A course or method of action selected, usually by a government, from among alternatives to guide and determine present and future decisions.
Decisions, usually developed by government policymakers, for determining present and future objectives pertaining to the health care system.
The decision process by which individuals, groups or institutions establish policies pertaining to plans, programs or procedures.
Activities concerned with governmental policies, functions, etc.
A course or method of action selected, usually by an organization, institution, university, society, etc., from among alternatives to guide and determine present and future decisions and positions on matters of public interest or social concern. It does not include internal policy relating to organization and administration within the corporate body, for which ORGANIZATION AND ADMINISTRATION is available.
A course or method of action selected to guide and determine present and future decisions.
Branch of medicine concerned with the prevention and control of disease and disability, and the promotion of physical and mental health of the population on the international, national, state, or municipal level.
The moral obligations governing the conduct of commercial or industrial enterprises.
The term "United States" in a medical context often refers to the country where a patient or study participant resides, and is not a medical term per se, but relevant for epidemiological studies, healthcare policies, and understanding differences in disease prevalence, treatment patterns, and health outcomes across various geographic locations.
The complex of political institutions, laws, and customs through which the function of governing is carried out in a specific political unit.
Governmental levies on property, inheritance, gifts, etc.
A process whereby representatives of a particular interest group attempt to influence governmental decision makers to accept the policy desires of the lobbying organization.
The promotion and support of consumers' rights and interests.
The level of governmental organization and function at the national or country-wide level.
Exercise of governmental authority to control conduct.
The rights of the individual to cultural, social, economic, and educational opportunities as provided by society, e.g., right to work, right to education, and right to social security.
A course of action or principle adopted or proposed by a government, party, business, or individual that concerns human interactions with nature and natural resources.
Encouraging consumer behaviors most likely to optimize health potentials (physical and psychosocial) through health information, preventive programs, and access to medical care.
Areawide planning for health care institutions on the basis of projected consumer need.
The application of a concept to that which it is not literally the same but which suggests a resemblance and comparison. Medical metaphors were widespread in ancient literature; the description of a sick body was often used by ancient writers to define a critical condition of the State, in which one corrupt part can ruin the entire system. (From Med Secoli Arte Sci, 1990;2(3):abstract 331)
The level of governmental organization and function below that of the national or country-wide government.
The obligations and accountability assumed in carrying out actions or ideas on behalf of others.
The effort of two or more parties to secure the business of a third party by offering, usually under fair or equitable rules of business practice, the most favorable terms.
Clusters of topics that fall within the domain of BIOETHICS, the field of study concerned with value questions that arise in biomedicine and health care delivery.
The attitude of a significant portion of a population toward any given proposition, based upon a measurable amount of factual evidence, and involving some degree of reflection, analysis, and reasoning.
Organized institutions which provide services to ameliorate conditions of need or social pathology in the community.
A social science dealing with group relationships, patterns of collective behavior, and social organization.
Organizations which are not operated for a profit and may be supported by endowments or private contributions.
I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Brazil" is not a medical term or concept, it is a country located in South America, known officially as the Federative Republic of Brazil. If you have any questions related to health, medicine, or science, I'd be happy to help answer those!
Promotion and protection of the rights of patients, frequently through a legal process.
The interchange of goods or commodities, especially on a large scale, between different countries or between populations within the same country. It includes trade (the buying, selling, or exchanging of commodities, whether wholesale or retail) and business (the purchase and sale of goods to make a profit). (From Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed, p411, p2005 & p283)
Laws and regulations, pertaining to the field of medicine, proposed for enactment or enacted by a legislative body.
Federal, state, or local government organized methods of financial assistance.
Legal guarantee protecting the individual from attack on personal liberties, right to fair trial, right to vote, and freedom from discrimination on the basis of race, color, religion, sex, age, disability, or national origin. (from http://www.usccr.gov/ accessed 1/31/2003)
The principles of professional conduct concerning the rights and duties of the physician, relations with patients and fellow practitioners, as well as actions of the physician in patient care and interpersonal relations with patient families.
The aggregate business enterprise of agriculture, manufacture, and distribution related to tobacco and tobacco-derived products.
Community or individual involvement in the decision-making process.
Fundamental claims of patients, as expressed in statutes, declarations, or generally accepted moral principles. (Bioethics Thesaurus) The term is used for discussions of patient rights as a group of many rights, as in a hospital's posting of a list of patient rights.
Critical and exhaustive investigation or experimentation, having for its aim the discovery of new facts and their correct interpretation, the revision of accepted conclusions, theories, or laws in the light of newly discovered facts, or the practical application of such new or revised conclusions, theories, or laws. (Webster, 3d ed)
Situations affecting a significant number of people, that are believed to be sources of difficulty or threaten the stability of the community, and that require programs of amelioration.
Innovation and improvement of the health care system by reappraisal, amendment of services, and removal of faults and abuses in providing and distributing health services to patients. It includes a re-alignment of health services and health insurance to maximum demographic elements (the unemployed, indigent, uninsured, elderly, inner cities, rural areas) with reference to coverage, hospitalization, pricing and cost containment, insurers' and employers' costs, pre-existing medical conditions, prescribed drugs, equipment, and services.
Administrative units of government responsible for policy making and management of governmental activities.
Programs and activities sponsored or administered by local, state, or national governments.
The composition of a committee; the state or status of being a member of a committee.
The science of controlling or modifying those conditions, influences, or forces surrounding man which relate to promoting, establishing, and maintaining health.
A mode of communication concerned with inducing or urging the adoption of certain beliefs, theories, or lines of action by others.
A situation in which an individual might benefit personally from official or professional actions. It includes a conflict between a person's private interests and official responsibilities in a position of trust. The term is not restricted to government officials. The concept refers both to actual conflict of interest and the appearance or perception of conflict.
The concept concerned with all aspects of providing and distributing health services to a patient population.
Time period from 1901 through 2000 of the common era.
The degree to which individuals are inhibited or facilitated in their ability to gain entry to and to receive care and services from the health care system. Factors influencing this ability include geographic, architectural, transportational, and financial considerations, among others.
Federal program, created by Public Law 89-97, Title XIX, a 1965 amendment to the Social Security Act, administered by the states, that provides health care benefits to indigent and medically indigent persons.
Programs in which participation is not required.
Private, not-for-profit hospitals that are autonomous, self-established, and self-supported.
A situation in which the level of living of an individual, family, or group is below the standard of the community. It is often related to a specific income level.
The act or practice of calling public attention to a product, service, need, etc., especially by paid announcements in newspapers, magazines, on radio, or on television. (Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed)
Guidelines and objectives pertaining to food supply and nutrition including recommendations for healthy diet.
Social and economic factors that characterize the individual or group within the social structure.
Decisions for determining and guiding present and future objectives from among alternatives.
Detailed financial plans for carrying out specific activities for a certain period of time. They include proposed income and expenditures.
Insurance providing coverage of medical, surgical, or hospital care in general or for which there is no specific heading.
Instruments or technological means of communication that reach large numbers of people with a common message: press, radio, television, etc.
Components of a national health care system which administer specific services, e.g., national health insurance.
Planning that has the goals of improving health, improving accessibility to health services, and promoting efficiency in the provision of services and resources on a comprehensive basis for a whole community. (From Facts on File Dictionary of Health Care Management, 1988, p299)
The largest country in North America, comprising 10 provinces and three territories. Its capital is Ottawa.
The concept pertaining to the health status of inhabitants of the world.
Programs in which participation is required.
Prohibition against tobacco smoking in specific areas to control TOBACCO SMOKE POLLUTION.
The study of natural phenomena by observation, measurement, and experimentation.
An approach of practicing medicine with the goal to improve and evaluate patient care. It requires the judicious integration of best research evidence with the patient's values to make decisions about medical care. This method is to help physicians make proper diagnosis, devise best testing plan, choose best treatment and methods of disease prevention, as well as develop guidelines for large groups of patients with the same disease. (from JAMA 296 (9), 2006)
A course or method of action selected, usually by a government, to guide and determine present and future decisions on population control by limiting the number of children or controlling fertility, notably through family planning and contraception within the nuclear family.
Systematic gathering of data for a particular purpose from various sources, including questionnaires, interviews, observation, existing records, and electronic devices. The process is usually preliminary to statistical analysis of the data.
Hospitals owned and operated by a corporation or an individual that operate on a for-profit basis, also referred to as investor-owned hospitals.
The area of a nation's economy that is tax-supported and under government control.
The privacy of information and its protection against unauthorized disclosure.
Countries in the process of change with economic growth, that is, an increase in production, per capita consumption, and income. The process of economic growth involves better utilization of natural and human resources, which results in a change in the social, political, and economic structures.
That distinct portion of the institutional, industrial, or economic structure of a country that is controlled or owned by non-governmental, private interests.
Health services required by a population or community as well as the health services that the population or community is able and willing to pay for.
A systematic statement of policy rules or principles. Guidelines may be developed by government agencies at any level, institutions, professional societies, governing boards, or by convening expert panels. The text may be cursive or in outline form but is generally a comprehensive guide to problems and approaches in any field of activity. For guidelines in the field of health care and clinical medicine, PRACTICE GUIDELINES AS TOPIC is available.
Absolute, comparative, or differential costs pertaining to services, institutions, resources, etc., or the analysis and study of these costs.
I'm sorry for any confusion, but "California" is a place, specifically a state on the western coast of the United States, and not a medical term or concept. Therefore, it doesn't have a medical definition.
A violation of the criminal law, i.e., a breach of the conduct code specifically sanctioned by the state, which through its administrative agencies prosecutes offenders and imposes and administers punishments. The concept includes unacceptable actions whether prosecuted or going unpunished.
Inhaling and exhaling the smoke of burning TOBACCO.
Generally refers to the amount of protection available and the kind of loss which would be paid for under an insurance contract with an insurer. (Slee & Slee, Health Care Terms, 2d ed)
Studies designed to assess the efficacy of programs. They may include the evaluation of cost-effectiveness, the extent to which objectives are met, or impact.
Variation in rates of disease occurrence and disabilities between population groups defined by socioeconomic characteristics such as age, ethnicity, economic resources, or gender and populations identified geographically or similar measures.
Great Britain is not a medical term, but a geographical name for the largest island in the British Isles, which comprises England, Scotland, and Wales, forming the major part of the United Kingdom.
The application of discoveries generated by laboratory research and preclinical studies to the development of clinical trials and studies in humans. A second area of translational research concerns enhancing the adoption of best practices.
Research that involves the application of the natural sciences, especially biology and physiology, to medicine.
The process of making a selective intellectual judgment when presented with several complex alternatives consisting of several variables, and usually defining a course of action or an idea.
Conversations with an individual or individuals held in order to obtain information about their background and other personal biographical data, their attitudes and opinions, etc. It includes school admission or job interviews.
The level of health of the individual, group, or population as subjectively assessed by the individual or by more objective measures.
Education that increases the awareness and favorably influences the attitudes and knowledge relating to the improvement of health on a personal or community basis.
Living facilities for humans.
A method of comparing the cost of a program with its expected benefits in dollars (or other currency). The benefit-to-cost ratio is a measure of total return expected per unit of money spent. This analysis generally excludes consideration of factors that are not measured ultimately in economic terms. Cost effectiveness compares alternative ways to achieve a specific set of results.
Individual or group aggressive behavior which is socially non-acceptable, turbulent, and often destructive. It is precipitated by frustrations, hostility, prejudices, etc.
Revenues or receipts accruing from business enterprise, labor, or invested capital.
Theoretical representations that simulate the behavior or activity of systems, processes, or phenomena. They include the use of mathematical equations, computers, and other electronic equipment.
Predetermined sets of questions used to collect data - clinical data, social status, occupational group, etc. The term is often applied to a self-completed survey instrument.
The integration of epidemiologic, sociological, economic, and other analytic sciences in the study of health services. Health services research is usually concerned with relationships between need, demand, supply, use, and outcome of health services. The aim of the research is evaluation, particularly in terms of structure, process, output, and outcome. (From Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 2d ed)
Discontinuation of the habit of smoking, the inhaling and exhaling of tobacco smoke.
A preconceived judgment made without factual basis.
Any substances taken in by the body that provide nourishment.
A plan for collecting and utilizing data so that desired information can be obtained with sufficient precision or so that an hypothesis can be tested properly.
Health insurance plans intended to reduce unnecessary health care costs through a variety of mechanisms, including: economic incentives for physicians and patients to select less costly forms of care; programs for reviewing the medical necessity of specific services; increased beneficiary cost sharing; controls on inpatient admissions and lengths of stay; the establishment of cost-sharing incentives for outpatient surgery; selective contracting with health care providers; and the intensive management of high-cost health care cases. The programs may be provided in a variety of settings, such as HEALTH MAINTENANCE ORGANIZATIONS and PREFERRED PROVIDER ORGANIZATIONS.
Studies in which the presence or absence of disease or other health-related variables are determined in each member of the study population or in a representative sample at one particular time. This contrasts with LONGITUDINAL STUDIES which are followed over a period of time.
Accidents on streets, roads, and highways involving drivers, passengers, pedestrians, or vehicles. Traffic accidents refer to AUTOMOBILES (passenger cars, buses, and trucks), BICYCLING, and MOTORCYCLES but not OFF-ROAD MOTOR VEHICLES; RAILROADS nor snowmobiles.
Voluntary authorization, by a patient or research subject, with full comprehension of the risks involved, for diagnostic or investigative procedures, and for medical and surgical treatment.
Differences in access to or availability of medical facilities and services.
Knowledge, attitudes, and associated behaviors which pertain to health-related topics such as PATHOLOGIC PROCESSES or diseases, their prevention, and treatment. This term refers to non-health workers and health workers (HEALTH PERSONNEL).
Elements of residence that characterize a population. They are applicable in determining need for and utilization of health services.
The process by which decisions are made in an institution or other organization.
The smallest continent and an independent country, comprising six states and two territories. Its capital is Canberra.
Behaviors expressed by individuals to protect, maintain or promote their health status. For example, proper diet, and appropriate exercise are activities perceived to influence health status. Life style is closely associated with health behavior and factors influencing life style are socioeconomic, educational, and cultural.
Public attitudes toward health, disease, and the medical care system.
The aggregate of social and cultural institutions, forms, patterns, and processes that influence the life of an individual or community.
The total number of cases of a given disease in a specified population at a designated time. It is differentiated from INCIDENCE, which refers to the number of new cases in the population at a given time.
The actual costs of providing services related to the delivery of health care, including the costs of procedures, therapies, and medications. It is differentiated from HEALTH EXPENDITURES, which refers to the amount of money paid for the services, and from fees, which refers to the amount charged, regardless of cost.
The external elements and conditions which surround, influence, and affect the life and development of an organism or population.
The prediction or projection of the nature of future problems or existing conditions based upon the extrapolation or interpretation of existing scientific data or by the application of scientific methodology.
**I'm really sorry, but I can't fulfill your request.**
The levels of excellence which characterize the health service or health care provided based on accepted standards of quality.
Statistical interpretation and description of a population with reference to distribution, composition, or structure.
An aspect of personal behavior or lifestyle, environmental exposure, or inborn or inherited characteristic, which, on the basis of epidemiologic evidence, is known to be associated with a health-related condition considered important to prevent.
I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Mexico" is not a medical term and does not have a medical definition. It is the name of a country located in North America, known officially as the United Mexican States. If you have any questions related to medical topics or terminology, I would be happy to help answer those!
The measurement of the health status for a given population using a variety of indices, including morbidity, mortality, and available health resources.
Directions or principles presenting current or future rules of policy for assisting health care practitioners in patient care decisions regarding diagnosis, therapy, or related clinical circumstances. The guidelines may be developed by government agencies at any level, institutions, professional societies, governing boards, or by the convening of expert panels. The guidelines form a basis for the evaluation of all aspects of health care and delivery.
The status during which female mammals carry their developing young (EMBRYOS or FETUSES) in utero before birth, beginning from FERTILIZATION to BIRTH.
An infant during the first month after birth.
Behaviors associated with the ingesting of alcoholic beverages, including social drinking.
The exposure to potentially harmful chemical, physical, or biological agents in the environment or to environmental factors that may include ionizing radiation, pathogenic organisms, or toxic chemicals.
The inhabitants of a city or town, including metropolitan areas and suburban areas.
The qualitative or quantitative estimation of the likelihood of adverse effects that may result from exposure to specified health hazards or from the absence of beneficial influences. (Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 1988)
Psychiatric illness or diseases manifested by breakdowns in the adaptational process expressed primarily as abnormalities of thought, feeling, and behavior producing either distress or impairment of function.
Disorders related to substance abuse.
The interaction of persons or groups of persons representing various nations in the pursuit of a common goal or interest.
Ongoing scrutiny of a population (general population, study population, target population, etc.), generally using methods distinguished by their practicability, uniformity, and frequently their rapidity, rather than by complete accuracy.
Educational attainment or level of education of individuals.
A status with BODY WEIGHT that is grossly above the acceptable or desirable weight, usually due to accumulation of excess FATS in the body. The standards may vary with age, sex, genetic or cultural background. In the BODY MASS INDEX, a BMI greater than 30.0 kg/m2 is considered obese, and a BMI greater than 40.0 kg/m2 is considered morbidly obese (MORBID OBESITY).
Damage inflicted on the body as the direct or indirect result of an external force, with or without disruption of structural continuity.
A systematic collection of factual data pertaining to health and disease in a human population within a given geographic area.
Educational institutions.
An acquired defect of cellular immunity associated with infection by the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), a CD4-positive T-lymphocyte count under 200 cells/microliter or less than 14% of total lymphocytes, and increased susceptibility to opportunistic infections and malignant neoplasms. Clinical manifestations also include emaciation (wasting) and dementia. These elements reflect criteria for AIDS as defined by the CDC in 1993.
Preferentially rated health-related activities or functions to be used in establishing health planning goals. This may refer specifically to PL93-641.
Individuals responsible for the development of policy and supervision of the execution of plans and functional operations.
Management of public health organizations or agencies.
Age as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or the effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from AGING, a physiological process, and TIME FACTORS which refers only to the passage of time.
An interactive process whereby members of a community are concerned for the equality and rights of all.
Those actions designed to carry out recommendations pertaining to health plans or programs.
Smallest political subdivisions within a country at which general governmental functions are carried-out.
Regular course of eating and drinking adopted by a person or animal.
Contamination of the air by tobacco smoke.
Planning for needed health and/or welfare services and facilities.
Statistical models which describe the relationship between a qualitative dependent variable (that is, one which can take only certain discrete values, such as the presence or absence of a disease) and an independent variable. A common application is in epidemiology for estimating an individual's risk (probability of a disease) as a function of a given risk factor.
Federal program, created by Public Law 89-97, Title XVIII-Health Insurance for the Aged, a 1965 amendment to the Social Security Act, that provides health insurance benefits to persons over the age of 65 and others eligible for Social Security benefits. It consists of two separate but coordinated programs: hospital insurance (MEDICARE PART A) and supplementary medical insurance (MEDICARE PART B). (Hospital Administration Terminology, AHA, 2d ed and A Discursive Dictionary of Health Care, US House of Representatives, 1976)
Procedures for finding the mathematical function which best describes the relationship between a dependent variable and one or more independent variables. In linear regression (see LINEAR MODELS) the relationship is constrained to be a straight line and LEAST-SQUARES ANALYSIS is used to determine the best fit. In logistic regression (see LOGISTIC MODELS) the dependent variable is qualitative rather than continuously variable and LIKELIHOOD FUNCTIONS are used to find the best relationship. In multiple regression, the dependent variable is considered to depend on more than a single independent variable.
The collective designation of three organizations with common membership: the European Economic Community (Common Market), the European Coal and Steel Community, and the European Atomic Energy Community (Euratom). It was known as the European Community until 1994. It is primarily an economic union with the principal objectives of free movement of goods, capital, and labor. Professional services, social, medical and paramedical, are subsumed under labor. The constituent countries are Austria, Belgium, Denmark, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Ireland, Italy, Luxembourg, Netherlands, Portugal, Spain, Sweden, and the United Kingdom. (The World Almanac and Book of Facts 1997, p842)
Descriptions and evaluations of specific health care organizations.
Maleness or femaleness as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from SEX CHARACTERISTICS, anatomical or physiological manifestations of sex, and from SEX DISTRIBUTION, the number of males and females in given circumstances.
The quality or state of relating to or affecting two or more nations. (After Merriam-Webster Collegiate Dictionary, 10th ed)
Planning for the equitable allocation, apportionment, or distribution of available health resources.
Health insurance coverage for all persons in a state or country, rather than for some subset of the population. It may extend to the unemployed as well as to the employed; to aliens as well as to citizens; for pre-existing conditions as well as for current illnesses; for mental as well as for physical conditions.
The containment, regulation, or restraint of costs. Costs are said to be contained when the value of resources committed to an activity is not considered excessive. This determination is frequently subjective and dependent upon the specific geographic area of the activity being measured. (From Dictionary of Health Services Management, 2d ed)
The amounts spent by individuals, groups, nations, or private or public organizations for total health care and/or its various components. These amounts may or may not be equivalent to the actual costs (HEALTH CARE COSTS) and may or may not be shared among the patient, insurers, and/or employers.
Control of drug and narcotic use by international agreement, or by institutional systems for handling prescribed drugs. This includes regulations concerned with the manufacturing, dispensing, approval (DRUG APPROVAL), and marketing of drugs.
Societal or individual decisions about the equitable distribution of available resources.
Use of marketing principles also used to sell products to consumers to promote ideas, attitudes and behaviors. Design and use of programs seeking to increase the acceptance of a social idea or practice by target groups, not for the benefit of the marketer, but to benefit the target audience and the general society.
A specialized agency of the United Nations designed as a coordinating authority on international health work; its aim is to promote the attainment of the highest possible level of health by all peoples.
The circulation or wide dispersal of information.
Drinkable liquids containing ETHANOL.
The protection, preservation, restoration, and rational use of all resources in the total environment.
Any type of research that employs nonnumeric information to explore individual or group characteristics, producing findings not arrived at by statistical procedures or other quantitative means. (Qualitative Inquiry: A Dictionary of Terms Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications, 1997)
The process of formulating, improving, and expanding educational, managerial, or service-oriented work plans (excluding computer program development).
I'm sorry for any confusion, but 'Europe' is a geographical continent and not a medical term; therefore, it doesn't have a medical definition.
An international organization whose members include most of the sovereign nations of the world with headquarters in New York City. The primary objectives of the organization are to maintain peace and security and to achieve international cooperation in solving international economic, social, cultural, or humanitarian problems.
Place or physical location of work or employment.

Animal-to-human organ transplants--a solution or a new problem? (1/1382)

Xenotransplantation is seen by some mainly as an opportunity and by others mainly as a danger. It could help overcome the shortage of organs from human donors, but it raises a number of questions, particularly about safety, ethics and human nature. This article reviews the progress of research, debate and decision-making in this area.  (+info)

Developing communality: family-centered programs to improve children's health and well-being. (2/1382)

Despite decades of enormous investment in research and public programs, the United States continues to face pandemics of preventable health problems such as low birth weight, teenage pregnancy, drug abuse, and interpersonal violence. With some justification, these problems have been blamed on the failings of families. The reasons why families may function poorly in their child-rearing roles have not been coherently or vigorously addressed by our social policies; sometimes these policies have aggravated the problems. This paper provides background to allow a better understanding of families' role in the social determination of children's health, and argues for programs and policies that assist families through the creation of social supports embedded in communities that are characterized by trust and mutual obligation.  (+info)

The health impact of economic sanctions. (3/1382)

Embargoes and sanctions are tools of foreign policy. They can induce a decline in economic activity in addition to reducing imports and untoward health effects can supervene, especially among older persons and those with chronic illnesses. Often, violations of the rights of life, health, social services, and protection of human dignity occur among innocent civilians in embargoed nations. This paper examines the effects of embargoes and sanctions against several nations, and calls for studies to determine ways in which economic warfare might be guided by the rule of humanitarian international law, to reduce the effects on civilians. It suggests that the ability to trade in exempted goods and services should be improved, perhaps by establishing uniform criteria and definitions for exemptions, operational criteria under which sanctions committees might function, and methods for monitoring the impact of sanctions on civilian populations in targeted states, particularly with regard to water purity, food availability, and infectious-disease control. Prospective studies are advocated, to generate the data needed to provide better information and monitoring capacity than presently exists.  (+info)

Focus on adolescent pregnancy and childbearing: a bit of history and implications for the 21st century. (4/1382)

Early childbearing in the United States has roots in the past; is the focus of intense partisan debate at the present time; and will have demographic, social, and economic ramifications in the future. It is an extremely complex issue, for which its associated problems have no easy or simple answers. Early parenthood is viewed as a social problem that has defied public policy attempts to stem its growth. It has become the focus of concern primarily for three reasons: (1) sexual activity has increased sharply, most recently among the youngest teens; (2) out-of-wedlock childbearing has risen among all teenagers, regardless of age; and (3) the issue of welfare. A review of statistics highlights the problem and discussion focuses on means of mitigating the negative effects of early childbearing.  (+info)

Pesticides and immunosuppression: the risks to public health. (5/1382)

There is substantial experimental, epidemiological and other evidence that many pesticides in widespread use around the world are immunosuppressive. This poses a potentially serious health risk in populations highly exposed to infectious and parasitic diseases, subject to malnutrition, and inadequately serve by curative health programmes. An expanded programme of research is needed to investigate this potential risk and to design precautionary measures.  (+info)

Reform follows failure: II. Pressure for change in the Lebanese health sector. (6/1382)

This paper describes how, against a background of growing financial crisis, pressure for reform is building up in the Lebanese health care system. It describes the various agendas and influences that played a role. The Ministry of Health, backed by some international organizations, has started taking the lead in a reform that addresses both the way care is delivered and the way it is financed. The paper describes the interventions made to prepare reform. The experience in Lebanon shows that this preparation is a process of muddling through, experimentation and alliance building, rather than the marketing of an overall coherent blueprint.  (+info)

Role of technology assessment in health benefits coverage for medical devices. (7/1382)

With the profusion of new medical technology, managed care organizations are faced with the challenge of determining which medical devices and services warrant health benefits coverage. To aid in this decision-making process, managed care companies turn to technology assessment, a process that differs from the Food and Drug Administration's review of medical devices. Health plans typically use a structured approach to implementing coverage requirements in employer group benefits contracts and use technology assessment to evaluate the scientific evidence of effectiveness to support coverage decisions. Also important is the societal context for decisions regarding coverage for new technologies and the options being considered by policy makers for accountability in technology assessment by private insurers and health plans.  (+info)

The limited state of technology assessment for medical devices: facing the issues. (8/1382)

Medical devices are an integral part of clinical practice and account for a substantial proportion of the national health budget. Clinical testing and regulation of medical devices, however, is vastly different from and inferior to the testing and regulation of drugs. As managed care organizations begin to exert controls on device use, providers are being caught between the policies of their organizations and the demands of device manufacturers and patients, who want wider access to devices. We outline several reasons for the poor state of medical device evaluations and the dangers of using devices without adequate information, and include the recently developed device assessment and reporting guidelines created by the Task Force on Technology Assessment of Medical Devices.  (+info)

"Public policy" is not a medical term, but rather a term used in the field of politics, government, and public administration. It refers to a course or principle of action adopted or proposed by a government, party, business, or organization to guide decisions and achieve specific goals related to public health, safety, or welfare.

However, in the context of healthcare and medicine, "public policy" often refers to laws, regulations, guidelines, and initiatives established by government entities to promote and protect the health and well-being of the population. Public policies in healthcare aim to ensure access to quality care, reduce health disparities, promote public health, regulate healthcare practices and industries, and address broader social determinants of health. Examples include Medicaid and Medicare programs, laws mandating insurance coverage for certain medical procedures or treatments, and regulations governing the safety and efficacy of drugs and medical devices.

Health policy refers to a set of decisions, plans, and actions that are undertaken to achieve specific healthcare goals within a population. It is formulated by governmental and non-governmental organizations with the objective of providing guidance and direction for the management and delivery of healthcare services. Health policies address various aspects of healthcare, including access, financing, quality, and equity. They can be designed to promote health, prevent disease, and provide treatment and rehabilitation services to individuals who are sick or injured. Effective health policies require careful consideration of scientific evidence, ethical principles, and societal values to ensure that they meet the needs of the population while being fiscally responsible.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "policy making" is not a medical term per se. It refers to the process of formulating or establishing official guidelines or rules, such as public policies or organizational policies, that govern decisions and actions. In the context of healthcare, policy making can refer to the development of guidelines, laws, regulations, and procedures that govern the delivery, financing, and accessibility of medical care and health promotion activities.

Examples of policy making in healthcare include:

* Developing clinical practice guidelines for the management of specific medical conditions
* Establishing reimbursement policies for medical procedures or treatments
* Implementing regulations to ensure patient safety and quality of care
* Creating public health policies to address population health issues, such as tobacco control or obesity prevention.

I must clarify that I'm a helpful assistant and not a doctor, but I can tell you that 'politics' is not a term used in medicine. Politics refers to the activities associated with the governance of a country or area, especially the debate or conflict among individuals or groups having or hoping to achieve power. If you have any medical questions, feel free to ask!

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "organizational policy" is not a medical term. It falls under the broader category of management or administrative terminology.

An organizational policy generally refers to a formal statement or set of guidelines that outline an organization's approved course of action or conduct regarding various matters. These policies guide decision-making and help ensure consistent action across the organization. They can cover a wide range of topics, including (but not limited to) employee behavior, data security, patient care standards, and operational procedures.

In a healthcare setting, organizational policies play a crucial role in maintaining quality of care, ensuring patient safety, and complying with relevant laws and regulations.

In the context of healthcare, "policy" refers to a course or principle of action adopted or proposed by an organization or government to guide and determine its decisions, actions, and responses to issues related to the provision, financing, and regulation of health and healthcare services. Health policies are formulated to address various aspects such as access to care, quality of care, cost containment, medical research, public health, and patient safety. They can be established through legislation, regulations, guidelines, protocols, or organizational rules and may be aimed at various stakeholders, including healthcare providers, payers, patients, and the general public.

Public health is defined by the World Health Organization (WHO) as "the art and science of preventing disease, prolonging life and promoting human health through organized efforts of society." It focuses on improving the health and well-being of entire communities, populations, and societies, rather than individual patients. This is achieved through various strategies, including education, prevention, surveillance of diseases, and promotion of healthy behaviors and environments. Public health also addresses broader determinants of health, such as access to healthcare, housing, food, and income, which have a significant impact on the overall health of populations.

Business ethics refers to the principles and values that guide the conduct of individuals and organizations in the business community. It involves making decisions and taking actions based on moral and ethical considerations, such as honesty, fairness, respect, and integrity. The goal of business ethics is to create a positive and responsible culture within an organization that promotes trust, reputation, and long-term success.

Business ethics covers a wide range of topics, including corporate social responsibility, environmental sustainability, employee rights and treatment, financial reporting and transparency, and marketing practices. It also involves addressing ethical dilemmas and conflicts that may arise in the workplace, such as discrimination, harassment, and conflicts of interest.

Having a strong foundation in business ethics is essential for any organization that wants to maintain a positive reputation, build trust with stakeholders, and comply with legal and regulatory requirements. It can also help attract and retain talented employees, improve financial performance, and foster a positive work culture.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "United States" is a geopolitical entity, specifically the name of the country consisting of 50 states, and it is not a medical term or concept. Therefore, I can't provide a medical definition for it. If you have any questions related to health, medicine, or biology, I would be happy to try to help answer those!

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "government" is a political or administrative concept and does not have a medical definition. In general, it refers to the group of people who govern a community or country, or the system by which they govern. This could include elected officials, appointed leaders, and bureaucracies that oversee various functions such as public health, education, and infrastructure. However, in the context of your question, I assume you may be interested in how government policies and systems can impact health and healthcare. If you have any specific questions related to this or another topic, please let me know!

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Taxes" is not a medical term. It refers to a compulsory financial charge or levy imposed on individuals or entities by a governmental authority to fund various public expenditures and services. If you have any medical questions or terms you would like defined, I'd be happy to help!

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "lobbying" is not a term that has a medical definition. Lobbying refers to the act of attempting to influence decisions made by legislators or other officials in favor of specific causes or outcomes. It is commonly used to describe advocacy efforts by various interest groups, including healthcare organizations and pharmaceutical companies, to shape health policy and regulations. However, it is not a medical term with a specific clinical meaning.

Consumer advocacy in a medical context refers to the process of representing and supporting the rights and interests of patients and healthcare consumers. Consumer advocates work to ensure that individuals receive safe, effective, and affordable healthcare services, and that they are empowered to make informed decisions about their own care. This may involve promoting transparency and accountability in the healthcare system, advocating for policies that protect patient rights, and providing education and support to help consumers navigate the complex world of healthcare. Consumer advocacy can take many forms, including individual case advocacy, class action lawsuits, policy reform efforts, and public awareness campaigns.

The Federal Government, in the context of medical definitions, typically refers to the national government of a country that has a federal system of government. In such a system, power is divided between the national government and regional or state governments. The Federal Government is responsible for matters that affect the entire nation, such as foreign policy, national defense, and regulating interstate commerce, including certain aspects of healthcare policy and regulation.

In the United States, for example, the Federal Government plays a significant role in healthcare through programs like Medicare, Medicaid, and the Affordable Care Act (ACA), which are designed to ensure access to affordable healthcare services for specific populations or address broader health reform initiatives. The Federal Government also regulates food and drugs through agencies such as the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). These federal entities work to ensure the safety, efficacy, and security of medical products, foods, and public health.

Government regulation in the context of medicine refers to the rules, guidelines, and laws established by government agencies to control, monitor, and standardize various aspects of healthcare. These regulations are designed to protect patients, promote public health, ensure quality of care, and regulate the healthcare industry. Examples of government regulation in medicine include:

1. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) regulations for drug approval, medical device clearance, and food safety.
2. Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) regulations for healthcare reimbursement, quality measures, and program eligibility.
3. Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) regulations for workplace safety in healthcare settings.
4. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) regulations to minimize environmental impacts from healthcare facilities and pharmaceutical manufacturing.
5. State medical boards' regulations for licensing, disciplining, and monitoring physicians and other healthcare professionals.
6. Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) regulations for patient privacy and data security.
7. Clinical Laboratory Improvement Amendments (CLIA) regulations for laboratory testing quality and standards.
8. Federal Trade Commission (FTC) regulations to prevent deceptive or unfair trade practices in healthcare marketing and advertising.
9. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) guidelines for evidence-based practice and patient safety.
10. Public Health Service Act (PHSA) regulations related to infectious diseases, bioterrorism preparedness, and substance abuse treatment.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Human Rights" is a social, political, and legal concept, rather than a medical one. Human rights are basic rights and freedoms to which all individuals are entitled, regardless of nationality, sex, ethnicity, religion, language, or any other status. They include civil and political rights, such as the right to life, liberty, and freedom of expression; as well as social, cultural and economic rights, like the right to participate in culture, the right to food, and the right to work and receive an education.

However, in the context of healthcare, human rights are crucial. The Universal Declaration of Human Rights recognizes the right to medical care and the right to enjoy the highest attainable standard of physical and mental health. Healthcare providers have a responsibility to respect and protect their patients' human rights, ensuring that they receive care without discrimination, that their privacy is protected, and that they are involved in decisions regarding their healthcare.

Violations of human rights can significantly impact an individual's health and well-being, making the promotion and protection of human rights a critical public health issue.

Environmental policy refers to the regulations, guidelines, and practices established by federal, state, or local governments to protect natural resources, human health, and the environment from potential harm caused by human activities. These policies aim to balance economic development with environmental sustainability through various measures such as:

1. Setting standards for air and water quality, waste management, and hazardous substance handling.
2. Encouraging sustainable practices in industries, agriculture, transportation, and energy production.
3. Promoting conservation efforts, habitat restoration, and biodiversity preservation.
4. Implementing monitoring programs to assess environmental impacts and enforce regulations.
5. Providing education and awareness campaigns to engage the public in environmentally responsible behaviors.

Environmental policies can be mandatory or voluntary and may involve various stakeholders, including government agencies, businesses, non-governmental organizations (NGOs), and communities. The primary goal of environmental policy is to minimize negative human impacts on ecosystems while promoting a healthy and sustainable environment for present and future generations.

Health promotion is the process of enabling people to increase control over their health and its determinants, and to improve their health. It moves beyond a focus on individual behavior change to include social and environmental interventions that can positively influence the health of individuals, communities, and populations. Health promotion involves engaging in a wide range of activities, such as advocacy, policy development, community organization, and education that aim to create supportive environments and personal skills that foster good health. It is based on principles of empowerment, participation, and social justice.

Health facility planning is a specialized area of healthcare architecture and design that involves the careful analysis, programming, and design of physical facilities to meet the current and future needs of healthcare providers and patients. The goal of health facility planning is to create efficient, functional, safe, and healing environments that support high-quality patient care, promote staff productivity and satisfaction, and optimize operational workflows.

Health facility planning typically involves a multidisciplinary team of professionals, including architects, interior designers, engineers, construction managers, and healthcare administrators, who work together to develop a comprehensive plan for the facility. This plan may include an assessment of the current facility's strengths and weaknesses, identification of future space needs, development of functional program requirements, selection of appropriate building systems and technologies, and creation of a detailed design and construction schedule.

Effective health facility planning requires a deep understanding of the unique needs and challenges of healthcare delivery, as well as a commitment to evidence-based design principles that are informed by research and best practices. The ultimate goal is to create healing environments that support positive patient outcomes, enhance the overall patient experience, and promote the health and well-being of all who use the facility.

I must clarify that I'm here to provide information related to health, medicine, and symptoms. I don't provide definitions for literary devices such as "metaphor." However, I can tell you that in the context of medicine, metaphors are often used to help explain medical concepts to patients in a more understandable and relatable way. For example, a doctor might describe a leaky heart valve as "a gate that doesn't close properly, allowing blood to leak back." This is not a formal medical definition, but rather a figure of speech used to help patients better understand their condition.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "State Government" is not a medical term. It refers to the level of government in the United States that is responsible for governing each of the individual states. This includes executives (such as governors), legislative bodies (like state senates and houses of representatives), and courts.

If you have any questions related to medicine or healthcare, I'd be happy to try and help answer those for you!

I'm not able to provide a medical definition of "social responsibility" as it is not a term that has a specific meaning within the field of medicine. However, I can tell you that social responsibility generally refers to the idea that individuals and organizations have a duty to act in the best interests of society and to contribute to its overall well-being. This might involve taking actions to protect the environment, promote social justice, or support the needs of vulnerable populations. In a medical context, this could mean providing care to underserved communities, engaging in public health advocacy, or conducting research that addresses important societal issues.

Economic competition in the context of healthcare and medicine generally refers to the rivalry among healthcare providers, organizations, or pharmaceutical companies competing for patients, resources, market share, or funding. This competition can drive innovation, improve quality of care, and increase efficiency. However, it can also lead to cost-containment measures that may negatively impact patient care and safety.

In the pharmaceutical industry, economic competition exists between different companies developing and marketing similar drugs. This competition can result in lower prices for consumers and incentives for innovation, but it can also lead to unethical practices such as price gouging or misleading advertising.

Regulation and oversight are crucial to ensure that economic competition in healthcare and medicine promotes the well-being of patients and the public while discouraging harmful practices.

Bioethical issues refer to the ethical dilemmas and challenges that arise in biological research, healthcare, and medical technology. These issues often involve conflicts between scientific or medical advancements and moral, social, legal, and cultural values. Examples of bioethical issues include:

1. End-of-life care: Decisions about life-sustaining treatments, such as artificial nutrition and hydration, mechanical ventilation, and do-not-resuscitate orders, can raise ethical questions about the quality of life, patient autonomy, and the role of healthcare providers.
2. Genetic testing and screening: The use of genetic information for medical decision-making, predictive testing, and reproductive choices can have significant implications for individuals, families, and society, raising concerns about privacy, discrimination, and informed consent.
3. Organ transplantation: Issues surrounding organ donation and allocation, such as fairness, scarcity, and the definition of death, can create ethical dilemmas that require careful consideration of medical, legal, and moral principles.
4. Stem cell research: The use of embryonic stem cells for research and therapy raises questions about the moral status of embryos, potential therapeutic benefits, and the role of government in regulating scientific research.
5. Assisted reproductive technologies (ART): Techniques such as in vitro fertilization (IVF), surrogacy, and gamete donation can challenge traditional notions of family, parenthood, and reproduction, leading to debates about the rights and interests of children, parents, and society.
6. Mental health treatment: The use of psychotropic medications, electroconvulsive therapy (ECT), and other interventions for mental illness can raise concerns about patient autonomy, informed consent, and the balance between therapeutic benefits and potential risks.
7. Public health emergencies: Responses to infectious disease outbreaks, bioterrorism, and other public health crises can involve difficult decisions about resource allocation, individual rights, and the role of government in protecting population health.
8. Research involving human subjects: The ethical conduct of clinical trials, observational studies, and other research that involves human participants requires careful consideration of issues such as informed consent, risk-benefit analysis, and respect for participant autonomy and privacy.
9. Health care access and financing: Debates about health care reform, insurance coverage, and affordability can raise questions about the role of government in ensuring access to essential medical services, the balance between individual rights and social responsibility, and the ethical implications of rationing limited resources.
10. Global health ethics: Issues such as international cooperation, resource distribution, and cultural sensitivity can challenge traditional notions of global justice, human rights, and the responsibilities of wealthy nations to address health disparities in low- and middle-income countries.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "public opinion" is not a term that has a medical definition. Public opinion refers to the collective views, attitudes, and beliefs held by a group or society about a particular issue or topic. It is typically formed through interaction, discussion, and various forms of communication within a community or population. If you have any questions related to healthcare or medicine, I'd be happy to help with those!

"Social welfare" is a broad concept and not a medical term per se, but it is often discussed in the context of public health and medical social work. Here's a definition related to those fields:

Social welfare refers to the programs, services, and benefits provided by governmental and non-governmental organizations to promote the well-being of individuals, families, and communities, with a particular focus on meeting basic needs, protecting vulnerable populations, and enhancing social and economic opportunities. These efforts aim to improve overall quality of life, reduce health disparities, and strengthen the social determinants of health.

Examples of social welfare programs include Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF), Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP), Medicaid, Section 8 housing assistance, and various community-based services such as mental health counseling, substance abuse treatment, and home healthcare.

In the medical field, social workers often play a crucial role in connecting patients to available social welfare resources to address various psychosocial needs that can impact their health outcomes.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "sociology" is not a term that has a medical definition. Sociology is a social science that focuses on the study of human behavior and interactions in society, including the development, structure, and functioning of human societies. It is distinct from medical disciplines which focus on the diagnosis and treatment of health conditions.

Nonprofit organizations in the medical context are private entities that operate on a nonprofit basis and are typically dedicated to furthering a particular social, healthcare-related, or advocacy mission. They are usually tax-exempt and rely on donations, grants, and sometimes membership fees to support their work. Examples of nonprofit organizations in the medical field include hospitals, clinics, research institutions, patient advocacy groups, and health-related foundations. Their primary goal is to provide services or conduct activities that benefit the community or a specific group, rather than generating profits for shareholders or owners.

I apologize, but "Brazil" is not a medical term or condition. It is the largest country in both South America and Latin America by land area and population. If you have any questions related to medical terminology or health concerns, please provide more information and I will do my best to help.

Patient advocacy refers to the process of supporting and empowering patients to make informed decisions about their healthcare. Patient advocates may help patients communicate with healthcare providers, access necessary resources and services, understand their health conditions and treatment options, and navigate complex healthcare systems. They may also work to promote patient-centered care, raise awareness of patient rights and concerns, and advocate for policies that improve the quality and accessibility of healthcare services. Patient advocacy can be provided by healthcare professionals, family members, friends, or dedicated patient advocates.

I believe you may have mixed up the terms "medicine" and "commerce." Commerce is a broad term that refers to the buying and selling of goods and services. It is not typically used in a medical context, so it does not have a specific medical definition. However, I can provide you with some related terms that might be helpful:

1. Medical commerce: This term generally refers to the business aspects of healthcare, such as the buying and selling of medical supplies, equipment, and services. It may also refer to the economic relationships between various stakeholders in the healthcare system, including providers, insurers, pharmaceutical companies, and patients.
2. Telemedicine commerce: This term specifically refers to the use of technology to facilitate remote consultations and transactions between healthcare providers and patients. Examples include online appointment scheduling, virtual consultations, and electronic prescribing.
3. Medical tourism: This is a form of commerce where people travel to other countries to receive medical treatment or procedures that may be less expensive or more accessible than in their home country. It can also refer to the business of providing medical services to international patients.
4. Healthcare marketing: This term refers to the activities and strategies used by healthcare organizations to promote their products, services, and brands to potential customers. It includes advertising, public relations, social media, content marketing, and other tactics designed to build awareness, generate leads, and drive sales.

I hope this information is helpful! Let me know if you have any further questions or concerns.

Medical legislation refers to laws and regulations that govern the practice of medicine and related healthcare fields. These laws are established by federal, state, or local governments to ensure that medical professionals provide safe, ethical, and effective care to their patients. They cover a wide range of issues including:

1. Licensing and certification of healthcare providers
2. Standards of care and professional conduct
3. Patient rights and privacy (e.g., HIPAA)
4. Prescription medication use and abuse
5. Medical malpractice and liability
6. Healthcare facility accreditation and safety
7. Public health and prevention measures
8. Research involving human subjects
9. Reimbursement for medical services (e.g., Medicare, Medicaid)
10. Telemedicine and telehealth practices

Medical legislation aims to protect both patients and healthcare providers while maintaining a high standard of care and promoting the overall health of the population.

'Government Financing' in the context of healthcare refers to the role of government in funding healthcare services, programs, and infrastructure. This can be achieved through various mechanisms such as:

1. Direct provision of healthcare services: The government operates and funds its own hospitals, clinics, and other healthcare facilities, where it employs healthcare professionals to deliver care.
2. Public insurance programs: The government establishes and manages health insurance programs, like Medicare and Medicaid in the United States, which provide coverage for specific populations and reimburse healthcare providers for services delivered to enrollees.
3. Tax subsidies and incentives: Governments may offer tax breaks or other financial incentives to encourage private investments in healthcare infrastructure, research, and development.
4. Grants and loans: Government agencies can provide funding to healthcare organizations, researchers, and educational institutions in the form of grants and loans for specific projects, programs, or initiatives.
5. Public-private partnerships (PPPs): Governments collaborate with private entities to jointly fund and manage healthcare services, facilities, or infrastructure projects.

Government financing plays a significant role in shaping healthcare systems and ensuring access to care for vulnerable populations. The extent of government involvement in financing varies across countries, depending on their political, economic, and social contexts.

Civil rights are a group of rights and protections that guarantee equal treatment to all individuals, regardless of their race, color, religion, sex, national origin, age, disability, or other characteristics. These rights are enshrined in the laws and constitutions of various countries and include freedoms such as the right to vote, the right to a fair trial, the right to equal protection under the law, and the right to freedom of speech, religion, and assembly.

In the United States, the Civil Rights Act of 1964 is a landmark piece of legislation that prohibits discrimination on the basis of race, color, religion, sex, or national origin in employment, education, and access to public accommodations. Other important civil rights laws in the U.S. include the Voting Rights Act of 1965, which protects the right to vote, and the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, which prohibits discrimination against people with disabilities.

Violations of civil rights can take many forms, including discrimination, harassment, intimidation, and violence. Those whose civil rights have been violated may be entitled to legal remedies, such as damages, injunctions, or orders for relief.

Medical ethics is a branch of ethics that deals with moral issues in medical care, research, and practice. It provides a framework for addressing questions related to patient autonomy, informed consent, confidentiality, distributive justice, beneficentia (doing good), and non-maleficence (not doing harm). Medical ethics also involves the application of ethical principles such as respect for persons, beneficence, non-maleficence, and justice to specific medical cases and situations. It is a crucial component of medical education and practice, helping healthcare professionals make informed decisions that promote patient well-being while respecting their rights and dignity.

A Tobacco Industry is a commercial sector involved in the cultivation, production, manufacturing, marketing, and distribution of tobacco and tobacco-related products. This can include growers who produce tobacco leaves, manufacturers who process the leaves into various forms (such as cigarettes, chewing tobacco, or snuff), and companies that market and distribute these products to consumers. It is important to note that the tobacco industry has been associated with significant health risks, as the use of tobacco products can lead to a range of serious health problems, including cancer, heart disease, and lung disease.

Consumer participation in the context of healthcare refers to the active involvement and engagement of patients, families, caregivers, and communities in their own healthcare decision-making processes and in the development, implementation, and evaluation of health policies, programs, and services. It emphasizes the importance of patient-centered care, where the unique needs, preferences, values, and experiences of individuals are respected and integrated into their healthcare.

Consumer participation can take many forms, including:

1. Patient-provider communication: Consumers engage in open and honest communication with their healthcare providers to make informed decisions about their health.
2. Shared decision-making: Consumers work together with their healthcare providers to weigh the benefits and risks of different treatment options and make evidence-based decisions that align with their values, preferences, and goals.
3. Patient education: Consumers receive accurate, timely, and understandable information about their health conditions, treatments, and self-management strategies.
4. Patient advocacy: Consumers advocate for their own health needs and rights, as well as those of other patients and communities.
5. Community engagement: Consumers participate in the development, implementation, and evaluation of health policies, programs, and services that affect their communities.
6. Research partnerships: Consumers collaborate with researchers to design, conduct, and disseminate research that is relevant and meaningful to their lives.

Consumer participation aims to improve healthcare quality, safety, and outcomes by empowering individuals to take an active role in their own health and well-being, and by ensuring that healthcare systems are responsive to the needs and preferences of diverse populations.

Patient rights refer to the ethical principles, legal regulations, and professional guidelines that protect and ensure the autonomy, dignity, and well-being of patients during healthcare encounters. These rights encompass various aspects of patient care, including informed consent, privacy, confidentiality, access to medical records, freedom from abuse and discrimination, pain management, and communication with healthcare providers.

The specific components of patient rights may vary depending on the jurisdiction and legal framework but generally include:

1. Right to receive information: Patients have the right to obtain accurate, clear, and comprehensive information about their health status, diagnosis, treatment options, benefits, risks, and prognosis in a manner they can understand. This includes the right to ask questions and seek clarification.
2. Informed consent: Patients have the right to make informed decisions about their care based on complete and accurate information. They must be given sufficient time and support to consider their options and provide voluntary, informed consent before any treatment or procedure is performed.
3. Privacy and confidentiality: Patients have the right to privacy during medical examinations and treatments. Healthcare providers must protect patients' personal and medical information from unauthorized access, disclosure, or use.
4. Access to medical records: Patients have the right to access their medical records and obtain copies of them in a timely manner. They can also request amendments to their records if they believe there are errors or inaccuracies.
5. Freedom from discrimination: Patients have the right to receive care without discrimination based on race, ethnicity, national origin, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, age, disability, or socioeconomic status.
6. Pain management: Patients have the right to appropriate pain assessment and management, including access to palliative and hospice care when appropriate.
7. Refusal of treatment: Patients have the right to refuse any treatment or procedure, even if it may be life-saving, as long as they are competent to make that decision and understand the consequences.
8. Communication and language assistance: Patients have the right to clear, effective communication with their healthcare providers, including access to interpreters or other necessary language assistance services.
9. Respect and dignity: Patients have the right to be treated with respect, dignity, and consideration during all aspects of their care.
10. Complaint resolution: Patients have the right to voice concerns about their care and receive timely responses from healthcare providers or institutions. They also have the right to file complaints with regulatory bodies if necessary.

Research, in the context of medicine, is a systematic and rigorous process of collecting, analyzing, and interpreting information in order to increase our understanding, develop new knowledge, or evaluate current practices and interventions. It can involve various methodologies such as observational studies, experiments, surveys, or literature reviews. The goal of medical research is to advance health care by identifying new treatments, improving diagnostic techniques, and developing prevention strategies. Medical research is typically conducted by teams of researchers including clinicians, scientists, and other healthcare professionals. It is subject to ethical guidelines and regulations to ensure that it is conducted responsibly and with the best interests of patients in mind.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "social problems" is not a term that has a specific medical definition. It is a broad term used in sociology and social work to refer to issues that affect large numbers of people within a society, such as poverty, discrimination, crime, and substance abuse. These issues can certainly have impacts on individuals' mental and physical health, but they are not considered medical conditions themselves. If you have any questions related to healthcare or medical terminology, I would be happy to try to help answer those!

Health care reform refers to the legislative efforts, initiatives, and debates aimed at improving the quality, affordability, and accessibility of health care services. These reforms may include changes to health insurance coverage, delivery systems, payment methods, and healthcare regulations. The goals of health care reform are often to increase the number of people with health insurance, reduce healthcare costs, and improve the overall health outcomes of a population. Examples of notable health care reform measures in the United States include the Affordable Care Act (ACA) and Medicare for All proposals.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Government Agencies" is a very broad term and does not have a specific medical definition. Government agencies are administrative bodies of a government that carry out certain legislated functions, and these can cover a wide range of areas, including public health, environmental protection, workplace safety, and many others.

However, if you're interested in learning about government agencies that deal with health-related matters, here are a few examples:

1. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC): A federal agency in the United States that conducts and supports public health activities to decrease preventable diseases, injuries, and disabilities.
2. National Institutes of Health (NIH): A US government agency responsible for biomedical and health-related research. It comprises 27 institutes and centers focusing on various disease areas and other health issues.
3. Food and Drug Administration (FDA): A US government agency that oversees the safety of food, dietary supplements, medications, vaccines, cosmetics, medical devices, and radiation-emitting products.
4. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA): A US government agency responsible for protecting human health and the environment by enforcing regulations related to air and water quality, hazardous waste disposal, pesticides, and other environmental concerns.
5. World Health Organization (WHO): An international organization that coordinates global health initiatives, sets international health standards, and provides technical assistance to member countries in addressing various health issues.

These are just a few examples of government agencies that deal with health-related matters. If you have a specific agency or area of interest, I'd be happy to help provide more information!

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Government Programs" is a very broad term and can encompass many different fields, including healthcare, social services, education, and more. If you're looking for a medical definition related to government programs, you might be referring to initiatives like Medicare, Medicaid, or the Affordable Care Act in the United States, which are government-run health insurance programs or policies.

1. Medicare: A federal health insurance program in the United States, primarily for people 65 and older, but also for some younger people with disabilities and those with end-stage renal disease. Medicare provides coverage for hospitalization, doctor visits, and other healthcare services.

2. Medicaid: A joint federal-state health insurance program in the United States that provides coverage to low-income individuals, including children, pregnant women, elderly adults, and people with disabilities. Medicaid covers a range of medical services, including hospital stays, doctor visits, and long-term care.

3. The Affordable Care Act (ACA): Also known as "Obamacare," the ACA is a United States healthcare reform law that aims to increase the quality and affordability of health insurance, lower the uninsured rate, and regulate the health insurance industry. The ACA includes provisions such as mandated insurance coverage, subsidies for low-income individuals, and protections for those with pre-existing conditions.

Please provide more context if you were looking for information on a different government program related to the medical field.

Committee membership, in a medical context, refers to the role of an individual serving on a committee that is responsible for making decisions or providing guidance related to medical issues or healthcare delivery. This could include committees within a hospital or healthcare organization, professional medical societies, or governmental bodies. Committee members may be involved in developing policies, guidelines, or standards; overseeing research or quality improvement initiatives; or addressing ethical or regulatory concerns. Membership on such committees is often composed of medical professionals with relevant expertise and experience.

Environmental health is a branch of public health that focuses on the study of how environmental factors, including physical, chemical, and biological factors, impact human health and disease. It involves the assessment, control, and prevention of environmental hazards in order to protect and promote human health and well-being.

Environmental health encompasses a wide range of issues, such as air and water quality, food safety, waste management, housing conditions, occupational health and safety, radiation protection, and climate change. It also involves the promotion of healthy behaviors and the development of policies and regulations to protect public health from environmental hazards.

The goal of environmental health is to create safe and healthy environments that support human health and well-being, prevent disease and injury, and promote sustainable communities. This requires a multidisciplinary approach that involves collaboration between various stakeholders, including policymakers, researchers, healthcare providers, community organizations, and the public.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Persuasive Communication" is not a term that has a specific medical definition. Persuasive communication is a broader term used in various fields including psychology, sociology, and communications to refer to the process of using communication to influence or persuade others to adopt a particular viewpoint or course of action.

However, in a medical context, communication is a crucial aspect of healthcare delivery, and effective communication skills are essential for healthcare professionals to build trust, ensure informed consent, and promote patient engagement and adherence to treatment plans. This includes being able to effectively communicate complex medical information in a clear and understandable way, as well as being sensitive to patients' emotions, values, and cultural backgrounds.

If you have any specific questions about communication in a medical context or any other healthcare-related topic, I would be happy to try to help answer them!

A conflict of interest (COI) is a situation in which a person or organization has dual loyalties or is in a position to exploit their professional or personal relationships for personal or institutional gain. In the medical field, COIs can arise when healthcare providers, researchers, or institutions have financial or other interests that may influence their judgment or actions in providing care, conducting research, or making recommendations.

Examples of conflicts of interest in medicine include:

* A physician who has a financial relationship with a pharmaceutical company and receives compensation for promoting the company's products to patients or colleagues.
* A researcher who owns stock in a company that is funding their study and may stand to benefit financially from positive results.
* An institution that accepts funding from industry partners for research or educational programs, which could potentially influence the outcomes of the research or bias the education provided.

COIs can compromise the integrity of medical research, patient care, and professional judgment. Therefore, it is essential to disclose and manage COIs transparently to maintain trust in the healthcare system and ensure that decisions are made in the best interests of patients and society as a whole.

The "delivery of health care" refers to the process of providing medical services, treatments, and interventions to individuals in order to maintain, restore, or improve their health. This encompasses a wide range of activities, including:

1. Preventive care: Routine check-ups, screenings, immunizations, and counseling aimed at preventing illnesses or identifying them at an early stage.
2. Diagnostic services: Tests and procedures used to identify and understand medical conditions, such as laboratory tests, imaging studies, and biopsies.
3. Treatment interventions: Medical, surgical, or therapeutic treatments provided to manage acute or chronic health issues, including medications, surgeries, physical therapy, and psychotherapy.
4. Acute care services: Short-term medical interventions focused on addressing immediate health concerns, such as hospitalizations for infections, injuries, or complications from medical conditions.
5. Chronic care management: Long-term care and support provided to individuals with ongoing medical needs, such as those living with chronic diseases like diabetes, heart disease, or cancer.
6. Rehabilitation services: Programs designed to help patients recover from illnesses, injuries, or surgeries, focusing on restoring physical, cognitive, and emotional function.
7. End-of-life care: Palliative and hospice care provided to individuals facing terminal illnesses, with an emphasis on comfort, dignity, and quality of life.
8. Public health initiatives: Population-level interventions aimed at improving community health, such as disease prevention programs, health education campaigns, and environmental modifications.

The delivery of health care involves a complex network of healthcare professionals, institutions, and systems working together to ensure that patients receive the best possible care. This includes primary care physicians, specialists, nurses, allied health professionals, hospitals, clinics, long-term care facilities, and public health organizations. Effective communication, coordination, and collaboration among these stakeholders are essential for high-quality, patient-centered care.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "History, 20th Century" is a broad and complex topic that refers to the events, developments, and transformations that occurred throughout the world during the 1900s. It is not a medical term or concept. If you're interested in learning more about this historical period, I would recommend consulting a history textbook, reputable online resources, or speaking with a historian. They can provide detailed information about the political, social, economic, and cultural changes that took place during the 20th century.

Health services accessibility refers to the degree to which individuals and populations are able to obtain needed health services in a timely manner. It includes factors such as physical access (e.g., distance, transportation), affordability (e.g., cost of services, insurance coverage), availability (e.g., supply of providers, hours of operation), and acceptability (e.g., cultural competence, language concordance).

According to the World Health Organization (WHO), accessibility is one of the key components of health system performance, along with responsiveness and fair financing. Improving accessibility to health services is essential for achieving universal health coverage and ensuring that everyone has access to quality healthcare without facing financial hardship. Factors that affect health services accessibility can vary widely between and within countries, and addressing these disparities requires a multifaceted approach that includes policy interventions, infrastructure development, and community engagement.

Medicaid is a joint federal-state program that provides health coverage for low-income individuals, including children, pregnant women, elderly adults, and people with disabilities. Eligibility, benefits, and administration vary by state, but the program is designed to ensure that low-income individuals have access to necessary medical services. Medicaid is funded jointly by the federal government and the states, and is administered by the states under broad federal guidelines.

Medicaid programs must cover certain mandatory benefits, such as inpatient and outpatient hospital services, laboratory and X-ray services, and physician services. States also have the option to provide additional benefits, such as dental care, vision services, and prescription drugs. In addition, many states have expanded their Medicaid programs to cover more low-income adults under the Affordable Care Act (ACA).

Medicaid is an important source of health coverage for millions of Americans, providing access to necessary medical care and helping to reduce financial burden for low-income individuals.

I'm happy to help, but I must clarify that the term "voluntary programs" is not a medical term per se. Instead, it is a more general term used in various fields, including healthcare and medicine, to refer to initiatives or activities that individuals willingly choose to participate in.

In the context of healthcare and medicine, voluntary programs might include wellness initiatives, smoking cessation support groups, or community health education classes. These programs are typically designed to promote healthy behaviors, prevent illnesses, or manage existing medical conditions. Participants engage in these activities voluntarily, without any external pressure or coercion, and can choose to discontinue their involvement at any time.

It is essential to understand that the specifics of a "voluntary program" may vary depending on the context and setting. If you are looking for information about a particular type of voluntary program in healthcare or medicine, please provide more details so I can offer a more precise response.

Voluntary hospitals, also known as non-profit or private hospitals, are medical institutions that are privately owned and operated, typically by a charitable organization or community group. They are called "voluntary" because they are not run by the government and rely on donations, grants, and other forms of financial support from the community to operate.

Voluntary hospitals can be religious or secular in nature and often have a mission to serve specific populations or provide care for underserved communities. They may offer a range of medical services, including emergency care, inpatient and outpatient care, diagnostic testing, and specialized treatments.

These hospitals are typically governed by a board of directors made up of community members and are required to operate on a non-profit basis, meaning that any revenue generated must be reinvested into the hospital's operations or mission rather than distributed to shareholders or owners. Voluntary hospitals may also receive funding from government sources such as Medicare and Medicaid, but they are not owned or operated by the government.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "poverty" is not a medical condition or term. It is a social condition defined by the World Bank as "pronounced deprivation in well-being," and measured through indicators such as income, consumption, and access to basic services. Poverty can have significant impacts on health outcomes and healthcare access, but it is not considered a medical diagnosis. If you have any questions related to health or medicine, I'd be happy to try my best to help answer them!

Advertising is a form of communication used to promote or sell products, services, or ideas. In the medical field, advertising is often used by healthcare providers, hospitals, and pharmaceutical companies to reach potential patients or customers. Advertisements may appear in various media formats, such as television, radio, print, online platforms, and outdoor displays.

In the context of medical advertising, it is essential to ensure that all information presented is accurate, balanced, and not misleading. The advertising of prescription medications directly to consumers is regulated by government agencies, such as the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in the United States, to ensure that the benefits and risks of the medication are clearly communicated.

Healthcare providers may also engage in advertising to promote their services or expertise. This can include listing their qualifications, areas of specialization, and patient testimonials. However, healthcare providers must adhere to ethical guidelines and avoid making exaggerated claims about their abilities or the outcomes that patients can expect.

Overall, medical advertising plays an essential role in informing the public about available healthcare options and promoting healthy behaviors. Still, it is crucial to ensure that all advertisements are truthful, transparent, and adhere to ethical standards.

Nutrition policy refers to a set of guidelines, regulations, or laws established by governmental or organizational bodies to promote healthy eating habits and reduce the risk of diet-related chronic diseases. These policies aim to create an environment that supports and encourages individuals to make healthier food choices. Nutrition policies can cover various aspects such as food labeling, nutrition education, food safety, agricultural practices, and access to affordable and nutritious foods. They may also address issues related to marketing and advertising of unhealthy food products, particularly to children. The ultimate goal of nutrition policy is to improve public health by creating a food environment that supports optimal nutrition and well-being.

Socioeconomic factors are a range of interconnected conditions and influences that affect the opportunities and resources a person or group has to maintain and improve their health and well-being. These factors include:

1. Economic stability: This includes employment status, job security, income level, and poverty status. Lower income and lack of employment are associated with poorer health outcomes.
2. Education: Higher levels of education are generally associated with better health outcomes. Education can affect a person's ability to access and understand health information, as well as their ability to navigate the healthcare system.
3. Social and community context: This includes factors such as social support networks, discrimination, and community safety. Strong social supports and positive community connections are associated with better health outcomes, while discrimination and lack of safety can negatively impact health.
4. Healthcare access and quality: Access to affordable, high-quality healthcare is an important socioeconomic factor that can significantly impact a person's health. Factors such as insurance status, availability of providers, and cultural competency of healthcare systems can all affect healthcare access and quality.
5. Neighborhood and built environment: The physical conditions in which people live, work, and play can also impact their health. Factors such as housing quality, transportation options, availability of healthy foods, and exposure to environmental hazards can all influence health outcomes.

Socioeconomic factors are often interrelated and can have a cumulative effect on health outcomes. For example, someone who lives in a low-income neighborhood with limited access to healthy foods and safe parks may also face challenges related to employment, education, and healthcare access that further impact their health. Addressing socioeconomic factors is an important part of promoting health equity and reducing health disparities.

"Social control policies" is not a term that has a specific medical definition. However, in a broader social context, social control policies refer to the strategies and measures implemented by society or its institutions to regulate, manage, and shape the behavior of individuals or groups in order to maintain social order, conformity, and cohesion.

In the field of public health, social control policies may refer to interventions aimed at changing behaviors that pose risks to individual or community health, such as tobacco control policies, alcohol regulation measures, or food safety regulations. These policies are designed to promote healthy behaviors, prevent disease and injury, and protect vulnerable populations from harm.

It's worth noting that the concept of social control can be controversial, as it raises questions about individual autonomy, privacy, and social justice. Therefore, the development and implementation of social control policies should involve careful consideration of ethical principles and community engagement to ensure that they are fair, effective, and respectful of human rights.

In medical terminology, a budget is not explicitly defined. However, in a general sense, it refers to a financial plan that outlines the anticipated costs and expenses for a specific period. In healthcare, budgets can be used by hospitals, clinics, or other medical facilities to plan for and manage their finances.

A healthcare organization's budget may include expenses related to:

* Salaries and benefits for staff
* Equipment and supply costs
* Facility maintenance and improvements
* Research and development expenses
* Insurance and liability coverage
* Marketing and advertising costs

Budgets can help healthcare organizations manage their finances effectively, allocate resources efficiently, and make informed decisions about spending. They may also be used to plan for future growth and expansion.

Health Insurance is a type of insurance that covers the whole or a part of the risk of a person incurring medical expenses, spreading the risk over a large number of persons. By purchasing health insurance, insured individuals pay a premium to an insurance company, which then pools those funds with other policyholders' premiums to pay for the medical care costs of individuals who become ill or injured. The coverage can include hospitalization, medical procedures, prescription drugs, and preventive care, among other services. The goal of health insurance is to provide financial protection against unexpected medical expenses and to make healthcare services more affordable.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Mass Media" is not a term that has a medical definition. Mass media refers to the means of communication that reach large numbers of people simultaneously, such as television, radio, newspapers, and the Internet. It may be used in a public health context to discuss how information about health-related topics is disseminated to the general population. However, it is not a term that is typically used within the field of medicine to describe a specific medical concept or condition.

National health programs are systematic, large-scale initiatives that are put in place by national governments to address specific health issues or improve the overall health of a population. These programs often involve coordinated efforts across various sectors, including healthcare, education, and social services. They may aim to increase access to care, improve the quality of care, prevent the spread of diseases, promote healthy behaviors, or reduce health disparities. Examples of national health programs include immunization campaigns, tobacco control initiatives, and efforts to address chronic diseases such as diabetes or heart disease. These programs are typically developed based on scientific research, evidence-based practices, and public health data, and they may be funded through a variety of sources, including government budgets, grants, and private donations.

Community health planning is a systematic and continuous process that involves assessing the health needs and resources of a defined population, setting priorities for health improvement, and developing and implementing action plans to achieve those priorities. It is a collaborative effort between various stakeholders, including community members, healthcare providers, public health professionals, and other relevant organizations. The goal of community health planning is to improve the overall health and well-being of the community by addressing the social, environmental, and economic factors that impact health. This process typically involves the following steps:

1. Needs assessment: Identifying the health needs and priorities of the community through data collection and analysis, including demographic information, health status indicators, and healthcare utilization patterns.
2. Resource assessment: Identifying the available resources in the community, such as healthcare facilities, public health programs, and community-based organizations that can be leveraged to address the identified needs.
3. Priority setting: Determining the most pressing health issues that need to be addressed based on the needs and resource assessments. This involves engaging stakeholders in a participatory process to identify shared priorities.
4. Plan development: Developing an action plan that outlines specific strategies, activities, and timelines for addressing the identified priorities. The plan should also include indicators for measuring progress and evaluating outcomes.
5. Implementation: Putting the action plan into practice by engaging community members, healthcare providers, and other stakeholders in implementing the strategies and activities outlined in the plan.
6. Evaluation: Monitoring and evaluating the progress of the action plan to ensure that it is achieving the desired outcomes and making adjustments as needed.

Community health planning is an essential component of public health practice because it helps to ensure that resources are allocated effectively, priorities are aligned with community needs, and interventions are tailored to the unique characteristics of the population being served.

I apologize, but "Canada" is not a medical term or concept. It is a country located in North America, known for its vast wilderness, multicultural cities, and significant natural resources. If you have any questions related to healthcare or medical terms, I would be happy to help answer those!

"World Health" is not a term that has a specific medical definition. However, it is often used in the context of global health, which can be defined as:

"The area of study, research and practice that places a priority on improving health and achieving equity in health for all people worldwide. It emphasizes trans-national health issues, determinants, and solutions; involves many disciplines within and beyond the health sciences and engages stakeholders from across sectors and societies." (World Health Organization)

Therefore, "world health" could refer to the overall health status and health challenges faced by populations around the world. It encompasses a broad range of factors that affect the health of individuals and communities, including social, economic, environmental, and political determinants. The World Health Organization (WHO) plays a key role in monitoring and promoting global health, setting international standards and guidelines, and coordinating responses to global health emergencies.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Mandatory Programs" is not a medical term or concept. It is a more general term that can be used in various contexts, including computer science, law, and policy-making. In the context of medicine or healthcare, it might refer to programs or initiatives that are required by law or regulation, but there is no specific medical definition for this term. If you have a specific context in mind, I'd be happy to help further clarify if I can!

A smoke-free policy is a set of rules or regulations that prohibit smoking in a specific area or organization-wide, with the goal of protecting people from the harmful effects of secondhand smoke. These policies can apply to various settings such as workplaces, hospitals, schools, restaurants, and public places. The ultimate aim of a smoke-free policy is to reduce exposure to tobacco smoke, promote healthier living environments, and encourage smoking cessation. Smoke-free policies are evidence-based interventions that have been shown to significantly improve indoor air quality, decrease the prevalence of respiratory symptoms, and lower the risk of cardiovascular diseases among non-smoking individuals.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Science" is a broad field that refers to a systematic and logical process used to discover how things in the universe work. It's not typically used as a medical term. However, within the context of medicine, "science" often refers to evidence-based practices, which are treatments and preventions that have been scientifically researched and proven to be effective. This could include areas like pharmacology (the study of drugs), pathophysiology (the study of changes in the body due to disease), or clinical trials (studies used to test new treatments). If you're looking for a specific medical term, could you please provide more context?

Evidence-Based Medicine (EBM) is a medical approach that combines the best available scientific evidence with clinical expertise and patient values to make informed decisions about diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of diseases. It emphasizes the use of systematic research, including randomized controlled trials and meta-analyses, to guide clinical decision making. EBM aims to provide the most effective and efficient care while minimizing variations in practice, reducing errors, and improving patient outcomes.

Family planning policy refers to a government's official position or action regarding the use of family planning services, including contraception, fertility awareness, and reproductive health education. The goal of family planning policies is to enable individuals and couples to make informed decisions about whether and when to have children, thus contributing to improved maternal and child health outcomes, reduced unintended pregnancies, and lower abortion rates. Family planning policies may include provisions for the provision of free or subsidized contraceptive methods, sex education in schools, training for healthcare providers, and public awareness campaigns. The specific content and implementation of family planning policies vary widely between countries and are often influenced by cultural, religious, and political factors.

Data collection in the medical context refers to the systematic gathering of information relevant to a specific research question or clinical situation. This process involves identifying and recording data elements, such as demographic characteristics, medical history, physical examination findings, laboratory results, and imaging studies, from various sources including patient interviews, medical records, and diagnostic tests. The data collected is used to support clinical decision-making, inform research hypotheses, and evaluate the effectiveness of treatments or interventions. It is essential that data collection is performed in a standardized and unbiased manner to ensure the validity and reliability of the results.

Proprietary hospitals, also known as private for-profit hospitals, are healthcare institutions that are owned and operated by a private company or individual with the primary goal of generating a profit. These hospitals are funded through patient fees, investments, and other sources of revenue. They are required to meet state and federal regulations regarding patient care and safety but may have more flexibility in making business decisions compared to non-profit or government-owned hospitals.

A Public Sector, in the context of healthcare, refers to the portion of a country's health system that is managed and funded by the government. This sector provides medical services through state-owned hospitals, clinics, and other healthcare facilities, as well as through publicly financed programs such as Medicare and Medicaid in the United States or the National Health Service (NHS) in the United Kingdom. The public sector aims to ensure that all citizens have access to necessary medical care, regardless of their ability to pay. It is often funded through taxes and is accountable to the public for its performance.

Confidentiality is a legal and ethical principle in medicine that refers to the obligation of healthcare professionals to protect the personal and sensitive information of their patients. This information, which can include medical history, diagnosis, treatment plans, and other private details, is shared between the patient and the healthcare provider with the expectation that it will be kept confidential and not disclosed to third parties without the patient's consent.

Confidentiality is a fundamental component of the trust relationship between patients and healthcare providers, as it helps to ensure that patients feel safe and comfortable sharing sensitive information with their doctors, nurses, and other members of their healthcare team. It also helps to protect patients' privacy rights and uphold their autonomy in making informed decisions about their healthcare.

There are some limited circumstances in which confidentiality may be breached, such as when there is a legal obligation to report certain types of information (e.g., suspected child abuse or neglect), or when the disclosure is necessary to protect the health and safety of the patient or others. However, these exceptions are typically narrowly defined and subject to strict guidelines and safeguards to ensure that confidentiality is protected as much as possible.

The term "developing countries" is a socio-economic classification used to describe nations that are in the process of industrialization and modernization. This term is often used interchangeably with "low and middle-income countries" or "Global South." The World Bank defines developing countries as those with a gross national income (GNI) per capita of less than US $12,695.

In the context of healthcare, developing countries face unique challenges including limited access to quality medical care, lack of resources and infrastructure, high burden of infectious diseases, and a shortage of trained healthcare professionals. These factors contribute to significant disparities in health outcomes between developing and developed nations.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but the term "Private Sector" is not a medical definition. It is an economic and sociopolitical term that refers to businesses and organizations which are not owned or controlled by the government. They can be privately owned and operated for profit, such as corporations, partnerships, and sole proprietorships, or they can be non-profit organizations, such as charities and advocacy groups. The private sector is distinct from the "Public Sector," which includes entities that are owned and controlled by the government, like public schools, hospitals, and other services provided by the state.

Health services needs refer to the population's requirement for healthcare services based on their health status, disease prevalence, and clinical guidelines. These needs can be categorized into normative needs (based on expert opinions or clinical guidelines) and expressed needs (based on individuals' perceptions of their own healthcare needs).

On the other hand, health services demand refers to the quantity of healthcare services that consumers are willing and able to pay for, given their preferences, values, and financial resources. Demand is influenced by various factors such as price, income, education level, and cultural beliefs.

It's important to note that while needs represent a population's requirement for healthcare services, demand reflects the actual utilization of these services. Understanding both health services needs and demand is crucial in planning and delivering effective healthcare services that meet the population's requirements while ensuring efficient resource allocation.

'Guidelines' in the medical context are systematically developed statements or sets of recommendations designed to assist healthcare professionals and patients in making informed decisions about appropriate health care for specific clinical circumstances. They are based on a thorough evaluation of the available evidence, including scientific studies, expert opinions, and patient values. Guidelines may cover a wide range of topics, such as diagnosis, treatment, prevention, screening, and management of various diseases and conditions. They aim to standardize care, improve patient outcomes, reduce unnecessary variations in practice, and promote efficient use of healthcare resources.

Costs refer to the total amount of resources, such as money, time, and labor, that are expended in the provision of a medical service or treatment. Costs can be categorized into direct costs, which include expenses directly related to patient care, such as medication, supplies, and personnel; and indirect costs, which include overhead expenses, such as rent, utilities, and administrative salaries.

Cost analysis is the process of estimating and evaluating the total cost of a medical service or treatment. This involves identifying and quantifying all direct and indirect costs associated with the provision of care, and analyzing how these costs may vary based on factors such as patient volume, resource utilization, and reimbursement rates.

Cost analysis is an important tool for healthcare organizations to understand the financial implications of their operations and make informed decisions about resource allocation, pricing strategies, and quality improvement initiatives. It can also help policymakers and payers evaluate the cost-effectiveness of different treatment options and develop evidence-based guidelines for clinical practice.

"California" is a geographical location and does not have a medical definition. It is a state located on the west coast of the United States, known for its diverse landscape including mountains, beaches, and forests. However, in some contexts, "California" may refer to certain medical conditions or situations that are associated with the state, such as:

* California encephalitis: a viral infection transmitted by mosquitoes that is common in California and other western states.
* California king snake: a non-venomous snake species found in California and other parts of the southwestern United States, which can bite and cause allergic reactions in some people.
* California roll: a type of sushi roll that originated in California and is made with avocado, cucumber, and crab meat, which may pose an allergy risk for some individuals.

It's important to note that these uses of "California" are not medical definitions per se, but rather descriptive terms that refer to specific conditions or situations associated with the state.

I am not a medical professional, but I can tell you that the term "crime" is typically not used in a medical context. A crime is a violation of laws or regulations established by a government and enforced by its authorities. It's a legal concept, not a medical one. However, there are some overlaps between criminal behavior and mental health, as certain mental health conditions may increase the risk of criminal behavior. But it's essential to understand that having a mental health condition does not automatically make someone a criminal.

Smoking is not a medical condition, but it's a significant health risk behavior. Here is the definition from a public health perspective:

Smoking is the act of inhaling and exhaling the smoke of burning tobacco that is commonly consumed through cigarettes, pipes, and cigars. The smoke contains over 7,000 chemicals, including nicotine, tar, carbon monoxide, and numerous toxic and carcinogenic substances. These toxins contribute to a wide range of diseases and health conditions, such as lung cancer, heart disease, stroke, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and various other cancers, as well as adverse reproductive outcomes and negative impacts on the developing fetus during pregnancy. Smoking is highly addictive due to the nicotine content, which makes quitting smoking a significant challenge for many individuals.

Insurance coverage, in the context of healthcare and medicine, refers to the financial protection provided by an insurance policy that covers all or a portion of the cost of medical services, treatments, and prescription drugs. The coverage is typically offered by health insurance companies, employers, or government programs such as Medicare and Medicaid.

The specific services and treatments covered by insurance, as well as the out-of-pocket costs borne by the insured individual, are determined by the terms of the insurance policy. These terms may include deductibles, copayments, coinsurance, and coverage limits or exclusions. The goal of insurance coverage is to help individuals manage the financial risks associated with healthcare expenses and ensure access to necessary medical services.

Program Evaluation is a systematic and objective assessment of a healthcare program's design, implementation, and outcomes. It is a medical term used to describe the process of determining the relevance, effectiveness, and efficiency of a program in achieving its goals and objectives. Program evaluation involves collecting and analyzing data related to various aspects of the program, such as its reach, impact, cost-effectiveness, and quality. The results of program evaluation can be used to improve the design and implementation of existing programs or to inform the development of new ones. It is a critical tool for ensuring that healthcare programs are meeting the needs of their intended audiences and delivering high-quality care in an efficient and effective manner.

Health status disparities refer to differences in the health outcomes that are observed between different populations. These populations can be defined by various sociodemographic factors such as race, ethnicity, sex, gender identity, sexual orientation, age, disability, income, education level, and geographic location. Health status disparities can manifest as differences in rates of illness, disease prevalence or incidence, morbidity, mortality, access to healthcare services, and quality of care received. These disparities are often the result of systemic inequities and social determinants of health that negatively impact certain populations, leading to worse health outcomes compared to other groups. It is important to note that health status disparities are preventable and can be addressed through targeted public health interventions and policies aimed at reducing health inequities.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but the term "Great Britain" is not a medical concept or condition. It is a geographical and political term referring to the largest island in the British Isles, on which the majority of England, Scotland, and Wales are located. It's also used to refer to the political union of these three countries, which is called the United Kingdom. Therefore, it doesn't have a medical definition.

Translational medical research, also known as "translational research," refers to the process of turning basic scientific discoveries into clinical interventions that improve human health and well-being. This type of research aims to "translate" findings from laboratory, animal, or cellular studies into practical applications for the prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of human diseases.

Translational medical research typically involves a multidisciplinary approach, bringing together researchers from various fields such as biology, chemistry, engineering, genetics, and medicine to work collaboratively on solving complex health problems. The process often includes several stages, including:

1. Identifying basic scientific discoveries that have the potential to be translated into clinical applications.
2. Developing and optimizing new diagnostic tools, drugs, or therapies based on these discoveries.
3. Conducting preclinical studies in the laboratory or with animal models to evaluate the safety and efficacy of these interventions.
4. Designing and implementing clinical trials to test the effectiveness and safety of the new interventions in human patients.
5. Disseminating research findings to the scientific community, healthcare providers, and the public to facilitate the adoption of new practices or treatments.

Translational medical research is essential for bridging the gap between basic scientific discoveries and clinical applications, ultimately improving patient care and outcomes.

Biomedical research is a branch of scientific research that involves the study of biological processes and diseases in order to develop new treatments and therapies. This type of research often involves the use of laboratory techniques, such as cell culture and genetic engineering, as well as clinical trials in humans. The goal of biomedical research is to advance our understanding of how living organisms function and to find ways to prevent and treat various medical conditions. It encompasses a wide range of disciplines, including molecular biology, genetics, immunology, pharmacology, and neuroscience, among others. Ultimately, the aim of biomedical research is to improve human health and well-being.

Decision-making is the cognitive process of selecting a course of action from among multiple alternatives. In a medical context, decision-making refers to the process by which healthcare professionals and patients make choices about medical tests, treatments, or management options based on a thorough evaluation of available information, including the patient's preferences, values, and circumstances.

The decision-making process in medicine typically involves several steps:

1. Identifying the problem or issue that requires a decision.
2. Gathering relevant information about the patient's medical history, current condition, diagnostic test results, treatment options, and potential outcomes.
3. Considering the benefits, risks, and uncertainties associated with each option.
4. Evaluating the patient's preferences, values, and goals.
5. Selecting the most appropriate course of action based on a careful weighing of the available evidence and the patient's individual needs and circumstances.
6. Communicating the decision to the patient and ensuring that they understand the rationale behind it, as well as any potential risks or benefits.
7. Monitoring the outcomes of the decision and adjusting the course of action as needed based on ongoing evaluation and feedback.

Effective decision-making in medicine requires a thorough understanding of medical evidence, clinical expertise, and patient preferences. It also involves careful consideration of ethical principles, such as respect for autonomy, non-maleficence, beneficence, and justice. Ultimately, the goal of decision-making in healthcare is to promote the best possible outcomes for patients while minimizing harm and respecting their individual needs and values.

I'm happy to help, but it seems there might be some confusion in your question. "Interviews" is a broad topic that isn't typically a medical term or subject. However, interviews can certainly be a part of medical settings and procedures, such as job interviews for healthcare positions, patient interviews during medical consultations, or research interviews in clinical studies.

In the context of medical education, an interview might refer to the process by which medical schools evaluate applicants for admission, known as the medical school interview. This is a critical component of the application process and typically involves one-on-one conversations between the applicant and an admissions committee member or a series of multiple mini-interviews (MMIs) with various evaluators.

If you could provide more context or clarify what you mean by "Interviews as Topic" in a medical setting, I'd be happy to help further!

Health status is a term used to describe the overall condition of an individual's health, including physical, mental, and social well-being. It is often assessed through various measures such as medical history, physical examination, laboratory tests, and self-reported health assessments. Health status can be used to identify health disparities, track changes in population health over time, and evaluate the effectiveness of healthcare interventions.

Health education is the process of providing information and strategies to individuals and communities about how to improve their health and prevent disease. It involves teaching and learning activities that aim to empower people to make informed decisions and take responsible actions regarding their health. Health education covers a wide range of topics, including nutrition, physical activity, sexual and reproductive health, mental health, substance abuse prevention, and environmental health. The ultimate goal of health education is to promote healthy behaviors and lifestyles that can lead to improved health outcomes and quality of life.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "housing" is not a term that has a medical definition. In a general sense, housing refers to a place where someone lives, such as a house or apartment. If you have any questions related to healthcare, medicine, or health-related topics, I would be happy to try to help answer them.

Cost-benefit analysis (CBA) is a systematic process used to compare the costs and benefits of different options to determine which one provides the greatest net benefit. In a medical context, CBA can be used to evaluate the value of medical interventions, treatments, or policies by estimating and monetizing all the relevant costs and benefits associated with each option.

The costs included in a CBA may include direct costs such as the cost of the intervention or treatment itself, as well as indirect costs such as lost productivity or time away from work. Benefits may include improved health outcomes, reduced morbidity or mortality, and increased quality of life.

Once all the relevant costs and benefits have been identified and quantified, they are typically expressed in monetary terms to allow for a direct comparison. The option with the highest net benefit (i.e., the difference between total benefits and total costs) is considered the most cost-effective.

It's important to note that CBA has some limitations and can be subject to various biases and assumptions, so it should be used in conjunction with other evaluation methods to ensure a comprehensive understanding of the value of medical interventions or policies.

Violence is not typically defined in medical terms, but it can be described as the intentional use of physical force or power, threatened or actual, against oneself, another person, or against a group or community, that either results in or has a high likelihood of resulting in injury, death, psychological harm, maldevelopment, or deprivation. This definition is often used in public health and medical research to understand the impact of violence on health outcomes.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "income" is not a medical term. Income is an economic term that refers to the inflow of monetary resources or earnings that an individual or household receives from various sources, such as employment, investments, or government benefits. It is typically used in financial and economic contexts rather than medical ones. If you have any questions related to medical terminology or concepts, I would be happy to help with those!

The term "Theoretical Models" is used in various scientific fields, including medicine, to describe a representation of a complex system or phenomenon. It is a simplified framework that explains how different components of the system interact with each other and how they contribute to the overall behavior of the system. Theoretical models are often used in medical research to understand and predict the outcomes of diseases, treatments, or public health interventions.

A theoretical model can take many forms, such as mathematical equations, computer simulations, or conceptual diagrams. It is based on a set of assumptions and hypotheses about the underlying mechanisms that drive the system. By manipulating these variables and observing the effects on the model's output, researchers can test their assumptions and generate new insights into the system's behavior.

Theoretical models are useful for medical research because they allow scientists to explore complex systems in a controlled and systematic way. They can help identify key drivers of disease or treatment outcomes, inform the design of clinical trials, and guide the development of new interventions. However, it is important to recognize that theoretical models are simplifications of reality and may not capture all the nuances and complexities of real-world systems. Therefore, they should be used in conjunction with other forms of evidence, such as experimental data and observational studies, to inform medical decision-making.

A questionnaire in the medical context is a standardized, systematic, and structured tool used to gather information from individuals regarding their symptoms, medical history, lifestyle, or other health-related factors. It typically consists of a series of written questions that can be either self-administered or administered by an interviewer. Questionnaires are widely used in various areas of healthcare, including clinical research, epidemiological studies, patient care, and health services evaluation to collect data that can inform diagnosis, treatment planning, and population health management. They provide a consistent and organized method for obtaining information from large groups or individual patients, helping to ensure accurate and comprehensive data collection while minimizing bias and variability in the information gathered.

Health services research (HSR) is a multidisciplinary field of scientific investigation that studies how social factors, financing systems, organizational structures and processes, health technologies, and personal behaviors affect access to healthcare, the quality and cost of care, and ultimately, our health and well-being. The goal of HSR is to inform policy and practice, improve system performance, and enhance the health and well-being of individuals and communities. It involves the use of various research methods, including epidemiology, biostatistics, economics, sociology, management science, political science, and psychology, to answer questions about the healthcare system and how it can be improved.

Examples of HSR topics include:

* Evaluating the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of different healthcare interventions and technologies
* Studying patient-centered care and patient experiences with the healthcare system
* Examining healthcare workforce issues, such as shortages of primary care providers or the impact of nurse-to-patient ratios on patient outcomes
* Investigating the impact of health insurance design and financing systems on access to care and health disparities
* Analyzing the organization and delivery of healthcare services in different settings, such as hospitals, clinics, and long-term care facilities
* Identifying best practices for improving healthcare quality and safety, reducing medical errors, and eliminating wasteful or unnecessary care.

Smoking cessation is the process of discontinuing tobacco smoking. This can be achieved through various methods such as behavioral modifications, counseling, and medication. The goal of smoking cessation is to improve overall health, reduce the risk of tobacco-related diseases, and enhance quality of life. It is a significant step towards preventing lung cancer, heart disease, stroke, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and other serious health conditions.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "prejudice" is not a term that has a medical definition in the same way that a term like "myocardial infarction" (heart attack) does. Prejudice is a psychological or sociological concept that refers to preconceived opinions or attitudes about a person or group that are not based on reason or actual experience. It often involves stereotypes and can lead to discrimination or unfair treatment. While prejudice itself is not a medical condition, it can certainly have impacts on mental and physical health, both for those who experience it and for those who hold such biases.

A medical definition of 'food' would be:

"Substances consumed by living organisms, usually in the form of meals, which contain necessary nutrients such as carbohydrates, proteins, fats, vitamins, minerals, and water. These substances are broken down during digestion to provide energy, build and repair tissues, and regulate bodily functions."

It's important to note that while this is a medical definition, it also aligns with common understanding of what food is.

A research design in medical or healthcare research is a systematic plan that guides the execution and reporting of research to address a specific research question or objective. It outlines the overall strategy for collecting, analyzing, and interpreting data to draw valid conclusions. The design includes details about the type of study (e.g., experimental, observational), sampling methods, data collection techniques, data analysis approaches, and any potential sources of bias or confounding that need to be controlled for. A well-defined research design helps ensure that the results are reliable, generalizable, and relevant to the research question, ultimately contributing to evidence-based practice in medicine and healthcare.

Managed care programs are a type of health insurance plan that aims to control healthcare costs and improve the quality of care by managing the utilization of healthcare services. They do this by using a network of healthcare providers who have agreed to provide services at reduced rates, and by implementing various strategies such as utilization review, case management, and preventive care.

In managed care programs, there is usually a primary care physician (PCP) who acts as the patient's main doctor and coordinates their care within the network of providers. Patients may need a referral from their PCP to see specialists or access certain services. Managed care programs can take various forms, including Health Maintenance Organizations (HMOs), Preferred Provider Organizations (PPOs), Point-of-Service (POS) plans, and Exclusive Provider Organizations (EPOs).

The goal of managed care programs is to provide cost-effective healthcare services while maintaining or improving the quality of care. They can help patients save money on healthcare costs by providing coverage for a range of services at lower rates than traditional fee-for-service plans, but they may also limit patient choice and require prior authorization for certain procedures or treatments.

A cross-sectional study is a type of observational research design that examines the relationship between variables at one point in time. It provides a snapshot or a "cross-section" of the population at a particular moment, allowing researchers to estimate the prevalence of a disease or condition and identify potential risk factors or associations.

In a cross-sectional study, data is collected from a sample of participants at a single time point, and the variables of interest are measured simultaneously. This design can be used to investigate the association between exposure and outcome, but it cannot establish causality because it does not follow changes over time.

Cross-sectional studies can be conducted using various data collection methods, such as surveys, interviews, or medical examinations. They are often used in epidemiology to estimate the prevalence of a disease or condition in a population and to identify potential risk factors that may contribute to its development. However, because cross-sectional studies only provide a snapshot of the population at one point in time, they cannot account for changes over time or determine whether exposure preceded the outcome.

Therefore, while cross-sectional studies can be useful for generating hypotheses and identifying potential associations between variables, further research using other study designs, such as cohort or case-control studies, is necessary to establish causality and confirm any findings.

Traffic accidents are incidents that occur when a vehicle collides with another vehicle, a pedestrian, an animal, or a stationary object, resulting in damage or injury. These accidents can be caused by various factors such as driver error, distracted driving, drunk driving, speeding, reckless driving, poor road conditions, and adverse weather conditions. Traffic accidents can range from minor fender benders to severe crashes that result in serious injuries or fatalities. They are a significant public health concern and cause a substantial burden on healthcare systems, emergency services, and society as a whole.

Informed consent is a process in medical care where patients are provided with all relevant information about their health status, proposed treatments, potential risks and benefits, and alternative options. This allows patients to make informed decisions regarding their healthcare and understand the consequences of their choices. The process includes ensuring that the patient has adequate mental capacity to make such decisions, is fully aware of the implications, and gives their voluntary agreement for the proposed treatment or procedure. It's a fundamental principle in medical ethics and is required by law in many jurisdictions to protect patients' rights.

Healthcare disparities refer to differences in the quality, accessibility, and outcomes of healthcare that are systematically related to social or economic disadvantage. These disparities may exist between different racial, ethnic, socioeconomic, gender, sexual orientation, geographic, or disability status groups. They can result from a complex interplay of factors including provider bias, patient-provider communication, health system policies, and structural racism, among others. Healthcare disparities often lead to worse health outcomes and reduced quality of life for disadvantaged populations.

"Health Knowledge, Attitudes, and Practices" (HKAP) is a term used in public health to refer to the knowledge, beliefs, assumptions, and behaviors that individuals possess or engage in that are related to health. Here's a brief definition of each component:

1. Health Knowledge: Refers to the factual information and understanding that individuals have about various health-related topics, such as anatomy, physiology, disease processes, and healthy behaviors.
2. Attitudes: Represent the positive or negative evaluations, feelings, or dispositions that people hold towards certain health issues, practices, or services. These attitudes can influence their willingness to adopt and maintain healthy behaviors.
3. Practices: Encompass the specific actions or habits that individuals engage in related to their health, such as dietary choices, exercise routines, hygiene practices, and use of healthcare services.

HKAP is a multidimensional concept that helps public health professionals understand and address various factors influencing individual and community health outcomes. By assessing and addressing knowledge gaps, negative attitudes, or unhealthy practices, interventions can be designed to promote positive behavior change and improve overall health status.

I'm happy to help, but I need to clarify that "residence characteristics" is not a commonly used medical term. It is more related to the field of public health or epidemiology. However, if you are asking for the characteristics of a residence that could be relevant to medical or health research, they might include:

1. Housing type (single-family home, apartment, mobile home, etc.)
2. Age and condition of the housing unit
3. Presence of environmental hazards (lead paint, asbestos, radon, etc.)
4. Quality of heating, ventilation, and air conditioning systems
5. Access to clean water and sanitation facilities
6. Safety features (smoke detectors, carbon monoxide detectors, etc.)
7. Presence of pests (rodents, cockroaches, bed bugs, etc.)
8. Neighborhood characteristics (crime rates, access to healthy food options, walkability, etc.)

These factors can all have an impact on the health outcomes of individuals and communities, and are often studied in public health research.

Organizational decision-making is a management process in which a group or team within an organization makes a judgment or choice among several options or alternatives to achieve specific goals or objectives. This process involves collecting and analyzing information, evaluating alternatives, selecting the best option, and implementing and monitoring the decision. It often requires collaboration, communication, and consensus-building among team members with diverse perspectives and expertise. Effective organizational decision-making can lead to better outcomes, improved performance, and increased innovation, while poor decision-making can result in missed opportunities, wasted resources, and decreased competitiveness.

I apologize for any confusion, but "Australia" is not a medical term or concept. It is the world's largest island and smallest continent, located in the Southern Hemisphere, surrounded by the Pacific and Indian Oceans. It is composed of many diverse ecosystems, including deserts, rainforests, and coastal areas, and is home to a wide variety of unique plant and animal species.

If you have any questions related to medical terminology or health-related topics, I would be happy to try and help answer them for you!

Health behavior can be defined as a series of actions and decisions that individuals take to protect, maintain or promote their health and well-being. These behaviors can include activities such as engaging in regular exercise, eating a healthy diet, getting sufficient sleep, practicing safe sex, avoiding tobacco and excessive alcohol consumption, and managing stress.

Health behaviors are influenced by various factors, including knowledge and attitudes towards health, beliefs and values, cultural norms, social support networks, environmental factors, and individual genetic predispositions. Understanding health behaviors is essential for developing effective public health interventions and promoting healthy lifestyles to prevent chronic diseases and improve overall quality of life.

An "attitude to health" is a set of beliefs, values, and behaviors that an individual holds regarding their own health and well-being. It encompasses their overall approach to maintaining good health, preventing illness, seeking medical care, and managing any existing health conditions.

A positive attitude to health typically includes:

1. A belief in the importance of self-care and taking responsibility for one's own health.
2. Engaging in regular exercise, eating a balanced diet, getting enough sleep, and avoiding harmful behaviors such as smoking and excessive alcohol consumption.
3. Regular check-ups and screenings to detect potential health issues early on.
4. Seeking medical care when necessary and following recommended treatment plans.
5. A willingness to learn about and implement new healthy habits and lifestyle changes.
6. Developing a strong support network of family, friends, and healthcare professionals.

On the other hand, a negative attitude to health may involve:

1. Neglecting self-care and failing to take responsibility for one's own health.
2. Engaging in unhealthy behaviors such as sedentary lifestyle, poor diet, lack of sleep, smoking, and excessive alcohol consumption.
3. Avoidance of regular check-ups and screenings, leading to delayed detection and treatment of potential health issues.
4. Resistance to seeking medical care or following recommended treatment plans.
5. Closed-mindedness towards new healthy habits and lifestyle changes.
6. Lack of a support network or reluctance to seek help from others.

Overall, an individual's attitude to health can significantly impact their physical and mental well-being, as well as their ability to manage and overcome any health challenges that may arise.

A "social environment" is not a term that has a specific medical definition, but it is often used in the context of public health and social sciences to refer to the physical and social conditions, relationships, and organized institutions that influence the health and well-being of individuals and communities.

The social environment includes factors such as:

* Social support networks (family, friends, community)
* Cultural norms and values
* Socioeconomic status (income, education, occupation)
* Housing and neighborhood conditions
* Access to resources (food, healthcare, transportation)
* Exposure to discrimination, violence, and other stressors

These factors can have a significant impact on health outcomes, as they can influence behaviors related to health (such as diet, exercise, and substance use), as well as exposure to disease and access to healthcare. Understanding the social environment is essential for developing effective public health interventions and policies that promote health equity and reduce health disparities.

Prevalence, in medical terms, refers to the total number of people in a given population who have a particular disease or condition at a specific point in time, or over a specified period. It is typically expressed as a percentage or a ratio of the number of cases to the size of the population. Prevalence differs from incidence, which measures the number of new cases that develop during a certain period.

Health care costs refer to the expenses incurred for medical services, treatments, procedures, and products that are used to maintain or restore an individual's health. These costs can be categorized into several types:

1. Direct costs: These include payments made for doctor visits, hospital stays, medications, diagnostic tests, surgeries, and other medical treatments and services. Direct costs can be further divided into two subcategories:
* Out-of-pocket costs: Expenses paid directly by patients, such as co-payments, deductibles, coinsurance, and any uncovered medical services or products.
* Third-party payer costs: Expenses covered by insurance companies, government programs (like Medicare, Medicaid), or other entities that pay for health care services on behalf of patients.
2. Indirect costs: These are the expenses incurred as a result of illness or injury that indirectly impact an individual's ability to work and earn a living. Examples include lost productivity, absenteeism, reduced earning capacity, and disability benefits.
3. Non-medical costs: These are expenses related to caregiving, transportation, home modifications, assistive devices, and other non-medical services required for managing health conditions or disabilities.

Health care costs can vary significantly depending on factors such as the type of medical service, geographic location, insurance coverage, and individual health status. Understanding these costs is essential for patients, healthcare providers, policymakers, and researchers to make informed decisions about treatment options, resource allocation, and health system design.

The term "environment" in a medical context generally refers to the external conditions and surroundings that can have an impact on living organisms, including humans. This includes both physical factors such as air quality, water supply, soil composition, temperature, and radiation, as well as biological factors such as the presence of microorganisms, plants, and animals.

In public health and epidemiology, the term "environmental exposure" is often used to describe the contact between an individual and a potentially harmful environmental agent, such as air pollution or contaminated water. These exposures can have significant impacts on human health, contributing to a range of diseases and disorders, including respiratory illnesses, cancer, neurological disorders, and reproductive problems.

Efforts to protect and improve the environment are therefore critical for promoting human health and preventing disease. This includes measures to reduce pollution, conserve natural resources, promote sustainable development, and mitigate the impacts of climate change.

"Forecasting" is not a term that has a specific medical definition. It is a general term used in various fields, including finance, economics, and meteorology, to describe the process of making predictions or estimates about future events or trends based on historical data, trends, and other relevant factors. In healthcare and public health, forecasting may be used to predict the spread of diseases, identify potential shortages of resources such as hospital beds or medical equipment, or plan for future health care needs. However, there is no medical definition for "forecasting" itself.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "New York" is not a medical term or concept. New York refers to a state in the United States, as well as its largest city. If you have any questions about medical terminology or concepts, I would be happy to help with those!

Quality of health care is a term that refers to the degree to which health services for individuals and populations increase the likelihood of desired health outcomes and are consistent with current professional knowledge. It encompasses various aspects such as:

1. Clinical effectiveness: The use of best available evidence to make decisions about prevention, diagnosis, treatment, and care. This includes considering the benefits and harms of different options and making sure that the most effective interventions are used.
2. Safety: Preventing harm to patients and minimizing risks associated with healthcare. This involves identifying potential hazards, implementing measures to reduce errors, and learning from adverse events to improve systems and processes.
3. Patient-centeredness: Providing care that is respectful of and responsive to individual patient preferences, needs, and values. This includes ensuring that patients are fully informed about their condition and treatment options, involving them in decision-making, and providing emotional support throughout the care process.
4. Timeliness: Ensuring that healthcare services are delivered promptly and efficiently, without unnecessary delays. This includes coordinating care across different providers and settings to ensure continuity and avoid gaps in service.
5. Efficiency: Using resources wisely and avoiding waste, while still providing high-quality care. This involves considering the costs and benefits of different interventions, as well as ensuring that healthcare services are equitably distributed.
6. Equitability: Ensuring that all individuals have access to quality healthcare services, regardless of their socioeconomic status, race, ethnicity, gender, age, or other factors. This includes addressing disparities in health outcomes and promoting fairness and justice in healthcare.

Overall, the quality of health care is a multidimensional concept that requires ongoing evaluation and improvement to ensure that patients receive the best possible care.

Demography is the statistical study of populations, particularly in terms of size, distribution, and characteristics such as age, race, gender, and occupation. In medical contexts, demography is often used to analyze health-related data and trends within specific populations. This can include studying the prevalence of certain diseases or conditions, identifying disparities in healthcare access and outcomes, and evaluating the effectiveness of public health interventions. Demographic data can also be used to inform policy decisions and allocate resources to address population health needs.

Medical Definition:

"Risk factors" are any attribute, characteristic or exposure of an individual that increases the likelihood of developing a disease or injury. They can be divided into modifiable and non-modifiable risk factors. Modifiable risk factors are those that can be changed through lifestyle choices or medical treatment, while non-modifiable risk factors are inherent traits such as age, gender, or genetic predisposition. Examples of modifiable risk factors include smoking, alcohol consumption, physical inactivity, and unhealthy diet, while non-modifiable risk factors include age, sex, and family history. It is important to note that having a risk factor does not guarantee that a person will develop the disease, but rather indicates an increased susceptibility.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Mexico" is not a medical term or concept. It is the name of a country located in North America. If you have any questions related to medical topics, I would be happy to try and help answer those for you.

Health status indicators are measures used to assess and monitor the health and well-being of a population. They provide information about various aspects of health, such as mortality rates, morbidity rates, prevalence of chronic diseases, lifestyle factors, environmental exposures, and access to healthcare services. These indicators can be used to identify trends and disparities in health outcomes, inform policy decisions, allocate resources, and evaluate the effectiveness of public health interventions. Examples of health status indicators include life expectancy, infant mortality rate, prevalence of diabetes, smoking rates, and access to primary care.

Practice guidelines, also known as clinical practice guidelines, are systematically developed statements that aim to assist healthcare professionals and patients in making informed decisions about appropriate health care for specific clinical circumstances. They are based on a thorough evaluation of the available scientific evidence, consensus of expert opinion, and consideration of patient preferences. Practice guidelines can cover a wide range of topics, including diagnosis, management, prevention, and treatment options for various medical conditions. They are intended to improve the quality and consistency of care, reduce unnecessary variations in practice, and promote evidence-based medicine. However, they should not replace clinical judgment or individualized patient care.

Pregnancy is a physiological state or condition where a fertilized egg (zygote) successfully implants and grows in the uterus of a woman, leading to the development of an embryo and finally a fetus. This process typically spans approximately 40 weeks, divided into three trimesters, and culminates in childbirth. Throughout this period, numerous hormonal and physical changes occur to support the growing offspring, including uterine enlargement, breast development, and various maternal adaptations to ensure the fetus's optimal growth and well-being.

A newborn infant is a baby who is within the first 28 days of life. This period is also referred to as the neonatal period. Newborns require specialized care and attention due to their immature bodily systems and increased vulnerability to various health issues. They are closely monitored for signs of well-being, growth, and development during this critical time.

'Alcohol drinking' refers to the consumption of alcoholic beverages, which contain ethanol (ethyl alcohol) as the active ingredient. Ethanol is a central nervous system depressant that can cause euphoria, disinhibition, and sedation when consumed in small to moderate amounts. However, excessive drinking can lead to alcohol intoxication, with symptoms ranging from slurred speech and impaired coordination to coma and death.

Alcohol is metabolized in the liver by enzymes such as alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) and aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH). The breakdown of ethanol produces acetaldehyde, a toxic compound that can cause damage to various organs in the body. Chronic alcohol drinking can lead to a range of health problems, including liver disease, pancreatitis, cardiovascular disease, neurological disorders, and increased risk of cancer.

Moderate drinking is generally defined as up to one drink per day for women and up to two drinks per day for men, where a standard drink contains about 14 grams (0.6 ounces) of pure alcohol. However, it's important to note that there are no safe levels of alcohol consumption, and any level of drinking carries some risk to health.

Environmental exposure refers to the contact of an individual with any chemical, physical, or biological agent in the environment that can cause a harmful effect on health. These exposures can occur through various pathways such as inhalation, ingestion, or skin contact. Examples of environmental exposures include air pollution, water contamination, occupational chemicals, and allergens. The duration and level of exposure, as well as the susceptibility of the individual, can all contribute to the risk of developing an adverse health effect.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Urban Population" is not a medical term. It is a demographic term used to describe the portion of a country's population that lives in areas classified as urban. The United Nations defines an urban area as a city, town, or other agglomeration with a population of 20,000 or more. However, the specific definition can vary by country and organization.

In contrast, medical terms typically refer to conditions, diseases, symptoms, treatments, or healthcare-related concepts. If you have any questions related to health or medicine, I'd be happy to help if I can!

Risk assessment in the medical context refers to the process of identifying, evaluating, and prioritizing risks to patients, healthcare workers, or the community related to healthcare delivery. It involves determining the likelihood and potential impact of adverse events or hazards, such as infectious diseases, medication errors, or medical devices failures, and implementing measures to mitigate or manage those risks. The goal of risk assessment is to promote safe and high-quality care by identifying areas for improvement and taking action to minimize harm.

A mental disorder is a syndrome characterized by clinically significant disturbance in an individual's cognition, emotion regulation, or behavior. It's associated with distress and/or impaired functioning in social, occupational, or other important areas of life, often leading to a decrease in quality of life. These disorders are typically persistent and can be severe and disabling. They may be related to factors such as genetics, early childhood experiences, or trauma. Examples include depression, anxiety disorders, bipolar disorder, schizophrenia, and personality disorders. It's important to note that a diagnosis should be made by a qualified mental health professional.

Substance-related disorders, as defined in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5), refer to a group of conditions caused by the use of substances such as alcohol, drugs, or medicines. These disorders are characterized by a problematic pattern of using a substance that leads to clinically significant impairment or distress. They can be divided into two main categories: substance use disorders and substance-induced disorders. Substance use disorders involve a pattern of compulsive use despite negative consequences, while substance-induced disorders include conditions such as intoxication, withdrawal, and substance/medication-induced mental disorders. The specific diagnosis depends on the type of substance involved, the patterns of use, and the presence or absence of physiological dependence.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "International Cooperation" is not a medical term. It refers to the collaboration and exchange of resources and information between countries or international organizations in various fields, including politics, economics, culture, environment, and security, among others. In the context of healthcare and medicine, international cooperation can involve joint research projects, sharing of data and clinical trial results, collaborative efforts to combat global health issues (such as infectious diseases or chronic conditions), capacity building in low-resource settings, and standardizing medical practices and guidelines across countries.

Population surveillance in a public health and medical context refers to the ongoing, systematic collection, analysis, interpretation, and dissemination of health-related data for a defined population over time. It aims to monitor the health status, identify emerging health threats or trends, and evaluate the impact of interventions within that population. This information is used to inform public health policy, prioritize healthcare resources, and guide disease prevention and control efforts. Population surveillance can involve various data sources, such as vital records, disease registries, surveys, and electronic health records.

Educational status refers to the level or stage of education that a person has reached. It can be used to describe an individual's educational background, achievements, and qualifications. Educational status can be categorized in various ways, including by level (e.g., elementary school, high school, college, graduate school), years of schooling completed, or type of degree earned (e.g., bachelor's, master's, doctoral).

In medical settings, educational status may be used as a demographic variable to describe the characteristics of a patient population or to identify potential disparities in health outcomes based on education level. Research has shown that higher levels of education are often associated with better health outcomes, including lower rates of chronic diseases and improved mental health. Therefore, understanding a patient's educational status can help healthcare providers tailor their care and education strategies to meet the unique needs and challenges of each individual.

Obesity is a complex disease characterized by an excess accumulation of body fat to the extent that it negatively impacts health. It's typically defined using Body Mass Index (BMI), a measure calculated from a person's weight and height. A BMI of 30 or higher is indicative of obesity. However, it's important to note that while BMI can be a useful tool for identifying obesity in populations, it does not directly measure body fat and may not accurately reflect health status in individuals. Other factors such as waist circumference, blood pressure, cholesterol levels, and blood sugar levels should also be considered when assessing health risks associated with weight.

A wound is a type of injury that occurs when the skin or other tissues are cut, pierced, torn, or otherwise broken. Wounds can be caused by a variety of factors, including accidents, violence, surgery, or certain medical conditions. There are several different types of wounds, including:

* Incisions: These are cuts that are made deliberately, often during surgery. They are usually straight and clean.
* Lacerations: These are tears in the skin or other tissues. They can be irregular and jagged.
* Abrasions: These occur when the top layer of skin is scraped off. They may look like a bruise or a scab.
* Punctures: These are wounds that are caused by sharp objects, such as needles or knives. They are usually small and deep.
* Avulsions: These occur when tissue is forcibly torn away from the body. They can be very serious and require immediate medical attention.

Injuries refer to any harm or damage to the body, including wounds. Injuries can range from minor scrapes and bruises to more severe injuries such as fractures, dislocations, and head trauma. It is important to seek medical attention for any injury that is causing significant pain, swelling, or bleeding, or if there is a suspected bone fracture or head injury.

In general, wounds and injuries should be cleaned and covered with a sterile bandage to prevent infection. Depending on the severity of the wound or injury, additional medical treatment may be necessary. This may include stitches for deep cuts, immobilization for broken bones, or surgery for more serious injuries. It is important to follow your healthcare provider's instructions carefully to ensure proper healing and to prevent complications.

Health surveys are research studies that collect data from a sample population to describe the current health status, health behaviors, and healthcare utilization of a particular group or community. These surveys may include questions about various aspects of health such as physical health, mental health, chronic conditions, lifestyle habits, access to healthcare services, and demographic information. The data collected from health surveys can be used to monitor trends in health over time, identify disparities in health outcomes, develop and evaluate public health programs and policies, and inform resource allocation decisions. Examples of national health surveys include the National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) and the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS).

I believe there may be some confusion in your question. "Schools" is not a medical term. It generally refers to educational institutions where children or adults receive instruction in various subjects. If you are asking about a medical condition that might be associated with the word "school," it's possible you could mean "psychological disorders that first present or become evident during the school-aged period (approximately 5-18 years of age)." These disorders can include, but are not limited to, ADHD, learning disabilities, anxiety disorders, and mood disorders. However, without more context, it's difficult for me to provide a more specific answer.

Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome (AIDS) is a chronic, life-threatening condition caused by the Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV). AIDS is the most advanced stage of HIV infection, characterized by the significant weakening of the immune system, making the person more susceptible to various opportunistic infections and cancers.

The medical definition of AIDS includes specific criteria based on CD4+ T-cell count or the presence of certain opportunistic infections and diseases. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), a person with HIV is diagnosed with AIDS when:

1. The CD4+ T-cell count falls below 200 cells per cubic millimeter of blood (mm3) - a normal range is typically between 500 and 1,600 cells/mm3.
2. They develop one or more opportunistic infections or cancers that are indicative of advanced HIV disease, regardless of their CD4+ T-cell count.

Some examples of these opportunistic infections and cancers include:

* Pneumocystis pneumonia (PCP)
* Candidiasis (thrush) affecting the esophagus, trachea, or lungs
* Cryptococcal meningitis
* Toxoplasmosis of the brain
* Cytomegalovirus disease
* Kaposi's sarcoma
* Non-Hodgkin's lymphoma
* Invasive cervical cancer

It is important to note that with appropriate antiretroviral therapy (ART), people living with HIV can maintain their CD4+ T-cell counts, suppress viral replication, and prevent the progression to AIDS. Early diagnosis and consistent treatment are crucial for managing HIV and improving life expectancy and quality of life.

Health Priorities are key areas of focus in healthcare that receive the greatest attention, resources, and efforts due to their significant impact on overall population health. These priorities are typically determined by evaluating various health issues and factors such as prevalence, severity, mortality rates, and social determinants of health. By addressing health priorities, healthcare systems and public health organizations aim to improve community health, reduce health disparities, and enhance the quality of life for individuals. Examples of health priorities may include chronic diseases (such as diabetes or heart disease), mental health, infectious diseases, maternal and child health, injury prevention, and health promotion through healthy lifestyles.

Administrative personnel in a medical context typically refer to individuals who work in healthcare facilities or organizations, but do not provide direct patient care. Their roles involve supporting the management and operations of the healthcare system through various administrative tasks. These responsibilities may include managing schedules, coordinating appointments, handling billing and insurance matters, maintaining medical records, communicating with patients and other staff members, and performing various clerical duties.

Examples of administrative personnel in a medical setting might include medical office assistants, medical receptionists, medical billers, medical coders, medical transcriptionists, and healthcare administrators. While they do not provide direct patient care, their work is essential to ensuring the smooth functioning of healthcare services and the overall quality of patient care.

Public Health Administration refers to the leadership, management, and coordination of public health services and initiatives at the local, state, or national level. It involves overseeing and managing the development, implementation, and evaluation of policies, programs, and services aimed at improving the health and well-being of populations. This may include addressing issues such as infectious disease control, chronic disease prevention, environmental health, emergency preparedness and response, and health promotion and education.

Public Health Administration requires a strong understanding of public health principles, leadership and management skills, and the ability to work collaboratively with a variety of stakeholders, including community members, healthcare providers, policymakers, and other organizations. The ultimate goal of Public Health Administration is to ensure that public health resources are used effectively and efficiently to improve the health outcomes of populations and reduce health disparities.

"Age factors" refer to the effects, changes, or differences that age can have on various aspects of health, disease, and medical care. These factors can encompass a wide range of issues, including:

1. Physiological changes: As people age, their bodies undergo numerous physical changes that can affect how they respond to medications, illnesses, and medical procedures. For example, older adults may be more sensitive to certain drugs or have weaker immune systems, making them more susceptible to infections.
2. Chronic conditions: Age is a significant risk factor for many chronic diseases, such as heart disease, diabetes, cancer, and arthritis. As a result, age-related medical issues are common and can impact treatment decisions and outcomes.
3. Cognitive decline: Aging can also lead to cognitive changes, including memory loss and decreased decision-making abilities. These changes can affect a person's ability to understand and comply with medical instructions, leading to potential complications in their care.
4. Functional limitations: Older adults may experience physical limitations that impact their mobility, strength, and balance, increasing the risk of falls and other injuries. These limitations can also make it more challenging for them to perform daily activities, such as bathing, dressing, or cooking.
5. Social determinants: Age-related factors, such as social isolation, poverty, and lack of access to transportation, can impact a person's ability to obtain necessary medical care and affect their overall health outcomes.

Understanding age factors is critical for healthcare providers to deliver high-quality, patient-centered care that addresses the unique needs and challenges of older adults. By taking these factors into account, healthcare providers can develop personalized treatment plans that consider a person's age, physical condition, cognitive abilities, and social circumstances.

I'm happy to help! However, it's important to note that while "social justice" is a term used in many fields, including public health and medicine, it does not have a single, universally accepted medical definition. Instead, the concept of social justice in healthcare is generally understood as the pursuit of fairness, equity, and equality in the distribution of healthcare resources, opportunities, and outcomes.

The World Health Organization (WHO) defines social justice as "the fair and equitable distribution of social determinants of health, which are conditions in which people are born, grow, live, work, and age, including the health system." According to this definition, social justice in healthcare requires addressing the root causes of health disparities, such as poverty, discrimination, and lack of access to education and employment opportunities.

The American Public Health Association (APHA) defines social justice as "the distribution of resources, benefits, and burdens of society to all individuals and groups. When principles of social justice are applied, the resulting distribution is equitable and all members of society have a fair opportunity to benefit from the resources, benefits, and burdens."

In summary, while there may not be a single medical definition of social justice, it is generally understood as the pursuit of fairness, equity, and equality in healthcare and health outcomes. This involves addressing the root causes of health disparities and ensuring that all individuals have access to the resources and opportunities they need to achieve optimal health.

Health plan implementation is not a medical term per se, but rather a term used in the context of healthcare management and administration. It refers to the process of putting into action the plans, strategies, and policies of a health insurance or healthcare benefit program. This includes activities such as:

1. Designing and structuring health benefits and coverage options
2. Developing provider networks and reimbursement rates
3. Establishing procedures for claims processing and utilization management
4. Implementing care management programs to improve health outcomes and reduce costs
5. Communicating the plan details to members and providers
6. Ensuring compliance with relevant laws, regulations, and accreditation standards

The goal of health plan implementation is to create a well-functioning healthcare benefit program that meets the needs of its members while managing costs and ensuring quality care.

I apologize for any confusion, but "Local Government" is not a medical term. It refers to a level of government that is responsible for administering public services within a specific geographic area, typically smaller than a state or province. Local governments may include entities such as counties, municipalities, cities, towns, and villages. They are usually responsible for providing services such as police and fire protection, emergency medical services, waste management, local road maintenance, and public education. It is not directly related to the practice of medicine or healthcare.

A diet, in medical terms, refers to the planned and regular consumption of food and drinks. It is a balanced selection of nutrient-rich foods that an individual eats on a daily or periodic basis to meet their energy needs and maintain good health. A well-balanced diet typically includes a variety of fruits, vegetables, whole grains, lean proteins, and low-fat dairy products.

A diet may also be prescribed for therapeutic purposes, such as in the management of certain medical conditions like diabetes, hypertension, or obesity. In these cases, a healthcare professional may recommend specific restrictions or modifications to an individual's regular diet to help manage their condition and improve their overall health.

It is important to note that a healthy and balanced diet should be tailored to an individual's age, gender, body size, activity level, and any underlying medical conditions. Consulting with a healthcare professional, such as a registered dietitian or nutritionist, can help ensure that an individual's dietary needs are being met in a safe and effective way.

Tobacco smoke pollution is not typically defined in medical terms, but it refers to the presence of tobacco smoke in indoor or outdoor environments, which can have negative effects on air quality and human health. It is also known as secondhand smoke or environmental tobacco smoke (ETS). This type of smoke is a mixture of sidestream smoke (the smoke given off by a burning cigarette) and mainstream smoke (the smoke exhaled by a smoker).

The medical community recognizes tobacco smoke pollution as a serious health hazard. It contains more than 7,000 chemicals, hundreds of which are toxic and about 70 that can cause cancer. Exposure to tobacco smoke pollution can cause a range of adverse health effects, including respiratory symptoms, lung cancer, heart disease, and stroke. In children, it can also lead to ear infections, asthma attacks, and sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS).

Therefore, many laws and regulations have been implemented worldwide to protect people from tobacco smoke pollution, such as smoking bans in public places and workplaces.

Health planning is a systematic process of creating strategies, policies, and goals to improve the health of a population and ensure the provision of adequate and accessible healthcare services. It involves assessing the health needs of the community, establishing priorities, developing interventions, and implementing and evaluating programs to address those needs. The ultimate goal of health planning is to optimize the health status of the population, reduce health disparities, and make efficient use of resources in the healthcare system. This process typically involves collaboration among various stakeholders, including healthcare professionals, policymakers, community members, and advocacy groups.

Logistic models, specifically logistic regression models, are a type of statistical analysis used in medical and epidemiological research to identify the relationship between the risk of a certain health outcome or disease (dependent variable) and one or more independent variables, such as demographic factors, exposure variables, or other clinical measurements.

In contrast to linear regression models, logistic regression models are used when the dependent variable is binary or dichotomous in nature, meaning it can only take on two values, such as "disease present" or "disease absent." The model uses a logistic function to estimate the probability of the outcome based on the independent variables.

Logistic regression models are useful for identifying risk factors and estimating the strength of associations between exposures and health outcomes, adjusting for potential confounders, and predicting the probability of an outcome given certain values of the independent variables. They can also be used to develop clinical prediction rules or scores that can aid in decision-making and patient care.

Medicare is a social insurance program in the United States, administered by the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS), that provides health insurance coverage to people who are aged 65 and over; or who have certain disabilities; or who have End-Stage Renal Disease (permanent kidney failure requiring dialysis or a transplant).

The program consists of four parts:

1. Hospital Insurance (Part A), which helps pay for inpatient care in hospitals, skilled nursing facilities, hospices, and home health care.
2. Medical Insurance (Part B), which helps pay for doctors' services, outpatient care, medical supplies, and preventive services.
3. Medicare Advantage Plans (Part C), which are private insurance plans that provide all of your Part A and Part B benefits, and may include additional benefits like dental, vision, and hearing coverage.
4. Prescription Drug Coverage (Part D), which helps pay for medications doctors prescribe for treatment.

Medicare is funded by payroll taxes, premiums paid by beneficiaries, and general revenue. Beneficiaries typically pay a monthly premium for Part B and Part D coverage, while Part A is generally free for those who have worked and paid Medicare taxes for at least 40 quarters.

Regression analysis is a statistical technique used in medicine, as well as in other fields, to examine the relationship between one or more independent variables (predictors) and a dependent variable (outcome). It allows for the estimation of the average change in the outcome variable associated with a one-unit change in an independent variable, while controlling for the effects of other independent variables. This technique is often used to identify risk factors for diseases or to evaluate the effectiveness of medical interventions. In medical research, regression analysis can be used to adjust for potential confounding variables and to quantify the relationship between exposures and health outcomes. It can also be used in predictive modeling to estimate the probability of a particular outcome based on multiple predictors.

The European Union (EU) is not a medical term or organization, but rather a political and economic union of 27 European countries. It is primarily involved in matters related to policy, law, and trade, and does not have a direct role in the provision or regulation of healthcare services, except in certain specific areas such as pharmaceutical regulations and cross-border healthcare directives.

Therefore, there is no medical definition for "European Union."

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Organizational Case Studies" is not a medical term. It is a term that is used in various fields including business, management, and social sciences to describe the analysis of a specific organization or a particular aspect of its functioning. An organizational case study typically involves an in-depth examination of an organization, including its structure, culture, processes, and outcomes, with the aim of understanding its performance, challenges, and opportunities for improvement.

In healthcare, case studies are often used to examine specific clinical scenarios or patient cases. However, "Organizational Case Studies" in a medical context might refer to the study of healthcare organizations, such as hospitals or clinics, to analyze their management practices, quality of care, financial performance, and other factors that can impact patient outcomes and overall organizational success.

"Sex factors" is a term used in medicine and epidemiology to refer to the differences in disease incidence, prevalence, or response to treatment that are observed between males and females. These differences can be attributed to biological differences such as genetics, hormones, and anatomy, as well as social and cultural factors related to gender.

For example, some conditions such as autoimmune diseases, depression, and osteoporosis are more common in women, while others such as cardiovascular disease and certain types of cancer are more prevalent in men. Additionally, sex differences have been observed in the effectiveness and side effects of various medications and treatments.

It is important to consider sex factors in medical research and clinical practice to ensure that patients receive appropriate and effective care.

I must apologize, but there seems to be a misunderstanding. The term "internationality" is not a commonly used medical term with a specific definition in the field of medicine or healthcare. It is a more general term that can refer to the quality or state of being international or global in scope, relevance, or application. If you have any questions related to medical terminology or health-related topics, I would be happy to try and help clarify those for you.

Health care rationing refers to the deliberate limitation or restriction of medical services, treatments, or resources provided to patients based on specific criteria or guidelines. These limitations can be influenced by various factors such as cost-effectiveness, scarcity of resources, evidence-based medicine, and clinical appropriateness. The primary goal of health care rationing is to ensure fair distribution and allocation of finite medical resources among a population while maximizing overall health benefits and minimizing harm.

Rationing can occur at different levels within the healthcare system, including individual patient care decisions, insurance coverage policies, and governmental resource allocation. Examples of rationing include prioritizing certain treatments based on their proven effectiveness, restricting access to high-cost procedures with limited clinical benefits, or setting age limits for specific interventions.

It is important to note that health care rationing remains a controversial topic due to ethical concerns about potential disparities in care and the balance between individual patient needs and societal resource constraints.

Universal coverage is a term used in healthcare policy to describe a system in which all residents of a particular country or region have access to necessary healthcare services, regardless of their ability to pay. This can be achieved through various mechanisms, such as mandatory health insurance, government provision of care, or a mix of public and private financing.

The goal of universal coverage is to ensure that everyone has access to essential medical services, including preventive care, doctor visits, hospitalizations, and prescription medications, without facing financial hardship due to medical expenses. Universal coverage can help reduce disparities in healthcare access and outcomes, improve overall population health, and provide economic benefits by reducing the burden of uncompensated care on healthcare providers and taxpayers.

It's important to note that universal coverage does not necessarily mean that all healthcare services are provided for free or at no cost to the individual. Rather, it means that everyone has access to a basic level of care, and that out-of-pocket costs are kept affordable through various mechanisms such as cost-sharing, subsidies, or risk pooling.

Cost control in a medical context refers to the strategies and practices employed by healthcare organizations to manage and reduce the costs associated with providing patient care while maintaining quality and safety. The goal is to optimize resource allocation, increase efficiency, and contain expenses without compromising the standard of care. This may involve measures such as:

1. Utilization management: Reviewing and monitoring the use of medical services, tests, and treatments to ensure they are necessary, appropriate, and evidence-based.
2. Case management: Coordinating patient care across various healthcare providers and settings to improve outcomes, reduce unnecessary duplication of services, and control costs.
3. Negotiating contracts with suppliers and vendors to secure favorable pricing for medical equipment, supplies, and pharmaceuticals.
4. Implementing evidence-based clinical guidelines and pathways to standardize care processes and reduce unwarranted variations in practice that can drive up costs.
5. Using technology such as electronic health records (EHRs) and telemedicine to streamline operations, improve communication, and reduce errors.
6. Investing in preventive care and wellness programs to keep patients healthy and reduce the need for costly interventions and hospitalizations.
7. Continuously monitoring and analyzing cost data to identify trends, opportunities for improvement, and areas of potential waste or inefficiency.

Health expenditures refer to the total amount of money spent on health services, goods, and resources in a given period. This can include expenses for preventive care, medical treatments, medications, long-term care, and administrative costs. Health expenditures can be made by individuals, corporations, insurance companies, or governments, and they can be measured at the national, regional, or household level.

Health expenditures are often used as an indicator of a country's investment in its healthcare system and can reflect the overall health status of a population. High levels of health expenditures may indicate a strong commitment to healthcare, but they can also place a significant burden on individuals, businesses, and governments. Understanding patterns and trends in health expenditures is important for policymakers, healthcare providers, and researchers who are working to improve the efficiency, effectiveness, and accessibility of healthcare services.

"Drug and narcotic control" refers to the regulation and oversight of drugs and narcotics, including their production, distribution, and use. This is typically carried out by governmental agencies in order to ensure public safety, prevent abuse and diversion, and protect the health of individuals. The goal of drug and narcotic control is to strike a balance between making sure that medications are available for legitimate medical purposes while also preventing their misuse and illegal sale.

Drug control policies may include measures such as licensing and registration of manufacturers, distributors, and pharmacies; tracking and monitoring of controlled substances; setting standards for prescription practices; and enforcement of laws and regulations related to drug use and trafficking. Narcotic control specifically refers to the regulation of drugs that have a high potential for abuse and are subject to international treaties, such as opioids.

It's important to note that while these regulations aim to protect public health and safety, they can also be controversial and have unintended consequences, such as contributing to drug shortages or creating barriers to access for people who need controlled substances for legitimate medical reasons.

Resource allocation in a medical context refers to the process of distributing and managing healthcare resources, such as budget, staff, equipment, and supplies, in an efficient and equitable manner to meet the health needs of a population. This involves prioritizing the use of resources to maximize benefits, improve patient outcomes, and ensure fair access to healthcare services. It is a critical aspect of healthcare planning and management, particularly in situations where resources are limited or there are competing demands for them.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Social Marketing" is not a term typically used in the field of medicine. Instead, it is a marketing strategy that uses commercial marketing techniques and principles to influence the behavior of target audiences in order to improve their personal well-being and that of their communities. This approach has been applied to various public health and healthcare initiatives, such as promoting healthy lifestyles, preventing substance abuse, and increasing vaccination rates.

However, if you're looking for a medical definition related to social aspects or interactions, there might be some confusion. In that case, I would need more context to provide an accurate definition. Could you please clarify your question?

The World Health Organization (WHO) is not a medical condition or term, but rather a specialized agency of the United Nations responsible for international public health. Here's a brief description:

The World Health Organization (WHO) is a specialized agency of the United Nations that acts as the global authority on public health issues. Established in 1948, WHO's primary role is to coordinate and collaborate with its member states to promote health, prevent diseases, and ensure universal access to healthcare services. WHO is headquartered in Geneva, Switzerland, and has regional offices around the world. It plays a crucial role in setting global health standards, monitoring disease outbreaks, and providing guidance on various public health concerns, including infectious diseases, non-communicable diseases, mental health, environmental health, and maternal, newborn, child, and adolescent health.

I'm happy to help! However, I must clarify that "information dissemination" is not a medical term per se, but rather a general term used in various fields, including healthcare and medicine. It refers to the process of spreading or distributing information to a specific audience or the public.

In the context of medicine and healthcare, information dissemination often relates to sharing clinical guidelines, research findings, public health messages, or patient education materials with healthcare professionals, patients, or the general public. This can occur through various channels, such as scientific conferences, peer-reviewed journals, newsletters, websites, social media platforms, and other communication methods.

The goal of information dissemination in medicine is to ensure that accurate, evidence-based, and up-to-date information reaches the intended audience, ultimately improving healthcare quality, patient outcomes, and decision-making processes.

Alcoholic beverages are drinks that contain ethanol (ethyl alcohol), which is produced by the fermentation of yeast, sugars, and starches. The amount of alcohol in a drink is measured in terms of "alcohol content" or "alcohol by volume" (ABV). Different types of alcoholic beverages include:

1. Beer: A fermented beverage made from grains, such as barley, wheat, or rye. The alcohol content of beer typically ranges from 3-6% ABV.
2. Wine: A fermented beverage made from grapes or other fruits. The alcohol content of wine usually falls between 10-15% ABV.
3. Spirits (or liquors): Distilled beverages with higher alcohol content, typically ranging from 40-50% ABV. Examples include vodka, whiskey, rum, gin, and tequila.
4. Fortified wines: Wines that have had a distilled spirit added to them, increasing their alcohol content. Examples include port, sherry, and madeira, which typically contain 17-20% ABV.
5. Malt beverages: Fermented beverages made from malted barley or other grains, with additional flavorings or sweeteners. These can range in alcohol content from around 4-8% ABV.

It is important to note that excessive consumption of alcoholic beverages can lead to various health issues, including addiction, liver disease, and an increased risk of accidents and injuries. Moderate drinking is generally defined as up to one drink per day for women and up to two drinks per day for men, although individual tolerance and sensitivity to alcohol may vary.

The conservation of natural resources refers to the responsible use and management of natural resources, such as water, soil, minerals, forests, and wildlife, in a way that preserves their availability for future generations. This may involve measures such as reducing waste and pollution, promoting sustainable practices, protecting habitats and ecosystems, and engaging in careful planning and decision-making to ensure the long-term sustainability of these resources. The goal of conservation is to balance the needs of the present with the needs of the future, so that current and future generations can continue to benefit from the many goods and services that natural resources provide.

Qualitative research is a methodological approach in social sciences and healthcare research that focuses on understanding the meanings, experiences, and perspectives of individuals or groups within a specific context. It aims to gather detailed, rich data through various techniques such as interviews, focus groups, observations, and content analysis. The findings from qualitative research are typically descriptive and exploratory, providing insights into processes, perceptions, and experiences that may not be captured through quantitative methods.

In medical research, qualitative research can be used to explore patients' experiences of illness, healthcare providers' perspectives on patient care, or the cultural and social factors that influence health behaviors. It is often used in combination with quantitative methods to provide a more comprehensive understanding of complex health issues.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Program Development" is not a medical term. It is a general term that refers to the process of creating, planning, and implementing a new program or project, typically in a business, education, or community setting. In a healthcare context, it might refer to the development of a new healthcare service, treatment program, or educational initiative.

If you have any questions related to medical terminology or concepts, I'd be happy to try and help!

I'm sorry for any confusion, but the term "Europe" is a geographical and political designation, rather than a medical one. It refers to the continent located entirely in the Northern Hemisphere and mostly in the Eastern Hemisphere. It is bordered by the Arctic Ocean to the north, the Atlantic Ocean to the west, and the Mediterranean Sea to the south. Europe is made up of approximately 50 countries, depending on how one defines a "country."

If you have any questions related to medical terminology or health-related topics, I'd be happy to help answer them!

I'm sorry for any confusion, but the term "United Nations" is a political and international organization, not a medical concept or term. The United Nations (UN) is an intergovernmental organization that was established on October 24, 1945, to promote international cooperation and prevent conflicts. It is headquartered in New York City, and its member states work together to address various global issues, such as peace and security, climate change, human rights, and sustainable development.

If you have any questions related to medical terminology or health-related topics, I would be happy to help!

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "workplace" is not a term that has a specific medical definition. The term "workplace" generally refers to a place where people work or carry out their jobs. It could be an office, a factory, a construction site, a retail store, or any other location where work-related activities take place.

If you're looking for a term related to health or medicine that describes a physical location, some examples might include "healthcare facility," "clinic," "hospital," "operating room," or "examination room." If you could provide more context or clarify what you're looking for, I'd be happy to help further!

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Overton window Policy Public comment Public criminology Public policy school Martinez, Jessica. "What is Public Policy?". ... Public policy making is a time-consuming policy cycle. The policy cycle as set out in Understanding Public Policy: Theories ... The implementation of public policy is known as public administration. Public policy can be considered to be the sum of a ... Much of public policy is concerned with evaluating decision-making in governments and public bureaucracies. Public policy ...
The Global Public Policy Committee (GPPC) brings together senior representatives from the six large international accounting ... Global public policy committee. The Global Public Policy Committee (GPPC) brings together senior representatives from the six ... to participate constructively in matters concerning global public policy to advance the public interest and to enhance public ... You may withdraw your consent to cookies at any time once you have entered the website through a link in the privacy policy, ...
Exit Notification / Disclaimer Policy. Close Links with this icon indicate that you are leaving the CDC website. *The Centers ... BMC Public Health 2006;6:64 [cited 2014 May 13].. *Hyland A, Hassan LM, Higbee C, Boudreau C, Fong GT, Borland R, Cummings KM, ... Smokefree Policies Result in High Levels of Compliance. *Ventilation Does Not Effectively Protect People Who Dont Smoke from ... Promising Policies And Practices To Address Tobacco Use By Persons With Mental And Substance Use Disorders ...
MPA 809 - Implementing Public Policy [PDF 137 KB] (Fall). 4. Policy Process. *MPA 810 - Introduction to Public Administration ( ... The programs emphasis is on public policy, and the broad social, economic and political context within which public ... Policy leadership requires skills in policy analysis and the capacity to implement new solutions. Policy and management are ... The program has been preparing students at the entry and mid-career levels for leadership roles in public service and policy- ...
Electric vehicle support for public transport - policy from the IEA Policies Database. ... The scheme set up by Germany with a budget of €70 million will support public transport operators until the end of 2021, ... A problem with this policy?. Tell us and we will take a look. ... Policies Electric vehicle support for public transport. Last ... Want to know more about this policy ? Learn more. ... Policies database. Past, existing or planned government ...
Public Health Insurance in California. March 2023 Policy Brief: Pandemic Changes to Medi-Cal and Implications for Californias ... Policy Brief · October 2023 Policy Brief: Health Conditions and Health Care among Californias Undocumented Immigrants ... Policy Brief: Health Care Access among Californias Farmworkers. June 2021 Health Coverage and Care for Undocumented Immigrants ... Expertise: Health policy, Medi-Cal Paulette Cha is a research fellow at PPIC, where her work focuses on the health of ...
SBM Public Policy Resource Center. Public Acts. Michigan Supreme Court. Michigan Legislature. MCL Search Engines ... Thomas Albert) Crimes: penalties; penalties for falsely pulling an active shooter alarm in a public place; provide for.. SB 400 ... Graham Filler) Criminal procedure: forfeiture; public and regional airport authorities; exempt from certain requirements in ... Alex Garza) Criminal procedure: forfeiture; public and regional airport authorities; exempt from certain requirements in ...
... but hes doing better in the court of public opinion now than he did at the polls in the state last November.. 47% of Alabamans ...
SD School Board Reverses Public-Criticism Policy By Ana Tintocalis / Education Reporter, KPBS Public Broadcasting ... But the policy angered community leaders who say the rule is unconstitutional and stamps out public dissent. ... Grier says it was the boards decision to push the policy forward. He says hes open to the change and to any criticism. ... The controversial rule banned trustees from criticizing Superintendent Terry Grier or his administration in public. ...
Nick leads the Institute for Policy Research (IPR) across the range of its research, teaching, policy programmes and public ... Nick is Professor of Public Policy and Director of the Institute for Policy Research (IPR) at the University of Bath. He has ... He serves on the advisory boards of the Higher Education Policy Institute and the Wales Centre for Public Policy. He is a ... Nick leads the Institute for Policy Research (IPR) across the range of its research, teaching, policy programmes and public ...
Announcing Sherwin Siy, Senior Public Policy Manager at the Wikimedia Foundation by Stephen LaPorte ... Public Sector Information Directive --- The Directive that commands public bodies to release data and documents under re-usable ... Our job is to make sure this something isnt the public domain article. --- Our safeguarding the public domain article is ... joined the Wikimedia Foundation Legal Team as Senior Public Policy Manager. Sherwin Siy has spent his career working in ...
... student teams evaluate policy options for government intervention in the heroin market. ... What are effective public policies for the heroin market? Mark Maier. Glendale Community College (CA) ... policies that affect supply have different effects than policies affecting demand. Teams must justify one policy choice as most ... Student teams use a supply/demand model for the heroin market to analyze public policy approaches. Because inelastic demand, ...
... accountable government by advancing competitive delivery of public services and increasing government transparency! ... Police Unions & the Public Trust: How public sector unions obstruct good policing. ... This suite of free websites allows the public to access vast amounts of information on state and local governments. Each of ... Installing bike and bus lanes requires public debate. June 12, 2023/by Barbara Anthony ...
Apply Now: Public Policy Center Summer 2024 Research Programs The Public Policy Center is now accepting applications for Summer ... Public Health and Prevention , Journal Article Health Care Provider Knowledge Around Shared Clinical Decision-Making Regarding ... and students doing qualitative and quantitative social science research of significant public interest. ...
Institute of Public Policy and Management Policy Brief Institute of Public Policy Management 2019 ...
2019-02-19 13:45:00 2019-02-19 16:30:00 America/Los_Angeles Building Digital Resilience Workshop Boardroom at the Public Policy ... The Digital Resilience workshop is tailored to women either in or thinking about stepping into leadership, public appointments ... all forms of public life and activism, who wish to have an online presence that will be a positive force to help them achieve ... making it all the more important for women in the public sphere to be prepared. ...
Policy History. The Board adopted this policy on July 6, 2017. This policy shall be reviewed by the Board at least every five ... Library Director Evaluation Policy. I. Purpose. The purpose of this policy is to provide a process by which the Board of ... borrowing policies. hours and locations. library board. policies. mission and vision. services and collections. impact stories ... Madison Public Library is an agency of the City of Madison and a member of the South Central Library System ...
This interim payment policy sets out how NIHR supports members of the public to be involved by rewarding and recognising them ... About this policy. This payment policy sets out how NIHR supports members of the public to be involved by rewarding and ... Please note this policy does not cover payment for patients and the public involved directly in NIHR-funded research projects. ... NIHR defines public involvement in research as research being carried out with or by members of the public rather than to ...
The case for risk-based subsidies in public health insurance - Volume 1 Issue 2 ... The roads to managed competition for mixed public-private health systems: a conceptual framework. Health Economics, Policy and ... Health Economics, Policy and Law , Volume 1 , Issue 2 , April 2006 , pp. 195 - 199 ... Response: The case for risk-based subsidies in public health insurance. Published online by Cambridge University Press: 23 ...
Stephen White works for George Weigel at the Ethics and Public Policy Center in Washington, DC. He has been the coordinator of ... Founded in 1992 - and run since 2000 by the Ethics and Public Policy Center - the Tertio Millennio Seminar on the Free Society ... Like many other things the Biden White House implements, they force through a multitude of ideas, concepts and public health ...
Orange County Public Schools » Departments » School Board Services » School Board Policies Overview » School Board Policies ... These policies provide a setting for all of the School Boards other policies.. CODE. POLICY NAME. ADOPTION DATE. ... Section A contains policies governing the Districts legal role in providing public education and the basic principles ... Section H contains policies governing the process of negotiating with staff units recognized by the School Board.. CODE. POLICY ...
... of-covid-19-public-health-groups-concerned-over-new-trump-administration-coronavirus-data-reporting-policy-susan-rice-discusses ... Public health groups denounce new Trump move sidelining CDC (Weixel, 7/16). New York Times: Chief Vaccine Scientist Will Not Be ... The KFF Daily Global Health Policy Report summarized news and information on global health policy from hundreds of sources, ... Public Health Groups Concerned Over New Trump Administration Coronavirus Data Reporting Policy; Susan Rice Discusses Pandemic, ...
BS in Communications and you are planning on pursuing a Masters in Public Policy Can you after graduation work in Public ... BS in Communications and you are planning on pursuing a Masters in Public Policy Can you after graduation work in Public ... BS in Communications and you are planning on pursuing a Masters in Public Policy Can you after graduation work in Public ... About Us Contact Us Terms of Use Privacy Policy Disclaimer Cookie Policy IP Issues Cookie Settings. ...
Toledo Public Schools utilizes BoardDocs, a Web-based system that provides a means for immediately publishing and revising ... Board meeting agenda items, support documents, policies and procedures. This innovative system allows the administration to ...
Public Policy, Politics, And International Affairs Test quiz which has been attempted 64 times by avid quiz takers. Also ... C. The Public Record Explanation. The correct answer is The Public Record. When looking at a candidates voting history, the ... B. Influence Laws & Policy Explanation. The correct answer is "Influence Laws & Policy" because when party leaders meet with a ... E. Candidates run campaigns to inform the public about their agendas and positions on the issues, F. The winner is directly ...
Privatization, Politics, and Policymaking in Public Education Share. Close. Share. Why is Facebook not here? Why is Twitter not ... National Education Policy Center School of Education University of Colorado Boulder, CO 80309-0249 [email protected] ...
Public access for studies paid for by taxpayer money seems like a no-brainer. Theres no reason peer-reviewed journals should ... Why Do Democrats Want To Get Rid Of The NIH Public Access Policy? ... Public access for studies paid for by taxpayer money seems like ... for the public. At Science 2.0, scientists are the journalists,. with no political bias or editorial control. We. cant do it ... I get why publishers who probably donate to Conyers want public access killed, but that doesnt mean we should allow it.. Dont ...
The Global Threat of New and Reemerging Infectious Diseases: Reconciling U.S. National Security and Public Health Policy On ... The Global Threat of New and Reemerging Infectious Diseases: Reconciling U.S. National Security and Public Health Policy. ... The Global Threat of New and Reemerging Infectious Diseases: Reconciling U.S. National Security and Public Health Policy. ... The Global Threat of New and Reemerging Infectious Diseases: Reconciling U.S. National Security and Public Health Policy. Emerg ...
Statement of CSPI Nutrition Policy Director Margo G. Wootan. The final rule published today by the U.S. Department of ... Under the final rule, wellness policies will provide for greater parental and community involvement, and ensure stronger ... Copyright 2024, Center for Science in the Public Interest. All rights reserved. ... implementation of nutrition and physical activity policies in every school. Todays rule caps six important years of ...
  • The policy document is meant for a five-year period (2022-26) but it will be reviewed at the end of every year. (dawn.com)
  • It divides the policy process into a series of stages, from a notional starting point at which policymakers begin to think about a policy problem to a notional end point at which a policy has been implemented and policymakers think about how successful it has been before deciding what to do next. (wikipedia.org)
  • There are many examples in today's world where the intersection of threats to public health and national security should direct the attention of policymakers, security and public health strategists, and the systems that support each toward an organized response. (cdc.gov)
  • In their summary and conclusions, the authors provide recommendations for policymakers addressing both public health and security issues. (cdc.gov)
  • The thrust of the authors' conclusions is to push policymakers and strategists to actions that strengthen the infrastructure of a public health response system and broaden the traditional definition of national security to include the impact of naturally occurring and intentionally released microbial agents. (cdc.gov)
  • These recommendations, developed by workshop participants, will be useful to medical and public health professionals and state policymakers who are evaluating the merits of population-based screening of newborns for CF. (cdc.gov)
  • Through the M.A. in Public Policy programme, you will take a research-intensive approach to studying and analysing contemporary global political, economic, and social issues, with a key focus on grass-root level challenges in developing countries. (coursera.org)
  • We are looking for a programme manager for our policy work. (fsfe.org)
  • There are three distinct aspects to Malaysian public policy: the grounded philosophy, the mode of policy formulation, and hierarchy of implementation. (eurasiareview.com)
  • Opposition parties have criticised the government for not taking their input during the formulation of the policy. (dawn.com)
  • For our graduates to be effective in the workforce, they need not only strong policy skills, but also a keen awareness of how policy interventions require collaboration across public, private and voluntary sectors. (queensu.ca)
  • Before joining PPIC, she was a joint postdoctoral fellow at UCLA and the University of Southern California, and she has past experience evaluating social policy interventions in health and education for low-income individuals. (ppic.org)
  • The implementation of public policy is known as public administration. (wikipedia.org)
  • 1 National and international studies have shown strong public support for smokefree laws, with levels of support increasing after policy implementation among both nonsmokers and smokers. (cdc.gov)
  • They became the basis of policy, budgeting, the allocation of resources and implementation. (eurasiareview.com)
  • Critical analysis of the state of affairs in various sectors is contained in the main document, and the implementation framework and the indicators developed for monitoring and evaluating the progress made towards the policy's execution are not being included in the public version, which, moreover, would not spell out the different elements of national interest. (dawn.com)
  • While that represents an important milestone, a far more noteworthy development is that CIRA also quietly announced the implementation of a new 'whois' policy that will better protect the privacy of hundreds of thousands of Canadians and serve as a model for domain name registries around the world. (michaelgeist.ca)
  • The third essay examines how fiscal performance is affected by specific institutions aimed at encouraging the budget discipline of agents responsible for policy implementation. (lu.se)
  • Standard-setting Working Group (SSWG) - Engages with regulators and standard-setting bodies to promote high-quality audit, ethics, and independence standards in the public interest. (ey.com)
  • Banking Working Group (BWG) and Insurance Working Group (IWG) - Engages policy-makers in the banking and insurance sectors on relevant topics. (ey.com)
  • NCA engages in two types of work related to public policy. (natcom.org)
  • David Easton in the USA of the 1950s provided an illustration of the need he found to broaden his conceptualization of public policy beyond stated ideas: "If the formal policy of an educational system forbids discrimination against Negroes but local school boards or administrators so zone school attendance that Negroes are segregated in a few schools, both the impartial law and discriminatory practices must be considered part of the policy. (wikipedia.org)
  • Results of search for 'su:{Public policy. (who.int)
  • Brower and Chalk's book is a powerful and useful argument for the urgent need to integrate and streamline public health and national security strategies. (cdc.gov)
  • The ATSDR Public Health Statements (PHSs) listed below are a series of summaries about hazardous substances developed by the ATSDR Division of Toxicology. (cdc.gov)
  • By ATSDR declaring the Public Health Advisory, EPA is able to take immediate actions to prevent harmful exposures permanently to residents, especially children, exposed to arsenic contamination in residential soils. (cdc.gov)
  • [Advocacy Advisors] Meta discussion: European Commission public consultation on copyright by Stephen LaPorte Hello advocacy advisory group, Here is a thought: let's collaboratively draft a public response on wiki. (wikimedia.org)
  • Moreover, registrants of controversial domain names, such as domains used for websites devoted to public criticism or political advocacy, often wanted to shield their personal information for fear of public censure. (michaelgeist.ca)
  • Policy advocacy. (who.int)
  • Public health advocacy strategies to influence policy agendas: lessons from a narrative review of success in trade policy. (bvsalud.org)
  • The program's emphasis is on public policy, and the broad social, economic and political context within which public organizations operate. (queensu.ca)
  • This course will examine the manner in which various worldviews affect American Public Policy, with particular emphasis on the contrast between the Judeo-Christian worldview and secular humanism, Marxism/Leninism, and Islamic Fundamentalism. (liberty.edu)
  • In the foreign policy domain, NSP places equal emphasis on political as well as economic diplomacy, besides listing peace in the region as the top priority. (dawn.com)
  • The course will also provide advanced understanding and knowledge of the values that underpin health policy with an emphasis on human rights and questions related to welfare policy. (lu.se)
  • Public Policy Analysis provides an introduction, foundation, and framework for the Public Administration program/concentration by introducing students to the policy and policy analysis considerations from a public administration perspective and by preparing students to approach these considerations from a Judeo-Christian worldview. (liberty.edu)
  • Although their narratives have been vastly different, all three pursued in practice the same public policy framework. (eurasiareview.com)
  • One dividing line in conceptions of public policy is between those that see it primarily in terms of ideas (principles and plans of action) and those that see it as a collection of empirical phenomena (the things that are done, and their outcomes). (wikipedia.org)
  • She holds a PhD in health policy/health economics from the University of California, Berkeley. (ppic.org)
  • Brower and Chalk, authors of The Global Threat of New and Reemerging Infectious Diseases: Reconciling U.S. National Security and Public Health Policy, describe their book's purpose as examining "the changing nature of security" and focusing on "the threat of infectious diseases. (cdc.gov)
  • During January 1997, a workshop was convened at CDC in Atlanta, Georgia to discuss the benefits and risks associated with screening newborns for CF and to develop public health policy concerning such screening. (cdc.gov)
  • explain basic theories and concepts in health policy · explain contemporary questions in health policy and the values they rest on · explain the interaction between evidence and values in health policy · explain how theories are related to the carrying out of health policy · explain the relationship between human rights, welfare policy and health policy. (lu.se)
  • identify ethical problems in health policy as well as engage in a discussion of these based on ethical principles and guidelines. (lu.se)
  • The course will give a deeper understanding of how health policy is carried out and how one critically evaluates evidence-based health policy as a concept. (lu.se)
  • The course will develop the students' ability to analyse health policy positions and reforms using theoretical concepts and models. (lu.se)
  • The course will cover the key figures in health policy in the global arena and critically evaluate their underlying values. (lu.se)
  • Health policy. (bvsalud.org)
  • In the event that we expand the Medscape Network through our acquisition of another company and/or its properties, that company may operate under its own privacy policy accessible via a link on its properties until we integrate its privacy practices with ours, at which point a link to this Privacy Policy will be displayed on its properties. (medscape.com)
  • The association has provided funds to Communication scholars to form public policy working groups that worked to translate existing communication research findings into recommendations that could inform and impact public policy. (natcom.org)
  • ACP public policy papers summarize and dissect published research and discussion on current issues involving clinical practice, medical education, bioethics, and health care financing and delivery, and make specific recommendations for internal medicine physicians, patients, and policy makers. (acponline.org)
  • Such leadership is needed to protect the public from inappropriate testing and to ensure that validated and useful tests are properly integrated into medical and public health practice. (cdc.gov)
  • Public policies are the focus of this study, aiming to identify, systematize and analyze Brazilian legislation on the insertion of the professional guidance practice in the Brazilian educational system. (bvsalud.org)
  • He served on the CIRA board from 2000 - 2006 and was active supporter of whois policy reforms. (michaelgeist.ca)
  • Our main policy topics cover Free Software and Open Standards issues on the EU and member state level. (fsfe.org)
  • As a consequence, these bureaucrats have wielded great influence, with successive administrations tending to follow civil service advice on most policy issues. (eurasiareview.com)
  • To better understand how our educational system addresses fiscal issues in the training of planners, I surveyed planning instructors from across the United States and Canada and analyzed a series of public finance course syllabi. (lincolninst.edu)
  • First, Communication scholarship informs discussion about public issues, and the association sometimes takes corresponding positions on these issues . (natcom.org)
  • Please learn about our policy issues of focus and the ways in which we advocate on Capitol Hill and beyond and join us in our efforts. (natcom.org)
  • Thorny issues should also be made public. (dawn.com)
  • The complex and controversial issues concerning genetics research that have emerged (e.g., the quality of laboratory testing, the rapid commercialization of genetic tests, and the potential for discrimination and stigmatization) require public health leadership. (cdc.gov)
  • Health issues that received attention on trade policy agendas included access to medicines , food nutrition and food security , tobacco control , non-communicable diseases , access to knowledge , and asbestos harm. (bvsalud.org)
  • Industrial policy and the pharmaceutical industry : the proceedings of a symposium held on 22nd June 1994, London / edited by Adrian Towse. (who.int)
  • International transmission of population policy experience : proceedings of the Expert Group Meeting on the International Transmission of Population Policy Experience, New York City, 27-30 June 1988. (who.int)
  • These assignments are meant to provide preparation for the policy briefs that are due later on in those assigned Modules: Weeks. (liberty.edu)
  • The student will write five 1½-2-page Policy Briefs in current APA format in which the May-Can-Should model is applied in the context of the policy focus for the assigned module/week. (liberty.edu)
  • Joe Wang, senior consul at the Taipei Economic and Cultural Office in Los Angeles, is one of 15 mid-career professionals who took part in a two-week program at the University of Southern California Center on Public Diplomacy. (voanews.com)
  • University of Southern California professor Nicholas Cull says public diplomacy can entail advocating policies, but often it does not. (voanews.com)
  • Students can be asked to evaluate other social policy responses including response to other drugs such as marijuana with different price elasticities of demand. (carleton.edu)
  • Academics and other experts in policy studies have developed a range of tools and approaches to help in this task. (wikipedia.org)
  • Student teams use a supply/demand model for the heroin market to analyze public policy approaches. (carleton.edu)
  • Despite almost a century of combat disease, with oncological assistance programs and prevention campaigns based public policies, the incidence of oral cancer in several regions is still high. (bvsalud.org)
  • In an institutionalist view, the foundation of public policy is composed of national constitutional laws and regulations. (wikipedia.org)
  • He says public diplomacy may involve promoting a national image, or creating open forums for the sharing of ideas, a process facilitated by new technologies. (voanews.com)
  • ISLAMABAD: The public version of the recently approved National Secu-ri--ty Policy (NSP) will be launched on Friday. (dawn.com)
  • National policy for health, social, labor and environment affairs. (who.int)
  • These policy prescriptions have been generated from specific cases, such as the World Trade Organization 's Doha Declaration on TRIPS and Public Health or specific instances of trade-related policymaking at the national level. (bvsalud.org)
  • Despite accumulating evidence of the implications of trade policy for public health , trade and health sectors continue to operate largely in silos. (bvsalud.org)
  • by policy-makers affiliated with (in democratic polities) currently elected politicians. (wikipedia.org)
  • Represent the FSFE towards policy makers and other actors on all levels in EU institutions. (fsfe.org)
  • Knowledge brokering: Knowledge brokering refers to the operational linkage between research institutions and policy-makers in a way that optimizes the translation of research findings to policy. (who.int)
  • Professor ALI (alternate to Professor Haque, Bangladesh) said that his country was committed to providing ophthalmic care for its citizens and had created infrastructures in both the public and the private sectors. (who.int)
  • Without the management skills to translate commitment into action, policy goals are empty promises. (queensu.ca)
  • I joined this program to enhance my skills to employ Public Policy as a medium to translate field experiences into actionable policy frameworks. (coursera.org)
  • The theoretical parts of the course will be supplemented by practical exercises and assignments focusing on practical questions related to how health policies are formulated and carried out. (lu.se)
  • Learn from top faculty, policy practitioners, and researchers at the forefront of the discipline, develop qualitative and quantitative analytical skills, and receive exposure to the real-world policymaking process. (coursera.org)
  • Taken together the survey results provide an interesting picture of the significance of public finance to planning academics and practitioners. (lincolninst.edu)
  • Policy design entails conscious and deliberate effort to define policy aims and map them instrumentally. (wikipedia.org)
  • The program aims to develop policy leaders. (queensu.ca)
  • The oral cancer in Brazil is considered an important public health issue. (bvsalud.org)
  • In Brazil, since the beginning of the 20st century, has been trying to introduce public policies to combat oral cancer. (bvsalud.org)
  • They are generally family neighborhoods where children attend public or parochial school. (frbsf.org)
  • At Queen's School of Policy Studies, we believe in the value of experiential learning and strive to incorporate the practical application of skills as a major component of the learning experience. (queensu.ca)
  • The School of Policy Studies is committed to equity and diversity in education and welcome applications from individuals from equity seeking groups such as women, racialized/visible minorities, Indigenous/Aboriginal peoples, persons with a disability, persons who identify in the LGBTQ+ community and others who reflect the diversity of Canadian society. (queensu.ca)
  • Luginbill said he's drawing up a flowchart of who school staff should call if they suspect a problem based on existing policies at the Madison Metropolitan School District. (wpr.org)
  • Extreme urban poverties in Europe : contradictions and perverse effects in welfare policies / edited by Paolo Guidicini, Giovanni Pieretti, Maurizio Bergamaschi. (who.int)
  • Because CF is a genetic disease that affects one in 3,800 newborns, public awareness of CF can be expected to increase, generating more requests for CF screening. (cdc.gov)
  • After two major public consultations, mounting opposition from law enforcement about its loss to 'unfettered' access to WHOIS data, and years of operational delays, CIRA last week began informing registrants that the new policy will take effect on June 10, 2008. (michaelgeist.ca)
  • PioneerPublic promotes limited, accountable government by advancing competitive delivery of public services, addressing state and local unfunded liabilities and increasing government transparency. (pioneerinstitute.org)
  • In this case it may be useful to identify a policy in terms of what actually happens. (wikipedia.org)
  • Students will be able to use a supply/demand model to identify price and quantity changes that occur as a result of public policies. (carleton.edu)
  • The Louisiana Board of Elementary and Secondary Education (BESE) policy requires transfer students to public schools seeking placement in grades 5 and 9 to take English Language Arts and Mathematics portions of the State Placement Test. (katc.com)
  • They are created and/or enacted on behalf of the public typically by a government. (wikipedia.org)
  • It hasn't really mattered who governed Malaysia, policy has been consistent across all successive federal and state administrations, and local government. (eurasiareview.com)
  • Government policy and plans have lost their substance, degenerating into catchphrase headings with complex and colorful diagrams. (eurasiareview.com)
  • Based on a supply/demand model with inelastic demand, student teams evaluate policy options for government intervention in the heroin market. (carleton.edu)
  • Given the following supply/demand model for the U.S. heroin market, what will be the most effective government policy? (carleton.edu)
  • Which policy should the federal government pursue? (carleton.edu)
  • This study demonstrates how events can overload the public health response system and weaken public confidence in its government. (cdc.gov)
  • Her research has been published in peer-reviewed outlets including the American Journal of Public Health and the Journal of Adolescent Health , and she has been cited in numerous media outlets such as the Sacramento Bee and the Orange County Register . (ppic.org)
  • The student will write a 10-12-page research-based paper in current APA format that focuses on the May-Can-Should model as applied to a policy issue of the student's choice. (liberty.edu)
  • Parfait Yongabo, PhD student in Research Policy, is defending his doctoral dissertation. (lu.se)
  • Parfait Yongabo, PhD student in Research Policy, is defending his doctoral dissertation Fostering Knowledge uptake in Emerging Innovation Systems: Enhancing Conditions for Innovation in Rwanda . (lu.se)
  • More recently, Antonio Lassance has defined public policy as "an institutionalized proposal to solve a central problem, guided by a conception" (Lassance, 2020: 7). (wikipedia.org)
  • He says public diplomacy explains a government's positions, but does not always make them popular. (voanews.com)
  • By agreeing to the Medscape Network Terms of Use , you confirm that you have read and understand this Privacy Policy which explains how we collect, disclose, transfer, secure and use information about you in connection with your use of the Services and the rights and choices you have regarding these activities. (medscape.com)
  • The Global Public Policy Committee (GPPC) brings together senior representatives from the six large international accounting networks (BDO, Deloitte, EY, Grant Thornton, KPMG and PwC). (ey.com)
  • This article builds on the above debates to provides further empirical evidence on the way actors of a country compete over, and negotiate, the use of public space and the way it should be regulated. (lu.se)
  • During orientation, we immersed our students in Kingston's policy world. (queensu.ca)
  • Knowledge of EU's political environment, plus ability to understand or learn the policy environment of Member States on demand. (fsfe.org)
  • This suite of free websites allows the public to access vast amounts of information on state and local governments. (pioneerinstitute.org)
  • Citing privacy and spam concerns, many registrants preferred to conceal their identity from the public (though CIRA and the domain name registrar responsible for the registration would have access to the personal information). (michaelgeist.ca)
  • CIRA will allow the public to contact domain name registrants without access to their personal information by relaying the message through a web-based submission form. (michaelgeist.ca)
  • While the so-called "end of public space" literature, focusing on encroachment of private interests and state surveillance, has contributed to critical thinking of access (or the lack thereof) to public space, and the loss of publicity of public space, the conceptual tools such literature offers to understand contestations in and over public space have remained underdeveloped or, at best, underexplored. (lu.se)
  • This endeavor is defined within the core functions of public health agencies proposed by the Institute of Medicine: assessment, policy development, assurance, and evaluation (3,4). (cdc.gov)
  • Data from the New York State Adult Tobacco Survey indicated that public support for the smokefree law increased among both smokers and nonsmokers within 2 years after the law took effect. (cdc.gov)
  • So from there, we can understand the major concept of promoting public diplomacy in a host country is to engage in direct dialogue,' Wang said. (voanews.com)
  • What we're learning about, I hope, in this public diplomacy program, is not to spin a country so that it's popular, but to understand all the elements of it,' Cowan said. (voanews.com)
  • The prevailing economic dogma within orientalist academia favored public sector led development economic theory. (eurasiareview.com)
  • World population trends, population and development interrelations and population policies : 1983 monitoring report. (who.int)
  • A popular way of understanding and engaging in public policy is through a series of stages known as "the policy cycle", which was first discussed by the political scientist Harold Laswell in his book The Decision Process: Seven Categories of Functional Analysis, published in 1956. (wikipedia.org)
  • Although the NEP was intended as a temporary policy to be dissolved once bumis caught up, successive Barisan Nasional administrations transformed it into a political philosophy. (eurasiareview.com)
  • He, however, believed that all sides of the country's political divide agree on the direction recommended by the policy. (dawn.com)
  • The first essay examines how population aging affects the generosity of public long-term care. (lu.se)
  • While the CIRA policy protects the privacy of individual registrants, corporate or organizational registrants will typically have their full information publicly disclosed. (michaelgeist.ca)
  • A problem with this policy? (iea.org)
  • Cancer is a major public health problem in developed and developing countries, accounting more than 10 million new cases and more than 6 million deaths each year worldwide 1 . (bvsalud.org)
  • Policy leadership requires skills in policy analysis and the capacity to implement new solutions. (queensu.ca)
  • Strong written and verbal communication skills, ideally public speaking skills. (fsfe.org)
  • The GPPC's primary objectives are to participate constructively in matters concerning global public policy to advance the public interest and to enhance public confidence in the profession. (ey.com)
  • These experiences outside the classroom are integrated with the goals and objectives of our policy curriculum. (queensu.ca)
  • The New Economic Policy (NEP) was formulated as a policy to create new wealth within Bumiputera groups to facilitate an economic catch up with the Chinese. (eurasiareview.com)
  • In this second survey, planners were asked to provide their perspectives on the importance of public finance to effective planning. (lincolninst.edu)
  • Most policy formation was focused here, with lucrative consultancies dished out to private subcontractors. (eurasiareview.com)
  • Theoretically, starting from the way public and private are negotiated, and the extent to which this happens, we will suggest that resistance to state measures, and policies, that do not suit a considerable portion of a population may happen not only formally but also informally. (lu.se)