The circulation of the BLOOD through the LUNGS.
The short wide vessel arising from the conus arteriosus of the right ventricle and conveying unaerated blood to the lungs.
Increased VASCULAR RESISTANCE in the PULMONARY CIRCULATION, usually secondary to HEART DISEASES or LUNG DISEASES.
The movement of the BLOOD as it is pumped through the CARDIOVASCULAR SYSTEM.
Either of the pair of organs occupying the cavity of the thorax that effect the aeration of the blood.
Relatively complete absence of oxygen in one or more tissues.
The force that opposes the flow of BLOOD through a vascular bed. It is equal to the difference in BLOOD PRESSURE across the vascular bed divided by the CARDIAC OUTPUT.
A fetal blood vessel connecting the pulmonary artery with the descending aorta.
Hypertrophy and dilation of the RIGHT VENTRICLE of the heart that is caused by PULMONARY HYPERTENSION. This condition is often associated with pulmonary parenchymal or vascular diseases, such as CHRONIC OBSTRUCTIVE PULMONARY DISEASE and PULMONARY EMBOLISM.
The movement and the forces involved in the movement of the blood through the CARDIOVASCULAR SYSTEM.
The physiological narrowing of BLOOD VESSELS by contraction of the VASCULAR SMOOTH MUSCLE.
The veins that return the oxygenated blood from the lungs to the left atrium of the heart.
Enlargement of the RIGHT VENTRICLE of the heart. This increase in ventricular mass is often attributed to PULMONARY HYPERTENSION and is a contributor to cardiovascular morbidity and mortality.
The pressure within the CARDIAC ATRIUM. It can be measured directly by using a pressure catheter (see HEART CATHETERIZATION). It can be also estimated using various imaging techniques or other pressure readings such as PULMONARY CAPILLARY WEDGE PRESSURE (an estimate of left atrial pressure) and CENTRAL VENOUS PRESSURE (an estimate of right atrial pressure).
PRESSURE of the BLOOD on the ARTERIES and other BLOOD VESSELS.
A free radical gas produced endogenously by a variety of mammalian cells, synthesized from ARGININE by NITRIC OXIDE SYNTHASE. Nitric oxide is one of the ENDOTHELIUM-DEPENDENT RELAXING FACTORS released by the vascular endothelium and mediates VASODILATION. It also inhibits platelet aggregation, induces disaggregation of aggregated platelets, and inhibits platelet adhesion to the vascular endothelium. Nitric oxide activates cytosolic GUANYLATE CYCLASE and thus elevates intracellular levels of CYCLIC GMP.
The vascular resistance to the flow of BLOOD through the CAPILLARIES portions of the peripheral vascular bed.
The volume of BLOOD passing through the HEART per unit of time. It is usually expressed as liters (volume) per minute so as not to be confused with STROKE VOLUME (volume per beat).
Any of the ruminant mammals with curved horns in the genus Ovis, family Bovidae. They possess lachrymal grooves and interdigital glands, which are absent in GOATS.
The hemodynamic and electrophysiological action of the right HEART VENTRICLE.
A syndrome of persistent PULMONARY HYPERTENSION in the newborn infant (INFANT, NEWBORN) without demonstrable HEART DISEASES. This neonatal condition can be caused by severe pulmonary vasoconstriction (reactive type), hypertrophy of pulmonary arterial muscle (hypertrophic type), or abnormally developed pulmonary arterioles (hypoplastic type). The newborn patient exhibits CYANOSIS and ACIDOSIS due to the persistence of fetal circulatory pattern of right-to-left shunting of blood through a patent ductus arteriosus (DUCTUS ARTERIOSUS, PATENT) and at times a patent foramen ovale (FORAMEN OVALE, PATENT).
The anatomical study of specific regions or parts of organisms, emphasizing the relationship between the various structures (e.g. muscles, nerves, skeletal, cardiovascular, etc.).
The exchange of OXYGEN and CARBON DIOXIDE between alveolar air and pulmonary capillary blood that occurs across the BLOOD-AIR BARRIER.
The physiological widening of BLOOD VESSELS by relaxing the underlying VASCULAR SMOOTH MUSCLE.
The domestic dog, Canis familiaris, comprising about 400 breeds, of the carnivore family CANIDAE. They are worldwide in distribution and live in association with people. (Walker's Mammals of the World, 5th ed, p1065)
Treatment process involving the injection of fluid into an organ or tissue.
The blood pressure as recorded after wedging a CATHETER in a small PULMONARY ARTERY; believed to reflect the PRESSURE in the pulmonary CAPILLARIES.
Drugs used to cause dilation of the blood vessels.
Diversion of blood flow through a circuit located outside the body but continuous with the bodily circulation.
Theoretical representations that simulate the behavior or activity of the cardiovascular system, processes, or phenomena; includes the use of mathematical equations, computers and other electronic equipment.
Left bronchial arteries arise from the thoracic aorta, the right from the first aortic intercostal or the upper left bronchial artery; they supply the bronchi and the lower trachea.
Excessive accumulation of extravascular fluid in the lung, an indication of a serious underlying disease or disorder. Pulmonary edema prevents efficient PULMONARY GAS EXCHANGE in the PULMONARY ALVEOLI, and can be life-threatening.
A value equal to the total volume flow divided by the cross-sectional area of the vascular bed.
Procedures in which placement of CARDIAC CATHETERS is performed for therapeutic or diagnostic procedures.
A stable prostaglandin endoperoxide analog which serves as a thromboxane mimetic. Its actions include mimicking the hydro-osmotic effect of VASOPRESSIN and activation of TYPE C PHOSPHOLIPASES. (From J Pharmacol Exp Ther 1983;224(1): 108-117; Biochem J 1984;222(1):103-110)
The biological science concerned with the life-supporting properties, functions, and processes of living organisms or their parts.
Symmetrical osteitis of the four limbs, chiefly localized to the phalanges and the terminal epiphyses of the long bones of the forearm and leg, sometimes extending to the proximal ends of the limbs and the flat bones, and accompanied by dorsal kyphosis and joint involvement. It is often secondary to chronic conditions of the lungs and heart. (Dorland, 27th ed)
The unborn young of a viviparous mammal, in the postembryonic period, after the major structures have been outlined. In humans, the unborn young from the end of the eighth week after CONCEPTION until BIRTH, as distinguished from the earlier EMBRYO, MAMMALIAN.
A condition in which the RIGHT VENTRICLE of the heart was functionally impaired. This condition usually leads to HEART FAILURE or MYOCARDIAL INFARCTION, and other cardiovascular complications. Diagnosis is made by measuring the diminished ejection fraction and a depressed level of motility of the right ventricular wall.
The flow of BLOOD through or around an organ or region of the body.
The administration of drugs by the respiratory route. It includes insufflation into the respiratory tract.
The blood pressure in the VEINS. It is usually measured to assess the filling PRESSURE to the HEART VENTRICLE.
Devices for accelerating protons or electrons in closed orbits where the accelerating voltage and magnetic field strength varies (the accelerating voltage is held constant for electrons) in order to keep the orbit radius constant.
A 21-amino acid peptide produced in a variety of tissues including endothelial and vascular smooth-muscle cells, neurons and astrocytes in the central nervous system, and endometrial cells. It acts as a modulator of vasomotor tone, cell proliferation, and hormone production. (N Eng J Med 1995;333(6):356-63)
A type of impedance plethysmography in which bioelectrical impedance is measured between electrodes positioned around the neck and around the lower thorax. It is used principally to calculate stroke volume and cardiac volume, but it is also related to myocardial contractility, thoracic fluid content, and circulation to the extremities.
An element with atomic symbol O, atomic number 8, and atomic weight [15.99903; 15.99977]. It is the most abundant element on earth and essential for respiration.
The act of breathing with the LUNGS, consisting of INHALATION, or the taking into the lungs of the ambient air, and of EXHALATION, or the expelling of the modified air which contains more CARBON DIOXIDE than the air taken in (Blakiston's Gould Medical Dictionary, 4th ed.). This does not include tissue respiration (= OXYGEN CONSUMPTION) or cell respiration (= CELL RESPIRATION).
Rhythmic, intermittent propagation of a fluid through a BLOOD VESSEL or piping system, in contrast to constant, smooth propagation, which produces laminar flow.
A pyrrolizidine alkaloid and a toxic plant constituent that poisons livestock and humans through the ingestion of contaminated grains and other foods. The alkaloid causes pulmonary artery hypertension, right ventricular hypertrophy, and pathological changes in the pulmonary vasculature. Significant attenuation of the cardiopulmonary changes are noted after oral magnesium treatment.
The pathologic narrowing of the orifice of the PULMONARY VALVE. This lesion restricts blood outflow from the RIGHT VENTRICLE to the PULMONARY ARTERY. When the trileaflet valve is fused into an imperforate membrane, the blockage is complete.
The minute vessels that connect the arterioles and venules.
Drugs used to cause constriction of the blood vessels.
Small polyhedral outpouchings along the walls of the alveolar sacs, alveolar ducts and terminal bronchioles through the walls of which gas exchange between alveolar air and pulmonary capillary blood takes place.
Blocking of the PULMONARY ARTERY or one of its branches by an EMBOLUS.
Refers to animals in the period of time just after birth.
Single pavement layer of cells which line the luminal surface of the entire vascular system and regulate the transport of macromolecules and blood components.
A congenital heart defect characterized by the persistent opening of fetal DUCTUS ARTERIOSUS that connects the PULMONARY ARTERY to the descending aorta (AORTA, DESCENDING) allowing unoxygenated blood to bypass the lung and flow to the PLACENTA. Normally, the ductus is closed shortly after birth.
Synthetic compounds that are analogs of the naturally occurring prostaglandin endoperoxides and that mimic their pharmacologic and physiologic activities. They are usually more stable than the naturally occurring compounds.
A 52-amino acid peptide with multi-functions. It was originally isolated from PHEOCHROMOCYTOMA and ADRENAL MEDULLA but is widely distributed throughout the body including lung and kidney tissues. Besides controlling fluid-electrolyte homeostasis, adrenomedullin is a potent vasodilator and can inhibit pituitary ACTH secretion.
Developmental abnormalities involving structures of the heart. These defects are present at birth but may be discovered later in life.
An NADPH-dependent enzyme that catalyzes the conversion of L-ARGININE and OXYGEN to produce CITRULLINE and NITRIC OXIDE.
An inhibitor of nitric oxide synthetase which has been shown to prevent glutamate toxicity. Nitroarginine has been experimentally tested for its ability to prevent ammonia toxicity and ammonia-induced alterations in brain energy and ammonia metabolites. (Neurochem Res 1995:200(4):451-6)
Maintenance of blood flow to an organ despite obstruction of a principal vessel. Blood flow is maintained through small vessels.
21-Amino-acid peptides produced by vascular endothelial cells and functioning as potent vasoconstrictors. The endothelin family consists of three members, ENDOTHELIN-1; ENDOTHELIN-2; and ENDOTHELIN-3. All three peptides contain 21 amino acids, but vary in amino acid composition. The three peptides produce vasoconstrictor and pressor responses in various parts of the body. However, the quantitative profiles of the pharmacological activities are considerably different among the three isopeptides.
Diseases which have one or more of the following characteristics: they are permanent, leave residual disability, are caused by nonreversible pathological alteration, require special training of the patient for rehabilitation, or may be expected to require a long period of supervision, observation, or care. (Dictionary of Health Services Management, 2d ed)
A CALCIUM-dependent, constitutively-expressed form of nitric oxide synthase found primarily in ENDOTHELIAL CELLS.
A prostaglandin that is a powerful vasodilator and inhibits platelet aggregation. It is biosynthesized enzymatically from PROSTAGLANDIN ENDOPEROXIDES in human vascular tissue. The sodium salt has been also used to treat primary pulmonary hypertension (HYPERTENSION, PULMONARY).
The nonstriated involuntary muscle tissue of blood vessels.
The lower right and left chambers of the heart. The right ventricle pumps venous BLOOD into the LUNGS and the left ventricle pumps oxygenated blood into the systemic arterial circulation.
Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.
Any of the tubular vessels conveying the blood (arteries, arterioles, capillaries, venules, and veins).
An abnormal direct communication between an artery and a vein without passing through the CAPILLARIES. An A-V fistula usually leads to the formation of a dilated sac-like connection, arteriovenous aneurysm. The locations and size of the shunts determine the degree of effects on the cardiovascular functions such as BLOOD PRESSURE and HEART RATE.
The circulation of the BLOOD through the MICROVASCULAR NETWORK.
Radiography of blood vessels after injection of a contrast medium.
A strain of albino rat used widely for experimental purposes because of its calmness and ease of handling. It was developed by the Sprague-Dawley Animal Company.
Pathological processes involving any part of the LUNG.
Measurement of oxygen and carbon dioxide in the blood.
An infant during the first month after birth.
Volume of circulating BLOOD. It is the sum of the PLASMA VOLUME and ERYTHROCYTE VOLUME.
Cell surface proteins that bind ENDOTHELINS with high affinity and trigger intracellular changes which influence the behavior of cells.
Guanosine cyclic 3',5'-(hydrogen phosphate). A guanine nucleotide containing one phosphate group which is esterified to the sugar moiety in both the 3'- and 5'-positions. It is a cellular regulatory agent and has been described as a second messenger. Its levels increase in response to a variety of hormones, including acetylcholine, insulin, and oxytocin and it has been found to activate specific protein kinases. (From Merck Index, 11th ed)
Recycling through liver by excretion in bile, reabsorption from intestines (INTESTINAL REABSORPTION) into portal circulation, passage back into liver, and re-excretion in bile.
The status during which female mammals carry their developing young (EMBRYOS or FETUSES) in utero before birth, beginning from FERTILIZATION to BIRTH.
Any of various animals that constitute the family Suidae and comprise stout-bodied, short-legged omnivorous mammals with thick skin, usually covered with coarse bristles, a rather long mobile snout, and small tail. Included are the genera Babyrousa, Phacochoerus (wart hogs), and Sus, the latter containing the domestic pig (see SUS SCROFA).
The hollow, muscular organ that maintains the circulation of the blood.
A powerful vasodilator used in emergencies to lower blood pressure or to improve cardiac function. It is also an indicator for free sulfhydryl groups in proteins.
A type of stress exerted uniformly in all directions. Its measure is the force exerted per unit area. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)
The number of times the HEART VENTRICLES contract per unit of time, usually per minute.
The volume of packed RED BLOOD CELLS in a blood specimen. The volume is measured by centrifugation in a tube with graduated markings, or with automated blood cell counters. It is an indicator of erythrocyte status in disease. For example, ANEMIA shows a low value; POLYCYTHEMIA, a high value.
The circulation of blood through the CORONARY VESSELS of the HEART.
The circulation of blood through the BLOOD VESSELS of the BRAIN.
A potent natriuretic and vasodilatory peptide or mixture of different-sized low molecular weight PEPTIDES derived from a common precursor and secreted mainly by the HEART ATRIUM. All these peptides share a sequence of about 20 AMINO ACIDS.
The species Oryctolagus cuniculus, in the family Leporidae, order LAGOMORPHA. Rabbits are born in burrows, furless, and with eyes and ears closed. In contrast with HARES, rabbits have 22 chromosome pairs.
Measurement of intracardiac blood flow using an M-mode and/or two-dimensional (2-D) echocardiogram while simultaneously recording the spectrum of the audible Doppler signal (e.g., velocity, direction, amplitude, intensity, timing) reflected from the moving column of red blood cells.
A group of compounds derived from unsaturated 20-carbon fatty acids, primarily arachidonic acid, via the cyclooxygenase pathway. They are extremely potent mediators of a diverse group of physiological processes.
Organic compounds containing the -CO-NH2 radical. Amides are derived from acids by replacement of -OH by -NH2 or from ammonia by the replacement of H by an acyl group. (From Grant & Hackh's Chemical Dictionary, 5th ed)
Highly specialized EPITHELIAL CELLS that line the HEART; BLOOD VESSELS; and lymph vessels, forming the ENDOTHELIUM. They are polygonal in shape and joined together by TIGHT JUNCTIONS. The tight junctions allow for variable permeability to specific macromolecules that are transported across the endothelial layer.
A non-selective inhibitor of nitric oxide synthase. It has been used experimentally to induce hypertension.
The relationship between the dose of an administered drug and the response of the organism to the drug.
The circulation of BLOOD, of both the mother and the FETUS, through the PLACENTA.
The property of blood capillary ENDOTHELIUM that allows for the selective exchange of substances between the blood and surrounding tissues and through membranous barriers such as the BLOOD-AIR BARRIER; BLOOD-AQUEOUS BARRIER; BLOOD-BRAIN BARRIER; BLOOD-NERVE BARRIER; BLOOD-RETINAL BARRIER; and BLOOD-TESTIS BARRIER. Small lipid-soluble molecules such as carbon dioxide and oxygen move freely by diffusion. Water and water-soluble molecules cannot pass through the endothelial walls and are dependent on microscopic pores. These pores show narrow areas (TIGHT JUNCTIONS) which may limit large molecule movement.
Naturally occurring or experimentally induced animal diseases with pathological processes sufficiently similar to those of human diseases. They are used as study models for human diseases.
An essential amino acid that is physiologically active in the L-form.
The circulation of blood through the BLOOD VESSELS supplying the abdominal VISCERA.
The main trunk of the systemic arteries.
A group of intracellular-signaling serine threonine kinases that bind to RHO GTP-BINDING PROTEINS. They were originally found to mediate the effects of rhoA GTP-BINDING PROTEIN on the formation of STRESS FIBERS and FOCAL ADHESIONS. Rho-associated kinases have specificity for a variety of substrates including MYOSIN-LIGHT-CHAIN PHOSPHATASE and LIM KINASES.
A colorless, odorless gas that can be formed by the body and is necessary for the respiration cycle of plants and animals.
A strain of albino rat developed at the Wistar Institute that has spread widely at other institutions. This has markedly diluted the original strain.
The larger air passages of the lungs arising from the terminal bifurcation of the TRACHEA. They include the largest two primary bronchi which branch out into secondary bronchi, and tertiary bronchi which extend into BRONCHIOLES and PULMONARY ALVEOLI.
The age of the conceptus, beginning from the time of FERTILIZATION. In clinical obstetrics, the gestational age is often estimated as the time from the last day of the last MENSTRUATION which is about 2 weeks before OVULATION and fertilization.
Determination of the shortest time interval between the injection of a substance in the vein and its arrival at some distant site in sufficient concentration to produce a recognizable end result. It represents approximately the inverse of the average velocity of blood flow between two points.
A neurotransmitter found at neuromuscular junctions, autonomic ganglia, parasympathetic effector junctions, a subset of sympathetic effector junctions, and at many sites in the central nervous system.
The range or frequency distribution of a measurement in a population (of organisms, organs or things) that has not been selected for the presence of disease or abnormality.
Non-striated, elongated, spindle-shaped cells found lining the digestive tract, uterus, and blood vessels. They are derived from specialized myoblasts (MYOBLASTS, SMOOTH MUSCLE).
Substances used to allow enhanced visualization of tissues.
The circulation of BLOOD through the LIVER.
Genetically identical individuals developed from brother and sister matings which have been carried out for twenty or more generations or by parent x offspring matings carried out with certain restrictions. This also includes animals with a long history of closed colony breeding.
Compounds or agents that combine with an enzyme in such a manner as to prevent the normal substrate-enzyme combination and the catalytic reaction.
The rate at which oxygen is used by a tissue; microliters of oxygen STPD used per milligram of tissue per hour; the rate at which oxygen enters the blood from alveolar gas, equal in the steady state to the consumption of oxygen by tissue metabolism throughout the body. (Stedman, 25th ed, p346)
Theoretical representations that simulate the behavior or activity of biological processes or diseases. For disease models in living animals, DISEASE MODELS, ANIMAL is available. Biological models include the use of mathematical equations, computers, and other electronic equipment.
A biochemical messenger and regulator, synthesized from the essential amino acid L-TRYPTOPHAN. In humans it is found primarily in the central nervous system, gastrointestinal tract, and blood platelets. Serotonin mediates several important physiological functions including neurotransmission, gastrointestinal motility, hemostasis, and cardiovascular integrity. Multiple receptor families (RECEPTORS, SEROTONIN) explain the broad physiological actions and distribution of this biochemical mediator.
A heterogeneous condition in which the heart is unable to pump out sufficient blood to meet the metabolic need of the body. Heart failure can be caused by structural defects, functional abnormalities (VENTRICULAR DYSFUNCTION), or a sudden overload beyond its capacity. Chronic heart failure is more common than acute heart failure which results from sudden insult to cardiac function, such as MYOCARDIAL INFARCTION.
Ultrasonic recording of the size, motion, and composition of the heart and surrounding tissues. The standard approach is transthoracic.
The mass or quantity of heaviness of an individual. It is expressed by units of pounds or kilograms.

Nonlinear indicial response of complex nonstationary oscillations as pulmonary hypertension responding to step hypoxia. (1/2234)

This paper is devoted to the quantization of the degree of nonlinearity of the relationship between two biological variables when one of the variables is a complex nonstationary oscillatory signal. An example of the situation is the indicial responses of pulmonary blood pressure (P) to step changes of oxygen tension (DeltapO2) in the breathing gas. For a step change of DeltapO2 beginning at time t1, the pulmonary blood pressure is a nonlinear function of time and DeltapO2, which can be written as P(t-t1 | DeltapO2). An effective method does not exist to examine the nonlinear function P(t-t1 | DeltapO2). A systematic approach is proposed here. The definitions of mean trends and oscillations about the means are the keys. With these keys a practical method of calculation is devised. We fit the mean trends of blood pressure with analytic functions of time, whose nonlinearity with respect to the oxygen level is clarified here. The associated oscillations about the mean can be transformed into Hilbert spectrum. An integration of the square of the Hilbert spectrum over frequency yields a measure of oscillatory energy, which is also a function of time, whose mean trends can be expressed by analytic functions. The degree of nonlinearity of the oscillatory energy with respect to the oxygen level also is clarified here. Theoretical extension of the experimental nonlinear indicial functions to arbitrary history of hypoxia is proposed. Application of the results to tissue remodeling and tissue engineering of blood vessels is discussed.  (+info)

Pulmonary capillary perfusion: intra-alveolar fractal patterns and interalveolar independence. (2/2234)

Pulmonary capillary perfusion was analyzed from videomicroscopic recordings to determine flow switching characteristics among capillary segments in isolated, blood-perfused canine lungs. Within each alveolus, the rapid switching pattern was repetitive and was, therefore, nonrandom (fractal dimensions near 1.0). This self-similarity over time was unexpected in a network widely considered to be passive. Among adjacent alveoli, the relationship among the switching patterns was even more surprising, for there was virtually no relationship between the perfusion patterns (coefficients of determination approaching zero). These findings demonstrated that the perfusion patterns in individual alveolar walls were independent of their next-door neighbors. The lack of dependence among neighboring networks suggests an interesting characteristic: the failure of one alveolar-capillary bed would leave its neighbors relatively unaffected, a feature of a robust design.  (+info)

Lactate kinetics at rest and during exercise in lambs with aortopulmonary shunts. (3/2234)

In a previous study [G. C. M. Beaufort-Krol, J. Takens, M. C. Molenkamp, G. B. Smid, J. J. Meuzelaar, W. G. Zijlstra, and J. R. G. Kuipers. Am. J. Physiol. 275 (Heart Circ. Physiol. 44): H1503-H1512, 1998], a lower systemic O2 supply was found in lambs with aortopulmonary left-to-right shunts. To determine whether the lower systemic O2 supply results in increased anaerobic metabolism, we used [1-13C]lactate to investigate lactate kinetics in eight 7-wk-old lambs with shunts and eight control lambs, at rest and during moderate exercise [treadmill; 50% of peak O2 consumption (VO2)]. The mean left-to-right shunt fraction in the shunt lambs was 55 +/- 3% of pulmonary blood flow. Arterial lactate concentrations and the rate of appearance (Ra) and disappearance (Rd) of lactate were similar in shunt and control lambs, both at rest (lactate: 1, 201 +/- 76 vs. 1,214 +/- 151 micromol/l; Ra = Rd: 12.97 +/- 1.71 vs. 12.55 +/- 1.25 micromol. min-1. kg-1) and during a similar relative workload. We found a positive correlation between Ra and systemic blood flow, O2 supply, and VO2 in both groups of lambs. In conclusion, shunt lambs have similar lactate kinetics as do control lambs, both at rest and during moderate exercise at a similar fraction of their peak VO2, despite a lower systemic O2 supply.  (+info)

Validation of haemodialysis recirculation and access blood flow measured by thermodilution. (4/2234)

BACKGROUND: Recirculation (R) and access blood flow (Qac) measurements are considered useful indicators of adequate delivery of haemodialysis. It was the purpose of this study to compare measurements of R and Qac obtained by two different techniques which are based on the same principle of indicator dilution, but which differ because of the characteristics of the injection and detection of the different indicators used. METHODS: Recirculation measured by a thermal dilution technique using temperature sensors (BTM, Fresenius Medical Care) was compared with recirculation measured by a validated saline dilution technique using ultrasonic transducers placed on arterial and venous segments of the extracorporeal circulation (HDM, Transonic Systems, Inc.). Calculated access flows were compared by Bland Altman analysis. Data are given as mean +/- SD. RESULTS: A total of 104 measurements obtained in 52 treatments (17 patients, 18 accesses) were compared. Recirculation measured with correct placement of blood lines and corrected for the effect of cardiopulmonary recirculation using the 'double recirculation technique' was -0.02 +/- 0.14% by the BTM technique and not different from the 0% measured by the HDM technique. Recirculation measured with reversed placement of blood lines and corrected for the effect of cardiopulmonary recirculation was 19.66 +/- 10.77% measured by the BTM technique compared with 20.87 +/- 11.64% measured by the HDM technique. The difference between techniques was small (-1.21 +/- 2.44%) albeit significant. Access flow calculated from BTM recirculation was 1328 +/- 627 ml/min compared with 1390 +/- 657 ml/min calculated by the HDM technique. There was no bias between techniques. CONCLUSION: BTM thermodilution yields results which are consistent with the HDM ultrasound dilution technique with regard to both recirculation and access flow measurement.  (+info)

Inducible NO synthase inhibition attenuates shear stress-induced pulmonary vasodilation in the ovine fetus. (5/2234)

Recent studies have suggested that type II (inducible) nitric oxide (NO) synthase (NOS II) is present in the fetal lung, but its physiological roles are uncertain. Whether NOS II activity contributes to the NO-mediated fall in pulmonary vascular resistance (PVR) during shear stress-induced pulmonary vasodilation is unknown. We studied the hemodynamic effects of two selective NOS II antagonists [aminoguanidine (AG) and S-ethylisothiourea (EIT)], a nonselective NOS antagonist [nitro-L-arginine (L-NNA)], and a nonselective vasoconstrictor (U-46619) on PVR during partial compression of the ductus arteriosus (DA) in 20 chronically prepared fetal lambs (mean age 132 +/- 2 days, term 147 days). At surgery, catheters were placed in the left pulmonary artery (LPA) for selective drug infusion, an ultrasonic flow transducer was placed on the LPA to measure blood flow, and an inflatable vascular occluder was placed loosely around the DA for compression. On alternate days, a brief intrapulmonary infusion of normal saline (control), AG, EIT, L-NNA, or U-46619 was infused in random order into the LPA. The DA was compressed to increase mean pulmonary arterial pressure (MPAP) 12-15 mmHg above baseline values and held constant for 30 min. In control studies, DA compression reduced PVR by 42% from baseline values (P < 0.01). L-NNA treatment completely blocked the fall in PVR during DA compression. AG and EIT attenuated the decrease in PVR by 30 and 19%, respectively (P < 0.05). Nonspecific elevation in PVR by U-46619 did not affect the fall in PVR during DA compression. Immunostaining for NOS II identified this isoform in airway epithelium and vascular smooth muscle in the late-gestation ovine fetal lung. We conclude that selective NOS II antagonists attenuate but do not block shear stress-induced vasodilation in the fetal lung. We speculate that stimulation of NOS II activity, perhaps from smooth muscle cells, contributes in part to the NO-mediated fall in PVR during shear stress-induced pulmonary vasodilation.  (+info)

RSR13, an allosteric effector of haemoglobin, and carbogen radiosensitize FSAII and SCCVII tumours in C3H mice. (6/2234)

Pre-clinical evaluation has demonstrated that 2-[4-(((3,5-dimethylanilino)carbonyl)methyl)phenoxy]-2-methylpropi onic acid (RSR13) acts as an allosteric effector of haemoglobin (Hb). RSR13 binding to Hb results in decreased haemoglobin-oxygen (Hb-O2) affinity, improved tumour oxygenation, and enhanced radiation-induced cell killing in several experimental tumour systems. In the present work, ex vivo clonogenic survival analyses are applied in two murine tumour systems to characterize the relationship between the magnitude of decrease in Hb-O2 affinity and radiosensitization, the influence of inspired pO2 upon this effect, and the efficacy of combining RSR13 and radiation during a course of repeated radiation exposures. For FSaII tumours in C3H mice breathing air, 100 mg kg(-1) RSR13 administered intraperitoneally produced an enhancement ratio (ER) of 1.3, but there was marked desensitization at a RSR13 dose of 300 mg kg(-1) (ER 0.6). The most likely reason for the increased radioresistance was insufficient oxygen loading of Hb in the pulmonary circulation due to reduced haemoglobin-oxygen affinity because carbogen breathing combined with 300 mg kg(-1) RSR13 reversed the effect and produced an ER of 1.8. In SCCVII tumours in C3H mice irradiated with eight fractions of 2.5 Gy over 4 days, the surviving fraction was reduced to 58-67% of control values when RSR13 was combined with radiation on days 1 and 2, days 3 and 4, or days 1-4. These results confirm that combining RSR13 and irradiation within a fractionated course of clinically relevant low-dose exposures provides significant radiosensitization. Additional preclinical experimentation is needed to define better the optimum dose-scheduling conditions for clinical applications.  (+info)

Effects of isoflurane anesthesia on pulmonary vascular response to K+ ATP channel activation and circulatory hypotension in chronically instrumented dogs. (7/2234)

BACKGROUND: The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of isoflurane anesthesia on the pulmonary vascular responses to exogenous adenosine triphosphate-sensitive potassium (K+ ATP) channel activation and circulatory hypotension compared with responses measured in the conscious state. In addition, the extent to which K+ ATP channel inhibition modulates the pulmonary vascular response to circulatory hypotension in conscious and isoflurane-anesthetized dogs was assessed. METHODS: Fifteen conditioned, male mongrel dogs were fitted with instruments for long-term monitoring to measure the left pulmonary vascular pressure-flow relation. The dose-response relation to the K+ ATP channel agonist, lemakalim, and the pulmonary vascular response to circulatory hypotension were assessed in conscious and isoflurane-anesthetized (approximately 1.2 minimum alveolar concentration) dogs. The effect of the selective K+ ATP channel antagonist, glibenclamide, on the pulmonary vascular response to hypotension was also assessed in conscious and isoflurane-anesthetized dogs. RESULTS: Isoflurane had no effect on the baseline pulmonary circulation, but it attenuated (P<0.05) the pulmonary vasodilator response to lemakalim. Reducing the mean systemic arterial pressure to approximately 50 mm Hg resulted in pulmonary vasoconstriction (P<0.05) in the conscious state, and this response was attenuated (P<0.05) during isoflurane. Glibenclamide had no effect on the baseline pulmonary circulation, but it potentiated (P<0.05) the pulmonary vasoconstrictor response to hypotension in conscious and isoflurane-anesthetized dogs. CONCLUSIONS: These results indicate that K+ ATP-mediated pulmonary vasodilation and the pulmonary vasoconstrictor response to hypotension are attenuated during isoflurane anesthesia. Endogenous K+ ATP channel activation modulates the pulmonary vasoconstrictor response to hypotension in the conscious state, and this effect is preserved during isoflurane anesthesia.  (+info)

Combined effects of nitric oxide and oxygen during acute pulmonary vasodilator testing. (8/2234)

OBJECTIVES: We compared the ability of inhaled nitric oxide (NO), oxygen (O2) and nitric oxide in oxygen (NO+O2) to identify reactive pulmonary vasculature in pulmonary hypertensive patients during acute vasodilator testing at cardiac catheterization. BACKGROUND: In patients with pulmonary hypertension, decisions regarding suitability for corrective surgery, transplantation and assessment of long-term prognosis are based on results obtained during acute pulmonary vasodilator testing. METHODS: In group 1, 46 patients had hemodynamic measurements in room air (RA), 100% O2, return to RA and NO (80 parts per million [ppm] in RA). In group 2, 25 additional patients were studied in RA, 100% O2 and 80 ppm NO in oxygen (NO+O2). RESULTS: In group 1, O2 decreased pulmonary vascular resistance (PVR) (mean+/-SEM) from 17.2+/-2.1 U.m2 to 11.1+/-1.5 U.m2 (p < 0.05). Nitric oxide caused a comparable decrease from 17.8+/-2.2 U.m2 to 11.7+/-1.7 U.m2 (p < 0.05). In group 2, PVR decreased from 20.1+/-2.6 U.m2 to 14.3+/-1.9 U.m2 in O2 (p < 0.05) and further to 10.5+/-1.7 U.m2 in NO+O2 (p < 0.05). A response of 20% or more reduction in PVR was seen in 22/25 patients with NO+O2 compared with 16/25 in O2 alone (p = 0.01). CONCLUSIONS: Inhaled NO and O2 produced a similar degree of selective pulmonary vasodilation. Our data suggest that combination testing with NO + O2 provides additional pulmonary vasodilation in patients with a reactive pulmonary vascular bed in a selective, safe and expeditious fashion during cardiac catheterization. The combination of NO+O2 identifies patients with significant pulmonary vasoreactivity who might not be recognized if O2 or NO were used separately.  (+info)

Pulmonary circulation refers to the process of blood flow through the lungs, where blood picks up oxygen and releases carbon dioxide. This is a vital part of the overall circulatory system, which delivers nutrients and oxygen to the body's cells while removing waste products like carbon dioxide.

In pulmonary circulation, deoxygenated blood from the systemic circulation returns to the right atrium of the heart via the superior and inferior vena cava. The blood then moves into the right ventricle through the tricuspid valve and gets pumped into the pulmonary artery when the right ventricle contracts.

The pulmonary artery divides into smaller vessels called arterioles, which further branch into a vast network of tiny capillaries in the lungs. Here, oxygen from the alveoli diffuses into the blood, binding to hemoglobin in red blood cells, while carbon dioxide leaves the blood and is exhaled through the nose or mouth.

The now oxygenated blood collects in venules, which merge to form pulmonary veins. These veins transport the oxygen-rich blood back to the left atrium of the heart, where it enters the systemic circulation once again. This continuous cycle enables the body's cells to receive the necessary oxygen and nutrients for proper functioning while disposing of waste products.

The pulmonary artery is a large blood vessel that carries deoxygenated blood from the right ventricle of the heart to the lungs for oxygenation. It divides into two main branches, the right and left pulmonary arteries, which further divide into smaller vessels called arterioles, and then into a vast network of capillaries in the lungs where gas exchange occurs. The thin walls of these capillaries allow oxygen to diffuse into the blood and carbon dioxide to diffuse out, making the blood oxygen-rich before it is pumped back to the left side of the heart through the pulmonary veins. This process is crucial for maintaining proper oxygenation of the body's tissues and organs.

Pulmonary hypertension is a medical condition characterized by increased blood pressure in the pulmonary arteries, which are the blood vessels that carry blood from the right side of the heart to the lungs. This results in higher than normal pressures in the pulmonary circulation and can lead to various symptoms and complications.

Pulmonary hypertension is typically defined as a mean pulmonary artery pressure (mPAP) greater than or equal to 25 mmHg at rest, as measured by right heart catheterization. The World Health Organization (WHO) classifies pulmonary hypertension into five groups based on the underlying cause:

1. Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH): This group includes idiopathic PAH, heritable PAH, drug-induced PAH, and associated PAH due to conditions such as connective tissue diseases, HIV infection, portal hypertension, congenital heart disease, and schistosomiasis.
2. Pulmonary hypertension due to left heart disease: This group includes conditions that cause elevated left atrial pressure, such as left ventricular systolic or diastolic dysfunction, valvular heart disease, and congenital cardiovascular shunts.
3. Pulmonary hypertension due to lung diseases and/or hypoxia: This group includes chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), interstitial lung disease, sleep-disordered breathing, alveolar hypoventilation disorders, and high altitude exposure.
4. Chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension (CTEPH): This group includes persistent obstruction of the pulmonary arteries due to organized thrombi or emboli.
5. Pulmonary hypertension with unclear and/or multifactorial mechanisms: This group includes hematologic disorders, systemic disorders, metabolic disorders, and other conditions that can cause pulmonary hypertension but do not fit into the previous groups.

Symptoms of pulmonary hypertension may include shortness of breath, fatigue, chest pain, lightheadedness, and syncope (fainting). Diagnosis typically involves a combination of medical history, physical examination, imaging studies, and invasive testing such as right heart catheterization. Treatment depends on the underlying cause but may include medications, oxygen therapy, pulmonary rehabilitation, and, in some cases, surgical intervention.

Blood circulation, also known as cardiovascular circulation, refers to the process by which blood is pumped by the heart and circulated throughout the body through a network of blood vessels, including arteries, veins, and capillaries. This process ensures that oxygen and nutrients are delivered to cells and tissues, while waste products and carbon dioxide are removed.

The circulation of blood can be divided into two main parts: the pulmonary circulation and the systemic circulation. The pulmonary circulation involves the movement of blood between the heart and the lungs, where it picks up oxygen and releases carbon dioxide. The systemic circulation refers to the movement of blood between the heart and the rest of the body, delivering oxygen and nutrients to cells and tissues while picking up waste products for removal.

The heart plays a central role in blood circulation, acting as a pump that contracts and relaxes to move blood through the body. The contraction of the heart's left ventricle pushes oxygenated blood into the aorta, which then branches off into smaller arteries that carry blood throughout the body. The blood then flows through capillaries, where it exchanges oxygen and nutrients for waste products and carbon dioxide with surrounding cells and tissues. The deoxygenated blood is then collected in veins, which merge together to form larger vessels that eventually return the blood back to the heart's right atrium. From there, the blood is pumped into the lungs to pick up oxygen and release carbon dioxide, completing the cycle of blood circulation.

A lung is a pair of spongy, elastic organs in the chest that work together to enable breathing. They are responsible for taking in oxygen and expelling carbon dioxide through the process of respiration. The left lung has two lobes, while the right lung has three lobes. The lungs are protected by the ribcage and are covered by a double-layered membrane called the pleura. The trachea divides into two bronchi, which further divide into smaller bronchioles, leading to millions of tiny air sacs called alveoli, where the exchange of gases occurs.

Anoxia is a medical condition that refers to the absence or complete lack of oxygen supply in the body or a specific organ, tissue, or cell. This can lead to serious health consequences, including damage or death of cells and tissues, due to the vital role that oxygen plays in supporting cellular metabolism and energy production.

Anoxia can occur due to various reasons, such as respiratory failure, cardiac arrest, severe blood loss, carbon monoxide poisoning, or high altitude exposure. Prolonged anoxia can result in hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy, a serious condition that can cause brain damage and long-term neurological impairments.

Medical professionals use various diagnostic tests, such as blood gas analysis, pulse oximetry, and electroencephalography (EEG), to assess oxygen levels in the body and diagnose anoxia. Treatment for anoxia typically involves addressing the underlying cause, providing supplemental oxygen, and supporting vital functions, such as breathing and circulation, to prevent further damage.

Vascular resistance is a measure of the opposition to blood flow within a vessel or a group of vessels, typically expressed in units of mmHg/(mL/min) or sometimes as dynes*sec/cm^5. It is determined by the diameter and length of the vessels, as well as the viscosity of the blood flowing through them. In general, a decrease in vessel diameter, an increase in vessel length, or an increase in blood viscosity will result in an increase in vascular resistance, while an increase in vessel diameter, a decrease in vessel length, or a decrease in blood viscosity will result in a decrease in vascular resistance. Vascular resistance is an important concept in the study of circulation and cardiovascular physiology because it plays a key role in determining blood pressure and blood flow within the body.

The Ductus Arteriosus is a fetal blood vessel that connects the pulmonary trunk (the artery that carries blood from the heart to the lungs) and the aorta (the largest artery in the body, which carries oxygenated blood from the heart to the rest of the body). This vessel allows most of the blood from the right ventricle of the fetal heart to bypass the lungs, as the fetus receives oxygen through the placenta rather than breathing air.

After birth, with the first breaths, the blood oxygen level increases and the pressure in the lungs rises. As a result, the circulation in the newborn's body changes, and the Ductus Arteriosus is no longer needed. Within the first few days or weeks of life, this vessel usually closes spontaneously, turning into a fibrous cord called the Ligamentum Arteriosum.

Persistent Patency of the Ductus Arteriosus (PDA) occurs when the Ductus Arteriosus does not close after birth, which can lead to various complications such as heart failure and pulmonary hypertension. This condition is often seen in premature infants and may require medical intervention or surgical closure of the vessel.

Pulmonary heart disease, also known as cor pulmonale, is a type of heart disease that occurs as a complication of chronic lung diseases or hypoxia (low oxygen levels in the body). The condition is characterized by enlargement and thickening of the right ventricle of the heart, which results from increased pressure in the pulmonary artery due to damaged or narrowed blood vessels in the lungs. This can lead to symptoms such as shortness of breath, fatigue, swelling in the legs and abdomen, and irregular heart rhythms. The condition can be managed with medications, oxygen therapy, and lifestyle changes, but if left untreated, it can lead to serious complications such as heart failure.

Hemodynamics is the study of how blood flows through the cardiovascular system, including the heart and the vascular network. It examines various factors that affect blood flow, such as blood volume, viscosity, vessel length and diameter, and pressure differences between different parts of the circulatory system. Hemodynamics also considers the impact of various physiological and pathological conditions on these variables, and how they in turn influence the function of vital organs and systems in the body. It is a critical area of study in fields such as cardiology, anesthesiology, and critical care medicine.

Vasoconstriction is a medical term that refers to the narrowing of blood vessels due to the contraction of the smooth muscle in their walls. This process decreases the diameter of the lumen (the inner space of the blood vessel) and reduces blood flow through the affected vessels. Vasoconstriction can occur throughout the body, but it is most noticeable in the arterioles and precapillary sphincters, which control the amount of blood that flows into the capillary network.

The autonomic nervous system, specifically the sympathetic division, plays a significant role in regulating vasoconstriction through the release of neurotransmitters like norepinephrine (noradrenaline). Various hormones and chemical mediators, such as angiotensin II, endothelin-1, and serotonin, can also induce vasoconstriction.

Vasoconstriction is a vital physiological response that helps maintain blood pressure and regulate blood flow distribution in the body. However, excessive or prolonged vasoconstriction may contribute to several pathological conditions, including hypertension, stroke, and peripheral vascular diseases.

Pulmonary veins are blood vessels that carry oxygenated blood from the lungs to the left atrium of the heart. There are four pulmonary veins in total, two from each lung, and they are the only veins in the body that carry oxygen-rich blood. The oxygenated blood from the pulmonary veins is then pumped by the left ventricle to the rest of the body through the aorta. Any blockage or damage to the pulmonary veins can lead to various cardiopulmonary conditions, such as pulmonary hypertension and congestive heart failure.

Right ventricular hypertrophy (RVH) is a medical condition characterized by an enlargement and thickening (hypertrophy) of the right ventricle of the heart. The right ventricle is one of the four chambers of the heart that is responsible for pumping deoxygenated blood to the lungs through the pulmonary artery.

In response to increased workload or pressure overload, such as in chronic lung diseases, pulmonary hypertension, or congenital heart defects, the right ventricle may undergo hypertrophy. This results in an increase in the size and thickness of the right ventricular muscle, which can impair its ability to fill with blood and pump it efficiently to the lungs.

RVH can be diagnosed through various tests, including electrocardiogram (ECG), echocardiography, cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), or cardiac catheterization. Treatment of RVH depends on the underlying cause and may include medications, oxygen therapy, surgery, or other interventions to reduce the workload on the right ventricle and improve its function.

Atrial pressure refers to the pressure or force exerted by the blood within the atria, which are the upper chambers of the heart. The atrial pressure varies throughout the cardiac cycle and is affected by several factors such as blood volume, contractility of the atria, and overall cardiovascular function.

In a healthy individual, the atrial pressure ranges from 0 to 10 millimeters of mercury (mmHg) during rest. However, this value can increase in certain medical conditions, such as heart failure or valvular heart disease, where the heart is unable to pump blood efficiently, leading to an increase in pressure within the atria.

Monitoring atrial pressure is important in clinical settings as it provides valuable information about the patient's cardiovascular status and helps guide diagnostic and therapeutic decisions. This can be done through various methods such as invasive monitoring with a catheter or non-invasive techniques like echocardiography.

Blood pressure is the force exerted by circulating blood on the walls of the blood vessels. It is measured in millimeters of mercury (mmHg) and is given as two figures:

1. Systolic pressure: This is the pressure when the heart pushes blood out into the arteries.
2. Diastolic pressure: This is the pressure when the heart rests between beats, allowing it to fill with blood.

Normal blood pressure for adults is typically around 120/80 mmHg, although this can vary slightly depending on age, sex, and other factors. High blood pressure (hypertension) is generally considered to be a reading of 130/80 mmHg or higher, while low blood pressure (hypotension) is usually defined as a reading below 90/60 mmHg. It's important to note that blood pressure can fluctuate throughout the day and may be affected by factors such as stress, physical activity, and medication use.

Nitric oxide (NO) is a molecule made up of one nitrogen atom and one oxygen atom. In the body, it is a crucial signaling molecule involved in various physiological processes such as vasodilation, immune response, neurotransmission, and inhibition of platelet aggregation. It is produced naturally by the enzyme nitric oxide synthase (NOS) from the amino acid L-arginine. Inhaled nitric oxide is used medically to treat pulmonary hypertension in newborns and adults, as it helps to relax and widen blood vessels, improving oxygenation and blood flow.

Capillary resistance, in the context of physiology and medicine, refers to the resistance to blood flow that is offered by the small capillaries in the circulatory system. Capillaries are tiny blood vessels that connect the arteries and veins, and they play a critical role in the exchange of oxygen, nutrients, and waste products between the blood and the body's tissues.

The resistance provided by the capillaries is determined by several factors, including the diameter and length of the capillaries, as well as the viscosity of the blood that flows through them. Capillary resistance is an important factor in regulating blood flow and blood pressure throughout the body. In general, an increase in capillary resistance can lead to a decrease in blood flow and an increase in blood pressure, while a decrease in capillary resistance can have the opposite effect.

It's worth noting that the term "capillary resistance" is not commonly used in medical literature or clinical practice. Instead, physicians and researchers may use more specific terms to describe the resistance provided by different parts of the circulatory system, such as "total peripheral resistance," which refers to the resistance provided by all of the body's blood vessels excluding the heart and lungs.

Cardiac output is a measure of the amount of blood that is pumped by the heart in one minute. It is defined as the product of stroke volume (the amount of blood pumped by the left ventricle during each contraction) and heart rate (the number of contractions per minute). Normal cardiac output at rest for an average-sized adult is about 5 to 6 liters per minute. Cardiac output can be increased during exercise or other conditions that require more blood flow, such as during illness or injury. It can be measured noninvasively using techniques such as echocardiography or invasively through a catheter placed in the heart.

I apologize, but "sheep" is not a term that has a medical definition. It is a common animal with the scientific name Ovis aries. If you have any medical or health-related questions, I would be happy to try and help answer those for you.

Right Ventricular Function refers to the ability of the right ventricle (RV) of the heart to receive and eject blood during the cardiac cycle. The right ventricle is one of the four chambers of the heart and is responsible for pumping deoxygenated blood from the body to the lungs for re-oxygenation.

Right ventricular function can be assessed by measuring various parameters such as:

1. Right Ventricular Ejection Fraction (RVEF): It is the percentage of blood that is ejected from the right ventricle during each heartbeat. A normal RVEF ranges from 45-75%.
2. Right Ventricular Systolic Function: It refers to the ability of the right ventricle to contract and eject blood during systole (contraction phase). This can be assessed by measuring the tricuspid annular plane systolic excursion (TAPSE) or tissue Doppler imaging.
3. Right Ventricular Diastolic Function: It refers to the ability of the right ventricle to relax and fill with blood during diastole (relaxation phase). This can be assessed by measuring the right ventricular inflow pattern, tricuspid valve E/A ratio, or deceleration time.
4. Right Ventricular Afterload: It refers to the pressure that the right ventricle must overcome to eject blood into the pulmonary artery. Increased afterload can impair right ventricular function.

Abnormalities in right ventricular function can lead to various cardiovascular conditions such as pulmonary hypertension, heart failure, and arrhythmias.

Persistent Fetal Circulation Syndrome (PFCS), also known as Persistent Truncus Arteriosus or Failure of Infant Pulmonary Circulation to Develop, is a rare and complex congenital heart defect. It is a condition where the fetal circulatory patterns persist after birth, preventing the normal transition from fetal to neonatal circulation.

In a healthy newborn, the circulation changes so that oxygenated blood flows to the body through the aorta and deoxygenated blood returns to the lungs through the pulmonary artery. However, in PFCS, the blood bypasses the lungs because of a lack of communication between the systemic and pulmonary circulations. This results in insufficient oxygen supply to the body and cyanosis (bluish discoloration of the skin and mucous membranes).

The main features of PFCS include:

1. Patent Ductus Arteriosus (PDA): A persistent opening between the pulmonary artery and the aorta, which should normally close after birth.
2. Persistent Foramen Ovale (PFO): An opening between the two atria of the heart that should also close after birth.
3. Reversed or absent flow in the ductus arteriosus or ligamentum arteriosum.
4. Intact ventricular septum, meaning there is no hole between the lower chambers (ventricles) of the heart.
5. Underdevelopment or absence of the pulmonary arterial tree and/or decreased pulmonary blood flow.

PFCS can vary in severity, and its diagnosis typically requires a combination of clinical evaluation, imaging studies such as echocardiography, and sometimes cardiac catheterization. Treatment usually involves surgical intervention to establish normal circulation and improve oxygenation. The prognosis depends on the severity of the condition and the timeliness and effectiveness of the treatment.

Regional anatomy is a subfield of anatomy that focuses on the study of specific regions or parts of the human body, such as the head and neck, thorax, abdomen, or extremities. It involves the detailed examination of the structures and functions of the organs, tissues, and systems within these regions, including their relationships with adjacent regions. Regional anatomy is often taught in medical schools and other health professions programs to provide a foundation for understanding clinical conditions and performing medical procedures. It is also relevant for professionals in fields such as athletic training, physical therapy, and exercise science, who need to understand the regional anatomy of the body to design safe and effective exercise programs or rehabilitation plans.

Pulmonary gas exchange is the process by which oxygen (O2) from inhaled air is transferred to the blood, and carbon dioxide (CO2), a waste product of metabolism, is removed from the blood and exhaled. This process occurs in the lungs, primarily in the alveoli, where the thin walls of the alveoli and capillaries allow for the rapid diffusion of gases between them. The partial pressure gradient between the alveolar air and the blood in the pulmonary capillaries drives this diffusion process. Oxygen-rich blood is then transported to the body's tissues, while CO2-rich blood returns to the lungs to be exhaled.

Vasodilation is the widening or increase in diameter of blood vessels, particularly the involuntary relaxation of the smooth muscle in the tunica media (middle layer) of the arteriole walls. This results in an increase in blood flow and a decrease in vascular resistance. Vasodilation can occur due to various physiological and pathophysiological stimuli, such as local metabolic demands, neural signals, or pharmacological agents. It plays a crucial role in regulating blood pressure, tissue perfusion, and thermoregulation.

I believe there might be a misunderstanding in your question. "Dogs" is not a medical term or condition. It is the common name for a domesticated carnivore of the family Canidae, specifically the genus Canis, which includes wolves, foxes, and other extant and extinct species of mammals. Dogs are often kept as pets and companions, and they have been bred in a wide variety of forms and sizes for different purposes, such as hunting, herding, guarding, assisting police and military forces, and providing companionship and emotional support.

If you meant to ask about a specific medical condition or term related to dogs, please provide more context so I can give you an accurate answer.

Perfusion, in medical terms, refers to the process of circulating blood through the body's organs and tissues to deliver oxygen and nutrients and remove waste products. It is a measure of the delivery of adequate blood flow to specific areas or tissues in the body. Perfusion can be assessed using various methods, including imaging techniques like computed tomography (CT) scans, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and perfusion scintigraphy.

Perfusion is critical for maintaining proper organ function and overall health. When perfusion is impaired or inadequate, it can lead to tissue hypoxia, acidosis, and cell death, which can result in organ dysfunction or failure. Conditions that can affect perfusion include cardiovascular disease, shock, trauma, and certain surgical procedures.

Pulmonary wedge pressure, also known as pulmonary capillary wedge pressure (PCWP) or left heart filling pressure, is a measurement obtained during right heart catheterization. It reflects the pressure in the left atrium, which is an estimate of the diastolic pressure in the left ventricle. Normal PCWP ranges from 4 to 12 mmHg. Increased pulmonary wedge pressure can indicate heart failure or other cardiac disorders that affect the left side of the heart.

Vasodilator agents are pharmacological substances that cause the relaxation or widening of blood vessels by relaxing the smooth muscle in the vessel walls. This results in an increase in the diameter of the blood vessels, which decreases vascular resistance and ultimately reduces blood pressure. Vasodilators can be further classified based on their site of action:

1. Systemic vasodilators: These agents cause a generalized relaxation of the smooth muscle in the walls of both arteries and veins, resulting in a decrease in peripheral vascular resistance and preload (the volume of blood returning to the heart). Examples include nitroglycerin, hydralazine, and calcium channel blockers.
2. Arterial vasodilators: These agents primarily affect the smooth muscle in arterial vessel walls, leading to a reduction in afterload (the pressure against which the heart pumps blood). Examples include angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors, angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs), and direct vasodilators like sodium nitroprusside.
3. Venous vasodilators: These agents primarily affect the smooth muscle in venous vessel walls, increasing venous capacitance and reducing preload. Examples include nitroglycerin and other organic nitrates.

Vasodilator agents are used to treat various cardiovascular conditions such as hypertension, heart failure, angina, and pulmonary arterial hypertension. It is essential to monitor their use carefully, as excessive vasodilation can lead to orthostatic hypotension, reflex tachycardia, or fluid retention.

Extracorporeal circulation (ECC) is a term used in medicine to describe the process of temporarily taking over the functions of the heart and lungs by using a machine. This allows the surgeon to perform certain types of surgery, such as open-heart surgery, on a still and bloodless operating field.

During ECC, the patient's blood is circulated outside the body through a pump and oxygenator. The pump helps to maintain blood flow and pressure, while the oxygenator adds oxygen to the blood and removes carbon dioxide. This allows the surgeon to stop the heart and arrest its motion, making it easier to perform delicate procedures on the heart and surrounding structures.

Extracorporeal circulation is a complex and high-risk procedure that requires careful monitoring and management by a team of healthcare professionals. It carries risks such as bleeding, infection, and injury to blood vessels or organs. However, when performed correctly, it can be a life-saving measure for patients undergoing certain types of surgery.

Cardiovascular models are simplified representations or simulations of the human cardiovascular system used in medical research, education, and training. These models can be physical, computational, or mathematical and are designed to replicate various aspects of the heart, blood vessels, and blood flow. They can help researchers study the structure and function of the cardiovascular system, test new treatments and interventions, and train healthcare professionals in diagnostic and therapeutic techniques.

Physical cardiovascular models may include artificial hearts, blood vessels, or circulation systems made from materials such as plastic, rubber, or silicone. These models can be used to study the mechanics of heart valves, the effects of different surgical procedures, or the impact of various medical devices on blood flow.

Computational and mathematical cardiovascular models use algorithms and equations to simulate the behavior of the cardiovascular system. These models may range from simple representations of a single heart chamber to complex simulations of the entire circulatory system. They can be used to study the electrical activity of the heart, the biomechanics of blood flow, or the distribution of drugs in the body.

Overall, cardiovascular models play an essential role in advancing our understanding of the human body and improving patient care.

The bronchial arteries are a pair of arteries that originate from the descending thoracic aorta and supply oxygenated blood to the bronchi, bronchioles, and connected tissues within the lungs. They play a crucial role in providing nutrients and maintaining the health of the airways in the respiratory system. The bronchial arteries also help in the defense mechanism of the lungs by delivering immune cells and participating in the process of angiogenesis (the formation of new blood vessels) during lung injury or repair.

Pulmonary edema is a medical condition characterized by the accumulation of fluid in the alveoli (air sacs) and interstitial spaces (the area surrounding the alveoli) within the lungs. This buildup of fluid can lead to impaired gas exchange, resulting in shortness of breath, coughing, and difficulty breathing, especially when lying down. Pulmonary edema is often a complication of heart failure, but it can also be caused by other conditions such as pneumonia, trauma, or exposure to certain toxins.

In the early stages of pulmonary edema, patients may experience mild symptoms such as shortness of breath during physical activity. However, as the condition progresses, symptoms can become more severe and include:

* Severe shortness of breath, even at rest
* Wheezing or coughing up pink, frothy sputum
* Rapid breathing and heart rate
* Anxiety or restlessness
* Bluish discoloration of the skin (cyanosis) due to lack of oxygen

Pulmonary edema can be diagnosed through a combination of physical examination, medical history, chest X-ray, and other diagnostic tests such as echocardiography or CT scan. Treatment typically involves addressing the underlying cause of the condition, as well as providing supportive care such as supplemental oxygen, diuretics to help remove excess fluid from the body, and medications to help reduce anxiety and improve breathing. In severe cases, mechanical ventilation may be necessary to support respiratory function.

Blood flow velocity is the speed at which blood travels through a specific part of the vascular system. It is typically measured in units of distance per time, such as centimeters per second (cm/s) or meters per second (m/s). Blood flow velocity can be affected by various factors, including cardiac output, vessel diameter, and viscosity of the blood. Measuring blood flow velocity is important in diagnosing and monitoring various medical conditions, such as heart disease, stroke, and peripheral vascular disease.

Cardiac catheterization is a medical procedure used to diagnose and treat cardiovascular conditions. In this procedure, a thin, flexible tube called a catheter is inserted into a blood vessel in the arm or leg and threaded up to the heart. The catheter can be used to perform various diagnostic tests, such as measuring the pressure inside the heart chambers and assessing the function of the heart valves.

Cardiac catheterization can also be used to treat certain cardiovascular conditions, such as narrowed or blocked arteries. In these cases, a balloon or stent may be inserted through the catheter to open up the blood vessel and improve blood flow. This procedure is known as angioplasty or percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI).

Cardiac catheterization is typically performed in a hospital cardiac catheterization laboratory by a team of healthcare professionals, including cardiologists, radiologists, and nurses. The procedure may be done under local anesthesia with sedation or general anesthesia, depending on the individual patient's needs and preferences.

Overall, cardiac catheterization is a valuable tool in the diagnosis and treatment of various heart conditions, and it can help improve symptoms, reduce complications, and prolong life for many patients.

Physiology is the scientific study of the normal functions and mechanisms of living organisms, including all of their biological systems, organs, cells, and biomolecules. It focuses on how various bodily functions are regulated, coordinated, and integrated to maintain a healthy state in an organism. This field encompasses a wide range of areas such as cellular physiology, neurophysiology, cardiovascular physiology, respiratory physiology, renal physiology, endocrine physiology, reproductive physiology, and exercise physiology, among others. Physiologists use a combination of experimental and theoretical approaches to understand the principles underlying normal biological function and to investigate how these functions are altered in various disease states.

Secondary hyertrophic osteoarthropathy, also known as secondary musculoskeletal hypertrophy or Pierre Marie-Bamberger syndrome, is a condition characterized by the proliferation of new bone formation (osteophytes) and thickening of the bones (hyertrophy) in the joints, typically affecting the hands and feet. This condition is a reactive process that occurs as a secondary response to an underlying medical disorder, most commonly chronic hypoxia or ischemia due to conditions such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), cyanotic congenital heart disease, or malignancy.

The exact pathophysiology of this condition is not fully understood, but it is thought to be related to the release of growth factors and cytokines in response to the underlying medical disorder. The clinical manifestations of secondary hyertrophic osteoarthropathy include joint pain, swelling, stiffness, and limited range of motion, as well as characteristic radiographic findings such as periostitis, bone resorption, and new bone formation.

Treatment of this condition involves addressing the underlying medical disorder and providing supportive care for the musculoskeletal symptoms. This may include pain management, physical therapy, and orthopedic interventions as needed.

A fetus is the developing offspring in a mammal, from the end of the embryonic period (approximately 8 weeks after fertilization in humans) until birth. In humans, the fetal stage of development starts from the eleventh week of pregnancy and continues until childbirth, which is termed as full-term pregnancy at around 37 to 40 weeks of gestation. During this time, the organ systems become fully developed and the body grows in size. The fetus is surrounded by the amniotic fluid within the amniotic sac and is connected to the placenta via the umbilical cord, through which it receives nutrients and oxygen from the mother. Regular prenatal care is essential during this period to monitor the growth and development of the fetus and ensure a healthy pregnancy and delivery.

Right ventricular dysfunction is a condition characterized by the impaired ability of the right ventricle (one of the two pumping chambers in the heart) to fill with blood during the diastolic phase or eject blood during the systolic phase. This results in reduced cardiac output from the right ventricle, which can lead to various complications such as fluid accumulation in the body, particularly in the abdomen and lower extremities, and ultimately congestive heart failure if left untreated.

Right ventricular dysfunction can be caused by various factors, including damage to the heart muscle due to a heart attack, high blood pressure in the lungs (pulmonary hypertension), chronic lung diseases, congenital heart defects, viral infections, and certain medications. Symptoms of right ventricular dysfunction may include shortness of breath, fatigue, swelling in the legs, ankles, or abdomen, and a decreased tolerance for physical activity.

Diagnosis of right ventricular dysfunction typically involves a combination of medical history, physical examination, imaging tests such as echocardiography, cardiac MRI, or CT scan, and other diagnostic procedures such as electrocardiogram (ECG) or cardiac catheterization. Treatment options depend on the underlying cause but may include medications to reduce fluid buildup, improve heart function, and manage symptoms, as well as lifestyle modifications such as reducing salt intake and increasing physical activity levels. In severe cases, more invasive treatments such as surgery or implantable devices like pacemakers or ventricular assist devices may be necessary.

Regional blood flow (RBF) refers to the rate at which blood flows through a specific region or organ in the body, typically expressed in milliliters per minute per 100 grams of tissue (ml/min/100g). It is an essential physiological parameter that reflects the delivery of oxygen and nutrients to tissues while removing waste products. RBF can be affected by various factors such as metabolic demands, neural regulation, hormonal influences, and changes in blood pressure or vascular resistance. Measuring RBF is crucial for understanding organ function, diagnosing diseases, and evaluating the effectiveness of treatments.

"Inhalation administration" is a medical term that refers to the method of delivering medications or therapeutic agents directly into the lungs by inhaling them through the airways. This route of administration is commonly used for treating respiratory conditions such as asthma, COPD (chronic obstructive pulmonary disease), and cystic fibrosis.

Inhalation administration can be achieved using various devices, including metered-dose inhalers (MDIs), dry powder inhalers (DPIs), nebulizers, and soft-mist inhalers. Each device has its unique mechanism of delivering the medication into the lungs, but they all aim to provide a high concentration of the drug directly to the site of action while minimizing systemic exposure and side effects.

The advantages of inhalation administration include rapid onset of action, increased local drug concentration, reduced systemic side effects, and improved patient compliance due to the ease of use and non-invasive nature of the delivery method. However, proper technique and device usage are crucial for effective therapy, as incorrect usage may result in suboptimal drug deposition and therapeutic outcomes.

Venous pressure is the pressure exerted on the walls of a vein, which varies depending on several factors such as the volume and flow of blood within the vein, the contractile state of the surrounding muscles, and the position of the body. In clinical settings, venous pressure is often measured in the extremities (e.g., arms or legs) to assess the functioning of the cardiovascular system.

Central venous pressure (CVP) is a specific type of venous pressure that refers to the pressure within the large veins that enter the right atrium of the heart. CVP is an important indicator of right heart function and fluid status, as it reflects the amount of blood returning to the heart and the ability of the heart to pump it forward. Normal CVP ranges from 0 to 8 mmHg (millimeters of mercury) in adults.

Elevated venous pressure can be caused by various conditions such as heart failure, obstruction of blood flow, or fluid overload, while low venous pressure may indicate dehydration or blood loss. Accurate measurement and interpretation of venous pressure require specialized equipment and knowledge, and are typically performed by healthcare professionals in a clinical setting.

A synchrotron is not a medical term, but rather a type of particle accelerator used in physics and related fields. Therefore, it doesn't have a specific medical definition. However, synchrotrons do have important applications in medicine, particularly in the field of medical imaging and radiation therapy.

In brief, a synchrotron is a large circular accelerator that uses magnetic fields to bend and focus a beam of charged particles (such as electrons) into a narrow, intense beam. The particles are then accelerated to very high speeds using electric fields. As the particles pass through special devices called insertion devices, they emit light in the form of X-rays or other forms of electromagnetic radiation. These X-rays can be used for a variety of scientific and medical applications, including:

1. Medical imaging: Synchrotron X-rays can produce high-resolution images of the body's internal structures, such as bones, tissues, and organs. This is particularly useful in the study of complex anatomical structures or diseases that affect them.
2. Radiation therapy: Synchrotron radiation can be used to deliver highly targeted doses of radiation to cancer cells while minimizing damage to surrounding healthy tissue. This technique, known as synchrotron-based radiotherapy, is still in the experimental stage but shows promise for improving the effectiveness and safety of radiation therapy.
3. Biomedical research: Synchrotron X-rays can be used to study the structure and function of biological molecules, such as proteins and DNA, at a molecular level. This information can help researchers better understand the mechanisms of diseases and develop new drugs and therapies.

In summary, while synchrotrons are not medical terms themselves, they have important applications in medicine, particularly in medical imaging, radiation therapy, and biomedical research.

Endothelin-1 is a small peptide (21 amino acids) and a potent vasoconstrictor, which means it narrows blood vessels. It is primarily produced by the endothelial cells that line the interior surface of blood vessels. Endothelin-1 plays a crucial role in regulating vascular tone, cell growth, and inflammation. Its dysregulation has been implicated in various cardiovascular diseases, such as hypertension and heart failure. It exerts its effects by binding to specific G protein-coupled receptors (ETA and ETB) on the surface of target cells.

Impedance cardiography is a non-invasive method to measure cardiac output and systemic vascular resistance. It uses low-frequency electrical currents passed through the thorax to measure changes in impedance or resistance to flow during each heartbeat. This allows for the calculation of stroke volume and cardiac output. Impedance cardiography can provide continuous, real-time monitoring of cardiovascular function, making it useful in critical care settings and for tracking changes in patients with heart failure or other cardiovascular conditions.

Oxygen is a colorless, odorless, tasteless gas that constitutes about 21% of the earth's atmosphere. It is a crucial element for human and most living organisms as it is vital for respiration. Inhaled oxygen enters the lungs and binds to hemoglobin in red blood cells, which carries it to tissues throughout the body where it is used to convert nutrients into energy and carbon dioxide, a waste product that is exhaled.

Medically, supplemental oxygen therapy may be provided to patients with conditions such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), pneumonia, heart failure, or other medical conditions that impair the body's ability to extract sufficient oxygen from the air. Oxygen can be administered through various devices, including nasal cannulas, face masks, and ventilators.

Medical Definition of Respiration:

Respiration, in physiology, is the process by which an organism takes in oxygen and gives out carbon dioxide. It's also known as breathing. This process is essential for most forms of life because it provides the necessary oxygen for cellular respiration, where the cells convert biochemical energy from nutrients into adenosine triphosphate (ATP), and releases waste products, primarily carbon dioxide.

In humans and other mammals, respiration is a two-stage process:

1. Breathing (or external respiration): This involves the exchange of gases with the environment. Air enters the lungs through the mouth or nose, then passes through the pharynx, larynx, trachea, and bronchi, finally reaching the alveoli where the actual gas exchange occurs. Oxygen from the inhaled air diffuses into the blood, while carbon dioxide, a waste product of metabolism, diffuses from the blood into the alveoli to be exhaled.

2. Cellular respiration (or internal respiration): This is the process by which cells convert glucose and other nutrients into ATP, water, and carbon dioxide in the presence of oxygen. The carbon dioxide produced during this process then diffuses out of the cells and into the bloodstream to be exhaled during breathing.

In summary, respiration is a vital physiological function that enables organisms to obtain the necessary oxygen for cellular metabolism while eliminating waste products like carbon dioxide.

Pulsatile flow is a type of fluid flow that occurs in a rhythmic, wave-like pattern, typically seen in the cardiovascular system. It refers to the periodic variation in the volume or velocity of a fluid (such as blood) that is caused by the regular beating of the heart. In pulsatile flow, there are periods of high flow followed by periods of low or no flow, which creates a distinct pattern on a graph or tracing. This type of flow is important for maintaining proper function and health in organs and tissues throughout the body.

Monocrotaline is not a medical condition but a toxic compound that is found in certain plants, including the Crotalaria species (also known as "rattlebox" or "crowtoe"). It has been used in research to create laboratory models of pulmonary hypertension. Ingestion or inhalation of monocrotaline can lead to serious health effects, including lung damage and death.

Therefore, there is no medical definition for 'Monocrotaline' as it is not a disease or condition.

Pulmonary Valve Stenosis is a cardiac condition where the pulmonary valve, located between the right ventricle and the pulmonary artery, has a narrowed opening. This stenosis (narrowing) can cause obstruction of blood flow from the right ventricle to the lungs. The narrowing can be caused by a fusion of the valve leaflets, thickened or calcified valve leaflets, or rarely, a dysplastic valve.

The severity of Pulmonary Valve Stenosis is classified based on the gradient pressure across the valve, which is measured during an echocardiogram. A mild stenosis has a gradient of less than 30 mmHg, moderate stenosis has a gradient between 30-59 mmHg, and severe stenosis has a gradient of 60 mmHg or higher.

Mild Pulmonary Valve Stenosis may not require treatment, while more severe cases may need to be treated with balloon valvuloplasty or surgical valve replacement. If left untreated, Pulmonary Valve Stenosis can lead to right ventricular hypertrophy, heart failure, and other complications.

Capillaries are the smallest blood vessels in the body, with diameters that range from 5 to 10 micrometers. They form a network of tiny tubes that connect the arterioles (small branches of arteries) and venules (small branches of veins), allowing for the exchange of oxygen, carbon dioxide, nutrients, and waste products between the blood and the surrounding tissues.

Capillaries are composed of a single layer of endothelial cells that surround a hollow lumen through which blood flows. The walls of capillaries are extremely thin, allowing for easy diffusion of molecules between the blood and the surrounding tissue. This is essential for maintaining the health and function of all body tissues.

Capillaries can be classified into three types based on their structure and function: continuous, fenestrated, and sinusoidal. Continuous capillaries have a continuous layer of endothelial cells with tight junctions that restrict the passage of large molecules. Fenestrated capillaries have small pores or "fenestrae" in the endothelial cell walls that allow for the passage of larger molecules, such as proteins and lipids. Sinusoidal capillaries are found in organs with high metabolic activity, such as the liver and spleen, and have large, irregular spaces between the endothelial cells that allow for the exchange of even larger molecules.

Overall, capillaries play a critical role in maintaining the health and function of all body tissues by allowing for the exchange of nutrients, oxygen, and waste products between the blood and surrounding tissues.

Vasoconstrictor agents are substances that cause the narrowing of blood vessels by constricting the smooth muscle in their walls. This leads to an increase in blood pressure and a decrease in blood flow. They work by activating the sympathetic nervous system, which triggers the release of neurotransmitters such as norepinephrine and epinephrine that bind to alpha-adrenergic receptors on the smooth muscle cells of the blood vessel walls, causing them to contract.

Vasoconstrictor agents are used medically for a variety of purposes, including:

* Treating hypotension (low blood pressure)
* Controlling bleeding during surgery or childbirth
* Relieving symptoms of nasal congestion in conditions such as the common cold or allergies

Examples of vasoconstrictor agents include phenylephrine, oxymetazoline, and epinephrine. It's important to note that prolonged use or excessive doses of vasoconstrictor agents can lead to rebound congestion and other adverse effects, so they should be used with caution and under the guidance of a healthcare professional.

Pulmonary alveoli, also known as air sacs, are tiny clusters of air-filled pouches located at the end of the bronchioles in the lungs. They play a crucial role in the process of gas exchange during respiration. The thin walls of the alveoli, called alveolar membranes, allow oxygen from inhaled air to pass into the bloodstream and carbon dioxide from the bloodstream to pass into the alveoli to be exhaled out of the body. This vital function enables the lungs to supply oxygen-rich blood to the rest of the body and remove waste products like carbon dioxide.

A pulmonary embolism (PE) is a medical condition that occurs when a blood clot, often formed in the deep veins of the legs (deep vein thrombosis), breaks off and travels to the lungs, blocking one or more pulmonary arteries. This blockage can lead to various symptoms such as shortness of breath, chest pain, rapid heart rate, and coughing up blood. In severe cases, it can cause life-threatening complications like low oxygen levels, hypotension, and even death if not promptly diagnosed and treated with anticoagulant medications or thrombolytic therapy to dissolve the clot.

"Newborn animals" refers to the very young offspring of animals that have recently been born. In medical terminology, newborns are often referred to as "neonates," and they are classified as such from birth until about 28 days of age. During this time period, newborn animals are particularly vulnerable and require close monitoring and care to ensure their survival and healthy development.

The specific needs of newborn animals can vary widely depending on the species, but generally, they require warmth, nutrition, hydration, and protection from harm. In many cases, newborns are unable to regulate their own body temperature or feed themselves, so they rely heavily on their mothers for care and support.

In medical settings, newborn animals may be examined and treated by veterinarians to ensure that they are healthy and receiving the care they need. This can include providing medical interventions such as feeding tubes, antibiotics, or other treatments as needed to address any health issues that arise. Overall, the care and support of newborn animals is an important aspect of animal medicine and conservation efforts.

The endothelium is a thin layer of simple squamous epithelial cells that lines the interior surface of blood vessels, lymphatic vessels, and heart chambers. The vascular endothelium, specifically, refers to the endothelial cells that line the blood vessels. These cells play a crucial role in maintaining vascular homeostasis by regulating vasomotor tone, coagulation, platelet activation, inflammation, and permeability of the vessel wall. They also contribute to the growth and repair of the vascular system and are involved in various pathological processes such as atherosclerosis, hypertension, and diabetes.

Patent Ductus Arteriosus (PDA) is a congenital heart defect in which the ductus arteriosus, a normal fetal blood vessel that connects the pulmonary artery and the aorta, fails to close after birth. The ductus arteriosus allows blood to bypass the lungs while the fetus is still in the womb, but it should close shortly after birth as the newborn begins to breathe and oxygenate their own blood.

If the ductus arteriosus remains open or "patent," it can result in abnormal blood flow between the pulmonary artery and aorta. This can lead to various cardiovascular complications, such as:

1. Pulmonary hypertension (high blood pressure in the lungs)
2. Congestive heart failure
3. Increased risk of respiratory infections

The severity of the symptoms and the need for treatment depend on the size of the PDA and the amount of blood flow that is shunted from the aorta to the pulmonary artery. Small PDAs may close on their own over time, while larger PDAs typically require medical intervention, such as medication or surgical closure.

Prostaglandin endoperoxides are naturally occurring lipid compounds that play important roles as mediators in the body's inflammatory and physiological responses. They are intermediate products in the conversion of arachidonic acid to prostaglandins and thromboxanes, which are synthesized by the action of enzymes called cyclooxygenases (COX-1 and COX-2).

Synthetic prostaglandin endoperoxides, on the other hand, are chemically synthesized versions of these compounds. They are used in medical research and therapeutic applications to mimic or inhibit the effects of naturally occurring prostaglandin endoperoxides. These synthetic compounds can be used to study the mechanisms of prostaglandin action, develop new drugs, or as stand-in agents for the natural compounds in experimental settings.

It's important to note that while synthetic prostaglandin endoperoxides can serve as useful tools in research and medicine, they also carry potential risks and side effects, much like their naturally occurring counterparts. Therefore, their use should be carefully monitored and regulated to ensure safety and efficacy.

Adrenomedullin is a hormone that is produced and released by the adrenal glands, specifically from the chromaffin cells in the adrenal medulla. It is a small peptide made up of 52 amino acids and has various physiological functions, including vasodilation, bronchodilation, and inhibition of cell growth.

Adrenomedullin acts as a potent vasodilator by binding to specific G protein-coupled receptors in the vascular smooth muscle cells, leading to relaxation of the blood vessels. It also has a role in regulating blood pressure and fluid balance in the body.

In addition to its effects on the cardiovascular system, adrenomedullin has been shown to have anti-inflammatory and neuroprotective properties. It is involved in various physiological processes such as wound healing, tissue repair, and angiogenesis (the formation of new blood vessels).

Abnormal levels of adrenomedullin have been implicated in several disease states, including hypertension, heart failure, sepsis, and cancer. Therefore, measuring adrenomedullin levels in the body can provide valuable diagnostic and prognostic information for these conditions.

Congenital heart defects (CHDs) are structural abnormalities in the heart that are present at birth. They can affect any part of the heart's structure, including the walls of the heart, the valves inside the heart, and the major blood vessels that lead to and from the heart.

Congenital heart defects can range from mild to severe and can cause various symptoms depending on the type and severity of the defect. Some common symptoms of CHDs include cyanosis (a bluish tint to the skin, lips, and fingernails), shortness of breath, fatigue, poor feeding, and slow growth in infants and children.

There are many different types of congenital heart defects, including:

1. Septal defects: These are holes in the walls that separate the four chambers of the heart. The two most common septal defects are atrial septal defect (ASD) and ventricular septal defect (VSD).
2. Valve abnormalities: These include narrowed or leaky valves, which can affect blood flow through the heart.
3. Obstruction defects: These occur when blood flow is blocked or restricted due to narrowing or absence of a part of the heart's structure. Examples include pulmonary stenosis and coarctation of the aorta.
4. Cyanotic heart defects: These cause a lack of oxygen in the blood, leading to cyanosis. Examples include tetralogy of Fallot and transposition of the great arteries.

The causes of congenital heart defects are not fully understood, but genetic factors and environmental influences during pregnancy may play a role. Some CHDs can be detected before birth through prenatal testing, while others may not be diagnosed until after birth or later in childhood. Treatment for CHDs may include medication, surgery, or other interventions to improve blood flow and oxygenation of the body's tissues.

Nitric Oxide Synthase (NOS) is a group of enzymes that catalyze the production of nitric oxide (NO) from L-arginine. There are three distinct isoforms of NOS, each with different expression patterns and functions:

1. Neuronal Nitric Oxide Synthase (nNOS or NOS1): This isoform is primarily expressed in the nervous system and plays a role in neurotransmission, synaptic plasticity, and learning and memory processes.
2. Inducible Nitric Oxide Synthase (iNOS or NOS2): This isoform is induced by various stimuli such as cytokines, lipopolysaccharides, and hypoxia in a variety of cells including immune cells, endothelial cells, and smooth muscle cells. iNOS produces large amounts of NO, which functions as a potent effector molecule in the immune response, particularly in the defense against microbial pathogens.
3. Endothelial Nitric Oxide Synthase (eNOS or NOS3): This isoform is constitutively expressed in endothelial cells and produces low levels of NO that play a crucial role in maintaining vascular homeostasis by regulating vasodilation, inhibiting platelet aggregation, and preventing smooth muscle cell proliferation.

Overall, NOS plays an essential role in various physiological processes, including neurotransmission, immune response, cardiovascular function, and respiratory regulation. Dysregulation of NOS activity has been implicated in several pathological conditions such as hypertension, atherosclerosis, neurodegenerative diseases, and inflammatory disorders.

Nitro-L-arginine or Nitroarginine is not a medical term per se, but it is a chemical compound that is sometimes used in medical research and experiments. It is a salt of nitric acid and L-arginine, an amino acid that is important for the functioning of the body.

Nitroarginine is known to inhibit the production of nitric oxide, a molecule that plays a role in various physiological processes such as blood flow regulation, immune response, and neurotransmission. As a result, nitroarginine has been used in research to study the effects of reduced nitric oxide levels on different systems in the body.

It's worth noting that nitroarginine is not approved for use as a medication in humans, and its use is generally limited to laboratory settings.

Collateral circulation refers to the alternate blood supply routes that bypass an obstructed or narrowed vessel and reconnect with the main vascular system. These collateral vessels can develop over time as a result of the body's natural adaptation to chronic ischemia (reduced blood flow) caused by various conditions such as atherosclerosis, thromboembolism, or vasculitis.

The development of collateral circulation helps maintain adequate blood flow and oxygenation to affected tissues, minimizing the risk of tissue damage and necrosis. In some cases, well-developed collateral circulations can help compensate for significant blockages in major vessels, reducing symptoms and potentially preventing the need for invasive interventions like revascularization procedures. However, the extent and effectiveness of collateral circulation vary from person to person and depend on factors such as age, overall health status, and the presence of comorbidities.

Endothelin is a type of peptide (small protein) that is produced by the endothelial cells, which line the interior surface of blood vessels. Endothelins are known to be potent vasoconstrictors, meaning they cause the narrowing of blood vessels, and thus increase blood pressure. There are three major types of endothelin molecules, known as Endothelin-1, Endothelin-2, and Endothelin-3. These endothelins bind to specific receptors (ETA, ETB) on the surface of smooth muscle cells in the blood vessel walls, leading to contraction and subsequent vasoconstriction. Additionally, endothelins have been implicated in various physiological and pathophysiological processes such as regulation of cell growth, inflammation, and fibrosis.

A chronic disease is a long-term medical condition that often progresses slowly over a period of years and requires ongoing management and care. These diseases are typically not fully curable, but symptoms can be managed to improve quality of life. Common chronic diseases include heart disease, stroke, cancer, diabetes, arthritis, and COPD (chronic obstructive pulmonary disease). They are often associated with advanced age, although they can also affect children and younger adults. Chronic diseases can have significant impacts on individuals' physical, emotional, and social well-being, as well as on healthcare systems and society at large.

Nitric Oxide Synthase Type III (NOS-III), also known as endothelial Nitric Oxide Synthase (eNOS), is an enzyme responsible for the production of nitric oxide (NO) in the endothelium, the lining of blood vessels. This enzyme catalyzes the conversion of L-arginine to L-citrulline, producing NO as a byproduct. The release of NO from eNOS plays an important role in regulating vascular tone and homeostasis, including the relaxation of smooth muscle cells in the blood vessel walls, inhibition of platelet aggregation, and modulation of immune function. Mutations or dysfunction in NOS-III can contribute to various cardiovascular diseases such as hypertension, atherosclerosis, and erectile dysfunction.

Epoprostenol is a medication that belongs to a class of drugs called prostaglandins. It is a synthetic analog of a natural substance in the body called prostacyclin, which widens blood vessels and has anti-platelet effects. Epoprostenol is used to treat pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH), a condition characterized by high blood pressure in the arteries that supply blood to the lungs.

Epoprostenol works by relaxing the smooth muscle in the walls of the pulmonary arteries, which reduces the resistance to blood flow and lowers the pressure within these vessels. This helps improve symptoms such as shortness of breath, fatigue, and chest pain, and can also prolong survival in people with PAH.

Epoprostenol is administered continuously through a small pump that delivers the medication directly into the bloodstream. It is a potent vasodilator, which means it can cause a sudden drop in blood pressure if not given carefully. Therefore, it is usually started in a hospital setting under close medical supervision.

Common side effects of epoprostenol include headache, flushing, jaw pain, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, and muscle or joint pain. More serious side effects can include bleeding, infection at the site of the catheter, and an allergic reaction to the medication.

A smooth muscle within the vascular system refers to the involuntary, innervated muscle that is found in the walls of blood vessels. These muscles are responsible for controlling the diameter of the blood vessels, which in turn regulates blood flow and blood pressure. They are called "smooth" muscles because their individual muscle cells do not have the striations, or cross-striped patterns, that are observed in skeletal and cardiac muscle cells. Smooth muscle in the vascular system is controlled by the autonomic nervous system and by hormones, and can contract or relax slowly over a period of time.

The heart ventricles are the two lower chambers of the heart that receive blood from the atria and pump it to the lungs or the rest of the body. The right ventricle pumps deoxygenated blood to the lungs, while the left ventricle pumps oxygenated blood to the rest of the body. Both ventricles have thick, muscular walls to generate the pressure necessary to pump blood through the circulatory system.

In the field of medicine, "time factors" refer to the duration of symptoms or time elapsed since the onset of a medical condition, which can have significant implications for diagnosis and treatment. Understanding time factors is crucial in determining the progression of a disease, evaluating the effectiveness of treatments, and making critical decisions regarding patient care.

For example, in stroke management, "time is brain," meaning that rapid intervention within a specific time frame (usually within 4.5 hours) is essential to administering tissue plasminogen activator (tPA), a clot-busting drug that can minimize brain damage and improve patient outcomes. Similarly, in trauma care, the "golden hour" concept emphasizes the importance of providing definitive care within the first 60 minutes after injury to increase survival rates and reduce morbidity.

Time factors also play a role in monitoring the progression of chronic conditions like diabetes or heart disease, where regular follow-ups and assessments help determine appropriate treatment adjustments and prevent complications. In infectious diseases, time factors are crucial for initiating antibiotic therapy and identifying potential outbreaks to control their spread.

Overall, "time factors" encompass the significance of recognizing and acting promptly in various medical scenarios to optimize patient outcomes and provide effective care.

Blood vessels are the part of the circulatory system that transport blood throughout the body. They form a network of tubes that carry blood to and from the heart, lungs, and other organs. The main types of blood vessels are arteries, veins, and capillaries. Arteries carry oxygenated blood away from the heart to the rest of the body, while veins return deoxygenated blood back to the heart. Capillaries connect arteries and veins and facilitate the exchange of oxygen, nutrients, and waste materials between the blood and the body's tissues.

An arteriovenous fistula is an abnormal connection or passageway between an artery and a vein. This connection causes blood to flow directly from the artery into the vein, bypassing the capillary network that would normally distribute the oxygen-rich blood to the surrounding tissues.

Arteriovenous fistulas can occur as a result of trauma, disease, or as a planned surgical procedure for patients who require hemodialysis, a treatment for advanced kidney failure. In hemodialysis, the arteriovenous fistula serves as a site for repeated access to the bloodstream, allowing for efficient removal of waste products and excess fluids.

The medical definition of an arteriovenous fistula is:

"An abnormal communication between an artery and a vein, usually created by surgical means for hemodialysis access or occurring as a result of trauma, congenital defects, or disease processes such as vasculitis or neoplasm."

Microcirculation is the circulation of blood in the smallest blood vessels, including arterioles, venules, and capillaries. It's responsible for the delivery of oxygen and nutrients to the tissues and the removal of waste products. The microcirculation plays a crucial role in maintaining tissue homeostasis and is regulated by various physiological mechanisms such as autonomic nervous system activity, local metabolic factors, and hormones.

Impairment of microcirculation can lead to tissue hypoxia, inflammation, and organ dysfunction, which are common features in several diseases, including diabetes, hypertension, sepsis, and ischemia-reperfusion injury. Therefore, understanding the structure and function of the microcirculation is essential for developing new therapeutic strategies to treat these conditions.

Angiography is a medical procedure in which an x-ray image is taken to visualize the internal structure of blood vessels, arteries, or veins. This is done by injecting a radiopaque contrast agent (dye) into the blood vessel using a thin, flexible catheter. The dye makes the blood vessels visible on an x-ray image, allowing doctors to diagnose and treat various medical conditions such as blockages, narrowing, or malformations of the blood vessels.

There are several types of angiography, including:

* Cardiac angiography (also called coronary angiography) - used to examine the blood vessels of the heart
* Cerebral angiography - used to examine the blood vessels of the brain
* Peripheral angiography - used to examine the blood vessels in the limbs or other parts of the body.

Angiography is typically performed by a radiologist, cardiologist, or vascular surgeon in a hospital setting. It can help diagnose conditions such as coronary artery disease, aneurysms, and peripheral arterial disease, among others.

Sprague-Dawley rats are a strain of albino laboratory rats that are widely used in scientific research. They were first developed by researchers H.H. Sprague and R.C. Dawley in the early 20th century, and have since become one of the most commonly used rat strains in biomedical research due to their relatively large size, ease of handling, and consistent genetic background.

Sprague-Dawley rats are outbred, which means that they are genetically diverse and do not suffer from the same limitations as inbred strains, which can have reduced fertility and increased susceptibility to certain diseases. They are also characterized by their docile nature and low levels of aggression, making them easier to handle and study than some other rat strains.

These rats are used in a wide variety of research areas, including toxicology, pharmacology, nutrition, cancer, and behavioral studies. Because they are genetically diverse, Sprague-Dawley rats can be used to model a range of human diseases and conditions, making them an important tool in the development of new drugs and therapies.

Lung diseases refer to a broad category of disorders that affect the lungs and other structures within the respiratory system. These diseases can impair lung function, leading to symptoms such as coughing, shortness of breath, chest pain, and wheezing. They can be categorized into several types based on the underlying cause and nature of the disease process. Some common examples include:

1. Obstructive lung diseases: These are characterized by narrowing or blockage of the airways, making it difficult to breathe out. Examples include chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), asthma, bronchiectasis, and cystic fibrosis.
2. Restrictive lung diseases: These involve stiffening or scarring of the lungs, which reduces their ability to expand and take in air. Examples include idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis, sarcoidosis, and asbestosis.
3. Infectious lung diseases: These are caused by bacteria, viruses, fungi, or parasites that infect the lungs. Examples include pneumonia, tuberculosis, and influenza.
4. Vascular lung diseases: These affect the blood vessels in the lungs, impairing oxygen exchange. Examples include pulmonary embolism, pulmonary hypertension, and chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension (CTEPH).
5. Neoplastic lung diseases: These involve abnormal growth of cells within the lungs, leading to cancer. Examples include small cell lung cancer, non-small cell lung cancer, and mesothelioma.
6. Other lung diseases: These include interstitial lung diseases, pleural effusions, and rare disorders such as pulmonary alveolar proteinosis and lymphangioleiomyomatosis (LAM).

It is important to note that this list is not exhaustive, and there are many other conditions that can affect the lungs. Proper diagnosis and treatment of lung diseases require consultation with a healthcare professional, such as a pulmonologist or respiratory therapist.

Blood gas analysis is a medical test that measures the levels of oxygen and carbon dioxide in the blood, as well as the pH level, which indicates the acidity or alkalinity of the blood. This test is often used to evaluate lung function, respiratory disorders, and acid-base balance in the body. It can also be used to monitor the effectiveness of treatments for conditions such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), asthma, and other respiratory illnesses. The analysis is typically performed on a sample of arterial blood, although venous blood may also be used in some cases.

A newborn infant is a baby who is within the first 28 days of life. This period is also referred to as the neonatal period. Newborns require specialized care and attention due to their immature bodily systems and increased vulnerability to various health issues. They are closely monitored for signs of well-being, growth, and development during this critical time.

Blood volume refers to the total amount of blood present in an individual's circulatory system at any given time. It is the combined volume of both the plasma (the liquid component of blood) and the formed elements (such as red and white blood cells and platelets) in the blood. In a healthy adult human, the average blood volume is approximately 5 liters (or about 1 gallon). However, blood volume can vary depending on several factors, including age, sex, body weight, and overall health status.

Blood volume plays a critical role in maintaining proper cardiovascular function, as it affects blood pressure, heart rate, and the delivery of oxygen and nutrients to tissues throughout the body. Changes in blood volume can have significant impacts on an individual's health and may be associated with various medical conditions, such as dehydration, hemorrhage, heart failure, and liver disease. Accurate measurement of blood volume is essential for diagnosing and managing these conditions, as well as for guiding treatment decisions in clinical settings.

Endothelin receptors are a type of G protein-coupled receptor that bind to endothelin, a potent vasoconstrictor peptide. There are two main types of endothelin receptors: ETA and ETB. ETA receptors are found in vascular smooth muscle cells and activate phospholipase C, leading to an increase in intracellular calcium and subsequent contraction of the smooth muscle. ETB receptors are found in both endothelial cells and vascular smooth muscle cells. In endothelial cells, ETB receptor activation leads to the release of nitric oxide and prostacyclin, which cause vasodilation. In vascular smooth muscle cells, ETB receptor activation causes vasoconstriction through a mechanism that is not fully understood.

Endothelin receptors play important roles in regulating blood flow, vascular remodeling, and the development of cardiovascular diseases such as hypertension and heart failure. They are also involved in the regulation of cell growth, differentiation, and apoptosis in various tissues.

Cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) is a important second messenger molecule that plays a crucial role in various biological processes within the human body. It is synthesized from guanosine triphosphate (GTP) by the enzyme guanylyl cyclase.

Cyclic GMP is involved in regulating diverse physiological functions, such as smooth muscle relaxation, cardiovascular function, and neurotransmission. It also plays a role in modulating immune responses and cellular growth and differentiation.

In the medical field, changes in cGMP levels or dysregulation of cGMP-dependent pathways have been implicated in various disease states, including pulmonary hypertension, heart failure, erectile dysfunction, and glaucoma. Therefore, pharmacological agents that target cGMP signaling are being developed as potential therapeutic options for these conditions.

Enterohepatic circulation is the process by which certain substances, such as bile salts, bilirubin, and some drugs, are chemically modified and reabsorbed in the enterohepatic system. This system includes the liver, bile ducts, and small intestine.

In the case of bile salts, they are synthesized in the liver, secreted into the bile, and stored in the gallbladder. After a meal, the gallbladder contracts and releases bile into the small intestine to aid in fat digestion. The bile salts help to emulsify fats, allowing them to be absorbed by the intestines. Once absorbed, they are transported back to the liver through the portal vein, where they can be reused for further bile production.

Similarly, bilirubin, a waste product produced from the breakdown of red blood cells, is also conjugated in the liver and excreted into the bile. In the small intestine, bacteria break down bilirubin into colorless urobilinogen, which can be reabsorbed and transported back to the liver for further processing.

Certain drugs may also undergo enterohepatic circulation, where they are metabolized in the liver, excreted into the bile, and then reabsorbed in the small intestine. This can prolong the duration of drug action and affect its overall effectiveness.

Pregnancy is a physiological state or condition where a fertilized egg (zygote) successfully implants and grows in the uterus of a woman, leading to the development of an embryo and finally a fetus. This process typically spans approximately 40 weeks, divided into three trimesters, and culminates in childbirth. Throughout this period, numerous hormonal and physical changes occur to support the growing offspring, including uterine enlargement, breast development, and various maternal adaptations to ensure the fetus's optimal growth and well-being.

"Swine" is a common term used to refer to even-toed ungulates of the family Suidae, including domestic pigs and wild boars. However, in a medical context, "swine" often appears in the phrase "swine flu," which is a strain of influenza virus that typically infects pigs but can also cause illness in humans. The 2009 H1N1 pandemic was caused by a new strain of swine-origin influenza A virus, which was commonly referred to as "swine flu." It's important to note that this virus is not transmitted through eating cooked pork products; it spreads from person to person, mainly through respiratory droplets produced when an infected person coughs or sneezes.

In medical terms, the heart is a muscular organ located in the thoracic cavity that functions as a pump to circulate blood throughout the body. It's responsible for delivering oxygen and nutrients to the tissues and removing carbon dioxide and other wastes. The human heart is divided into four chambers: two atria on the top and two ventricles on the bottom. The right side of the heart receives deoxygenated blood from the body and pumps it to the lungs, while the left side receives oxygenated blood from the lungs and pumps it out to the rest of the body. The heart's rhythmic contractions and relaxations are regulated by a complex electrical conduction system.

nitroprusside (ni-troe-rus-ide)

A rapid-acting vasodilator used in the management of severe hypertension, acute heart failure, and to reduce afterload in patients undergoing cardiac surgery. It is a potent arterial and venous dilator that decreases preload and afterload, thereby reducing myocardial oxygen demand. Nitroprusside is metabolized to cyanide, which must be monitored closely during therapy to prevent toxicity.

Pharmacologic class: Peripheral vasodilators

Therapeutic class: Antihypertensives, Vasodilators

Medical Categories: Cardiovascular Drugs, Hypertension Agents

In medical terms, pressure is defined as the force applied per unit area on an object or body surface. It is often measured in millimeters of mercury (mmHg) in clinical settings. For example, blood pressure is the force exerted by circulating blood on the walls of the arteries and is recorded as two numbers: systolic pressure (when the heart beats and pushes blood out) and diastolic pressure (when the heart rests between beats).

Pressure can also refer to the pressure exerted on a wound or incision to help control bleeding, or the pressure inside the skull or spinal canal. High or low pressure in different body systems can indicate various medical conditions and require appropriate treatment.

Heart rate is the number of heartbeats per unit of time, often expressed as beats per minute (bpm). It can vary significantly depending on factors such as age, physical fitness, emotions, and overall health status. A resting heart rate between 60-100 bpm is generally considered normal for adults, but athletes and individuals with high levels of physical fitness may have a resting heart rate below 60 bpm due to their enhanced cardiovascular efficiency. Monitoring heart rate can provide valuable insights into an individual's health status, exercise intensity, and response to various treatments or interventions.

Hematocrit is a medical term that refers to the percentage of total blood volume that is made up of red blood cells. It is typically measured as part of a complete blood count (CBC) test. A high hematocrit may indicate conditions such as dehydration, polycythemia, or living at high altitudes, while a low hematocrit may be a sign of anemia, bleeding, or overhydration. It is important to note that hematocrit values can vary depending on factors such as age, gender, and pregnancy status.

Coronary circulation refers to the circulation of blood in the coronary vessels, which supply oxygenated blood to the heart muscle (myocardium) and drain deoxygenated blood from it. The coronary circulation system includes two main coronary arteries - the left main coronary artery and the right coronary artery - that branch off from the aorta just above the aortic valve. These arteries further divide into smaller branches, which supply blood to different regions of the heart muscle.

The left main coronary artery divides into two branches: the left anterior descending (LAD) artery and the left circumflex (LCx) artery. The LAD supplies blood to the front and sides of the heart, while the LCx supplies blood to the back and sides of the heart. The right coronary artery supplies blood to the lower part of the heart, including the right ventricle and the bottom portion of the left ventricle.

The veins that drain the heart muscle include the great cardiac vein, the middle cardiac vein, and the small cardiac vein, which merge to form the coronary sinus. The coronary sinus empties into the right atrium, allowing deoxygenated blood to enter the right side of the heart and be pumped to the lungs for oxygenation.

Coronary circulation is essential for maintaining the health and function of the heart muscle, as it provides the necessary oxygen and nutrients required for proper contraction and relaxation of the myocardium. Any disruption or blockage in the coronary circulation system can lead to serious consequences, such as angina, heart attack, or even death.

Cerebrovascular circulation refers to the network of blood vessels that supply oxygenated blood and nutrients to the brain tissue, and remove waste products. It includes the internal carotid arteries, vertebral arteries, circle of Willis, and the intracranial arteries that branch off from them.

The internal carotid arteries and vertebral arteries merge to form the circle of Willis, a polygonal network of vessels located at the base of the brain. The anterior cerebral artery, middle cerebral artery, posterior cerebral artery, and communicating arteries are the major vessels that branch off from the circle of Willis and supply blood to different regions of the brain.

Interruptions or abnormalities in the cerebrovascular circulation can lead to various neurological conditions such as stroke, transient ischemic attack (TIA), and vascular dementia.

Atrial natriuretic factor (ANF), also known as atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP), is a hormone that is primarily produced and secreted by the atria of the heart in response to stretching of the cardiac muscle cells due to increased blood volume. ANF plays a crucial role in regulating body fluid homeostasis, blood pressure, and cardiovascular function.

The main physiological action of ANF is to promote sodium and water excretion by the kidneys, which helps lower blood volume and reduce blood pressure. ANF also relaxes vascular smooth muscle, dilates blood vessels, and inhibits the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS), further contributing to its blood pressure-lowering effects.

Defects in ANF production or action have been implicated in several cardiovascular disorders, including heart failure, hypertension, and kidney disease. Therefore, ANF and its analogs are being investigated as potential therapeutic agents for the treatment of these conditions.

I believe there may be some confusion in your question. "Rabbits" is a common name used to refer to the Lagomorpha species, particularly members of the family Leporidae. They are small mammals known for their long ears, strong legs, and quick reproduction.

However, if you're referring to "rabbits" in a medical context, there is a term called "rabbit syndrome," which is a rare movement disorder characterized by repetitive, involuntary movements of the fingers, resembling those of a rabbit chewing. It is also known as "finger-chewing chorea." This condition is usually associated with certain medications, particularly antipsychotics, and typically resolves when the medication is stopped or adjusted.

Doppler echocardiography is a type of ultrasound test that uses high-frequency sound waves to produce detailed images of the heart and its blood vessels. It measures the direction and speed of blood flow in the heart and major blood vessels leading to and from the heart. This helps to evaluate various conditions such as valve problems, congenital heart defects, and heart muscle diseases.

In Doppler echocardiography, a small handheld device called a transducer is placed on the chest, which emits sound waves that bounce off the heart and blood vessels. The transducer then picks up the returning echoes, which are processed by a computer to create moving images of the heart.

The Doppler effect is used to measure the speed and direction of blood flow. This occurs when the frequency of the sound waves changes as they bounce off moving objects, such as red blood cells. By analyzing these changes, the ultrasound machine can calculate the velocity and direction of blood flow in different parts of the heart.

Doppler echocardiography is a non-invasive test that does not require any needles or dyes. It is generally safe and painless, although patients may experience some discomfort from the pressure applied by the transducer on the chest. The test usually takes about 30 to 60 minutes to complete.

Prostaglandins are naturally occurring, lipid-derived hormones that play various important roles in the human body. They are produced in nearly every tissue in response to injury or infection, and they have diverse effects depending on the site of release and the type of prostaglandin. Some of their functions include:

1. Regulation of inflammation: Prostaglandins contribute to the inflammatory response by increasing vasodilation, promoting fluid accumulation, and sensitizing pain receptors, which can lead to symptoms such as redness, heat, swelling, and pain.
2. Modulation of gastrointestinal functions: Prostaglandins protect the stomach lining from acid secretion and promote mucus production, maintaining the integrity of the gastric mucosa. They also regulate intestinal motility and secretion.
3. Control of renal function: Prostaglandins help regulate blood flow to the kidneys, maintain sodium balance, and control renin release, which affects blood pressure and fluid balance.
4. Regulation of smooth muscle contraction: Prostaglandins can cause both relaxation and contraction of smooth muscles in various tissues, such as the uterus, bronchioles, and vascular system.
5. Modulation of platelet aggregation: Some prostaglandins inhibit platelet aggregation, preventing blood clots from forming too quickly or becoming too large.
6. Reproductive system regulation: Prostaglandins are involved in the menstrual cycle, ovulation, and labor induction by promoting uterine contractions.
7. Neurotransmission: Prostaglandins can modulate neurotransmitter release and neuronal excitability, affecting pain perception, mood, and cognition.

Prostaglandins exert their effects through specific G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) found on the surface of target cells. There are several distinct types of prostaglandins (PGs), including PGD2, PGE2, PGF2α, PGI2 (prostacyclin), and thromboxane A2 (TXA2). Each type has unique functions and acts through specific receptors. Prostaglandins are synthesized from arachidonic acid, a polyunsaturated fatty acid derived from membrane phospholipids, by the action of cyclooxygenase (COX) enzymes. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), such as aspirin and ibuprofen, inhibit COX activity, reducing prostaglandin synthesis and providing analgesic, anti-inflammatory, and antipyretic effects.

An amide is a functional group or a compound that contains a carbonyl group (a double-bonded carbon atom) and a nitrogen atom. The nitrogen atom is connected to the carbonyl carbon atom by a single bond, and it also has a lone pair of electrons. Amides are commonly found in proteins and peptides, where they form amide bonds (also known as peptide bonds) between individual amino acids.

The general structure of an amide is R-CO-NHR', where R and R' can be alkyl or aryl groups. Amides can be classified into several types based on the nature of R and R' substituents:

* Primary amides: R-CO-NH2
* Secondary amides: R-CO-NHR'
* Tertiary amides: R-CO-NR''R'''

Amides have several important chemical properties. They are generally stable and resistant to hydrolysis under neutral or basic conditions, but they can be hydrolyzed under acidic conditions or with strong bases. Amides also exhibit a characteristic infrared absorption band around 1650 cm-1 due to the carbonyl stretching vibration.

In addition to their prevalence in proteins and peptides, amides are also found in many natural and synthetic compounds, including pharmaceuticals, dyes, and polymers. They have a wide range of applications in chemistry, biology, and materials science.

Endothelial cells are the type of cells that line the inner surface of blood vessels, lymphatic vessels, and heart chambers. They play a crucial role in maintaining vascular homeostasis by controlling vasomotor tone, coagulation, platelet activation, and inflammation. Endothelial cells also regulate the transport of molecules between the blood and surrounding tissues, and contribute to the maintenance of the structural integrity of the vasculature. They are flat, elongated cells with a unique morphology that allows them to form a continuous, nonthrombogenic lining inside the vessels. Endothelial cells can be isolated from various tissues and cultured in vitro for research purposes.

NG-Nitroarginine Methyl Ester (L-NAME) is not a medication, but rather a research chemical used in scientific studies. It is an inhibitor of nitric oxide synthase, an enzyme that synthesizes nitric oxide, a molecule involved in the relaxation of blood vessels.

Therefore, L-NAME is often used in experiments to investigate the role of nitric oxide in various physiological and pathophysiological processes. It is important to note that the use of L-NAME in humans is not approved for therapeutic purposes due to its potential side effects, which can include hypertension, decreased renal function, and decreased cerebral blood flow.

A dose-response relationship in the context of drugs refers to the changes in the effects or symptoms that occur as the dose of a drug is increased or decreased. Generally, as the dose of a drug is increased, the severity or intensity of its effects also increases. Conversely, as the dose is decreased, the effects of the drug become less severe or may disappear altogether.

The dose-response relationship is an important concept in pharmacology and toxicology because it helps to establish the safe and effective dosage range for a drug. By understanding how changes in the dose of a drug affect its therapeutic and adverse effects, healthcare providers can optimize treatment plans for their patients while minimizing the risk of harm.

The dose-response relationship is typically depicted as a curve that shows the relationship between the dose of a drug and its effect. The shape of the curve may vary depending on the drug and the specific effect being measured. Some drugs may have a steep dose-response curve, meaning that small changes in the dose can result in large differences in the effect. Other drugs may have a more gradual dose-response curve, where larger changes in the dose are needed to produce significant effects.

In addition to helping establish safe and effective dosages, the dose-response relationship is also used to evaluate the potential therapeutic benefits and risks of new drugs during clinical trials. By systematically testing different doses of a drug in controlled studies, researchers can identify the optimal dosage range for the drug and assess its safety and efficacy.

Placental circulation refers to the specialized circulatory system that develops during pregnancy to allow for the exchange of nutrients, oxygen, and waste products between the mother's blood and the fetal blood in the placenta. The placenta is a highly vascular organ that grows within the uterus and is connected to the developing fetus via the umbilical cord.

In the maternal side of the placenta, the spiral arteries branch into smaller vessels called the intervillous spaces, where they come in close contact with the fetal blood vessels within the villi (finger-like projections) of the placenta. The intervillous spaces are filled with maternal blood that flows around the villi, allowing for the exchange of gases and nutrients between the two circulations.

On the fetal side, the umbilical cord contains two umbilical arteries that carry oxygen-depleted blood from the fetus to the placenta, and one umbilical vein that returns oxygenated blood back to the fetus. The umbilical arteries branch into smaller vessels within the villi, where they exchange gases and nutrients with the maternal blood in the intervillous spaces.

Overall, the placental circulation is a crucial component of fetal development, allowing for the growing fetus to receive the necessary oxygen and nutrients to support its growth and development.

Capillary permeability refers to the ability of substances to pass through the walls of capillaries, which are the smallest blood vessels in the body. These tiny vessels connect the arterioles and venules, allowing for the exchange of nutrients, waste products, and gases between the blood and the surrounding tissues.

The capillary wall is composed of a single layer of endothelial cells that are held together by tight junctions. The permeability of these walls varies depending on the size and charge of the molecules attempting to pass through. Small, uncharged molecules such as water, oxygen, and carbon dioxide can easily diffuse through the capillary wall, while larger or charged molecules such as proteins and large ions have more difficulty passing through.

Increased capillary permeability can occur in response to inflammation, infection, or injury, allowing larger molecules and immune cells to enter the surrounding tissues. This can lead to swelling (edema) and tissue damage if not controlled. Decreased capillary permeability, on the other hand, can lead to impaired nutrient exchange and tissue hypoxia.

Overall, the permeability of capillaries is a critical factor in maintaining the health and function of tissues throughout the body.

Animal disease models are specialized animals, typically rodents such as mice or rats, that have been genetically engineered or exposed to certain conditions to develop symptoms and physiological changes similar to those seen in human diseases. These models are used in medical research to study the pathophysiology of diseases, identify potential therapeutic targets, test drug efficacy and safety, and understand disease mechanisms.

The genetic modifications can include knockout or knock-in mutations, transgenic expression of specific genes, or RNA interference techniques. The animals may also be exposed to environmental factors such as chemicals, radiation, or infectious agents to induce the disease state.

Examples of animal disease models include:

1. Mouse models of cancer: Genetically engineered mice that develop various types of tumors, allowing researchers to study cancer initiation, progression, and metastasis.
2. Alzheimer's disease models: Transgenic mice expressing mutant human genes associated with Alzheimer's disease, which exhibit amyloid plaque formation and cognitive decline.
3. Diabetes models: Obese and diabetic mouse strains like the NOD (non-obese diabetic) or db/db mice, used to study the development of type 1 and type 2 diabetes, respectively.
4. Cardiovascular disease models: Atherosclerosis-prone mice, such as ApoE-deficient or LDLR-deficient mice, that develop plaque buildup in their arteries when fed a high-fat diet.
5. Inflammatory bowel disease models: Mice with genetic mutations affecting intestinal barrier function and immune response, such as IL-10 knockout or SAMP1/YitFc mice, which develop colitis.

Animal disease models are essential tools in preclinical research, but it is important to recognize their limitations. Differences between species can affect the translatability of results from animal studies to human patients. Therefore, researchers must carefully consider the choice of model and interpret findings cautiously when applying them to human diseases.

Arginine is an α-amino acid that is classified as a semi-essential or conditionally essential amino acid, depending on the developmental stage and health status of the individual. The adult human body can normally synthesize sufficient amounts of arginine to meet its needs, but there are certain circumstances, such as periods of rapid growth or injury, where the dietary intake of arginine may become necessary.

The chemical formula for arginine is C6H14N4O2. It has a molecular weight of 174.20 g/mol and a pKa value of 12.48. Arginine is a basic amino acid, which means that it contains a side chain with a positive charge at physiological pH levels. The side chain of arginine is composed of a guanidino group, which is a functional group consisting of a nitrogen atom bonded to three methyl groups.

In the body, arginine plays several important roles. It is a precursor for the synthesis of nitric oxide, a molecule that helps regulate blood flow and immune function. Arginine is also involved in the detoxification of ammonia, a waste product produced by the breakdown of proteins. Additionally, arginine can be converted into other amino acids, such as ornithine and citrulline, which are involved in various metabolic processes.

Foods that are good sources of arginine include meat, poultry, fish, dairy products, nuts, seeds, and legumes. Arginine supplements are available and may be used for a variety of purposes, such as improving exercise performance, enhancing wound healing, and boosting immune function. However, it is important to consult with a healthcare provider before taking arginine supplements, as they can interact with certain medications and have potential side effects.

Splanchnic circulation refers to the blood flow to the visceral organs, including the gastrointestinal tract, pancreas, spleen, and liver. These organs receive a significant portion of the cardiac output, with approximately 25-30% of the total restingly going to the splanchnic circulation. The splanchnic circulation is regulated by a complex interplay of neural and hormonal mechanisms that help maintain adequate blood flow to these vital organs while also allowing for the distribution of blood to other parts of the body as needed.

The splanchnic circulation is unique in its ability to vasodilate and increase blood flow significantly in response to meals or other stimuli, such as stress or hormonal changes. This increased blood flow helps support the digestive process and absorption of nutrients. At the same time, the body must carefully regulate this blood flow to prevent a significant drop in blood pressure or overloading the heart with too much work.

Overall, the splanchnic circulation plays a critical role in maintaining the health and function of the body's vital organs, and dysregulation of this system can contribute to various diseases, including digestive disorders, liver disease, and cardiovascular disease.

The aorta is the largest artery in the human body, which originates from the left ventricle of the heart and carries oxygenated blood to the rest of the body. It can be divided into several parts, including the ascending aorta, aortic arch, and descending aorta. The ascending aorta gives rise to the coronary arteries that supply blood to the heart muscle. The aortic arch gives rise to the brachiocephalic, left common carotid, and left subclavian arteries, which supply blood to the head, neck, and upper extremities. The descending aorta travels through the thorax and abdomen, giving rise to various intercostal, visceral, and renal arteries that supply blood to the chest wall, organs, and kidneys.

Rho-associated kinases (ROCKs) are serine/threonine kinases that are involved in the regulation of various cellular processes, including actin cytoskeleton organization, cell migration, and gene expression. They are named after their association with the small GTPase RhoA, which activates them upon binding.

ROCKs exist as two isoforms, ROCK1 and ROCK2, which share a high degree of sequence homology and have similar functions. They contain several functional domains, including a kinase domain, a coiled-coil region that mediates protein-protein interactions, and a Rho-binding domain (RBD) that binds to active RhoA.

Once activated by RhoA, ROCKs phosphorylate a variety of downstream targets, including myosin light chain (MLC), LIM kinase (LIMK), and moesin, leading to the regulation of actomyosin contractility, stress fiber formation, and focal adhesion turnover. Dysregulation of ROCK signaling has been implicated in various pathological conditions, such as cancer, cardiovascular diseases, neurological disorders, and fibrosis. Therefore, ROCKs have emerged as promising therapeutic targets for the treatment of these diseases.

Carbon dioxide (CO2) is a colorless, odorless gas that is naturally present in the Earth's atmosphere. It is a normal byproduct of cellular respiration in humans, animals, and plants, and is also produced through the combustion of fossil fuels such as coal, oil, and natural gas.

In medical terms, carbon dioxide is often used as a respiratory stimulant and to maintain the pH balance of blood. It is also used during certain medical procedures, such as laparoscopic surgery, to insufflate (inflate) the abdominal cavity and create a working space for the surgeon.

Elevated levels of carbon dioxide in the body can lead to respiratory acidosis, a condition characterized by an increased concentration of carbon dioxide in the blood and a decrease in pH. This can occur in conditions such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), asthma, or other lung diseases that impair breathing and gas exchange. Symptoms of respiratory acidosis may include shortness of breath, confusion, headache, and in severe cases, coma or death.

"Wistar rats" are a strain of albino rats that are widely used in laboratory research. They were developed at the Wistar Institute in Philadelphia, USA, and were first introduced in 1906. Wistar rats are outbred, which means that they are genetically diverse and do not have a fixed set of genetic characteristics like inbred strains.

Wistar rats are commonly used as animal models in biomedical research because of their size, ease of handling, and relatively low cost. They are used in a wide range of research areas, including toxicology, pharmacology, nutrition, cancer, cardiovascular disease, and behavioral studies. Wistar rats are also used in safety testing of drugs, medical devices, and other products.

Wistar rats are typically larger than many other rat strains, with males weighing between 500-700 grams and females weighing between 250-350 grams. They have a lifespan of approximately 2-3 years. Wistar rats are also known for their docile and friendly nature, making them easy to handle and work with in the laboratory setting.

"Bronchi" are a pair of airways in the respiratory system that branch off from the trachea (windpipe) and lead to the lungs. They are responsible for delivering oxygen-rich air to the lungs and removing carbon dioxide during exhalation. The right bronchus is slightly larger and more vertical than the left, and they further divide into smaller branches called bronchioles within the lungs. Any abnormalities or diseases affecting the bronchi can impact lung function and overall respiratory health.

Gestational age is the length of time that has passed since the first day of the last menstrual period (LMP) in pregnant women. It is the standard unit used to estimate the age of a pregnancy and is typically expressed in weeks. This measure is used because the exact date of conception is often not known, but the start of the last menstrual period is usually easier to recall.

It's important to note that since ovulation typically occurs around two weeks after the start of the LMP, gestational age is approximately two weeks longer than fetal age, which is the actual time elapsed since conception. Medical professionals use both gestational and fetal age to track the development and growth of the fetus during pregnancy.

Blood circulation time is the duration it takes for blood to travel throughout the body and return to the point of origin. It is typically measured from the time a substance is injected into the bloodstream until it can be detected at the original injection site after circulating through the body. This measurement can provide valuable information about an individual's cardiovascular health, as any delays in circulation time may indicate issues with the heart or blood vessels.

In medical terms, blood circulation time is often divided into two components: the pulmonary circulation time and the systemic circulation time. The pulmonary circulation time refers to the time it takes for blood to travel from the heart to the lungs and back again, while the systemic circulation time refers to the time it takes for blood to travel from the heart to the rest of the body and back again.

There are several methods for measuring blood circulation time, including injecting a dye or other substance into the bloodstream and using specialized equipment to detect its presence at various points in the body. This information can be used to diagnose and monitor conditions such as heart disease, shock, and other circulatory disorders.

Acetylcholine is a neurotransmitter, a type of chemical messenger that transmits signals across a chemical synapse from one neuron (nerve cell) to another "target" neuron, muscle cell, or gland cell. It is involved in both peripheral and central nervous system functions.

In the peripheral nervous system, acetylcholine acts as a neurotransmitter at the neuromuscular junction, where it transmits signals from motor neurons to activate muscles. Acetylcholine also acts as a neurotransmitter in the autonomic nervous system, where it is involved in both the sympathetic and parasympathetic systems.

In the central nervous system, acetylcholine plays a role in learning, memory, attention, and arousal. Disruptions in cholinergic neurotransmission have been implicated in several neurological disorders, including Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, and myasthenia gravis.

Acetylcholine is synthesized from choline and acetyl-CoA by the enzyme choline acetyltransferase and is stored in vesicles at the presynaptic terminal of the neuron. When a nerve impulse arrives, the vesicles fuse with the presynaptic membrane, releasing acetylcholine into the synapse. The acetylcholine then binds to receptors on the postsynaptic membrane, triggering a response in the target cell. Acetylcholine is subsequently degraded by the enzyme acetylcholinesterase, which terminates its action and allows for signal transduction to be repeated.

Reference values, also known as reference ranges or reference intervals, are the set of values that are considered normal or typical for a particular population or group of people. These values are often used in laboratory tests to help interpret test results and determine whether a patient's value falls within the expected range.

The process of establishing reference values typically involves measuring a particular biomarker or parameter in a large, healthy population and then calculating the mean and standard deviation of the measurements. Based on these statistics, a range is established that includes a certain percentage of the population (often 95%) and excludes extreme outliers.

It's important to note that reference values can vary depending on factors such as age, sex, race, and other demographic characteristics. Therefore, it's essential to use reference values that are specific to the relevant population when interpreting laboratory test results. Additionally, reference values may change over time due to advances in measurement technology or changes in the population being studied.

Smooth muscle myocytes are specialized cells that make up the contractile portion of non-striated, or smooth, muscles. These muscles are found in various organs and structures throughout the body, including the walls of blood vessels, the digestive system, the respiratory system, and the reproductive system.

Smooth muscle myocytes are smaller than their striated counterparts (skeletal and cardiac muscle cells) and have a single nucleus. They lack the distinctive banding pattern seen in striated muscles and instead have a uniform appearance of actin and myosin filaments. Smooth muscle myocytes are controlled by the autonomic nervous system, which allows them to contract and relax involuntarily.

These cells play an essential role in many physiological processes, such as regulating blood flow, moving food through the digestive tract, and facilitating childbirth. They can also contribute to various pathological conditions, including hypertension, atherosclerosis, and gastrointestinal disorders.

Contrast media are substances that are administered to a patient in order to improve the visibility of internal body structures or processes in medical imaging techniques such as X-rays, CT scans, MRI scans, and ultrasounds. These media can be introduced into the body through various routes, including oral, rectal, or intravenous administration.

Contrast media work by altering the appearance of bodily structures in imaging studies. For example, when a patient undergoes an X-ray examination, contrast media can be used to highlight specific organs, tissues, or blood vessels, making them more visible on the resulting images. In CT and MRI scans, contrast media can help to enhance the differences between normal and abnormal tissues, allowing for more accurate diagnosis and treatment planning.

There are several types of contrast media available, each with its own specific properties and uses. Some common examples include barium sulfate, which is used as a contrast medium in X-ray studies of the gastrointestinal tract, and iodinated contrast media, which are commonly used in CT scans to highlight blood vessels and other structures.

While contrast media are generally considered safe, they can sometimes cause adverse reactions, ranging from mild symptoms such as nausea or hives to more serious complications such as anaphylaxis or kidney damage. As a result, it is important for healthcare providers to carefully evaluate each patient's medical history and individual risk factors before administering contrast media.

Liver circulation, also known as hepatic circulation, refers to the blood flow through the liver. The liver receives blood from two sources: the hepatic artery and the portal vein.

The hepatic artery delivers oxygenated blood from the heart to the liver, accounting for about 25% of the liver's blood supply. The remaining 75% comes from the portal vein, which carries nutrient-rich, deoxygenated blood from the gastrointestinal tract, spleen, pancreas, and gallbladder to the liver.

In the liver, these two sources of blood mix in the sinusoids, small vessels with large spaces between the endothelial cells that line them. This allows for efficient exchange of substances between the blood and the hepatocytes (liver cells). The blood then leaves the liver through the hepatic veins, which merge into the inferior vena cava and return the blood to the heart.

The unique dual blood supply and extensive sinusoidal network in the liver enable it to perform various critical functions, such as detoxification, metabolism, synthesis, storage, and secretion of numerous substances, maintaining body homeostasis.

"Inbred strains of rats" are genetically identical rodents that have been produced through many generations of brother-sister mating. This results in a high degree of homozygosity, where the genes at any particular locus in the genome are identical in all members of the strain.

Inbred strains of rats are widely used in biomedical research because they provide a consistent and reproducible genetic background for studying various biological phenomena, including the effects of drugs, environmental factors, and genetic mutations on health and disease. Additionally, inbred strains can be used to create genetically modified models of human diseases by introducing specific mutations into their genomes.

Some commonly used inbred strains of rats include the Wistar Kyoto (WKY), Sprague-Dawley (SD), and Fischer 344 (F344) rat strains. Each strain has its own unique genetic characteristics, making them suitable for different types of research.

Enzyme inhibitors are substances that bind to an enzyme and decrease its activity, preventing it from catalyzing a chemical reaction in the body. They can work by several mechanisms, including blocking the active site where the substrate binds, or binding to another site on the enzyme to change its shape and prevent substrate binding. Enzyme inhibitors are often used as drugs to treat various medical conditions, such as high blood pressure, abnormal heart rhythms, and bacterial infections. They can also be found naturally in some foods and plants, and can be used in research to understand enzyme function and regulation.

Oxygen consumption, also known as oxygen uptake, is the amount of oxygen that is consumed or utilized by the body during a specific period of time, usually measured in liters per minute (L/min). It is a common measurement used in exercise physiology and critical care medicine to assess an individual's aerobic metabolism and overall health status.

In clinical settings, oxygen consumption is often measured during cardiopulmonary exercise testing (CPET) to evaluate cardiovascular function, pulmonary function, and exercise capacity in patients with various medical conditions such as heart failure, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and other respiratory or cardiac disorders.

During exercise, oxygen is consumed by the muscles to generate energy through a process called oxidative phosphorylation. The amount of oxygen consumed during exercise can provide important information about an individual's fitness level, exercise capacity, and overall health status. Additionally, measuring oxygen consumption can help healthcare providers assess the effectiveness of treatments and rehabilitation programs in patients with various medical conditions.

Biological models, also known as physiological models or organismal models, are simplified representations of biological systems, processes, or mechanisms that are used to understand and explain the underlying principles and relationships. These models can be theoretical (conceptual or mathematical) or physical (such as anatomical models, cell cultures, or animal models). They are widely used in biomedical research to study various phenomena, including disease pathophysiology, drug action, and therapeutic interventions.

Examples of biological models include:

1. Mathematical models: These use mathematical equations and formulas to describe complex biological systems or processes, such as population dynamics, metabolic pathways, or gene regulation networks. They can help predict the behavior of these systems under different conditions and test hypotheses about their underlying mechanisms.
2. Cell cultures: These are collections of cells grown in a controlled environment, typically in a laboratory dish or flask. They can be used to study cellular processes, such as signal transduction, gene expression, or metabolism, and to test the effects of drugs or other treatments on these processes.
3. Animal models: These are living organisms, usually vertebrates like mice, rats, or non-human primates, that are used to study various aspects of human biology and disease. They can provide valuable insights into the pathophysiology of diseases, the mechanisms of drug action, and the safety and efficacy of new therapies.
4. Anatomical models: These are physical representations of biological structures or systems, such as plastic models of organs or tissues, that can be used for educational purposes or to plan surgical procedures. They can also serve as a basis for developing more sophisticated models, such as computer simulations or 3D-printed replicas.

Overall, biological models play a crucial role in advancing our understanding of biology and medicine, helping to identify new targets for therapeutic intervention, develop novel drugs and treatments, and improve human health.

Serotonin, also known as 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT), is a monoamine neurotransmitter that is found primarily in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract, blood platelets, and the central nervous system (CNS) of humans and other animals. It is produced by the conversion of the amino acid tryptophan to 5-hydroxytryptophan (5-HTP), and then to serotonin.

In the CNS, serotonin plays a role in regulating mood, appetite, sleep, memory, learning, and behavior, among other functions. It also acts as a vasoconstrictor, helping to regulate blood flow and blood pressure. In the GI tract, it is involved in peristalsis, the contraction and relaxation of muscles that moves food through the digestive system.

Serotonin is synthesized and stored in serotonergic neurons, which are nerve cells that use serotonin as their primary neurotransmitter. These neurons are found throughout the brain and spinal cord, and they communicate with other neurons by releasing serotonin into the synapse, the small gap between two neurons.

Abnormal levels of serotonin have been linked to a variety of disorders, including depression, anxiety, schizophrenia, and migraines. Medications that affect serotonin levels, such as selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), are commonly used to treat these conditions.

Heart failure is a pathophysiological state in which the heart is unable to pump sufficient blood to meet the metabolic demands of the body or do so only at the expense of elevated filling pressures. It can be caused by various cardiac disorders, including coronary artery disease, hypertension, valvular heart disease, cardiomyopathy, and arrhythmias. Symptoms may include shortness of breath, fatigue, and fluid retention. Heart failure is often classified based on the ejection fraction (EF), which is the percentage of blood that is pumped out of the left ventricle during each contraction. A reduced EF (less than 40%) is indicative of heart failure with reduced ejection fraction (HFrEF), while a preserved EF (greater than or equal to 50%) is indicative of heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF). There is also a category of heart failure with mid-range ejection fraction (HFmrEF) for those with an EF between 40-49%.

Echocardiography is a medical procedure that uses sound waves to produce detailed images of the heart's structure, function, and motion. It is a non-invasive test that can help diagnose various heart conditions, such as valve problems, heart muscle damage, blood clots, and congenital heart defects.

During an echocardiogram, a transducer (a device that sends and receives sound waves) is placed on the chest or passed through the esophagus to obtain images of the heart. The sound waves produced by the transducer bounce off the heart structures and return to the transducer, which then converts them into electrical signals that are processed to create images of the heart.

There are several types of echocardiograms, including:

* Transthoracic echocardiography (TTE): This is the most common type of echocardiogram and involves placing the transducer on the chest.
* Transesophageal echocardiography (TEE): This type of echocardiogram involves passing a specialized transducer through the esophagus to obtain images of the heart from a closer proximity.
* Stress echocardiography: This type of echocardiogram is performed during exercise or medication-induced stress to assess how the heart functions under stress.
* Doppler echocardiography: This type of echocardiogram uses sound waves to measure blood flow and velocity in the heart and blood vessels.

Echocardiography is a valuable tool for diagnosing and managing various heart conditions, as it provides detailed information about the structure and function of the heart. It is generally safe, non-invasive, and painless, making it a popular choice for doctors and patients alike.

Body weight is the measure of the force exerted on a scale or balance by an object's mass, most commonly expressed in units such as pounds (lb) or kilograms (kg). In the context of medical definitions, body weight typically refers to an individual's total weight, which includes their skeletal muscle, fat, organs, and bodily fluids.

Healthcare professionals often use body weight as a basic indicator of overall health status, as it can provide insights into various aspects of a person's health, such as nutritional status, metabolic function, and risk factors for certain diseases. For example, being significantly underweight or overweight can increase the risk of developing conditions like malnutrition, diabetes, heart disease, and certain types of cancer.

It is important to note that body weight alone may not provide a complete picture of an individual's health, as it does not account for factors such as muscle mass, bone density, or body composition. Therefore, healthcare professionals often use additional measures, such as body mass index (BMI), waist circumference, and blood tests, to assess overall health status more comprehensively.

Vascular resistance Pulmonary shunt The pulmonary circulation is archaically known as the "lesser circulation" which is still ... The blood vessels of the pulmonary circulation are the pulmonary arteries and the pulmonary veins. A separate circulatory ... The pulmonary circulation loop is virtually bypassed in fetal circulation. The fetal lungs are collapsed, and blood passes from ... Media related to Pulmonary circulation at Wikimedia Commons Official Journal of the Pulmonary Vascular Research Institute (CS1 ...
... ". In Peacock, Andrew J.; Naeije, Robert; Rubin, Lewis J. (eds.). Pulmonary Circulation: Diseases ... Pages containing links to subscription-only content, Pulmonary heart disease and diseases of pulmonary circulation, Vascular ... "Balloon pulmonary angioplasty for inoperable patients with chronic thromboembolic disease". Pulmonary Circulation. 8 (1): ... Balloon pulmonary hypertension". In Fukumoto, Yoshihiro (ed.). Diagnosis and Treatment of Pulmonary Hypertension: From Bench to ...
To be classified as pulmonary heart disease, the cause must originate in the pulmonary circulation system; RVH due to a ... Pulmonary heart disease and diseases of pulmonary circulation, Cardiomegaly). ... Chronic pulmonary heart disease usually results in right ventricular hypertrophy (RVH), whereas acute pulmonary heart disease ... Pulmonary Circulation. 3 (1): 5-19. doi:10.4103/2045-8932.109910. ISSN 2045-8932. PMC 3641739. PMID 23662171. Taussig, Lynn M ...
George, MP; Champion, HC; Pilewski, JM (2011). "Lung transplantation for pulmonary hypertension". Pulmonary Circulation. 1 (2 ... Pulmonary heart disease and diseases of pulmonary circulation, Hypertension, Wikipedia medicine articles ready to translate, ... pulmonary hypertension or 'pulmonary venous hypertension'). However, in some patients, the raised pressure in the pulmonary ... Pulmonary Hypertension Wikimedia Commons has media related to Pulmonary hypertension. Scholia has a topic profile for Pulmonary ...
Pulmonary Circulation. 10 (1): e19. doi:10.1371/journal.pbio.0030019. PMC 544543. PMID 32166015. Woolfe A, Goodson M, Goode DK ... January 2005). "Transcriptional profiling of lung cell populations in idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension". ...
Pulmonary Circulation (Plain English summary). National Institute for Health and Care Research. 10 (1). doi:10.3310/alert_49221 ... Pulmonary Circulation. 10 (1): e175. doi:10.1192/bjo.2021.1006. PMC 8485342. PMID 32166015. "Statewide Health Information ... Acute exacerbations of chronic respiratory diseases, mainly asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), are ... 7 March 2022). "Transcriptional profiling of lung cell populations in idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension". ...
Pulmonary Circulation. 10 (1). doi:10.1038/stemcells.2007.124. PMC 7052475. PMID 32166015. Takahashi K, Tanabe K, Ohnuki M, ... 2006). "Transcriptional profiling of lung cell populations in idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension". Pulmonary ... 2007-12-06). "Transcriptional profiling of lung cell populations in idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension". ... Circulation. 10 (1): 976. doi:10.1038/nrn2022-c1. PMC 7052475. PMID 32166015. Mathers JC (June 2006). "Nutritional modulation ...
Pulmonary Circulation. 10 (1): 392-406. doi:10.1159/000231706. PMC 7052475. PMID 32166015. Calvani M, Anania C, Caffarelli C, ... Poor blood circulation leads to a weak pulse, pale skin and fainting. A severe case of an allergic reaction, caused by symptoms ... Serious danger regarding allergies can begin when the respiratory tract or blood circulation is affected. The former can be ... Epinephrine relieves airway swelling and obstruction, and improves blood circulation; blood vessels are tightened and heart ...
Pulmonary Circulation. 10 (1). doi:10.1016/j.gendis.2022.03.002. PMC 7052475. PMID 32166015. Gombos A, Metzger-Filho O, Dal ... March 2022). "Transcriptional profiling of lung cell populations in idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension". ...
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Pulmonary Circulation. 6 (2): 211-223. doi:10.1086/686140. PMC 4869926. PMID 27252848. Dockens RC, Santone KS, Mitroka JG, ... or SSc-associated Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension (SSc-PAH) " at ClinicalTrials.gov Clinical trial number NCT03340675 for "A ...
Pulmonary Circulation. 10 (1): 432-439. doi:10.1192/apt.11.6.432. PMC 7052475. PMID 32166015. Ribeiro JA, Sebastião AM (2010 ... "Adenosine as a vasodilator in primary pulmonary hypertension". Circulation. 84 (3): 1145-1149. doi:10.1161/01.CIR.84.3.1145. ... When adenosine enters the circulation, it is broken down by adenosine deaminase, which is present in red blood cells and the ... 2005). "Transcriptional profiling of lung cell populations in idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension". ...
... blunts the development of pulmonary arterial hypertension in neonatal piglets". Pulmonary Circulation. 2 (2): 193-200. doi: ... The second group showed a 2.55-fold increase of the pulmonary vascular resistance index (PVRI) compared to the first group. The ... thromboxane A2 synthase by furegrelate reduces hypoxia induced pulmonary arterial hypertension by preserving the pulmonary ... the muscularization of small pulmonary arteries was less prominent when comparing group 3 to group 2. Lastly, group 3 showed ...
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Pulmonary Circulation. 6 (1): 15-29. doi:10.1086/685051. ISSN 2045-8932. PMC 4860554. PMID 27162612. Shopp, Jacob D.; Stewart, ... Right heart strain can be caused by pulmonary hypertension, pulmonary embolism (or PE, which itself can cause pulmonary ... Pulmonary heart disease (cor pulmonale) Right heart failure Hampton hump The apical-four-chamber (A4C) view is best to ... Walsh, Brooks M.; Moore, Christopher L. (2015-09-01). "McConnell's Sign Is Not Specific for Pulmonary Embolism: Case Report and ...
Pulmonary Circulation. 8 (3): 2045894018778155. doi:10.1177/2045894018778155. PMC 5991195. PMID 29718794. Morimoto T, Enmi JI, ... are found in patients with pulmonary hypertension and aggravate hypoxia-induced pulmonary hypertension in mice". ...
Pulmonary Circulation. San Diego: Academic Press. 10 (1): 341-349. doi:10.1016/b978-0-12-374418-0.00026-8. ISBN 978-0-12-374418 ... 2021-04-21). "Transcriptional profiling of lung cell populations in idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension". Pulmonary ... 2010-01-01). Coleman WB, Tsongalis GJ (eds.). "Transcriptional profiling of lung cell populations in idiopathic pulmonary ... Circulation. 10 (1): 1-15. doi:10.1177/2045894020908782. PMC 7052475. PMID 32166015. "cross section: human pancreas". Berkshire ...
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Pulmonary Circulation. 10 (1): 26-39. doi:10.1034/j.1601-1546.2002.10103.x. PMC 7052475. PMID 32166015. Henderson S (2011). " ... This cytotoxic effect can influence the uterine tone and interfere with circulation, which can pose detrimental effects on the ... 2002). "Transcriptional profiling of lung cell populations in idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension". ...
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Pulmonary Circulation. 10 (1): 475-496. doi:10.1007/BF01878089. PMC 7052475. PMID 32166015. S2CID 32911188. synd/2799 at Who ... These cases are associated with hypertension in the pulmonary arteries. The bone marrow in a typical case is hypercellular and ... 1879). "Transcriptional profiling of lung cell populations in idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension". ... and pulmonary hypertension". Chest. 138 (6): 1506-1510. doi:10.1378/chest.10-0973. PMID 21138888. Primary Myelofibrosis, Merck ...
Pulmonary Circulation. 10 (1): 27-30. doi:10.15605/jafes.030.01.08. PMC 7052475. PMID 32166015. Fojo T (26 December 2016). " ... 2015). "Transcriptional profiling of lung cell populations in idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension". ...
Pulmonary Circulation. 10 (1): 1-15. doi:10.1177/2045894020908782. PMC 7052475. PMID 32166015. Oh BS, Kim JS, Yu SY, Ryu SW, ... 2020-03-01). "Transcriptional profiling of lung cell populations in idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension". Pulmonary ... 2020). "Transcriptional profiling of lung cell populations in idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension". ... Circulation. 10 (1): 103838. doi:10.1016/j.jff.2020.103838. PMC 7052475. PMID 32166015. Lobach AR, Roberts A, Rowland IR ( ...
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Vascular resistance Pulmonary shunt The pulmonary circulation is archaically known as the "lesser circulation" which is still ... The blood vessels of the pulmonary circulation are the pulmonary arteries and the pulmonary veins. A separate circulatory ... The pulmonary circulation loop is virtually bypassed in fetal circulation. The fetal lungs are collapsed, and blood passes from ... Media related to Pulmonary circulation at Wikimedia Commons Official Journal of the Pulmonary Vascular Research Institute (CS1 ...
... ... will not cause a cytokine release into systemic circulation. ...
Effect of increased blood flow on the pulmonary circulation before and during high altitude acclimatization. High Alt Med Biol ... Effect of increased blood flow on the pulmonary circulation before and during high altitude acclimatization. High Alt Med Biol ... The thigh cuff release maneuver-induced increase in cardiac output suggests a preserved ability of pulmonary circulation to ... The thigh cuff release maneuver-induced increase in cardiac output suggests a preserved ability of pulmonary circulation to ...
Pulmonary circulation and pulmonary function in neonatal lung hypoplasia: treatment with corticosteroids. In: Current Pediatric ... Pulmonary circulation and pulmonary function in neonatal lung hypoplasia: treatment with corticosteroids. / Suzuki, Keiji; ... Pulmonary circulation and pulmonary function in neonatal lung hypoplasia: treatment with corticosteroids. Current Pediatric ... Suzuki, K., & Harding, R. (2007). Pulmonary circulation and pulmonary function in neonatal lung hypoplasia: treatment with ...
Why publish in Pulmonary Circulation Journal? Get your content in front of leading scientists and physicians. Articles are ... Wide dissemination of articles to leading scientists and physicians within the pulmonary circulation and pulmonary vascular ... The Benefits of Publishing in Pulmonary Circulation. *Author version articles published online within 48 hours of acceptance ... The Pulmonary Vascular Research Institute (PVRI) is a registered Charity in the United Kingdom (Charity No: 1127115) and a ...
Hiroshi Kimura, MD, PhD is working as the Professor of Medicine in the Advanced Medicine for Pulmonary Circulation and ... Professor of Medicine, Department of Advanced Medicine for Pulmonary Circulation and Respiratory Failure (Donation Course) and ... Assembly Head, Assembly of Pulmonary Circulation, the Asian Pacific Society of Respirology (APSR).. ... Kimura has been focusing on not only pathophysiology of experimental and clinical pulmonary hypertension and hypoxic stress ...
The basic linear model of the circulation process is then discussed and the p ... This paper describes the procedure for determination of the non-linearity present in the pulmonary arterial circulation process ... Non-linearity in pulmonary arterial circulation process. N G NATH, R CHANDRA, P GHOSH, P KAPUR ... This paper describes the procedure for determination of the non-linearity present in the pulmonary arterial circulation process ...
Pulmonary Circulation * Early Career Investigator Award in Pulmonary Vascular Disease * Officers and Committees ... Pulmonary Function Testing (PFT). Calendar of Events. Ethics & COI. Job Board. APCCSD. ... The American Thoracic Society improves global health by advancing research, patient care, and public health in pulmonary ...
PULMONARY CIRCULATION IN ALPHA1 ANTITRYPSIN DEFICIENCY. Anesthesiology 1971; 34:587-588 doi: https://doi.org/10.1097/00000542- ... Practice Guidelines for Preoperative Fasting and the Use of Pharmacologic Agents to Reduce the Risk of Pulmonary Aspiration: ... Cysteinyl Leukotrienes Impair Hypoxic Pulmonary Vasoconstriction in Endotoxemic Mice Anesthesiology (October 2011) ... of Anesthesiologists Task Force on Preoperative Fasting and the Use of Pharmacologic Agents to Reduce the Risk of Pulmonary ...
Pulmonary blood circulation, Pulmonary hypertension, Simulator, Statistical inference",. author = "Umberto No{\`e} and Weiwei ... T1 - Inference in a partial differential equations model of pulmonary arterial and venous blood circulation using statistical ... Inference in a partial differential equations model of pulmonary arterial and venous blood circulation using statistical ... Inference in a partial differential equations model of pulmonary arterial and venous blood circulation using statistical ...
Original Articles: Pulmonary Circulation/ARDS. *. You have accessRestricted access. Expression of matrix metalloproteinases in ... Gelatinase expression in pulmonary arteries during experimental pulmonary hypertension E. Frisdal, V. Gest, A. Vieillard-Baron ... Pulmonary toxicity with mefloquine E. Udry, F. Bailly, M. Dusmet, P. Schnyder, R. Lemoine, J.W. Fitting ... Role of T- and B-;lymphocytes in pulmonary host defences B.B. Moore, T.A. Moore, G.B. Toews ...
Pulmonary stenosis: echocardiography. Circulation. 1993 Feb. 87(2 Suppl):I73-9. [QxMD MEDLINE Link]. ... Bacterial endocarditis in patients with aortic stenosis, pulmonary stenosis, or ventricular septal defect. Circulation. 1993 ... Massive dilatation of the pulmonary artery in association with pulmonic stenosis and pulmonary hypertension. Pulm Circ. 2012 ... The pulmonary annulus and the right ventricular outflow tract (RVOT) may be narrowed as well. While uncommon, it is the typical ...
Behavior of stimulated leukocytes in the pulmonary micro circulation of perfused rat lungs. Advances in experimental medicine ... Behavior of stimulated leukocytes in the pulmonary micro circulation of perfused rat lungs. In: Advances in experimental ... Behavior of stimulated leukocytes in the pulmonary micro circulation of perfused rat lungs. / Aoki, Takuya; Suzuki, Yukio; ... title = "Behavior of stimulated leukocytes in the pulmonary micro circulation of perfused rat lungs", ...
An Overview of Pulmonary and Systemic Circulation. In this animated and interactive object, learners examine how blood flows ...
Doppler Ultrasonography of the Human Fetal Pulmonary Circulation Technologie & Medisch €27,00. ...
Pulmonary angiography is a test to see how blood flows through the lung. ... Pulmonary circulation and pulmonary thromboembolism. In: Adam A, Dixon AK, Gillard JH, Schaefer-Prokop CM, eds. Grainger & ... The test is most often used to detect blood clots (pulmonary embolism) and other blockages in the blood flow in the lung. Most ... Pulmonary angiography is a test to see how blood flows through the lung. ...
In pulmonary circulation:. *The pulmonary artery is a big artery that comes from the heart. It splits into two main branches, ... Once the blood is back in the heart, it needs to re-enter the pulmonary circulation and go back to the lungs to drop off the ... The pulmonary circulation is a short loop from the heart to the lungs and back again. ... During this time, the aortic and pulmonary valves are open to allow blood into the aorta and pulmonary artery. When the ...
THE PULMONARY CIRCULATION Br Med J 1955; 1 :1515 (Published 25 June 1955) ...
In pulmonary circulation:. *The pulmonary artery is a big artery that comes from the heart. It splits into two main branches, ... Once the blood is back in the heart, it needs to re-enter the pulmonary circulation and go back to the lungs to drop off the ... The pulmonary circulation is a short loop from the heart to the lungs and back again. ... During this time, the aortic and pulmonary valves are open to allow blood into the aorta and pulmonary artery. When the ...
Pulmonary Complications in Patients With Fontan Circulation: JACC Review Topic of the Week. Journal of the American College of ... Pulmonary Complications in Patients With Fontan Circulation: JACC Review Topic of the Week. / Abdulkarim, Ali; Shaji, Shawn; ... Pulmonary Complications in Patients With Fontan Circulation : JACC Review Topic of the Week. In: Journal of the American ... Dive into the research topics of Pulmonary Complications in Patients With Fontan Circulation: JACC Review Topic of the Week. ...
Pulmonary Artery / diagnostic imaging* * Pulmonary Circulation * Pulmonary Embolism / diagnostic imaging* * Pulmonary Embolism ... Qualitative and quantitative DECT pulmonary angiography in COVID-19 pneumonia and pulmonary embolism Clin Radiol. 2021 May;76(5 ... pulmonary angiography (DECT-PA) in patients with COVID-19 pneumonia with and without pulmonary embolism (PE). ... QPS were significantly lower in patients with low SpO2 (p=0.003), intubation (p=0.006), and pulmonary arterial filling defects ...
... the pulmonary circulation and the systemic circulation. Vessels involved in the pulmonary circulation transport blood between ... The main vessels are the pulmonary arteries and the pulmonary veins. The two pulmonary arteries branch off from the pulmonary ... THE PULMONARY AND SYSTEMIC CIRCULATIONS. There are two main circulation circuits or routes in the body: ... Hepatic portal circulation. Another unique circulation route is the hepatic portal circulation, a subdivision of the systemic ...
This is called the pulmonary circulation.. *From your pulmonic valve, blood travels to the pulmonary artery to tiny capillary ... Pulmonic valve (also called pulmonary valve) between the right ventricle and pulmonary artery ... Note that oxygen-poor or CO2-containing blood goes through the pulmonary artery to the lungs where CO2 is exchanged for O2. ... The pulmonary vein empties oxygen-rich blood from the lungs into the left atrium of the heart. ...
Pulmonary Circulation, 12(4), e12144. (doi: 10.1002/pul2.12144) Morrow, A. J. et al. (2022) A multisystem, cardio-renal ... Pulmonary Circulation, 12(4), e12144. (doi: 10.1002/pul2.12144) Morrow, A. J. et al. (2022) A multisystem, cardio-renal ... Pulmonary Circulation, 10(2), (doi: 10.1177/2045894020922810) 2015. Menni, C. et al. (2015) Metabolomic identification of a ... 2020) Apoptosis signal-regulating kinase 1 inhibition in in vivo and in vitro models of pulmonary hypertension. Pulmonary ...
Protein kinase G is not essential to NO-cGMP modulation of basal tone in rat pulmonary circulation. In: American Journal of ... Protein kinase G is not essential to NO-cGMP modulation of basal tone in rat pulmonary circulation. American Journal of ... Protein kinase G is not essential to NO-cGMP modulation of basal tone in rat pulmonary circulation. / Fouty, Brian; Komalavilas ... title = "Protein kinase G is not essential to NO-cGMP modulation of basal tone in rat pulmonary circulation", ...
The correct answer is "Systemic." Systemic circulation refers to the circulation of blood throughout the body, delivering ... There are two main types of circulation - pulmonary and.... *. A. Atriatic. *. B. ... This type of circulation is essential for maintaining the overall functioning of the bodys organs and systems. ...
Second, they can form elsewhere in circulation, then become detached from their site of origin, get swept along through the ...
Pulmonary circulation during exercise. In: Weir EK, Reeves JT, eds. Pulmonary Vascular Physiology and Physiopathology. New York ... 8Pulmonary Circulation Unit, Pulmonary Division, Heart Institute (InCor), Hospital das Clinicas da Faculdade de Medicina da ... Pulmonary arterial hypertension in patients treated by dasatinib. Circulation 2012; 125: 2128-2137. ... Chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension (CTEPH): results from an international prospective registry. Circulation 2011; ...
Pulmonary Circulation 2022; 12(1) doi: 10.1002/pul2.12008 3. Arjun Agarwal, Durvesh Bhangale, Vinayak M. Sawardekar, Srikar ... Type II Abernethy malformation in an adult male patient-a rare and reversible cause of pulmonary hypertension: a case report ... Case report: Congenital extrahepatic portocaval shunt presenting as pulmonary arterial hypertension in a pregnant patient. ... Surgical shunt ligation for a congenital extrahepatic portosystemic shunt with pulmonary hypertension: A case report. ...
  • A number of medical conditions may affect the pulmonary circulation: Pulmonary hypertension describes an increase in resistance in the pulmonary arteries. (wikipedia.org)
  • Dr. Kimura has been focusing on not only pathophysiology of experimental and clinical pulmonary hypertension and hypoxic stress especially during exercise and sleep but also systemic effects of COPD and respiratory rehabilitation in various respiratory diseases. (advmedpc-nms.com)
  • Since the 1st World Symposium on Pulmonary Hypertension (WSPH) in 1973, pulmonary hypertension (PH) has been arbitrarily defined as mean pulmonary arterial pressure (mPAP) ≥25 mmHg at rest, measured by right heart catheterisation. (ersjournals.com)
  • Regarding clinical classification, the main Task Force changes were the inclusion in group 1 of a subgroup "pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) long-term responders to calcium channel blockers", due to the specific prognostic and management of these patients, and a subgroup "PAH with overt features of venous/capillaries (pulmonary veno-occlusive disease/pulmonary capillary haemangiomatosis) involvement", due to evidence suggesting a continuum between arterial, capillary and vein involvement in PAH. (ersjournals.com)
  • The main objectives of our Task Force were to reassess haemodynamic definitions and the clinical classification of pulmonary hypertension (PH). (ersjournals.com)
  • Since the 1st World Symposium on Pulmonary Hypertension (WSPH) organised by the WHO in Geneva in 1973, PH has been defined as mPAP ≥25 mmHg measured by right heart catheterisation (RHC) in the supine position at rest [ 2 ]. (ersjournals.com)
  • Here we report application of human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cell (HUCMSC)-derived therapy for pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). (nature.com)
  • Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a life-threatening disease characterized by vasoconstriction and remodeling of the pulmonary vessels. (lu.se)
  • The medical treatment of Eisenmenger syndrome is directed toward the improvement of symptoms related to heart failure and pulmonary hypertension and the prevention and management of complications related to cyanotic congenital heart disease. (medscape.com)
  • It is indicated for pulmonary arterial hypertension (WHO Class I) in patients with NYHA Class III or IV symptoms to improve exercise tolerance and symptoms and to delay deterioration. (medscape.com)
  • Bosentan is an endothelin receptor antagonist indicated for the treatment of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) in patients with WHO class III or IV symptoms. (medscape.com)
  • Value of Echocardiography in Pulmonary Hypertension Could echocardiography have a role in the diagnosis and prognosis of pulmonary hypertension? (medscape.com)
  • Decoding the Link Between Inflammation and PAH A new study identifies Regnase-1 as a central regulator of inflammation in pulmonary arterial hypertension. (medscape.com)
  • There is new advice on how to distinguish, in the CT scan, fresh thrombi in the lungs from chronic obstructions due to a disease called chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension (CTEPH), which requires a different type of therapy. (escardio.org)
  • Idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension (IPAH) is a rare disease characterized by elevated pulmonary artery pressure with no apparent cause. (medscape.com)
  • IPAH is also termed WHO Group I pulmonary hypertension (PH), precapillary pulmonary hypertension, and, previously, primary pulmonary hypertension. (medscape.com)
  • In approximately a third of patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH), Doppler echocardiography demonstrates right-to-left shunting across a patent foramen ovale. (medscape.com)
  • Chest radiography: A chest radiograph may help identify secondary causes of, or contributors to, pulmonary hypertension. (medscape.com)
  • Equally important, the echocardiogram helps to exclude secondary causes of, or contributors to, pulmonary hypertension, such as left-sided heart disease (eg, left ventricular dysfunction, valvular heart disease). (medscape.com)
  • Nuclear lung ventilation/perfusion scanning: This is performed to exclude chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension (Group IV PH). (medscape.com)
  • These conditions result in increased lung pressure, called pulmonary hypertension, and cause a major reduction in the quality of life and life expectancy of people who suffer from them. (icm-mhi.org)
  • We are studying the diseases that cause pulmonary hypertension to elucidate their mechanisms and find treatments. (icm-mhi.org)
  • We are also developing innovative approaches with molecular imaging to detect pulmonary hypertension at an earlier stage. (icm-mhi.org)
  • The team members in our laboratory also have expertise in various pre-clinical models of pulmonary hypertension (heart failure, hypoxia, monocrotaline, sugen/hypoxia) and use hemodynamic, molecular biology and histological methods along with cell cultures, isolated pulmonary arteries, isolated lungs and nuclear medicine. (icm-mhi.org)
  • Our product candidate for the imaging of pulmonary circulation, called PulmoBind, was developed completely at the Montreal Heart Institute and will soon be evaluated in a Phase III study in subjects with pulmonary hypertension. (icm-mhi.org)
  • PulmoBind may provide an earlier and more accurate diagnosis of pulmonary hypertension and help doctors treat this disease. (icm-mhi.org)
  • Phase I and phase II studies with PulmoBind have been sucessfully completed, and show the product's safety and its unique potential in the diagnosis and follow-up of subjects with pulmonary hypertension. (icm-mhi.org)
  • Study to elucidate the modifications of endothelial cell calcium homeostasis in pulmonary hypertension associated with left-sided heart failure. (icm-mhi.org)
  • In this study, we are using a mouse model that we developed in which pulmonary hypertension is secondary to myocardial infarction induced by ligature of the interventricular coronary artery. (icm-mhi.org)
  • Pulmonary hypertension is associated with major structural remodelling that contributes to shortness of breath in subjects with this condition. (icm-mhi.org)
  • We are currently evaluating the effect of new therapeutic classes on pulmonary hypertension and heart failure-related pulmonary remodeling. (icm-mhi.org)
  • Here you will find medical specialists in the field Pulmonary hypertension. (leading-medicine-guide.com)
  • The fundamental physiological disturbance in pulmonary hypertension is an increase in right ventricular (RV) afterload, regardless of disease aetiology. (bmj.com)
  • Pulmonary hypertension is increased pressure in the pulmonary circulation. (msdmanuals.com)
  • Severe pulmonary hypertension leads to right ventricular overload and failure. (msdmanuals.com)
  • Many conditions and drugs cause pulmonary hypertension. (msdmanuals.com)
  • In the first group (pulmonary arterial hypertension [PAH]), the primary disorder affects the small pulmonary arterioles. (msdmanuals.com)
  • Pulmonary embolism is occlusion or partial occlusion of the pulmonary artery or its branches by an embolus, usually from the embolization of a blood clot from deep vein thrombosis. (wikipedia.org)
  • The test is most often used to detect blood clots ( pulmonary embolism ) and other blockages in the blood flow in the lung. (medlineplus.gov)
  • To assess differences in qualitative and quantitative parameters of pulmonary perfusion from dual-energy computed tomography (CT) pulmonary angiography (DECT-PA) in patients with COVID-19 pneumonia with and without pulmonary embolism (PE). (nih.gov)
  • The European Society of Cardiology (ESC) Guidelines on acute pulmonary embolism are published online today in European Heart Journal (1), and on the ESC website. (escardio.org)
  • Acute pulmonary embolism is the third most common cause of cardiovascular death in Europe, after heart attack and stroke, contributing to more than 350,000 deaths each year. (escardio.org)
  • Major surgery such as knee or hip replacement, serious injury, prolonged bed rest and cancer are common risk factors for acute pulmonary embolism. (escardio.org)
  • The guidelines clarify how to diagnose acute pulmonary embolism step by step. (escardio.org)
  • A new table shows how CT scans and lung scans compare in their ability to diagnose or exclude pulmonary embolism, and how much radiation the patient receives with each of these tests. (escardio.org)
  • The guidelines recommend how to judge the severity of pulmonary embolism based on a combination of clinical, imaging and laboratory results. (escardio.org)
  • Also new is the guidance on which drugs to use in a patient with pulmonary embolism and cancer. (escardio.org)
  • Acute pulmonary embolism is a leading cause of maternal death in high-income countries, but diagnosis can be challenging because symptoms often overlap with those of normal pregnancy. (escardio.org)
  • Novel recommendations outline how to diagnose and treat pulmonary embolism in the pregnant patient. (escardio.org)
  • Last but not least, the 2019 ESC Guidelines endorse a multidisciplinary approach to pulmonary embolism after the acute phase and discharge of the patient. (escardio.org)
  • Arixtra is approved in the United States (U.S.) for the prevention of venous thromboembolism (VTE), which includes deep vein thrombosis (DVT) and pulmonary embolism (PE), in patients undergoing surgery for hip fracture (including extended prophylaxis), knee replacement, hip replacement, and in abdominal surgery patients who are at risk for thromboembolic complications. (webwire.com)
  • Pulmonary Embolism (PE) Pulmonary embolism (PE) is the occlusion of pulmonary arteries by thrombi that originate elsewhere, typically in the large veins of the legs or pelvis. (msdmanuals.com)
  • Risk factors for pulmonary embolism are. (msdmanuals.com)
  • However, this abnormal elevation of mPAP is not sufficient to define pulmonary vascular disease as it can be due to an increase in cardiac output or pulmonary arterial wedge pressure. (ersjournals.com)
  • The pathobiology of pulmonary vascular disease (PVD) and PAH is complex, multifactorial and driven by inflammation and metabolic dysfunction 1 . (nature.com)
  • The present article addresses the problem of inference in a multiscale computational model of pulmonary arterial and venous blood circulation. (ed.ac.uk)
  • Cyanosis post-Fontan procedure can be attributed to multiple causes including systemic to pulmonary venous collateral channels and pulmonary arteriovenous malformations. (aku.edu)
  • Introduction and Methods: Acute exposure to high altitude increases pulmonary artery pressure (Ppa) and pulmonary vascular resistance (PVR). (uzh.ch)
  • 4 PAP, pulmonary artery pressure. (bmj.com)
  • Diagnosis is made by finding elevated pulmonary artery pressure (estimated by echocardiography and confirmed by right heart catheterization). (msdmanuals.com)
  • The pulmonary arteries carry deoxygenated blood to the lungs, where carbon dioxide is released and oxygen is picked up during respiration. (wikipedia.org)
  • Oxygenated blood leaves the lungs through pulmonary veins, which return it to the left part of the heart, completing the pulmonary cycle. (wikipedia.org)
  • From the right ventricle, blood is pumped through the semilunar pulmonary valve into the left and right main pulmonary artery (one for each lung), which branch into smaller pulmonary arteries that spread throughout the lungs. (wikipedia.org)
  • The fetal lungs are collapsed, and blood passes from the right atrium directly into the left atrium through the foramen ovale (an open conduit between the paired atria) or through the ductus arteriosus (a shunt between the pulmonary artery and the aorta). (wikipedia.org)
  • When the lungs expand at birth, the pulmonary pressure drops and blood is drawn from the right atrium into the right ventricle and through the pulmonary circuit. (wikipedia.org)
  • The catheter is placed through the vein and carefully moved up into and through the right-sided heart chambers and into the pulmonary artery, which leads to the lungs. (medlineplus.gov)
  • The pulmonic valve is between the right ventricle and the pulmonary artery, which carries blood to the lungs. (kidshealth.org)
  • The pulmonary circulation is a short loop from the heart to the lungs and back again. (kidshealth.org)
  • Once the blood is back in the heart, it needs to re-enter the pulmonary circulation and go back to the lungs to drop off the carbon dioxide and pick up more oxygen. (kidshealth.org)
  • In isolated normotensive lungs, ODQ-mediated inhibition of soluble guanylyl cyclase augmented hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction, whereas the PKG inhibitors had no effect. (johnshopkins.edu)
  • The circulation to and from the lungs is known as the 'Pulmonary circulation' and that around the body is the systemic circulation. (markedbyteachers.com)
  • In the pulmonary circulation, the pulmonary artery carrying deoxygenated blood leaves the right ventricle to go to the lungs and enters the left atrium. (markedbyteachers.com)
  • This blood is pumped down to the right ventricle via the tricuspid valve and eventually through the pulmonic valve, leading to the pulmonary trunk that takes the oxygen deprived blood to the lungs for gas exchange. (medscape.com)
  • The blood vessels of the pulmonary circulation are the pulmonary arteries and the pulmonary veins. (wikipedia.org)
  • the blood has been forced into the arteries by the ventricular muscle contractions it must not be allowed to fall back into the ventricular when they relax which are named pulmonary and aortic valves. (markedbyteachers.com)
  • In 1961, a report of the World Health Organization (WHO) Expert Committee on Chronic Cor Pulmonale mentioned clearly that the mean pulmonary arterial pressure (mPAP) does not normally exceed 15 mmHg when the subject is at rest in a lying position, and that the value was little affected by age and never exceeded 20 mmHg [ 1 ]. (ersjournals.com)
  • It can cause difficulty breathing or chest pain, is usually diagnosed through a CT pulmonary angiography or V/Q scan, and is often treated with anticoagulants such as heparin and warfarin. (wikipedia.org)
  • Pulmonary angiography is a test to see how blood flows through the lung. (medlineplus.gov)
  • Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis Epidemiology and Comorbidities Understanding the epidemiology of IPF and its comorbidities could lead to better management and improved outcomes for these patients. (medscape.com)
  • Prolonged exposure can lead to chronic inflammatory lung diseases such as asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disorder, idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis, and bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome. (lu.se)
  • The pulmonary veins return oxygenated blood to the left atrium of the heart. (wikipedia.org)
  • The blood then returns to the heart through the pulmonary veins. (kidshealth.org)
  • Once gas exchange occurs in the lung tissue, the oxygen-laden blood is carried to the left atrium via the pulmonary veins, hence completing the pulmonary circuit (see the image above). (medscape.com)
  • In the pulmonary circulation, distal vessels may contribute more to total compliance compared with the systemic circulation. (bmj.com)
  • Pulmonic stenosis refers to increased resistance to pulmonary blood flow caused by narrowing within the right ventricular outflow tract, pulmonic valve, or pulmonary artery. (logicalimages.com)
  • Using an ovine model of bilateral LH we have studied pulmonary vascular development and blood flow in relation to ventilatory performance and lung mechanics. (monash.edu)
  • Several figures such as Hippocrates and al-Nafis receive credit for accurately predicting or developing specific elements of the modern model of pulmonary circulation: Hippocrates for being the first to describe pulmonary circulation as a discrete system separable from systemic circulation as a whole and al-Nafis for making great strides over the understanding of those before him and towards a rigorous model. (wikipedia.org)
  • In addition, the pulmonary and the aorta also have exits that are protected by valves called semi-lunar valves. (markedbyteachers.com)
  • Furthermore, the pulmonary circulation is highly pulsatile and it is estimated that the pulsatile component of the pulmonary arterial load accounts for 25% of RV power, as compared with 10% in a systemic left ventricle-aorta coupled system. (bmj.com)
  • The pulmonary annulus and the right ventricular outflow tract (RVOT) may be narrowed as well. (medscape.com)
  • Understanding the cardiopulmonary interactions along with improved recognition and treatment of pulmonary abnormalities may improve the long-term outcomes in this growing patient population. (aku.edu)
  • A separate circulatory circuit known as the bronchial circulation supplies oxygenated blood to the tissue of the larger airways of the lung. (wikipedia.org)
  • The authors hypothesized that, in patients without previous lung injury, a conventional potentially injurious ventilatory strategy with high V(T) and zero end-expiratory pressure (ZEEP) will not cause a cytokine release into systemic circulation. (nih.gov)
  • Although the effects of LH on the structure of lung parenchyma have been well defined in a number of species, little is known about its structural or functional effects on the pulmonary vasculature. (monash.edu)
  • In neonatal sheep with LH, lung compliance is not affected by a single dose of antenatal corticosteroids but pulmonary vascular resistance is significantly reduced, and mRNA expressions of PDGF and PECAM-1 normalised. (monash.edu)
  • Suzuki, K & Harding, R 2007, ' Pulmonary circulation and pulmonary function in neonatal lung hypoplasia: treatment with corticosteroids ', Current Pediatric Reviews , vol. 3, no. 4, pp. 264 - 276. (monash.edu)
  • Developments In Lung Disease in Pediatric Rheumatic Disease These findings provide new insights into our understanding of pulmonary complications of rheumatic disease in children. (medscape.com)
  • A large study called the Second Natural History Study of Congenital Heart Defects analyzed the treatment, quality of life, echocardiography findings, complications, exercise responses, and predisposition to endocarditis with regards to cardiac valvular disease, and pulmonary stenosis was found to be the most benign valvular lesion. (medscape.com)
  • LH greatly increases pulmonary vascular resistance and is associated with evidence of impaired development of the pulmonary vasculature, and decreased mRNA levels of vascular growth factors such as PDGF and PECAM-1. (monash.edu)
  • The objective of my research is to contribute to an increased understanding of the mechanisms behind inflammatory pulmonary diseases. (lu.se)
  • Pulmonary arterial compliance: a physiological variable still searching for clinical relevance? (bmj.com)
  • Pulmonary artery catheterization and bilateral thigh cuff release maneuver were performed at SL and HA3 to study the properties of pulmonary circulation after 3 weeks of acclimatization. (uzh.ch)
  • Catheterization is also performed to determine pulmonary vasoreactivity, which can be prognostic and figures in the initiation and titration of high-dose calcium channel blocker (CCB) therapy. (medscape.com)
  • QPS were significantly lower in patients with low SpO 2 (p=0.003), intubation (p=0.006), and pulmonary arterial filling defects (p=0.007). (nih.gov)
  • The thigh cuff release maneuver-induced increase in cardiac output suggests a preserved ability of pulmonary circulation to cope with sudden remarkable increase in pulmonary blood flow throughout acclimatization. (uzh.ch)
  • PAH is characterized by progressive, obliterative remodeling of pulmonary arterioles, pre-capillary vessel loss, right heart failure and death. (nature.com)
  • These studies suggest that whereas NO-mediated modulation of vascular tone in the normotensive and hypertensive pulmonary circulation is dependent on cGMP formation, activation of PKG may not be essential. (johnshopkins.edu)
  • The other division of the circulatory system is the systemic circulation that begins with receiving the oxygenated blood from the pulmonary circulation into the left atrium. (wikipedia.org)
  • From the atrium the oxygenated blood enters the left ventricle where it is pumped out to the rest of the body, returning as deoxygenated blood back to the pulmonary circulation. (wikipedia.org)
  • De-oxygenated blood leaves through the right ventricle through the pulmonary artery. (wikipedia.org)
  • Blood is then pumped from the right ventricle through the pulmonary valve and into the pulmonary artery. (wikipedia.org)
  • The blood is then distributed to the body through the systemic circulation before returning again to the pulmonary circulation. (wikipedia.org)
  • LH is a graded condition which, if severe, is life threatening due to impairment of ventilation, pulmonary blood flow and gas exchange. (monash.edu)
  • The systemic circulation carries blood from the heart to all the other parts of the body and back again. (kidshealth.org)
  • Systemic circulation refers to the circulation of blood throughout the body, delivering oxygen and nutrients to the tissues and removing waste products. (proprofs.com)
  • Second, they can form elsewhere in circulation, then become detached from their site of origin, get swept along through the blood and stuck in a thinner blood vessel at the site of injury. (khanacademy.org)
  • Animation showing the normal heart anatomy and blood pumping through pulmonary and systemic circulation. (childrensdayton.org)
  • Pulmonary circulation represents a vast surface for gas exchange to allow blood to become oxygenated and many circulating substances to be metabolized. (icm-mhi.org)
  • It functions as a pump supplying blood to the body and accepting it in return for transmission to the pulmonary circuit for gas exchange. (medscape.com)
  • These drugs can be effective in reversing reactive pulmonary vasoconstriction and can, therefore, lower pulmonary vascular resistance, decrease afterload, reduce the right ventricle, and reduce right-to-left shunting. (medscape.com)
  • Coronary circulation is the circulation to the heart organ itself. (medscape.com)
  • Vascular resistance Pulmonary shunt The pulmonary circulation is archaically known as the "lesser circulation" which is still used in non-English literature. (wikipedia.org)
  • The American Thoracic Society improves global health by advancing research, patient care, and public health in pulmonary disease, critical illness, and sleep disorders. (thoracic.org)
  • It will also yield data for national estimates of the distribution of pulmonary function, and prevalence of impaired function and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) in a representative sample. (cdc.gov)
  • Finally, NHANES III data will allow observation of trends and changes in COPD disease and impaired pulmonary function over time. (cdc.gov)
  • The Pulmonary Vascular Research Institute (PVRI) is a registered Charity in the United Kingdom (Charity No: 1127115) and a private limited company by guarantee. (pvrinstitute.org)
  • Two thoracic radiologists determined CT severity scores based on type and extent of pulmonary opacities, assessed presence of PE, and pulmonary parenchymal perfusion on MDI images. (nih.gov)
  • Pulmonary complications are common and may contribute to both circulatory and pulmonary insufficiency, leading ultimately to Fontan failure. (aku.edu)
  • Nitric oxide (NO) is important in modulating increased pulmonary vascular, tone. (johnshopkins.edu)
  • The pulmonary circulation is a division of the circulatory system in all vertebrates. (wikipedia.org)