Public Health: Branch of medicine concerned with the prevention and control of disease and disability, and the promotion of physical and mental health of the population on the international, national, state, or municipal level.Health Services: Services for the diagnosis and treatment of disease and the maintenance of health.Health Services Accessibility: The degree to which individuals are inhibited or facilitated in their ability to gain entry to and to receive care and services from the health care system. Factors influencing this ability include geographic, architectural, transportational, and financial considerations, among others.Health Status: The level of health of the individual, group, or population as subjectively assessed by the individual or by more objective measures.Mental Health Services: Organized services to provide mental health care.Delivery of Health Care: The concept concerned with all aspects of providing and distributing health services to a patient population.Health Services Needs and Demand: Health services required by a population or community as well as the health services that the population or community is able and willing to pay for.Health Services Research: The integration of epidemiologic, sociological, economic, and other analytic sciences in the study of health services. Health services research is usually concerned with relationships between need, demand, supply, use, and outcome of health services. The aim of the research is evaluation, particularly in terms of structure, process, output, and outcome. (From Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 2d ed)Public Health Administration: Management of public health organizations or agencies.Public Health Practice: The activities and endeavors of the public health services in a community on any level.Health Policy: Decisions, usually developed by government policymakers, for determining present and future objectives pertaining to the health care system.Health Care Reform: Innovation and improvement of the health care system by reappraisal, amendment of services, and removal of faults and abuses in providing and distributing health services to patients. It includes a re-alignment of health services and health insurance to maximum demographic elements (the unemployed, indigent, uninsured, elderly, inner cities, rural areas) with reference to coverage, hospitalization, pricing and cost containment, insurers' and employers' costs, pre-existing medical conditions, prescribed drugs, equipment, and services.Health Promotion: Encouraging consumer behaviors most likely to optimize health potentials (physical and psychosocial) through health information, preventive programs, and access to medical care.Health Surveys: A systematic collection of factual data pertaining to health and disease in a human population within a given geographic area.Community Health Services: Diagnostic, therapeutic and preventive health services provided for individuals in the community.Health Care Surveys: Statistical measures of utilization and other aspects of the provision of health care services including hospitalization and ambulatory care.Mental Health: The state wherein the person is well adjusted.Health Planning: Planning for needed health and/or welfare services and facilities.Child Health Services: Organized services to provide health care for children.Primary Health Care: Care which provides integrated, accessible health care services by clinicians who are accountable for addressing a large majority of personal health care needs, developing a sustained partnership with patients, and practicing in the context of family and community. (JAMA 1995;273(3):192)Rural Health Services: Health services, public or private, in rural areas. The services include the promotion of health and the delivery of health care.Quality of Health Care: The levels of excellence which characterize the health service or health care provided based on accepted standards of quality.Attitude to Health: Public attitudes toward health, disease, and the medical care system.Reproductive Health Services: Health care services related to human REPRODUCTION and diseases of the reproductive system. Services are provided to both sexes and usually by physicians in the medical or the surgical specialties such as REPRODUCTIVE MEDICINE; ANDROLOGY; GYNECOLOGY; OBSTETRICS; and PERINATOLOGY.Health: The state of the organism when it functions optimally without evidence of disease.United States Public Health Service: A constituent organization of the DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES concerned with protecting and improving the health of the nation.Insurance, Health: Insurance providing coverage of medical, surgical, or hospital care in general or for which there is no specific heading.Patient Acceptance of Health Care: The seeking and acceptance by patients of health service.World Health: The concept pertaining to the health status of inhabitants of the world.Public Health Nursing: A nursing specialty concerned with promoting and protecting the health of populations, using knowledge from nursing, social, and public health sciences to develop local, regional, state, and national health policy and research. It is population-focused and community-oriented, aimed at health promotion and disease prevention through educational, diagnostic, and preventive programs.Health Personnel: Men and women working in the provision of health services, whether as individual practitioners or employees of health institutions and programs, whether or not professionally trained, and whether or not subject to public regulation. (From A Discursive Dictionary of Health Care, 1976)Health Behavior: Behaviors expressed by individuals to protect, maintain or promote their health status. For example, proper diet, and appropriate exercise are activities perceived to influence health status. Life style is closely associated with health behavior and factors influencing life style are socioeconomic, educational, and cultural.Health Expenditures: The amounts spent by individuals, groups, nations, or private or public organizations for total health care and/or its various components. These amounts may or may not be equivalent to the actual costs (HEALTH CARE COSTS) and may or may not be shared among the patient, insurers, and/or employers.National Health Programs: Components of a national health care system which administer specific services, e.g., national health insurance.Maternal Health Services: Organized services to provide health care to expectant and nursing mothers.Preventive Health Services: Services designed for HEALTH PROMOTION and prevention of disease.Health Education: Education that increases the awareness and favorably influences the attitudes and knowledge relating to the improvement of health on a personal or community basis.Community Mental Health Services: Diagnostic, therapeutic and preventive mental health services provided for individuals in the community.Delivery of Health Care, Integrated: A health care system which combines physicians, hospitals, and other medical services with a health plan to provide the complete spectrum of medical care for its customers. In a fully integrated system, the three key elements - physicians, hospital, and health plan membership - are in balance in terms of matching medical resources with the needs of purchasers and patients. (Coddington et al., Integrated Health Care: Reorganizing the Physician, Hospital and Health Plan Relationship, 1994, p7)Health Services Administration: The organization and administration of health services dedicated to the delivery of health care.Health Services for the Aged: Services for the diagnosis and treatment of diseases in the aged and the maintenance of health in the elderly.Health Priorities: Preferentially rated health-related activities or functions to be used in establishing health planning goals. This may refer specifically to PL93-641.Occupational Health Services: Health services for employees, usually provided by the employer at the place of work.Adolescent Health Services: Organized services to provide health care to adolescents, ages ranging from 13 through 18 years.Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice: Knowledge, attitudes, and associated behaviors which pertain to health-related topics such as PATHOLOGIC PROCESSES or diseases, their prevention, and treatment. This term refers to non-health workers and health workers (HEALTH PERSONNEL).Oral Health: The optimal state of the mouth and normal functioning of the organs of the mouth without evidence of disease.Health Care Rationing: Planning for the equitable allocation, apportionment, or distribution of available health resources.Schools, Public Health: Educational institutions for individuals specializing in the field of public health.Environmental Health: The science of controlling or modifying those conditions, influences, or forces surrounding man which relate to promoting, establishing, and maintaining health.Socioeconomic Factors: Social and economic factors that characterize the individual or group within the social structure.State Medicine: A system of medical care regulated, controlled and financed by the government, in which the government assumes responsibility for the health needs of the population.Health Status Disparities: Variation in rates of disease occurrence and disabilities between population groups defined by socioeconomic characteristics such as age, ethnicity, economic resources, or gender and populations identified geographically or similar measures.Occupational Health: The promotion and maintenance of physical and mental health in the work environment.Public Health Informatics: The systematic application of information and computer sciences to public health practice, research, and learning.Women's Health Services: Organized services to provide health care to women. It excludes maternal care services for which MATERNAL HEALTH SERVICES is available.Attitude of Health Personnel: Attitudes of personnel toward their patients, other professionals, toward the medical care system, etc.Rural Health: The status of health in rural populations.Urban Health Services: Health services, public or private, in urban areas. The services include the promotion of health and the delivery of health care.Health Services, Indigenous: Health care provided to specific cultural or tribal peoples which incorporates local customs, beliefs, and taboos.Cross-Sectional Studies: Studies in which the presence or absence of disease or other health-related variables are determined in each member of the study population or in a representative sample at one particular time. This contrasts with LONGITUDINAL STUDIES which are followed over a period of time.Regional Health Planning: Planning for health resources at a regional or multi-state level.Health Care Sector: Economic sector concerned with the provision, distribution, and consumption of health care services and related products.United StatesCommunity Health Planning: Planning that has the goals of improving health, improving accessibility to health services, and promoting efficiency in the provision of services and resources on a comprehensive basis for a whole community. (From Facts on File Dictionary of Health Care Management, 1988, p299)Great BritainUrban Health: The status of health in urban populations.Family Planning Services: Health care programs or services designed to assist individuals in the planning of family size. Various methods of CONTRACEPTION can be used to control the number and timing of childbirths.World Health Organization: A specialized agency of the United Nations designed as a coordinating authority on international health work; its aim is to promote the attainment of the highest possible level of health by all peoples.Outcome Assessment (Health Care): Research aimed at assessing the quality and effectiveness of health care as measured by the attainment of a specified end result or outcome. Measures include parameters such as improved health, lowered morbidity or mortality, and improvement of abnormal states (such as elevated blood pressure).Health Facilities: Institutions which provide medical or health-related services.Women's Health: The concept covering the physical and mental conditions of women.Health Manpower: The availability of HEALTH PERSONNEL. It includes the demand and recruitment of both professional and allied health personnel, their present and future supply and distribution, and their assignment and utilization.Health Resources: Available manpower, facilities, revenue, equipment, and supplies to produce requisite health care and services.Quality Assurance, Health Care: Activities and programs intended to assure or improve the quality of care in either a defined medical setting or a program. The concept includes the assessment or evaluation of the quality of care; identification of problems or shortcomings in the delivery of care; designing activities to overcome these deficiencies; and follow-up monitoring to ensure effectiveness of corrective steps.Education, Public Health Professional: Education and training in PUBLIC HEALTH for the practice of the profession.Questionnaires: Predetermined sets of questions used to collect data - clinical data, social status, occupational group, etc. The term is often applied to a self-completed survey instrument.Community Health Centers: Facilities which administer the delivery of health care services to people living in a community or neighborhood.Politics: Activities concerned with governmental policies, functions, etc.Mental Disorders: Psychiatric illness or diseases manifested by breakdowns in the adaptational process expressed primarily as abnormalities of thought, feeling, and behavior producing either distress or impairment of function.Home Care Services: Community health and NURSING SERVICES providing coordinated multiple services to the patient at the patient's homes. These home-care services are provided by a visiting nurse, home health agencies, HOSPITALS, or organized community groups using professional staff for care delivery. It differs from HOME NURSING which is provided by non-professionals.Interviews as Topic: Conversations with an individual or individuals held in order to obtain information about their background and other personal biographical data, their attitudes and opinions, etc. It includes school admission or job interviews.Program Evaluation: Studies designed to assess the efficacy of programs. They may include the evaluation of cost-effectiveness, the extent to which objectives are met, or impact.Health Literacy: Degree to which individuals have the capacity to obtain, process, and understand basic health information and services needed to make appropriate health decisions.Population Surveillance: Ongoing scrutiny of a population (general population, study population, target population, etc.), generally using methods distinguished by their practicability, uniformity, and frequently their rapidity, rather than by complete accuracy.United States Indian Health Service: A division of the UNITED STATES PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE that is responsible for the public health and the provision of medical services to NATIVE AMERICANS in the United States, primarily those residing on reservation lands.United States Dept. of Health and Human Services: A cabinet department in the Executive Branch of the United States Government concerned with administering those agencies and offices having programs pertaining to health and human services.Dental Health Services: Services designed to promote, maintain, or restore dental health.Catchment Area (Health): A geographic area defined and served by a health program or institution.Financing, Government: Federal, state, or local government organized methods of financial assistance.Prevalence: The total number of cases of a given disease in a specified population at a designated time. It is differentiated from INCIDENCE, which refers to the number of new cases in the population at a given time.Interinstitutional Relations: The interactions between representatives of institutions, agencies, or organizations.EnglandNeeds Assessment: Systematic identification of a population's needs or the assessment of individuals to determine the proper level of services needed.Healthcare Disparities: Differences in access to or availability of medical facilities and services.School Health Services: Preventive health services provided for students. It excludes college or university students.Qualitative Research: Any type of research that employs nonnumeric information to explore individual or group characteristics, producing findings not arrived at by statistical procedures or other quantitative means. (Qualitative Inquiry: A Dictionary of Terms Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications, 1997)Rural Population: The inhabitants of rural areas or of small towns classified as rural.Reproductive Health: The physical condition of human reproductive systems.Policy Making: The decision process by which individuals, groups or institutions establish policies pertaining to plans, programs or procedures.Marketing of Health Services: Application of marketing principles and techniques to maximize the use of health care resources.Health Plan Implementation: Those actions designed to carry out recommendations pertaining to health plans or programs.Private Sector: That distinct portion of the institutional, industrial, or economic structure of a country that is controlled or owned by non-governmental, private interests.Poverty: A situation in which the level of living of an individual, family, or group is below the standard of the community. It is often related to a specific income level.History, 20th Century: Time period from 1901 through 2000 of the common era.Public Sector: The area of a nation's economy that is tax-supported and under government control.Organizational Objectives: The purposes, missions, and goals of an individual organization or its units, established through administrative processes. It includes an organization's long-range plans and administrative philosophy.Personal Health Services: Health care provided to individuals.Cooperative Behavior: The interaction of two or more persons or organizations directed toward a common goal which is mutually beneficial. An act or instance of working or acting together for a common purpose or benefit, i.e., joint action. (From Random House Dictionary Unabridged, 2d ed)Social Justice: An interactive process whereby members of a community are concerned for the equality and rights of all.Health Occupations: Professions or other business activities directed to the cure and prevention of disease. For occupations of medical personnel who are not physicians but who are working in the fields of medical technology, physical therapy, etc., ALLIED HEALTH OCCUPATIONS is available.Contract Services: Outside services provided to an institution under a formal financial agreement.Disaster Planning: Procedures outlined for the care of casualties and the maintenance of services in disasters.Program Development: The process of formulating, improving, and expanding educational, managerial, or service-oriented work plans (excluding computer program development).State Health Plans: State plans prepared by the State Health Planning and Development Agencies which are made up from plans submitted by the Health Systems Agencies and subject to review and revision by the Statewide Health Coordinating Council.Logistic Models: Statistical models which describe the relationship between a qualitative dependent variable (that is, one which can take only certain discrete values, such as the presence or absence of a disease) and an independent variable. A common application is in epidemiology for estimating an individual's risk (probability of a disease) as a function of a given risk factor.Infant, Newborn: An infant during the first month after birth.Health Benefit Plans, Employee: Health insurance plans for employees, and generally including their dependents, usually on a cost-sharing basis with the employer paying a percentage of the premium.Cost-Benefit Analysis: A method of comparing the cost of a program with its expected benefits in dollars (or other currency). The benefit-to-cost ratio is a measure of total return expected per unit of money spent. This analysis generally excludes consideration of factors that are not measured ultimately in economic terms. Cost effectiveness compares alternative ways to achieve a specific set of results.Quality Indicators, Health Care: Norms, criteria, standards, and other direct qualitative and quantitative measures used in determining the quality of health care.Electronic Health Records: Media that facilitate transportability of pertinent information concerning patient's illness across varied providers and geographic locations. Some versions include direct linkages to online consumer health information that is relevant to the health conditions and treatments related to a specific patient.Outcome and Process Assessment (Health Care): Evaluation procedures that focus on both the outcome or status (OUTCOMES ASSESSMENT) of the patient at the end of an episode of care - presence of symptoms, level of activity, and mortality; and the process (ASSESSMENT, PROCESS) - what is done for the patient diagnostically and therapeutically.Local Government: Smallest political subdivisions within a country at which general governmental functions are carried-out.Consumer Participation: Community or individual involvement in the decision-making process.Referral and Consultation: The practice of sending a patient to another program or practitioner for services or advice which the referring source is not prepared to provide.Allied Health Personnel: Health care workers specially trained and licensed to assist and support the work of health professionals. Often used synonymously with paramedical personnel, the term generally refers to all health care workers who perform tasks which must otherwise be performed by a physician or other health professional.Financing, Organized: All organized methods of funding.Organizational Case Studies: Descriptions and evaluations of specific health care organizations.Health Planning Support: Financial resources provided for activities related to health planning and development.Health Planning Guidelines: Recommendations for directing health planning functions and policies. These may be mandated by PL93-641 and issued by the Department of Health and Human Services for use by state and local planning agencies.Government Agencies: Administrative units of government responsible for policy making and management of governmental activities.Public Policy: A course or method of action selected, usually by a government, from among alternatives to guide and determine present and future decisions.Patient Satisfaction: The degree to which the individual regards the health care service or product or the manner in which it is delivered by the provider as useful, effective, or beneficial.Maternal-Child Health Centers: Facilities which administer the delivery of health care services to mothers and children.Health Maintenance Organizations: Organized systems for providing comprehensive prepaid health care that have five basic attributes: (1) provide care in a defined geographic area; (2) provide or ensure delivery of an agreed-upon set of basic and supplemental health maintenance and treatment services; (3) provide care to a voluntarily enrolled group of persons; (4) require their enrollees to use the services of designated providers; and (5) receive reimbursement through a predetermined, fixed, periodic prepayment made by the enrollee without regard to the degree of services provided. (From Facts on File Dictionary of Health Care Management, 1988)Pregnancy: The status during which female mammals carry their developing young (EMBRYOS or FETUSES) in utero before birth, beginning from FERTILIZATION to BIRTH.State Government: The level of governmental organization and function below that of the national or country-wide government.Urban Population: The inhabitants of a city or town, including metropolitan areas and suburban areas.International Cooperation: The interaction of persons or groups of persons representing various nations in the pursuit of a common goal or interest.Comprehensive Health Care: Providing for the full range of personal health services for diagnosis, treatment, follow-up and rehabilitation of patients.Costs and Cost Analysis: Absolute, comparative, or differential costs pertaining to services, institutions, resources, etc., or the analysis and study of these costs.Emergency Medical Services: Services specifically designed, staffed, and equipped for the emergency care of patients.Australia: The smallest continent and an independent country, comprising six states and two territories. Its capital is Canberra.Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (U.S.): An agency of the UNITED STATES PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE that conducts and supports programs for the prevention and control of disease and provides consultation and assistance to health departments and other countries.Privatization: Process of shifting publicly controlled services and/or facilities to the private sector.BrazilInsurance Coverage: Generally refers to the amount of protection available and the kind of loss which would be paid for under an insurance contract with an insurer. (Slee & Slee, Health Care Terms, 2d ed)Family Practice: A medical specialty concerned with the provision of continuing, comprehensive primary health care for the entire family.Decision Making, Organizational: The process by which decisions are made in an institution or other organization.Residence Characteristics: Elements of residence that characterize a population. They are applicable in determining need for and utilization of health services.Disease Outbreaks: Sudden increase in the incidence of a disease. The concept includes EPIDEMICS and PANDEMICS.Public Health Dentistry: A dental specialty concerned with the prevention of disease and the maintenance of oral health through promoting organized dental health programs at a community, state, or federal level.Community-Institutional Relations: The interactions between members of a community and representatives of the institutions within that community.Efficiency, Organizational: The capacity of an organization, institution, or business to produce desired results with a minimum expenditure of energy, time, money, personnel, materiel, etc.Social Responsibility: The obligations and accountability assumed in carrying out actions or ideas on behalf of others.National Institutes of Health (U.S.): An operating division of the US Department of Health and Human Services. It is concerned with the overall planning, promoting, and administering of programs pertaining to health and medical research. Until 1995, it was an agency of the United States PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE.Student Health Services: Health services for college and university students usually provided by the educational institution.Chronic Disease: Diseases which have one or more of the following characteristics: they are permanent, leave residual disability, are caused by nonreversible pathological alteration, require special training of the patient for rehabilitation, or may be expected to require a long period of supervision, observation, or care. (Dictionary of Health Services Management, 2d ed)Quality of Life: A generic concept reflecting concern with the modification and enhancement of life attributes, e.g., physical, political, moral and social environment; the overall condition of a human life.Age Factors: Age as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or the effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from AGING, a physiological process, and TIME FACTORS which refers only to the passage of time.Health Records, Personal: Longitudinal patient-maintained records of individual health history and tools that allow individual control of access.Ambulatory Care: Health care services provided to patients on an ambulatory basis, rather than by admission to a hospital or other health care facility. The services may be a part of a hospital, augmenting its inpatient services, or may be provided at a free-standing facility.Family Health: The health status of the family as a unit including the impact of the health of one member of the family on the family as a unit and on individual family members; also, the impact of family organization or disorganization on the health status of its members.Universal Coverage: Health insurance coverage for all persons in a state or country, rather than for some subset of the population. It may extend to the unemployed as well as to the employed; to aliens as well as to citizens; for pre-existing conditions as well as for current illnesses; for mental as well as for physical conditions.Educational Status: Educational attainment or level of education of individuals.Communicable Disease Control: Programs of surveillance designed to prevent the transmission of disease by any means from person to person or from animal to man.Men's Health: The concept covering the physical and mental conditions of men.Consumer Satisfaction: Customer satisfaction or dissatisfaction with a benefit or service received.Social Class: A stratum of people with similar position and prestige; includes social stratification. Social class is measured by criteria such as education, occupation, and income.Health Care Coalitions: Voluntary groups of people representing diverse interests in the community such as hospitals, businesses, physicians, and insurers, with the principal objective to improve health care cost effectiveness.Insurance, Health, Reimbursement: Payment by a third-party payer in a sum equal to the amount expended by a health care provider or facility for health services rendered to an insured or program beneficiary. (From Facts on File Dictionary of Health Care Management, 1988)Leadership: The function of directing or controlling the actions or attitudes of an individual or group with more or less willing acquiescence of the followers.Demography: Statistical interpretation and description of a population with reference to distribution, composition, or structure.Research: Critical and exhaustive investigation or experimentation, having for its aim the discovery of new facts and their correct interpretation, the revision of accepted conclusions, theories, or laws in the light of newly discovered facts, or the practical application of such new or revised conclusions, theories, or laws. (Webster, 3d ed)Social Work: The use of community resources, individual case work, or group work to promote the adaptive capacities of individuals in relation to their social and economic environments. It includes social service agencies.Vulnerable Populations: Groups of persons whose range of options is severely limited, who are frequently subjected to COERCION in their DECISION MAKING, or who may be compromised in their ability to give INFORMED CONSENT.Health Planning Councils: Organized groups serving in advisory capacities related to health planning activities.IndiaFees and Charges: Amounts charged to the patient as payer for health care services.LondonMedically Underserved Area: A geographic location which has insufficient health resources (manpower and/or facilities) to meet the medical needs of the resident population.Ontario: A province of Canada lying between the provinces of Manitoba and Quebec. Its capital is Toronto. It takes its name from Lake Ontario which is said to represent the Iroquois oniatariio, beautiful lake. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p892 & Room, Brewer's Dictionary of Names, 1992, p391)Cost of Illness: The personal cost of acute or chronic disease. The cost to the patient may be an economic, social, or psychological cost or personal loss to self, family, or immediate community. The cost of illness may be reflected in absenteeism, productivity, response to treatment, peace of mind, or QUALITY OF LIFE. It differs from HEALTH CARE COSTS, meaning the societal cost of providing services related to the delivery of health care, rather than personal impact on individuals.Cohort Studies: Studies in which subsets of a defined population are identified. These groups may or may not be exposed to factors hypothesized to influence the probability of the occurrence of a particular disease or other outcome. Cohorts are defined populations which, as a whole, are followed in an attempt to determine distinguishing subgroup characteristics.Information Dissemination: The circulation or wide dispersal of information.Sex Factors: Maleness or femaleness as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from SEX CHARACTERISTICS, anatomical or physiological manifestations of sex, and from SEX DISTRIBUTION, the number of males and females in given circumstances.Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Medicaid: Federal program, created by Public Law 89-97, Title XIX, a 1965 amendment to the Social Security Act, administered by the states, that provides health care benefits to indigent and medically indigent persons.Government Regulation: Exercise of governmental authority to control conduct.Social Change: Social process whereby the values, attitudes, or institutions of society, such as education, family, religion, and industry become modified. It includes both the natural process and action programs initiated by members of the community.Models, Organizational: Theoretical representations and constructs that describe or explain the structure and hierarchy of relationships and interactions within or between formal organizational entities or informal social groups.Emergency Service, Hospital: Hospital department responsible for the administration and provision of immediate medical or surgical care to the emergency patient.Social Welfare: Organized institutions which provide services to ameliorate conditions of need or social pathology in the community.Ethnic Groups: A group of people with a common cultural heritage that sets them apart from others in a variety of social relationships.Administrative Personnel: Individuals responsible for the development of policy and supervision of the execution of plans and functional operations.Social Support: Support systems that provide assistance and encouragement to individuals with physical or emotional disabilities in order that they may better cope. Informal social support is usually provided by friends, relatives, or peers, while formal assistance is provided by churches, groups, etc.Longitudinal Studies: Studies in which variables relating to an individual or group of individuals are assessed over a period of time.Organizations: Administration and functional structures for the purpose of collectively systematizing activities for a particular goal.Public Health Surveillance: The ongoing, systematic collection, analysis, and interpretation of health-related data with the purpose of preventing or controlling disease or injury, or of identifying unusual events of public health importance, followed by the dissemination and use of information for public health action. (From Am J Prev Med 2011;41(6):636)Evidence-Based Medicine: An approach of practicing medicine with the goal to improve and evaluate patient care. It requires the judicious integration of best research evidence with the patient's values to make decisions about medical care. This method is to help physicians make proper diagnosis, devise best testing plan, choose best treatment and methods of disease prevention, as well as develop guidelines for large groups of patients with the same disease. (from JAMA 296 (9), 2006)Resource Allocation: Societal or individual decisions about the equitable distribution of available resources.HIV Infections: Includes the spectrum of human immunodeficiency virus infections that range from asymptomatic seropositivity, thru AIDS-related complex (ARC), to acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS).
These programs include tutoring at the Hargeisa Orphanage and an afternoon primary school program. Four days a week, tutors ... These comprise computer programming, chess, science, health, public speaking, debate, creative writing, improv and drama. The ... "Community Service". Abaarso School of Science and Technology. Abaarso School of Science and Technology. Archived from the ... "Community Service". Abaarso School of Science and Technology. Abaarso School of Science and Technology. Archived from the ...
Besides being public funded, the health services provided by the SNS are mainly delivered by public health units. These include ... Those that groups both hospital and health centers are similar to the local health units of the SNS, providing both primary and ... The public hospitals are part of the National Health Service (SNS) or of the regional health services (SRS) of the Portuguese ... several public and private organizations related with the health sector - including medical services providers, pharmaceutical ...
Public health care is delivered at four levels meant to function as a referral chain. The entry level includes rural health ... Makawire Primary School, Shazhaume Primary School, Pambe Primary School,Zvirikure Primary School, Sarahuro Primary School, ... The district is serviced by a network of mostly gravel roads. Apart from the shoulder-less A1 highway, all other roads in the ... Neshuro Primary SChool,Rutenga Primary School,Gegare Primary School,Matibi Primary School. However, not all villages have ...
Mobile dental programs have special needs including offline data collection, central data availability and public health ... Should the primary database fail, one of these standby databases can be activated to become the new primary database". High ... The first open dental customer bought the technical support services on July 22, 2003. The database uses the dual licensed ... David's Community Health Foundation Leadership: Dental Program". St. David's Community Health Foundation. Retrieved 2009-06-12 ...
... go into Gambia College which provide pre-service training for teachers, nurses, public health officers and agricultural ... In 2002/2003 total enrolment at primary schools included 79 percent of children in the relevant age-group (boys 79 percent; ... In 1995, the gross primary enrollment rate was 77.1 percent and the net primary enrollment rate was 64.7 percent. School fees ... Nursing and Midwifery and Public Health. The Gambia portal Education portal "The Gambia" Archived 2013-10-07 at the Wayback ...
Resources and Health and Social Services. Special committee work included Fisheries, Education and Regulatory Review. Budget ... Outside politics she has pursued careers in health care, journalism and public relations. Sattler was originally elected in ... with Ivan's return to challenge her in the 2002 primary the closest contest she faced. She served on various standing ... Subcommittees included: Corrections, Courts and Public Safety. Most notably, Mary successfully coalesced the then defunct "Bush ...
First, the four service reform proposals, namely (i) enhance primary care; (ii) promote public-private partnership; (iii) ... Second, the six possible supplementary healthcare financing options, including (i) social health insurance; (ii) out-of-pocket ... There are also polyclinics that offer primary care services, including dentistry. A study published in 2016 found that around 8 ... 2011). My Health, My Choice: Report on Second Stage Public Consultation on Healthcare Reform. Hong Kong: Food and Health Bureau ...
A public services centre, the 'Gipsyville Multipurpose Centre' provides library, health and other community services. Shopping ... "Francis Askew Primary School Prospectus 2013-2014" (PDF), www.francisaskewprimary.org.uk, p. 4, archived from the original (PDF ... The southern part of Gipsyville includes an industrial area, known as Dairycoates Industrial Estate, the area known as ... As of 2013 the Library building functions as the 'Gipsyville multipurpose centre' providing multiple public services. By the ...
Government Primary Health Centre was established in 1990 and it has completed 25 years of service to public. One government ... The total extend of land of this village is 2441.5 acres including nearly 100 acres of forest and nearly 150 acres of water ... Four government primary schools are there. This village has two village administrative officers even though a single revenue ...
He also served on the Financial Institutions, the Judiciary and the Public Health Committees. His accomplishments include ... When not in public service, Weinzapfel is an attorney and an adjunct professor at the University of Southern Indiana. ... In the primary, Weinzapfel carried the more liberal parts of Monroe and Vanderburgh Counties, while McConnell won more ... the Environmental Affairs Committee and the Environmental Quality Service Council. ...
... health science and public service, technology and workforce development. In 1961, the Mansfield, Ohio, Board of Education ... This institution's primary purpose was to provide local residents with technical training so that they could advance in the ... This new institution expanded its programs beyond Mansfield to include residents of Ashland, Crawford, and Richland Counties. ... Child Development Center, OSU/NC State Schuttera Service Center, OSU Campus Recreation Center, OSU/NC State Ovalwood Hall/ ...
... case management and primary care services from a wide range of health professionals and practitioners, including; Alcohol and ... The organisation amalgamated with public health provider Eastern Health in October 2009, and is formally affiliated with Monash ... This includes using an evidence based approach to treatment services and implementing harm minimisation techniques towards ... Turning Point provides a comprehensive program to the local general public, including the supply and exchange of hypodermic ...
She has applied her skills in fields such as public information, economic research, health care and human services, and ... She is one of the founders of the African Queens and Women Cultural Leaders Network, whose primary focus is the "improvement of ... the lives of women and children in Africa". Collaborating organizations include the African Union, the United Nations, and ... Sylvia went on to work as a Public Information Officer and Research Consultant at the United Nations headquarters in New York, ...
The GPRD specialised in providing anonymised data and research service capabilities to a variety of medical and public health ... The data collected allows researchers access to a wealth of information including; Prescribed Primary Care drugS Laboratory ... capabilities and aims to provide a range of services and products in the areas of medical research and public health care. ... The primary health care data collected by the CPRD is taken from participating GP surgeries in the United Kingdom. Personal ...
Community and Public Sector Union Covering workers in the public sector, telecommunications, call centres, employment services ... The QCU has a number of committees leading discussion about issues including: Occupational Health & Safety Recruitment & ... In 1993 the organisation was renamed the Australian Council of Trade Unions Queensland Branch to reflect its primary function ... Some of the functions and services of the QCU include research, presentation of state general wage cases, presentation of test ...
... the Iskut First Nation Band Office and the Iskut Valley Health Services building are the primary public service amenities. ... Recreational activities in the area include fishing at any of the lakes of the Iskut Chain Lakes, which include, moving south ... Of particular public interest has been Royal Dutch Shell's plans for coalbed methane extraction on the Klappan Plateau, the ... Iskut is the home of the Iskut First Nation, a group of the Tahltan people, which also includes the communities of Dease Lake ...
Environmental issues are one of the primary causes of disease, health issues and long term livelihood impact for India. British ... 2001). "INDOOR AIR POLLUTION IN INDIA - A MAJOR ENVIRONMENTAL AND PUBLIC HEALTH CONCERN" (PDF). Indian Council of Medical ... of pollution in India include the rapid burning of fuelwood and biomass such as dried waste from livestock as the primary ... "India: Country Strategy paper, 2007-2013" (PDF). European External Action Service, European Union. 2007. Chabukdhara, Mayuri; ...
COPs are employed by the Health Service Executive. COPs see patients referred by general practitioners, public health ... of Health in 1980 in response to a report which identified the need for community-based rather than hospital-based primary eye ... Minimum qualifications included a Diploma in Ophthalmology from the Royal College of Physicians of Ireland. Training in medical ... COPs see and treat a variety of ophthalmic conditions, including: diabetic eye disease glaucoma macular degeneration strabismus ...
Humanities and Social Sciences College of Science College of Engineering and Technology College of Health and Public Services ... UVU grounds includes two reflecting ponds on the west side of campus, a stream running through the east part of campus, and a ... The primary colleges and schools at the university are: College of ... public service, and social work. The university's Wasatch Campus in Heber City, Utah, also offers bachelor's degrees in ...
... state health and regulatory agencies e.g. Primary Care Reimbursement Service (PCRS), the HSE, HPRA and professionals working in ... Reimbursement falls under the remit of the Health Service Executive (HSE). Drugs in Sport and Driving: Also included is top- ... IMF is also used by nursing professionals (especially nurse prescribers and public health nurses), academic institutions e.g. ... Health Services Executive (HSE) Website Health Services Executive (HSE), Ireland World Anti-Doping Agency Website DRUID Project ...
Public housing. Public health. Licensing of local services and facilities, including those related to entertainment, cultural ... Provision of public primary health care. Provision of family and other social welfare services, such as care for the vulnerable ... Provision of public pre-primary, primary and secondary education, including registration and licensing of educational ... Provision and maintenance of public services and utilities, including water supply, sewers and drains, sewage treatment, waste ...
There is also a wide range of psychotherapists (including family therapy), counselors, and public health professionals. In ... Manitoba Family Services and Housing. The Vulnerable Persons Living with a Mental Disability Act, 1996[non-primary source ... Activists campaign for improved mental health services and for more involvement and empowerment within mental health services, ... and Consumer-Operated Services" (PDF). Administration and Policy in Mental Health and Mental Health Services Research. 33 (1): ...
... she spent her entire career working in the public sector in the fields of primary care and public health. She was a medical ... officer and superintendent in the Gold Coast Civil Service. Hospitals she worked at include the Maternity Unit of the Korle-Bu ... These three pioneering physicians were all early advocates of maternal health, paediatric care and public health in Ghana. For ... at the Communicable Diseases Unit of the Regional Medical Officer of Health's Office (Ministry of Health) in Accra from 1971 to ...
Paediatrics Pathology and Molecular Medicine Primary Health Care and General Practice Psychological Medicine Public Health ... Wellington University of Otago Health Sciences First Year "Mein St's link with medical services". Stuff. Retrieved 2017-10-10 ... University of Otago Medical School (includes Christchurch, Dunedin, and Wellington) University of Otago, ... All University of Otago medical students who gain entry after a competitive Health Sciences First Year programme, or who gain ...
Internet services are available. The data bandwidth is poor. There is a small public health facility in the village with a ... There are a number of educational facilities around Bangabari, these include Government Primary School: 14 High School: 5 ...
A Public Health Emergency of International Concern (PHEIC) is a formal declaration by the World Health Organization (WHO). The declaration is promulgated by that body's Emergency Committee operating under International Health Regulations (IHR). This statement designates a public health crisis of potentially global reach. As a legally binding international instrument on disease prevention, surveillance, control, and response adopted by 194 countries, a PHEIC was first issued in April 2009 when the H1N1 (or swine flu) pandemic was still in Phase Three. The second PHEIC was issued in May 2014 with the resurgence of polio after its near-eradication, deemed "an extraordinary event." On Friday, August 8, 2014, the World Health Organization declared its third Public ...
IANPHI's long-term projects help public health systems in low-resource countries respond to modern public health challenges, improve outcomes, and support healthy populations and strong economies. These intensive multi-year engagements develop and strengthen national public health institutes (NPHIs), moving them forward on a continuum from those least developed to those with a comprehensive and coordinated scope of public health responsibilities. Currently, IANPHI has ongoing long-term projects in Bangladesh, Ethiopia, Ghana, Guinea-Bissau, Malawi, Morocco, Mozambique, Nigeria, Tanzania, and Togo.[87] Bangladesh: Strengthen disease surveillance and outbreak response in Bangladesh[88] Bangladesh has limited ability to get accurate data quickly from its 400-plus local disease ...
The American Journal of Public Health is a monthly peer-reviewed public health journal published by the American Public Health Association covering health policy and public health. The journal was established in 1911 and its stated mission is "to advance public health research, policy, practice, and education."[1] The journal occasionally publishes themed supplements. The editor-in-chief is Alfredo Morabia. The journal has been criticized for extending its open access embargo from 2 to 10 years as of June 1, 2013.[2] ...
... is the use of genomics information to benefit public health. This is visualized as more effective personalized preventive care and disease treatments with better specificity, targeted to the genetic makeup of each patient. According to the CDC, Public Health genomics is an emerging field of study that assesses the impact of genes and their interaction with behavior, diet and the environment on the population's health. This field of public health genomics is less than a decade old. A number of think tanks, universities, and governments (including the U.S., UK, and Australia) have started public health genomics projects. Research on the human genome is generating new knowledge that is changing public health programs and ...
... surveillance has led to the identification and prioritization of many public health issues facing the world today, including HIV/AIDS, diabetes, waterborne diseases, zoonotic diseases, and antibiotic resistance leading to the reemergence of infectious diseases such as tuberculosis. Antibiotic resistance, also known as drug resistance, was the theme of World Health Day 2011. Although the prioritization of pressing public health issues is important, Laurie Garrett argues that there are following consequences.[10] When foreign aid is funnelled into disease-specific programs, the importance of public health in general is disregarded. This public health problem of stovepiping is thought to create a lack of funds to combat other existing diseases in a given country.. For ...
The Directorate-General for Health and Food Safety (DG SANTE), until 2014 known as the Directorate-General for Health and Consumers (DG SANCO), is a Directorate-General of the European Commission. The DG is responsible for the implementation of European Union laws on the safety of food and other products, on consumers' rights and on the protection of people's health. In 2006, DG Sanco launched the public Health-EU portal to provide European citizens with easy access to comprehensive information on Public Health initiatives and programmes at EU level. ...
Thailand has had "a long and successful history of health development," according to the World Health Organization. Life expectancy is averaged at seventy years and a system providing universal health care for Thai nationals has been established since 2002. Health and medical care is overseen by the Ministry of Public Health (MOPH), along with several other non-ministerial government agencies, with total national expenditures on health amounting to 4.3 percent of GDP in 2009. Non-communicable diseases form the major burden of morbidity and mortality, while infectious diseases including malaria and tuberculosis, as well as traffic accidents, are also important public health issues. Most services in Thailand are delivered by ...
The Harvard Doctor of Public Health (DrPH) was launched in 2014 as a multidisciplinary degree providing advanced education in public health along with mastery of skills in management, leadership, communications, and innovation thinking. The program is a cohort-based program emphasizing small-group learning and collaboration. The program is designed for three years - two years at Harvard, plus one year in a field-based doctoral project - although some students may take up to four years to complete the program. Academic training in the DrPH covers the biological, social, and economic foundations of public health, as well as essential statistical, quantitative, and methodological skills in the first year, an individualized course of study in your second year, and a field-based, capstone project called the DELTA (Doctoral Engagement in Leadership and Translation ...
Following the U.S. invasion of Afghanistan the Ministry of Health, along with the World Health Organization and other technical partners and donors reconstructed the health sector. At the time, at least 70%[4] of the Afghan population was dependent on health services provided by the international community. Almost six million Afghans had no or very little access to medical care. In addition, 50 of the country's 330 districts had no health facilities whatsoever. The goal of the ministry is to develop the health sector to improve the health of the people of Afghanistan, especially women and children, through implementing the basic package of health services (BPHS) and the essential package of hospital ...
Finland has a history of more effective public health interventions than most countries have been able to achieve. The total annual alcohol consumption has risen from 7.6 litres (in 1985) to 10.0 litres of 100% alcohol equivalent per capita in 2010. There has been a small reduction in alcohol consumption in the recent years. Alcohol use is highest in the Northern Finland with 10,9 liters and lowest at the Åland Islands with 5,7 liters per person. Although the consumption is average to other western countries, binge drinking with especially teenagers and becoming intoxicated has remained as a characteristic of Finnish drinking habits. Finland has a national alcohol programme to reduce the long-term effects of alcohol. The World Health Organization has published a list of countries by alcohol consumption. Smoking among adults has shown a marked decline over the past thirty years in most OECD countries. Much of this decline ...
The meaning of health has evolved over time. In keeping with the biomedical perspective, early definitions of health focused on the theme of the body's ability to function; health was seen as a state of normal function that could be disrupted from time to time by disease. An example of such a definition of health is: "a state characterized by anatomic, physiologic, and psychological integrity; ability to perform personally valued family, work, and community roles; ability to deal with physical, biological, psychological, and social stress".[3] Then in 1948, in a radical departure from previous definitions, the World Health Organization (WHO) proposed a definition that aimed higher: linking health to well-being, in terms of "physical, mental, and social well-being, and not merely the absence of disease and ...
Text is available under the Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License and the GFDL; additional terms may apply. See Terms of Use for details ...
旅行血栓症[4]是指旅行者形成深靜脈血栓。[5]也有使用「經濟艙綜合症」或「經濟客位綜合症」來描述這個症狀。[6]乘坐飛機遠途旅行的人通常易患旅行血栓症。深靜脈血栓可以引起肺栓塞這一嚴重併發症。. 旅行者形成血栓可能是缺乏活動、脫水和隱藏因素的共同作用。在飛行途中的環境因素也可能與此有關。[7][8]儘管和飛行有關係,但這個問題是和缺乏活動聯繫在一起的,所以乘坐巴士、火車和汽車的旅行者也有同樣的風險。[9]. 患有易形成血栓疾病(如抗磷脂綜合徵或癌症)的人患病風險會高出很多。風險最高的人群包括老人,有嚴重疾病者,例如癌症的病人、最近接受矯形外科手術(腿或膝蓋)的人以及孕婦。[10]一些研究者認為耐力類運動員也是高危人群。[11][12]. 世界衛生組織的WRIGHT(World Health Organisation Research Into Global Hazards of ...
... DENTAL NEWSLETTER A publication of the Dental Prof… ... one that includes oral health literacy. Now you have asked for a Call to Action on health literacy and we arepleased to be an ... "The primary focus of the coursedentists, physicians, and pathologists attended. The training is to expose the experienced ... United States Public Health Service * 1. United States Public Health Service DENTAL NEWSLETTER A publication of the Dental ...
Pacific Health Services stocks medications commonly used in a primary care setting including antibiotics, oral contraceptives ... San Joaquin County Public Health Website. Sacramento County COVID-19 Homepage. SF Department of Public Health Website ... This fee is the primary funding for programs offered by Student Health Services ( SHS) and Counseling And Psychological ... The Student Health Insurance Plan requires Pacific Health Services to be utilized first if you are located within a 50 mile ...
Info concerning Rocky Mountain College student health center. Nursing is one of the fastest-growing job areas, and for good ... There are two primary types of cataract-removal surgery. The first is Small Incision Cataract Surgery, where a tiny probe is ... Additionally, career placement services can help you to structure your job search after graduation. If youd like to request ... Public universities typically evaluate applicants based on grades and test scores alone, while private universities tend to be ...
... and service.. Required qualifications include a Doctorate in Social Work or related field (e.g., Education, Public Health, ... Job duties and responsibilities include teaching, advising, research, ... Primary Research Areas. *Working Groups. *Training *Graduate Certificate in Demographic Methods. *Fellowships ...
Popular in health reform. *. Listening, trust and partnerships: learning from primary health care successes. ... Overview of Qld Health changes, including the "historic" dismantling of public and preventative health services. This post ... 7 thoughts on "Overview of Qld Health changes, including the "historic" dismantling of public and preventative health services ... "the greatest dismantling of public and preventative health services in recent Australian history". More than 60 public health ...
These programs include tutoring at the Hargeisa Orphanage and an afternoon primary school program. Four days a week, tutors ... These comprise computer programming, chess, science, health, public speaking, debate, creative writing, improv and drama. The ... "Community Service". Abaarso School of Science and Technology. Abaarso School of Science and Technology. Archived from the ... "Community Service". Abaarso School of Science and Technology. Abaarso School of Science and Technology. Archived from the ...
... as well as for state and local approaches to financing their services. ... New Mexico stands out for its widespread deployment of community health workers, ... This case study is the third in a series profiling how primary care clinics are meeting the needs of patients with low incomes ... integration of primary health care with public health, social services, and behavioral health ...
Additional important steps include the professionalisation of the management boards of SOEs, increasing transparency of ... It would moreover help level the playing field and generate equal opportunity for all market actors - private, public and ... "Other services" includes education, entertainment, health, public administration and professional services. ITC stands for ... The category "Primary sector" includes agriculture and mining. "Utilities" includes water supply and waste management, as well ...
... in 2003 more than 43 million Americans lacked health insurance. Being uninsured is associated... ... It should include: â ¢ broad public health and health education initiatives; â ¢ efforts to structure services, systems, and ... expanded access to primary and preventive services; â ¢ clinical and health services research; and â ¢ programs of quality ... how health policies and health services organization apply to Health Care (including employer â ¢ Personal health subsidy) the ...
A well-functioning public health system is a catalyst for effective universal health coverage and it should be everyones ... This was expanded in 1996 to include free services for all primary health care services. Not so long ago, in 2013, free ... A well-functioning public health system is a catalyst for effective universal health coverage and it should be everyones ... The focus on improving financing of health services in SA through the National Health Insurance (NHI), will not address the ...
The safety practices outlined in these guidelines remain the primary means of preventing occupational acquisition of HIV ... Public Health Service statement on management of occupational exposure to human immunodeficiency virus, including ... Public Health Service guidelines for counseling and antibody testing to prevent HIV infection and AIDS. MMWR 1987;36:509-15. 12 ... Provisional Public Health Service inter-agency recommendations for screening donated blood and plasma for antibody to the virus ...
Compare health status There are 100 core indicators published by WHO to compare countries for their health system. These ... Private providers constitute more than 80 % of service provided (Healthcare indicator, 2010). Public system comprises Primary ... central government health scheme, defense, railway employee. Private health system includes clinics, nursing home, hospitals. ... The Health And Health Care. 1340 Words , 6 Pages. *. Health Status and Health Care Services in Poland with Comparison to the ...
Ambulance services, Public hospitals and Mental health management. ... Part E includes performance reporting for Primary and community health, ... Services included in the sector. *Primary and community health. Includes general practice, pharmaceutical services, dentistry, ... Mental health management. Includes MBS-subsidised mental health services provided by primary and community health providers, ...
Besides being public funded, the health services provided by the SNS are mainly delivered by public health units. These include ... Those that groups both hospital and health centers are similar to the local health units of the SNS, providing both primary and ... The public hospitals are part of the National Health Service (SNS) or of the regional health services (SRS) of the Portuguese ... several public and private organizations related with the health sector - including medical services providers, pharmaceutical ...
Department of Health and Human Services Factors Associated with Ending Caregiving Among Informal Caregivers to the Functionally ... U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. Public Health Service.** People who either are the sole caregiver or have the ... In three cases there were three primary caregivers. Primary caregivers were not defined by relationship and included persons ... Department of Health and Human Services (HHS), Office of Social Services Policy (now known as the Office of Disability, Aging ...
c) Administering and providing for the expansion of the maternal and child health services to include pediatric primary care ... and social services, as appropriate. Family outreach workers may include social work professionals or nurses with public health ... Maternal and child health services shall include encouragement of breastfeeding.. (b) Administering or providing for periodic ... the Department of Health Deputy Secretary for Health and Deputy State Health Officer for Childrens Medical Services, and the ...
Clinical stakeholders include workers in primary care/general practices, emergency departments, hospitals, intensive care ... Department of Health and Human Services, the Public Health Service, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, or the ... Real-time modeling tools have the potential to aid public health officials make crucial decisions during public health crises. ... Fischer LS, Santibanez S, Hatchett RJ, Jernigan DB, Meyers LA, Thorpe PG, et al. CDC grand rounds: modeling and public health ...
c) Administering and providing for the expansion of the maternal and child health services to include pediatric primary care ... and social services, as appropriate. Family outreach workers may include social work professionals or nurses with public health ... Maternal and child health services shall include encouragement of breastfeeding.. (b) Administering or providing for periodic ... a) Patient records in the possession of a public or private provider of medical, dental, or mental health care, including, but ...
... health policy and management,school of public health,social policy,health outcomes,injury research,bioethics,health finance, ... health economics,managed care,risk sciences, quality of care,health services,health promotion,prevention,aging ... Explores primary and secondary market research techniques. Discusses marketing strategy, including positioning and branding, ... How do public health policymakers, practitioners, and researchers monitor health problems and track implementation of health ...
Emory University School of Public Health, the Evaluation and Support Center (ESC) for this initiative, assessed the ... into community-based HIV primary care and ancillary services. Interventions included flexible case management strategies that ... SPNS Initiative: Enhancing Linkages to HIV Primary Care and Services in Jail Settings, 2007-2012. Background. The Special ... Home > About the Ryan White HIV/AIDS Program > SPNS Initiative: Enhancing Linkages to HIV Primary Care and Services in Jail ...
It includes GPs, Public Health Nurses and a range of other services. They provide a single point of contact to. the health ... Primary Care: Health and Social Care Services. Primary Care is all of the health or social care services that you can find in ... Your Local Primary Care Services. Use the Map Centre to find your local Health Centre, GP, GP out of hours service.. Learn ... For questions about health services, your entitlements, or how to access HSE health or social services in your area? ...
... hospitals and mental health services, including pharmacists, opticians, community nurses and therapists. ... Explains how to complain about NHS services and health and care professionals other than GPs, dentists, ... primary care. *public health services for women who are pregnant and for children aged 0 to 5. This includes health visiting ... wheelchair services and home oxygen services (but not public health services such as health visiting and family nursing) ...
My current research interests include health services research, primary health care, public health issues, interprofessional ... Public Health and Health Services not elsewhere classified. 60. 119999. Medical and Health Sciences not elsewhere classified. ... Population Health & Planning, Hunter New England Local Health Network. Australia. 1/01/1997 - 1/01/2007. Public Health Officer ... Having qualified as a nurse over 25 years ago, I have worked in various areas of public hospitals and community health services ...
... including mental health services research. Following the overview, two high priority NIMH-funded research studies in the ... African Regional Research Partnerships for Scaling Up Child Mental Health EBPs (U19). ... We are identifying really one of the primary reasons that kids get referred to mental health services, and these are ... Treatment Targets, Target Engagement, And Target Populations in Mental Health Services Research to Improve Public Health: ...
  • If you are not residing by one of the three campuses, please consult your local health department for uo to date testing information and locations. (pacific.edu)
  • While many of our walk-in services are temporarily suspended, students can still reach us by calling 209.946.2315 option 1 or by visiting the medical portal to schedule a telehealth appointment with our Nurse Practitioners, Dietitian as well as our Insurance and Immunization experts. (pacific.edu)
  • When you step up to the podium and highlight the criticalUpcoming Events 23 role of oral health, there is a fresh and revitalized visibility and importance givenEditor CAPT Stephen P. Torna to oral health and to dentistry's role in overall health promotion and diseaseEditor CAPT Suzanne Saville prevention. (slideshare.net)
  • We have had the good fortune toThe USPHS Dental Newsletter is published 3-4 be part of your public health priority areas: prevention, preparedness, healthtimes annually, and is distributed electronically literacy and health disparities. (slideshare.net)
  • However, ourSpecial Articles 17 efforts are amplified a thousand times over by the personal involvement and commitment of the Surgeon General of the US Public Health Service to theAssociate Recruiting Program 19 nation's oral health. (slideshare.net)
  • Also, the Chief Dental Officer, RADM Dushanka Kleinman, charged each PAC, including DePAC, to improveits effectiveness in communication of pertinent issues to and from dental officers. (slideshare.net)
more