTM with features of pulmonary veno-occlusive disease (PVOD). (biomedcentral.com)
  • PTTM and PVOD are important diagnoses to consider in patients with a malignancy and the development of right heart failure and may be manifestations of a spectrum of similar disease processes. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Here we describe a woman being treated with the combination of a VEGF receptor (VEGFR) inhibitor and a programmed death-ligand 1 (PD-L1) inhibitor who developed pulmonary hypertension and right heart failure and was subsequently found to have PTTM with features of pulmonary veno-occlusive disease (PVOD). (biomedcentral.com)
  • Pulmonary veno-occlusive disease (PVOD) is a rare disease which is very difficult to recognize. (pvrinstitute.org)
  • Lung tissue histologic examination demonstrated intimal fibroelastosis of pulmonary vein brunches with narrowing or complete obliteration of vein lumen, which confirmed PVOD. (pvrinstitute.org)
  • Such mechanisms include extrinsic compression of large pulmonary arteries by mediastinal or hilar adenopathies or fibrosis, 2, 7 specific granulomatous vascular involvement 2, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12 which sometimes simulates secondary pulmonary veno-occlusive disease (PVOD), 11, 12 and pulmonary vasoconstriction by vasoactive factors. (bmj.com)
  • Heterozygous mutations in the gene encoding the bone morphogenetic protein receptor type 2 (BMPR2) are the commonest genetic cause of PAH, whereas biallelic mutations in the eukaryotic translation initiation factor 2 alpha kinase 4 gene (EIF2AK4) are described in pulmonary veno-occlusive disease and pulmonary capillary haemangiomatosis (PVOD/PCH). (whiterose.ac.uk)
  • Methods -Whole genome sequencing was performed on DNA from patients with idiopathic and heritable PAH, as well as PVOD/PCH recruited to the NIHR BioResource - Rare Diseases Study. (whiterose.ac.uk)
  • However, during the second bone marrow transplant, Caroline developed pulmonary veno-occlusive disease (PVOD). (alexslemonade.org)
  • As a result of the PVOD though, Caroline now had pulmonary hypertension. (alexslemonade.org)
  • BMPR2 haploinsufficiency as the inherited molecular mechanism for primary pulmonary hypertension. (nih.gov)
  • Pulmonary hypertension can have no identifiable cause and is then referred to as idiopathic pulmonary hypertension (formerly called primary pulmonary hypertension). (medicinenet.com)
  • Survival in patients with primary pulmonary hypertension. (springer.com)
  • Appetite-suppressant drugs and the risk of primary pulmonary hypertension. (springer.com)
  • International primary pulmonary hypertension study group. (springer.com)
  • Pulmonary hypertension (PH) was previously classified into two categories: primary pulmonary hypertension (PPH) or secondary pulmonary hypertension, depending on the absence or the presence of identifiable causes or risk factors. (onlinejacc.org)
  • The most common CT findings in these eight patients with pulmonary venoocclusive disease were smooth interlobular septal thickening, diffuse multifocal regions of ground-glass opacity, pleural effusions, enlarged central pulmonary arteries, and pulmonary veins of normal caliber. (nih.gov)
  • Pathological process resulting in the fibrous obstruction of the small- and medium-sized PULMONARY VEINS and PULMONARY HYPERTENSION. (harvard.edu)
  • Pulmonary veno-occlusive disease, a rare cause of pulmonary hypertension, is characterized by extensive and diffuse occlusion of pulmonary veins by fibrous tissue. (bgu.ac.il)
  • Atrial fibrillation (AF) recurrence after pulmonary vein isolation (PVI) is usually associated to conduction gaps in pulmonary veins (PVs). (bioportfolio.com)
  • Heart Failure Differentially Modulates the Effects of Ivabradine on the Electrical Activity of the Sinoatrial Node and Pulmonary Veins. (bioportfolio.com)
  • Heart failure (HF) or sinoatrial node (SAN) dysfunction increases the risk of AF, and pulmonary veins (PVs) play a critical role in the patho. (bioportfolio.com)
  • Pulmonary veno-occlusive disease and scleroderma associated pulmonary hypertension. (medscape.com)
  • Many cases are likely misdiagnosed as idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension, which is increased blood pressure in the pulmonary arteries without a known cause. (medlineplus.gov)
  • Pulmonary venoocclusive disease is rare, difficult to diagnose, and probably frequently misdiagnosed as idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension. (wikipedia.org)
  • As the condition worsens, affected individuals can develop a bluish tint to the skin (cyanosis), chest pains, fainting spells, and an accumulation of fluid in the lungs ( pulmonary edema ). (medlineplus.gov)
  • Pulmonary vascular disease is defined as a condition of blood flow to the lung's artery is blocked suddenly due to a blood clot somewhere in the body, including pulmonary embolism, chronic thromboembolic disease, pulmonary arterial hypertension, pulmonary veno-occlusive disease, pulmonary arteriovenous malformations, pulmonary edema, etc. (healthblogs.org)
  • Although the diagnosis can be suspected by the presence of the classic clinical triad of severe pulmonary arterial hypertension, radiographic evidence of pulmonary hypertension and edema, and normal pulmonary artery occlusion pressure, the definitive diagnosis is histopathologic. (bgu.ac.il)
  • If patients develop acute pulmonary edema during initiation of therapy with ambrisentan tablets, consider underlying pulmonary venoocclusive disease and discontinue treatment if necessary ( 5.4 ). (nih.gov)
  • Pulmonary edema could be the possibility of associated pulmonary veno-occlusive disease. (businesswire.com)
  • Of this group 12 had persistent radiographic postoperative pulmonary edema that cleared in all by 4 months. (biomedsearch.com)
  • Although pulmonary edema was present in each patient, the chest radiograph did not provide reliable information as to the exact site of obstruction. (biomedsearch.com)
  • Because blood flow through the lungs is difficult, pressure rises in the vessels that carry blood that needs to be oxygenated to the lungs from the heart ( the pulmonary arteries ). (medlineplus.gov)
  • Because of the increased blood pressure in the pulmonary arteries, the heart must work harder than normal to pump blood to the lungs, which can eventually lead to fatal heart failure. (medlineplus.gov)
  • Wagenvoort CA, Wagenvoort N, Takahashi T. Pulmonary veno-occlusive disease: involvement of pulmonary arteries and review of the literature. (medscape.com)
  • Pulmonary hypertension is high blood pressure in the arteries of the lungs. (stlukes-stl.com)
  • The high blood pressure occurs in the pulmonary arteries. (stlukes-stl.com)
  • A CT excluded a pulmonary embolus and indirect evidence of PAH, such as dilated pulmonary arteries or right-sided cardiac chambers. (bmj.com)
  • OPSUMIT is a prescription medicine used to treat pulmonary arterial hypertension ( PAH ), which is high blood pressure in the arteries of your lungs . (rxlist.com)
  • Pulmonary hypertension ( PH or PHTN ) is a condition of increased blood pressure within the arteries of the lungs . (wikipedia.org)
  • [11] A 1973 World Health Organization meeting was the first attempt to classify pulmonary hypertension by its cause, and a distinction was made between primary PH (resulting from a disease of the pulmonary arteries) and secondary PH (resulting secondary to other, non-vascular causes). (wikipedia.org)
  • Pulmonary arteries were evaluated for plexiform lesions, eccentric intimal fibrosis, concentric intimal fibrosis, recanalising thrombosis and muscularisation of small arteries. (ersjournals.com)
  • The treatment for pulmonary hypertension can include oxygen, diuretics, blood thinners, medications that open the pulmonary arteries, and treatments for any underlying disease. (medicinenet.com)
  • Pulmonary hypertension occurs when the pressure in the pulmonary arteries increases abnormally. (medicinenet.com)
  • To help explain this condition further, here is how the pulmonary arteries work. (medicinenet.com)
  • What are pulmonary arteries? (medicinenet.com)
  • The right ventricle pumps blood returning from the body into the pulmonary arteries to the lungs to receive oxygen. (medicinenet.com)
  • The pressures in the lung arteries (pulmonary arteries) are normally significantly lower than the pressures in the systemic circulation. (medicinenet.com)
  • This pressure is transmitted back to the right side of the heart and the pulmonary arteries. (medicinenet.com)
  • Some of this is a direct pressure transmission from the venous system backward and some can result from a reactive constriction of the pulmonary arteries. (medicinenet.com)
  • Less commonly, pulmonary hypertension results from constriction, or stiffening, of the pulmonary arteries that supply blood to the lungs, so called pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). (medicinenet.com)
  • Pulmonary tumor thrombotic microangiopathy (PTTM) is a rare cause of pulmonary hypertension that is associated with malignancies and is marked by the presence of non-occlusive tumor emboli and fibrocellular intimal proliferation of small pulmonary arteries leading to increased pulmonary vascular resistance and right heart failure. (biomedcentral.com)
  • The resultant obstruction of the small arteries and increase in pulmonary vascular resistance is thought to contribute to the clinical presentation of progressive cor pulmonale and death. (biomedcentral.com)
  • The histologic examination demonstrated intimal fibroelastosis of the pulmonary vein and artery brunches and fibrous and atheromatous plaques in segmental lung arteries. (pvrinstitute.org)
  • Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is caused by widespread occlusion or destruction of the smallest pulmonary arteries, leading to increased blood flow resistance, right ventricular hypertrophy, and heart failure. (arupconsult.com)
  • Pulmonary hypertension is high pressure inside the pulmonary arteries, which are the vessels carrying blood from the right-hand side of the heart to the lungs. (hse.ie)
  • In some cases this can prevent permanent damage to your pulmonary arteries. (hse.ie)
  • In a healthy person, the blood travelling through the pulmonary arteries from the right-hand side of the heart picks up oxygen when it reaches the lungs. (hse.ie)
  • During exercise, when the demand for oxygen increases, the heart beats more quickly and the pulmonary arteries normally widen to let more blood flow through to the lungs. (hse.ie)
  • However, if you have pulmonary hypertension, the walls of your pulmonary arteries may be thick and stiff, making them less able to expand to allow more blood through. (hse.ie)
  • Or, the pulmonary arteries may be blocked by a blood clot, which also hinders blood flow. (hse.ie)
  • PAH is a disease that is caused by narrowing of the blood vessels in the lungs, causing increased blood pressure in the arteries of the lungs. (medbroadcast.com)
  • One of the ways scleroderma can affect the lungs is by causing pulmonary fibrosis, which is a scarring of the lungs. (sclero.org)
  • Pulmonary (Lung) Fibrosis is a scarring of the lungs, and is the consequence of untreated pulmonary inflammation (alveolitis). (sclero.org)
  • A retrospective series of 22 sarcoidosis patients (16 men) of mean (SD) age 46 (13) years with PH was divided into two groups depending on the absence (stage 0: n = 2, stage II: n = 4, stage III: n = 1) or presence (n = 15) of radiographic pulmonary fibrosis at the time of PH diagnosis. (bmj.com)
  • In cases with fibrosis there was no correlation between haemodynamics and lung volumes or arterial oxygen tensions, suggesting other mechanisms for PH in addition to pulmonary destruction and hypoxaemia. (bmj.com)
  • three patients without pulmonary fibrosis experienced a sustained haemodynamic response. (bmj.com)
  • Two very different phenotypes of sarcoidosis combined with PH are observed depending on the presence or absence of pulmonary fibrosis. (bmj.com)
  • 1- 4 However, the severity of PH does not correlate well with the degree of pulmonary fibrosis and blood gas tensions, 6 and PH has also been reported as an early primary manifestation of sarcoidosis, suggesting that other mechanisms may contribute to the development of PH in patients with sarcoidosis. (bmj.com)
  • The section takes part in cutting-edge research and clinical trails, including those pertaining to idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF), COPD, and lung cancer. (yale.edu)
  • Pulmonary infection in Wegener's granulomatosis and idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. (swansea.ac.uk)
  • Pregnancy (Cat.X). Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis including those patients with pulmonary hypertension (WHO Group 3). (oncologynurseadvisor.com)
  • The pulmonary capillary wedge pressure (PCWP) was 12 mmHg. (ersjournals.com)
  • Pulmonary wedge pressure was normal. (ersjournals.com)
  • In one patient with pulmonary veno-occlusive disease diagnosed by a lung biopsy , sildenafil had a better effect on the pulmonary wedge pressure than inhaled nitric oxide (15 and 29 mmHg, respectively, acute test). (bvsalud.org)
  • Pulmonary artery wedge pressure assessment has a pivotal role in differentiating precapillary from postcapillary pulmonary hypertension. (smw.ch)
  • Pulmonary venoocclusive disease in a patient with systemic lupus erythematosus. (medscape.com)
  • Allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation in systemic mastocytosis: is there a high risk for veno-occlusive disease? (harvard.edu)
  • Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is an autoimmune disease. (stlukes-stl.com)
  • Pulmonary complications including pulmonary hypertension (PH) and interstitial lung disease (ILD) are leading causes of mortality in systemic sclerosis/scleroderma (SSc) [ 1 ]. (ersjournals.com)
  • Risk factors for pulmonary hypertension are liver failure, chronic lung disease, blood clotting disorders, and underlying diseases, such as scleroderma, dermatomyositis , and systemic lupus erythematosus . (medicinenet.com)
  • Iloprost dilates systemic and pulmonary arterial vascular beds. (wikipedia.org)
  • The impact of high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol on the development of atherosclerosis and diseases of systemic circulation has been well documented both in experimental and registry studies. (mdpi.com)
  • Sarcoidosis is a systemic disease that involves the lungs in almost all afflicted individuals. (springer.com)
  • To measure the prevalence of different types of pulmonary hypertension (PH) and to identify patients with systemic sclerosis (SSc) at highest risk in a multicenter European sample, with a metaanalysis of relevant studies. (jrheum.org)
  • The interest in PH due to systemic sclerosis (SSc), the connective tissue disease most often associated with PH, has recently increased 2 . (jrheum.org)
  • to update risk factors and associated conditions for pulmonary arterial hypertension and to propose guidelines in order to improve the classification of congenital systemic-to-pulmonary shunts. (onlinejacc.org)
  • Early diagnosis of PAH remains difficult, and screening programs in asymptomatic patients are feasible only in high-risk populations, particularly in patients with systemic sclerosis, for whom recent data suggest that a combination of clinical assessment and pulmonary function testing including diffusion capacity for carbon monoxide, biomarkers, and echocardiography has a higher predictive value than echocardiography alone. (onlinejacc.org)
  • Pulmonary hypertension (PH) is a condition frequently encountered in daily clinical practice and, despite the lack of good prevalence data, it is presumed to be the third most common cardiovascular condition after systemic hypertension and coronary artery disease [ 1 ]. (smw.ch)
  • PH was defined as mean pulmonary artery pressure ≥25 mmHg on right heart catheterisation. (ersjournals.com)
  • Pulmonary hypertension (PH) is defined by a mean pulmonary artery pressure ≥25 mm Hg at rest, measured during right heart catheterization. (onlinejacc.org)
  • Pulmonary veno-occlusive disease as a primary cause of pulmonary hypertension in a patient with mixed connective tissue disease. (medscape.com)
  • The disease is progressive and fatal, with median survival of about 2 years from the time of diagnosis to death. (wikipedia.org)
  • However, pulmonary hypertension (revealed via physical examination), in the presence of pleural effusion (done via CT scan) usually indicates a diagnosis of pulmonary veno-occlusive disease. (wikipedia.org)
  • Eight patients with CT scans of the thorax and a diagnosis of pulmonary venoocclusive disease were identified from three institutions. (nih.gov)
  • Due to her complaint of progressive dyspnoea for 15 months, and following the diagnosis of idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) in her sister 1 yr earlier, an echocardiogram was performed, which demonstrated an elevated pulmonary artery systolic pressure of 50 mmHg. (ersjournals.com)
  • A 27-yr-old female with a 6-month diagnosis of idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) confirmed elsewhere was referred to our centre with worsening dyspnoea. (ersjournals.com)
  • A 27-yr-old female was referred to the Pulmonary Vascular Diseases Centre of Bologna (Bologna, Italy) with a diagnosis of idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) and a history of progressive dyspnoea during exercise since the age of 26 yrs. (ersjournals.com)
  • Diagnosis was confirmed 1 month later following referral to an expert pulmonary hypertension centre and treatment with high-dose sildenafil was initiated (80 mg t.i.d. ). (ersjournals.com)
  • The prognosis of pulmonary veno-occlusive disease is poor with most described patients dying within 2 years of diagnosis. (bgu.ac.il)
  • Expert consensus statement on the diagnosis and treatment of paediatric pulmonary hypertension. (bmj.com)
  • Six patients with pulmonary venous obstruction were identified, the diagnosis being confirmed at catheterization or autopsy. (biomedsearch.com)
  • 2015 ESC/ERS Guidelines for the diagnosis and treatment of pulmonary hypertension: the Joint Task Force for the Diagnosis and Treatment of Pulmonary Hypertension of the European Society of Cardiology (ESC) and the European Respiratory Society (ERS): Endorsed by: Association for European Paediatric and Congenital Cardiology (AEPC), International Society for Heart and Lung Transplantation (ISHLT). (springer.com)
  • Drug toxicity should always be considered in the differential diagnosis in patients with respiratory distress or radiographic evidence of diffuse or multifocal pulmonary infiltrates. (endocrinologyadvisor.com)
  • TRALI is difficult to diagnose but should be included in the differential diagnosis of respiratory distress in patients with diffuse pulmonary infiltrates. (endocrinologyadvisor.com)
  • Knowing whether these symptoms are acute (hours to a several days), subacute (a few weeks to a few months) or chronic (many months to years) allows inclusion of some diseases and exclusion of others from the differential diagnosis. (bmj.com)
  • Diagnosis and assessment of patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) have been major topics at all previous world meetings on pulmonary hypertension (PH), with the last update coming from the 4th World Symposium on Pulmonary Hypertension (WSPH) held in 2008 in Dana Point, California (1) . (onlinejacc.org)
  • The definitive diagnosis and classification of pulmonary hypertension requires invasive confirmation of an elevated pulmonary artery mean pressure during a right heart catheterisation at rest. (smw.ch)
  • The correct acquisition and interpretation of invasive pulmonary haemodynamic variables play a central role, not only in confirming the diagnosis but also in prognostication and treatment decision-making. (smw.ch)
  • Recent data suggest that invasive pulmonary haemodynamic measurement during exercise may be more sensitive than resting haemodynamics for early diagnosis, for treatment response assessment and for prognostic purposes. (smw.ch)
  • All patients entered in these protocols for treatment also participate in biologic studies utilizing molecular markers of minimal residual disease and classification studies at diagnosis and relapse including complete immunophenotyping and cytogenetics as well as classical morphology and histochemistry. (stanford.edu)
  • There may be a delay in getting a diagnosis, as the symptoms can be quite general (see Pulmonary hypertension - Diagnosis ). (hse.ie)
  • A case of pulmonary veno-occlusive disease respondong to treatment with azathioprine. (medscape.com)
  • A case of pulmonary veno-occlusive disease: Etiological and therapeutic appraisal. (medscape.com)
  • Pulmonary hypertension is abnormally elevated pressure in the pulmonary circulation. (medicinenet.com)
  • The portion of the circulation that distributes the blood from the right side of the heart to the lungs and back to the left side of the heart is referred to as the pulmonary (lung) circulation. (medicinenet.com)
  • When pressure in the pulmonary circulation becomes abnormally elevated, it is referred to as pulmonary hypertension. (medicinenet.com)
  • The result is elevated pulmonary pressure throughout the pulmonary circulation. (medicinenet.com)
  • However, the exact mechanism in which this lipoprotein fraction exerts its effect in pulmonary circulation is still under investigation. (mdpi.com)
  • This paper reviews potential vasoprotective mechanisms of HDL in pulmonary circulation and presents current clinical reports on the role of HDL in PAH patients. (mdpi.com)
  • There appears to be a perception among some physicians that vascular pressures in the normal pulmonary circulation remain low during exercise. (ahajournals.org)
  • Obstructive proliferative vasculopathy of the small and medium-size pulmonary arterial circulation and chronic hypoxemia due to advanced lung disease are major causes of precapillary PH in SSc 7 , 8 . (jrheum.org)
  • Pulmonary hypertension (PH) was confirmed by right heart catheterisation, revealing a pulmonary arterial systolic pressure of 102 mmHg, a pulmonary arterial diastolic pressure of 40 mmHg and a mean pulmonary arterial pressure of 69 mmHg. (ersjournals.com)
  • A patient is deemed to have pulmonary hypertension if the pulmonary mean arterial pressure is greater than 25mmHg at rest, or greater than 30mmHg during exercise. (wikipedia.org)
  • Possibly this viewpoint originates in the early days of cardiac catheterization, when some studies apparently showed that mean pulmonary arterial pressure decreased as a result of exercise. (ahajournals.org)
  • The pulmonary arterial pressure therefore simply passively rises in response to the increase in venous pressure. (ahajournals.org)
  • Pulmonary hypertension (PH) is a fatal disorder characterized by an increase in pulmonary vascular resistance, which leads to right ventricular failure. (jrheum.org)
  • Her chest radiograph showed cardiomegaly, enlargement of the proximal pulmonary artery and diffuse interstitial oedema with basal Kerley B lines. (ersjournals.com)
  • or WHO group 3 related to interstitial lung disease (SSc-PH-ILD) [ 2 , 3 ]. (ersjournals.com)
  • In addition to vascular pathology, the pulmonary interstitium was examined for usual interstitial pneumonia, nonspecific interstitial pneumonia, emphysema and pneumonitis. (ersjournals.com)
  • Scleroderma-related Interstitial Lung Disease (SSc-ILD) Not Linked to Idiopathic Interstitial Pneumonia. (sclero.org)
  • The study confirmed that SSc-ILD and idiopathic interstitial pneumonia are different diseases, not sharing a genetic basis. (sclero.org)
  • Research interests in the section include: interstitial lung disease, small and large airway disease, congenital abnormalities of the thorax, quality assessment, intensive care imaging, and pulmonary nodule management, to name a few. (yale.edu)
  • Interstitial lung diseases of unknown cause, Part 1. (springer.com)
  • Precapillary PH was found in 64 patients (5%), of whom 42 had pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) and 22 had PH secondary to interstitial lung disease (ILD). (jrheum.org)
  • The complex world of interstitial lung disease presents nearly insurmountable challenges to the general surgical pathologist faced with a lung biopsy in this setting. (bmj.com)
  • A pattern-based histopathological approach to interstitial lung disease provides a "map" for the general pathologist to navigate this area successfully, especially so when used with aid of the clinical and radiological patterns of presentation. (bmj.com)
  • The pathology underlying this clinical and radiological presentation has been referred to as "interstitial" lung disease (ILD) and is nearly always the result of diffuse parenchymal injury, which in turn invokes a stereotypic response of inflammation followed inevitably by repair. (bmj.com)
  • Interstitial lung disease guideline. (swansea.ac.uk)
  • Clinical networks for interstitial lung disease. (swansea.ac.uk)
  • Within the Bu-Cy group, the incidence of veno-occlusive disease and haemorrhagic cystitis was similar in chronic myeloid leukaemia (CML) and acute leukaemia (AL) groups, but there was a significant (P = 0.003) incidence of interstitial pneumonia in the CML group 36% as compared to 7% in the AL group. (biomedsearch.com)
  • Rounds S, Cutaia MV. Pulmonary hypertension: Pathophysiology and clinical disorders. (medscape.com)
  • Twelve months later while in complete clinical remission, pulmonary hypertension and microangiopathic hemolytic anemia were recognized, progressed, and ended in his demise 6 months later. (nih.gov)
  • The platelet-derived growth factor receptor inhibitor imatinib has demonstrated clinical and haemodynamical improvement in both animal models of pulmonary hypertension (PH) and patients with PH. (ersjournals.com)
  • Clinical implications of determining BMPR2 mutation status in a large cohort of children and adults with pulmonary arterial hypertension. (semanticscholar.org)
  • Clinical outcomes of pulmonary arterial hypertension in carriers of BMPR2 mutation. (semanticscholar.org)
  • Adempas is indicated for the treatment of adults with persistent/ recurrent chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension (CTEPH), (WHO Group 4) after surgical treatment, or inoperable CTEPH, to improve exercise capacity and WHO functional class [see Clinical Studies ]. (rxlist.com)
  • Adempas is indicated for the treatment of adults with pulmonary arterial hypertension ( PAH ), (WHO Group 1), to improve exercise capacity, WHO functional class and to delay clinical worsening. (rxlist.com)
  • Studies establishing effectiveness included predominately patients with WHO functional class II-III and etiologies of idiopathic or heritable PAH (61%) or PAH associated with connective tissue diseases (25%) [see Clinical Studies ]. (rxlist.com)
  • Clinical characteristics of autoimmune rheumatic disease-related organizing pneumonia (AIRD-OP). Compared with cryptogenic organizing pneumonia patients, AIRD-OP patients are characterized with occult onset but more severe lung involvement and higher recurrence rate. (sclero.org)
  • Thus, PTTM is thought to be a unique clinical entity based on the presence of intimal proliferation, distinguishing it from obstructive pulmonary tumor emboli. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Clinical worsening events are defined as death, nonelective hospital admission for worsening PAH (further defined in clinical study protocol), initiation of parenteral or inhaled prostacyclin pathway agent for treatment of worsening PAH, disease progression (further defined in clinical study protocol), or unsatisfactory long-term clinical response (further defined in clinical study protocol). (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • Bosentan Tablets are indicated for the treatment of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) (WHO Group 1) in adults to improve exercise ability and to decrease clinical worsening. (businesswire.com)
  • Dr. Hopper's clinical responsibilities are focused on the inpatient and outpatient Pulmonary Hypertension (PH) Service based within the Children's Heart Center as well as the inpatient Cardiology service at LPCHS. (stanford.edu)
  • Additionally, Dr. Hopper pursues clinical and translational research in the area of pulmonary hypertension within the Children's Heart Center at LPCHS. (stanford.edu)
  • She completed her residency in Pediatrics at Boston Children's Hospital and performed both her fellowship training in Pediatric Cardiology and her advanced clinical fellowship in Pulmonary Hypertension at Lucile Packard Children's Hospital Stanford. (stanford.edu)
  • As part of a clinical trial, this study examined the pharmacokinetics (PK) of oral treprostinil in children with pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). (stanford.edu)
  • We have an active consultation service and work closely with the clinical services of Yale New-Haven Hospital including pulmonary and critical care medicine, thoracic and general oncology, thoracic surgery, radiation oncology, cardiology, general medicine and infectious disease. (yale.edu)
  • Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) (WHO Group I) to improve exercise ability and delay clinical worsening. (renalandurologynews.com)
  • 4 But, before any lung biopsy is performed, there is a patient with lung disease who is often manageable without a biopsy if one has knowledge of key clinical and radiological patterns of disease. (bmj.com)
  • Table 1 presents my view of the diseases most commonly associated with these three clinical presentations. (bmj.com)
  • In 1998, during the Second World Symposium on Pulmonary Hypertension (PH) held in Evian, France, a clinical classification of PH was proposed. (onlinejacc.org)
  • Current clinical classification of pulmonary hypertension considers five distinct groups. (smw.ch)
  • Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) (WHO Group I) in patients with WHO Class II or III symptoms to improve exercise ability and delay clinical worsening, or in combination with tadalafil to reduce the risks of disease progression and hospitalization for worsening PAH, and to improve exercise ability. (oncologynurseadvisor.com)
  • Heritable Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension. (nih.gov)
  • [11] Coughing up of blood may occur in some patients, particularly those with specific subtypes of pulmonary hypertension such as heritable pulmonary arterial hypertension, Eisenmenger syndrome and chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension . (wikipedia.org)
  • Genetics Home Reference provides information about pulmonary veno-occlusive disease. (nih.gov)
  • Our data suggest that in the majority of cases PCH represents a secondary angioproliferative process caused by postcapillary obstruction rather than a separate disease. (inserm.fr)
  • In dogs, PAH is poorly characterized and is generally considered to be idiopathic or secondary to (for example) congenital left-to right cardiovascular shunts or heartworm disease. (biomedcentral.com)
  • The classification of primary and secondary pulmonary hypertension has been reclassified, and now is based on the main underlying disease or condition, symptoms, and treatment options for pulmonary hypertension . (medicinenet.com)
  • In the initial report, unique pathologic changes in 21 patients were described with non-occluding microscopic tumor emboli limited to the small pulmonary arterial vessel wall, isolated or clumped in the vessel lumen and often with secondary thrombosis. (biomedcentral.com)
  • PAH secondary to sickle cell anemia (risk of vaso-occlusive crisis). (renalandurologynews.com)
  • RHC identified 17 patients (1%) with postcapillary PH secondary to left-heart disease. (jrheum.org)
  • The Dana Point classification distinguishes pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) from PH secondary to other morbid entities 1 . (jrheum.org)
  • The symptoms for pulmonary veno-occlusive disease are the following: Shortness of breath Fatigue Fainting Hemoptysis Difficulty breathing ( lying flat) Chest pain Cyanosis Hepatosplenic congestion The genetic cause of pulmonary veno-occlusive disease is mutations in EIF2AK4 gene. (wikipedia.org)
  • Genetic screening of EIF2AK4 was performed in index cases and relatives between November 2011 and July 2016 and histological pulmonary examination was carried out in patients who received a lung transplant or died. (revespcardiol.org)
  • Diseases associated with EIF2AK4 include Pulmonary Venoocclusive Disease 2, Autosomal Recessive and Pulmonary Venoocclusive Disease 1, Autosomal Dominant . (genecards.org)
  • [1] Risk factors include a family history, prior blood clots in the lungs , HIV/AIDS , sickle cell disease , cocaine use, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease , sleep apnea , living at high altitudes , and problems with the mitral valve . (wikipedia.org)
  • Obese patients and patients with obstructive lung diseases require special attention, given that spontaneous positive end-expiratory intrathoracic pressures are frequently observed. (smw.ch)
  • Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) associated with connective tissue disease (CTD) has a worse prognosis than that of idiopathic PAH, even when drugs for PAH treatment, such as vasodilators, are used. (elsevier.com)
  • SSc-PAH has poor prognosis and less favourable response to pulmonary vasodilator therapy compared to idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension (IPAH) [ 5 , 6 ]. (ersjournals.com)
  • however, prognosis may depend on the underlying disease or condition that is causing pulmonary hypertension. (medicinenet.com)
  • Recent discoveries in pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) revealed a significant impact of HDL on pulmonary artery vasoreactivity and patients' prognosis. (mdpi.com)
  • Abstract The pulmonary blood-gas barrier presents a dilemma. (ahajournals.org)
  • It is also well described in patients with chronic hemolytic anemias such as sickle cell disease. (springer.com)
  • A modified noninvasive screening protocol for pulmonary hypertension in children with sickle cell disease-Who should be sent for invasive evaluation? (springer.com)
  • Schematic showing pulmonary vascular pressures in healthy humans exercising at 80% to 90% of their maximal oxygen consumption. (ahajournals.org)
  • d) Patchy thickening of alveolar septa in the presence of occlusive microvessels (arrows). (ersjournals.com)
  • Pulmonary alveolar proteinosis is a rare complication seen in patients with hematologic malignancies--usually acute and chronic myeloid leukemias and myelodysplastic syndrome. (endocrinologyadvisor.com)
  • In a patient with significant pulmonary hypertension, the possibility of chronic pulmonary thromboembolic disease must be considered because it is one of the common and treatable causes of pulmonary hypertension. (medscape.com)
  • Further, primary PH was divided into the "arterial plexiform", "veno-occlusive" and "thromboembolic" forms. (wikipedia.org)
  • Riociguat is used to treat chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension (CTEPH) in people who cannot be treated with surgery, or in people who have undergone surgery but still have symptoms. (cigna.com)
  • In addition, left-heart disease and thromboembolic disease may cause, respectively, postcapillary/venous and precapillary PH 10 , 11 . (jrheum.org)
  • It is used to treat adults with Chronic Thromboembolic Pulmonary Hypertension (CTEPH) where surgery is not possible and CTEPH that continues or has returned after surgery. (medbroadcast.com)
  • The pathophysiology of veno-occlusive disease culminates in occlusion of the pulmonary blood vessels. (wikipedia.org)
  • Pulmonary veno-occlusive disease may have a genetic basis, published reports have indicated fatal occurrences that appeared to possess a familial pattern, more to the point, a germline mutation. (wikipedia.org)
  • Familial genetic screening was conducted, as well as assessment of sociocultural determinants with a potential influence on disease course. (revespcardiol.org)
  • Background: National genetic evaluations for disease resistance do not exist, precluding the genetic improvement of cattle for these traits. (umsystem.edu)
  • Background -Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a rare disease with an emerging genetic basis. (whiterose.ac.uk)
  • Genetic testing is most appropriate when no obvious etiology for pulmonary hypertension is found or if a family history of PAH exists. (arupconsult.com)
  • Pulmonary veno-occlusive disease and pulmonary capillary hemangiomatosis: a clinicopathologic study of 35 cases. (inserm.fr)
  • We describe the recurrence of pulmonary veno-occlusive disease at 3 months after heart-lung transplantation in a 26-year-old man. (bgu.ac.il)
  • Recurrence after transplantation for this disease has not been reported previously, and lung transplantation was thought to be definitive treatment. (bgu.ac.il)
  • With this 1st report of early recurrence of pulmonary veno-occlusive disease after heart-lung transplantation, we believe that extrapulmonary factors may play a role in the pathogenesis of this rare disease. (bgu.ac.il)
  • Morphological confirmation can be performed only postmortem or after lung transplantation, so the true disease prevalence is unknown. (pvrinstitute.org)
  • These included extrinsic arterial compression by lymphadenopathies in three cases and histologically proven pulmonary veno-occlusive disease in the five patients who underwent lung transplantation. (bmj.com)
  • Pulmonary leukostasis (PL) is a potentially life-threatening condition seen most often in patients with acute myeloid leukemias with severe leukocytosis, although it may also be seen in patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemias. (endocrinologyadvisor.com)
  • The most frequently seen acute cardiac toxicities in the PICU include ventricular dysfunction, pulmonary hypertension, and pericardial effusions. (springer.com)
  • At necropsy, minimal residual cancer and severe pulmonary veno-occlusive disease was found. (nih.gov)
  • Physical examination, laboratory analysis, thoracic radiography, echocardiography, a computed tomography scan and an ante mortem lung biopsy demonstrated severe arterial hypoxemia and severe PH but were not diagnostic for a known disease syndrome. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Pulmonary veno-occlusive disease associated with severe reduction of single-breath carbon monoxide diffusing capacity. (semanticscholar.org)
  • life threatening autoimmune diseases: severe progressive forms of lupus nephritis (inflammation of the kidney caused by a disease of the immune system) and Wegener's granulomatosis (a rare form of vasculitis). (drugs.com)
  • Pulmonary hypertension (PH) is a severe complication of sarcoidosis, with an unknown prevalence. (springer.com)
  • The course of sarcoidosis can vary from spontaneous resolution to severe and chronic disease. (springer.com)
  • For example, a patient with severe fibrotic abnormalities with a mean PAP that is in line with the severity of the lung disease will be classified as group 3 PH. (springer.com)
  • The condition is characterized by the development of severe respiratory distress/respiratory failure, hypoxemia, and diffuse pulmonary infiltrates shortly (typically with days) after initiating chemotherapy. (endocrinologyadvisor.com)
  • Studies establishing effectiveness included trials predominantly in patients with WHO Functional Class II-III symptoms and etiologies of idiopathic or heritable PAH (60%) or PAH associated with connective tissue diseases (34%) ( 1 ). (nih.gov)
  • Pulmonary venoocclusive disease is also a recognized cause of PH, which is thought to be more common in connective tissue diseases 9 . (jrheum.org)
  • Characteristics of patients with pulmonary venoocclusive disease awaiting transplantation. (harvard.edu)
  • There was a mixed venous saturation of 59%, a cardiac output of 3.0 L·min −1 and a pulmonary vascular resistance of 1,497 dynes·s −1 ·cm −5 . (ersjournals.com)
  • The simplest way of looking at this is that high pulmonary venous (or pulmonary arterial wedge) pressures are required for adequate filling of the left ventricle during the high cardiac outputs of intense exercise. (ahajournals.org)
  • She has a specific interest in pulmonary hypertension associated with prematurity and co-directs the multidisciplinary Cardiac and Respiratory care for Infants with Bronchopulmonary Dysplasia (CRIB) Program with Drs. Tracy and Bhombal. (stanford.edu)
  • The term pulmonary hypertension refers to a serious condition characterised by high pulmonary vascular pressure, mainly as a consequence of various cardiac and respiratory diseases. (smw.ch)
  • Radiation-induced heart disease: pathologic abnormalities and putative mechanisms. (springer.com)
  • Congenital Pulmonary Vein Stenosis: Encouraging Mid-term Outcome. (harvard.edu)
  • Researchers have identified more than 350 BMPR2 gene mutations that can cause pulmonary arterial hypertension, a condition characterized by abnormally high blood pressure (hypertension) in the blood vessel that carries blood from the heart to the lungs (the pulmonary artery). (nih.gov)
  • There are many different types of pulmonary hypertension and some are associated with underlying health conditions, particularly conditions affecting the heart or lungs. (hse.ie)
  • The strong inverse relationship between HDL and cardiovascular disease was first established by the Framingham Heart Study [ 1 ]. (mdpi.com)
  • The challenges to the HDL hypothesis of cardiovascular diseases are also driven by studies in patients with Mendelian disorders of lipoprotein metabolism. (mdpi.com)
  • 1 Department of Medicine, Division of Allergy, Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine or Division of Cardiovascular Medicine, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, Tennessee USA. (jci.org)
  • The Pulmonary Vascular Research Institute is a registered charity in the United Kingdom (Charity No: 1127115). (pvrinstitute.org)
  • Venous and arterial changes in pulmonary veno-occlusive disease, mitral stenosis and fibrosing mediastinitis. (medscape.com)
  • It remains unclear how BMPR2 gene mutations cause pulmonary arterial hypertension. (nih.gov)
  • Padalino MA, Cavalli G, De Franceschi M, Mancuso D, Maschietto N, Vida V, Milanesi O, Stellin G. Surgical outcomes of total anomalous pulmonary venous connection repair: a 22-year experience. (harvard.edu)
  • Two-dimensional and pulsed Doppler echocardiography in the postoperative evaluation of total anomalous pulmonary venous connection. (biomedsearch.com)
  • The role of combined two-dimensional and pulsed Doppler echocardiography in the postoperative assessment of patients with total anomalous pulmonary venous connection was evaluated. (biomedsearch.com)
  • Combined two-dimensional and Doppler echocardiography is a useful adjunct in the postoperative evaluation of patients with total anomalous pulmonary venous connection. (biomedsearch.com)
  • [13] Pulmonary venous hypertension typically presents with shortness of breath while lying flat or sleeping ( orthopnea or paroxysmal nocturnal dyspnea ), while pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) typically does not. (wikipedia.org)
  • This most commonly occurs when the pulmonary venous pressure is elevated, so called pulmonary venous hypertension (PVH). (medicinenet.com)
  • The Evian classification (3,4) consisted of five categories ( Table 1 ) in which PH diseases were grouped according to specific therapeutic interventions directed at dealing with the cause of: 1) PAH, 2) pulmonary venous hypertension, 3) PH associated with disorders of the respiratory system or hypoxemia, 4) PH caused by thrombotic or embolic diseases, and 5) PH caused by diseases affecting the pulmonary vasculature. (onlinejacc.org)
  • Evaluation of Primary Pulmonary Vein Stenosis in Children: Comparison of Radionuclide Perfusion Lung Scan and Angiography. (harvard.edu)
  • Ventilation/perfusion lung scan in pulmonary veno-occlusive disease. (semanticscholar.org)
  • The current study describes a patient with pulmonary arterial hypertension associated with a suspected pulmonary veno-occlusive disease. (ersjournals.com)
  • Pulmonary hypertension associated with benfluorex exposure. (springer.com)
  • Cautious use of specific PAH therapies is required in these patients because of the risk of pulmonary oedema. (ersjournals.com)