Motor Skills: Performance of complex motor acts.Psychomotor Performance: The coordination of a sensory or ideational (cognitive) process and a motor activity.Clinical Competence: The capability to perform acceptably those duties directly related to patient care.Educational Measurement: The assessing of academic or educational achievement. It includes all aspects of testing and test construction.Learning: Relatively permanent change in behavior that is the result of past experience or practice. The concept includes the acquisition of knowledge.User-Computer Interface: The portion of an interactive computer program that issues messages to and receives commands from a user.Serial Learning: Learning to make a series of responses in exact order.Atrophy: Decrease in the size of a cell, tissue, organ, or multiple organs, associated with a variety of pathological conditions such as abnormal cellular changes, ischemia, malnutrition, or hormonal changes.Psychomotor Disorders: Abnormalities of motor function that are associated with organic and non-organic cognitive disorders.Cerebellar Ataxia: Incoordination of voluntary movements that occur as a manifestation of CEREBELLAR DISEASES. Characteristic features include a tendency for limb movements to overshoot or undershoot a target (dysmetria), a tremor that occurs during attempted movements (intention TREMOR), impaired force and rhythm of diadochokinesis (rapidly alternating movements), and GAIT ATAXIA. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p90)Cerebellar Diseases: Diseases that affect the structure or function of the cerebellum. Cardinal manifestations of cerebellar dysfunction include dysmetria, GAIT ATAXIA, and MUSCLE HYPOTONIA.Visually Impaired Persons: Persons with loss of vision such that there is an impact on activities of daily living.Vision Disorders: Visual impairments limiting one or more of the basic functions of the eye: visual acuity, dark adaptation, color vision, or peripheral vision. These may result from EYE DISEASES; OPTIC NERVE DISEASES; VISUAL PATHWAY diseases; OCCIPITAL LOBE diseases; OCULAR MOTILITY DISORDERS; and other conditions (From Newell, Ophthalmology: Principles and Concepts, 7th ed, p132).Cerebellum: The part of brain that lies behind the BRAIN STEM in the posterior base of skull (CRANIAL FOSSA, POSTERIOR). It is also known as the "little brain" with convolutions similar to those of CEREBRAL CORTEX, inner white matter, and deep cerebellar nuclei. Its function is to coordinate voluntary movements, maintain balance, and learn motor skills.PubMed: A bibliographic database that includes MEDLINE as its primary subset. It is produced by the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI), part of the NATIONAL LIBRARY OF MEDICINE. PubMed, which is searchable through NLM's Web site, also includes access to additional citations to selected life sciences journals not in MEDLINE, and links to other resources such as the full-text of articles at participating publishers' Web sites, NCBI's molecular biology databases, and PubMed Central.Periodicals as Topic: A publication issued at stated, more or less regular, intervals.BooksPublishing: "The business or profession of the commercial production and issuance of literature" (Webster's 3d). It includes the publisher, publication processes, editing and editors. Production may be by conventional printing methods or by electronic publishing.MEDLINE: The premier bibliographic database of the NATIONAL LIBRARY OF MEDICINE. MEDLINE® (MEDLARS Online) is the primary subset of PUBMED and can be searched on NLM's Web site in PubMed or the NLM Gateway. MEDLINE references are indexed with MEDICAL SUBJECT HEADINGS (MeSH).Serial Publications: Publications in any medium issued in successive parts bearing numerical or chronological designations and intended to be continued indefinitely. (ALA Glossary of Library and Information Science, 1983, p203)Biological Science Disciplines: All of the divisions of the natural sciences dealing with the various aspects of the phenomena of life and vital processes. The concept includes anatomy and physiology, biochemistry and biophysics, and the biology of animals, plants, and microorganisms. It should be differentiated from BIOLOGY, one of its subdivisions, concerned specifically with the origin and life processes of living organisms.Muscle Hypotonia: A diminution of the skeletal muscle tone marked by a diminished resistance to passive stretching.Abnormalities, MultipleFacies: The appearance of the face that is often characteristic of a disease or pathological condition, as the elfin facies of WILLIAMS SYNDROME or the mongoloid facies of DOWN SYNDROME. (Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed)Syndrome: A characteristic symptom complex.Face: The anterior portion of the head that includes the skin, muscles, and structures of the forehead, eyes, nose, mouth, cheeks, and jaw.Intellectual Disability: Subnormal intellectual functioning which originates during the developmental period. This has multiple potential etiologies, including genetic defects and perinatal insults. Intelligence quotient (IQ) scores are commonly used to determine whether an individual has an intellectual disability. IQ scores between 70 and 79 are in the borderline range. Scores below 67 are in the disabled range. (from Joynt, Clinical Neurology, 1992, Ch55, p28)Caffeine: A methylxanthine naturally occurring in some beverages and also used as a pharmacological agent. Caffeine's most notable pharmacological effect is as a central nervous system stimulant, increasing alertness and producing agitation. It also relaxes SMOOTH MUSCLE, stimulates CARDIAC MUSCLE, stimulates DIURESIS, and appears to be useful in the treatment of some types of headache. Several cellular actions of caffeine have been observed, but it is not entirely clear how each contributes to its pharmacological profile. Among the most important are inhibition of cyclic nucleotide PHOSPHODIESTERASES, antagonism of ADENOSINE RECEPTORS, and modulation of intracellular calcium handling.Ethanol: A clear, colorless liquid rapidly absorbed from the gastrointestinal tract and distributed throughout the body. It has bactericidal activity and is used often as a topical disinfectant. It is widely used as a solvent and preservative in pharmaceutical preparations as well as serving as the primary ingredient in ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGES.Narcolepsy: A condition characterized by recurrent episodes of daytime somnolence and lapses in consciousness (microsomnias) that may be associated with automatic behaviors and AMNESIA. CATAPLEXY; SLEEP PARALYSIS, and hypnagogic HALLUCINATIONS frequently accompany narcolepsy. The pathophysiology of this disorder includes sleep-onset rapid eye movement (REM) sleep, which normally follows stage III or IV sleep. (From Neurology 1998 Feb;50(2 Suppl 1):S2-S7)Disorders of Excessive Somnolence: Disorders characterized by hypersomnolence during normal waking hours that may impair cognitive functioning. Subtypes include primary hypersomnia disorders (e.g., IDIOPATHIC HYPERSOMNOLENCE; NARCOLEPSY; and KLEINE-LEVIN SYNDROME) and secondary hypersomnia disorders where excessive somnolence can be attributed to a known cause (e.g., drug affect, MENTAL DISORDERS, and SLEEP APNEA SYNDROME). (From J Neurol Sci 1998 Jan 8;153(2):192-202; Thorpy, Principles and Practice of Sleep Medicine, 2nd ed, p320)Polysomnography: Simultaneous and continuous monitoring of several parameters during sleep to study normal and abnormal sleep. The study includes monitoring of brain waves, to assess sleep stages, and other physiological variables such as breathing, eye movements, and blood oxygen levels which exhibit a disrupted pattern with sleep disturbances.Cataplexy: A condition characterized by transient weakness or paralysis of somatic musculature triggered by an emotional stimulus or physical exertion. Cataplexy is frequently associated with NARCOLEPSY. During a cataplectic attack, there is a marked reduction in muscle tone similar to the normal physiologic hypotonia that accompanies rapid eye movement sleep (SLEEP, REM). (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p396)Sleep: A readily reversible suspension of sensorimotor interaction with the environment, usually associated with recumbency and immobility.Access to Information: Individual's rights to obtain and use information collected or generated by others.Journal Impact Factor: A quantitative measure of the frequency on average with which articles in a journal have been cited in a given period of time.Physical Endurance: The time span between the beginning of physical activity by an individual and the termination because of exhaustion.Bibliometrics: The use of statistical methods in the analysis of a body of literature to reveal the historical development of subject fields and patterns of authorship, publication, and use. Formerly called statistical bibliography. (from The ALA Glossary of Library and Information Science, 1983)Peer Review, Research: The evaluation by experts of the quality and pertinence of research or research proposals of other experts in the same field. Peer review is used by editors in deciding which submissions warrant publication, by granting agencies to determine which proposals should be funded, and by academic institutions in tenure decisions.ButanonesToluene: A widely used industrial solvent.Hexanes: Six-carbon saturated hydrocarbon group of the methane series. Include isomers and derivatives. Various polyneuropathies are caused by hexane poisoning.KetonesAcetone: A colorless liquid used as a solvent and an antiseptic. It is one of the ketone bodies produced during ketoacidosis.Toluene 2,4-Diisocyanate: Skin irritant and allergen used in the manufacture of polyurethane foams and other elastomers.Xylenes: A family of isomeric, colorless aromatic hydrocarbon liquids, that contain the general formula C6H4(CH3)2. They are produced by the destructive distillation of coal or by the catalytic reforming of petroleum naphthenic fractions. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 5th ed)Fatal Outcome: Death resulting from the presence of a disease in an individual, as shown by a single case report or a limited number of patients. This should be differentiated from DEATH, the physiological cessation of life and from MORTALITY, an epidemiological or statistical concept.Tomography, X-Ray Computed: Tomography using x-ray transmission and a computer algorithm to reconstruct the image.Magnetic Resonance Imaging: Non-invasive method of demonstrating internal anatomy based on the principle that atomic nuclei in a strong magnetic field absorb pulses of radiofrequency energy and emit them as radiowaves which can be reconstructed into computerized images. The concept includes proton spin tomographic techniques.Treatment Outcome: Evaluation undertaken to assess the results or consequences of management and procedures used in combating disease in order to determine the efficacy, effectiveness, safety, and practicability of these interventions in individual cases or series.Regression Analysis: Procedures for finding the mathematical function which best describes the relationship between a dependent variable and one or more independent variables. In linear regression (see LINEAR MODELS) the relationship is constrained to be a straight line and LEAST-SQUARES ANALYSIS is used to determine the best fit. In logistic regression (see LOGISTIC MODELS) the dependent variable is qualitative rather than continuously variable and LIKELIHOOD FUNCTIONS are used to find the best relationship. In multiple regression, the dependent variable is considered to depend on more than a single independent variable.Behavior, Animal: The observable response an animal makes to any situation.Feeding Behavior: Behavioral responses or sequences associated with eating including modes of feeding, rhythmic patterns of eating, and time intervals.
  • test in animals is a useful laboratory procedure for the screening and assay of potentially valuable agents in psychomotor epilepsy and to ascertain whether the assay results differ from those obtained by means of the minimal electroshock threshold (M.E.T.) test, eight clinically useful antiepileptic drugs have been examined for anticonvulsant potency by these two electroshock threshold tests. (aspetjournals.org)
  • Indeed, drugs ineffective in psychomotor epilepsy rank higher than does Phenurone, an agent acknowledged to be superior in the management of this disorder. (aspetjournals.org)
  • Eskimos excel on psychomotor tasks performed under low-temperature stress. (britannica.com)
  • Most of these psychomotor skills involve complex perceptual discrimination and motor tasks performed in response to visual, auditory, or palpatory stimuli. (jaoa.org)
  • Accreditation of surgeons requires reaching a consensus on metrics and tasks used to assess surgeons' psychomotor skills. (upm.es)
  • In addition to daily diaries (including the caffeine intake survey, premenstrual syndrome questionnaires, LH surge test, and the caffeine withdrawal checklist), the effect of caffeine abstinence on psychomotor tasks was assessed during the follicular (around day 5 of the cycle) and luteal phases (approximately 4 days after the LH surge) of the menstrual cycle. (umd.edu)
  • The Advanced Dundee Endoscopic Psychomotor Tester was developed for objective evaluation of bimanual endoscopic tasks. (desertspringsdesign.net)
  • Seventy-eight participants performed memory and psychomotor tasks the morning after a regular night of drinking and the morning after a night of no alcohol consumption. (ulster.ac.uk)
  • But if you'll give us 20 minutes (plus reflection time), we believe you'll gain a greater appreciation of assessing and documenting GTE students' performances in the cognitive, psychomotor and affective domains. (thefreelibrary.com)
  • Compared to people with affective psychoses such as bipolar disorder, moderate to high quality evidence suggests a small effect of poor psychomotor and mental speed in people with schizophrenia. (edu.au)
  • It is the goal of the DMS Program to prepare competent entry-level general sonographers in the cognitive (knowledge), psychomotor (skills), and affective (behavior) learning domains. (nwtc.edu)
  • The purpose of this document is to delineate cognitive , affective and psychomotor skills deemed essential to completion of this program and to perform as a competent generalist physical therapist. (samuelmerritt.edu)
  • Receive, interpret, remember, reproduce and use information in the cognitive, psychomotor, and affective domains of learning to solve problems, evaluate work, and generate new ways of processing or categorizing similar information as listed in course objectives. (samuelmerritt.edu)
  • The purpose of this document is to delineate the cognitive, affective and psychomotor skills deemed essential to the completion of this program and to perform as a competent certified registered nurse anesthetist. (samuelmerritt.edu)
  • We show here that deletion of the D1 dopamine receptor produces a neural phenotype in which amphetamine and cocaine, two addictive psychomotor stimulants, can no longer stimulate neurons in the striatum to express cFos or JunB or to regulate dynorphin. (pnas.org)
  • These findings demonstrate that D2 dopamine receptors can function without the enabling role of D1 receptors but that D1 dopamine receptors are essential for the control of gene expression and motor behavior by psychomotor stimulants. (pnas.org)
  • Such drugs include psychomotor stimulants, which increase motor behavior and produce addictive behavior, as well as neuroleptic drugs, which are given therapeutically to treat symptoms of schizophrenia. (pnas.org)
  • Psychomotor stimulants regulate transcription factors and dynorphin mainly in striatal projection neurons giving rise to the movement-enhancing "direct pathway" of the basal ganglia and in striatonigral neurons of striosomes ( 2 , 6 , 7 ). (pnas.org)
  • These selective actions of psychomotor stimulants and neuroleptics on striatal neurons are thought to underlie the movement-related effects of the drugs and aspects of the addictive response. (pnas.org)
  • As dynorphin is a principal target of psychomotor stimulant regulation in the striatum, we asked whether, despite low basal levels of dynorphin in the mutant striatum, the expression of this neuropeptide could nonetheless be induced in striatal neurons by massive doses of psychomotor stimulants. (pnas.org)
  • Repeated administration of psychomotor stimulants (e.g., cocaine and amphetamine) causes long-lasting behavioral plasticity. (pnas.org)
  • Increased rate of psychosis and psychomotor change in depression with age. (nih.gov)
  • or = 60 years) subjects and, more specifically, the interaction between age and psychomotor disturbance associated with depression. (nih.gov)
  • Level of psychomotor disturbance and rates of psychosis did not differ between those elderly subjects with an early onset (before the age of 60 years) and those with a late onset (at or after 60 years) of depression. (nih.gov)
  • The association between age and psychomotor change may assist our understanding of the neurobiology of depression. (nih.gov)
  • Air pollution exposure during pregnancy, particularly NO2, was associated with reduced psychomotor development (global psychomotor development score decreased by 0.68 points [95% confidence interval = -1.25 to -0.per increase of 10 μg/m in NO2). (biomedsearch.com)
  • The baby's psychomotor development progresses in pulses, in stages. (pediatros-thes.gr)
  • The psychomotor development of every child is different, the scope of normal is wide, and the age at which certain developmental milestones are achieved cannot be estimated in days or months. (pediatros-thes.gr)
  • In February 2001, a questionnaire (available on request) was mailed to the 2378 women with a list of questions about the outcome of pregnancy, the perinatal history, and the physical and psychomotor development of their children. (bmj.com)
  • AIMS To study long term effects of GH on linear growth and psychomotor development in young children with Down's syndrome. (bmj.com)
  • Linear growth, psychomotor development, skeletal maturation, serum concentrations of IGF-I and its binding proteins (BPs), and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) concentrations of IGF-II were studied. (bmj.com)
  • Maternal prepregnancy body mass index and psychomotor development in children. (afar.info)
  • Background.In a prospective study, the association between maternal nutritional status and psychomotor development of low-income African-American children was evaluated. (afar.info)
  • A neuro-psychomotor balance in a playful context and the administration of standardised tests such as for example: APCM-2, VMI visual-motor development and integration testing, TPV perception tests and visual-motor integration, BHK scala sintetica per la valutazione della scrittura ecc. (imparole.it)
  • So while Mr. Brady was not directly assessing the psychomotor objective, he was indirectly assessing our knowledge of the psychomotor process. (thefreelibrary.com)
  • Experiments were conducted with 20 subjects on 9 evenings to study the effects of caffeine (150 mg and 300 mg) as compared with placebo upon objective tests of alertness and psychomotor coordination. (aspetjournals.org)
  • I69.013 is a billable code used to specify a medical diagnosis of psychomotor deficit following nontraumatic subarachnoid hemorrhage. (icdlist.com)
  • An observational study conducted in a US endoscopy suite investigated the use of psychomotor tests , in the PACU to assess recovery from sedation. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • A cross-sectional design was utilized in which 12 graduating residents and 10 PTs entering the residency program completed a live-patient practical examination to assess the knowledge, clinical reasoning, and psychomotor skills related to the examination and evaluation of musculoskeletal conditions. (frontiersin.org)
  • Presence and type of psychomotor disturbance may be an important psychopathologic feature that differentiates clinically distinct forms of juvenile MDD. (ovid.com)
  • Examples of psychomotor tests include the Grooved Pegboard test, and the Purdue Pegboard test that measure visual-motor coordination. (edu.au)
  • Norwegian Psychomotor Physiotherapy in Patients With Long-lasting Musculoskeletal Pain. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • Employees With Long lasting musculoskeletal pain problems, working in the Municipality of Bergen, will be invited to participate in an Randomized Clinical Trial (RCT), and randomized to either receive Norwegian Psychomotor Physiotherapy (NPMP) or a series of Cognitive Patient Education in combination with active individual physiotherapy (COPE-PT). (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • another name for recurrent partial seizure s. the term psychomotor is used to describe the distort ed emotion s and behaviours often exhibited. (everything2.com)
  • Some paraphilic activities may be conducted while the paraphile is in a temporal lobe, psychomotor, or complex partial seizure state. (everything2.com)
  • In order to determine whether the recently described experimental "psychomotor" seizure (PsM. (aspetjournals.org)
  • Of particular interest is the transcription factor ΔFosB, a truncated and stable FosB gene product whose expression in nucleus accumbens (NAc), a key reward region, is induced by chronic exposure to virtually all drugs of abuse and regulates their psychomotor and rewarding effects. (jneurosci.org)
  • In this study we assessed the effects of growth hormone (GH) treatment combined with psychomotor and cognitive stimulation in the neurodevelopment of children with CP and GH deficiency (GHD). (dovepress.com)
  • This study employed multiple .assessments, including sleep/resting waking EEG (visual scoring and power spectral analysis) and psychomotor vigilance task, to access effects of varying pulse-modulated microwaves (such as: 'talk', 'listen' and 'standby' mode signals) emitted from a standard mobile phone. (lboro.ac.uk)
  • This research presents a new aggression regulation intervention for individuals with eating disorders (ED). The intervention, developed in psychomotor therapy (PMT), contributes to the need to treat anger and aggression problems in patients with ED, particularly excessive anger internalization. (rgoc.nl)
  • To evaluate the reliability of the Advanced Dundee Endoscopic Psychomotor Tester (ADEPT). (desertspringsdesign.net)
  • The system is in several aspects relevant to an actual endoscopic environment, and initial studies showed a strong correlation with, ADEPT: Advanced Dundee Endoscopic Psychomotor Tester Nem rendelkezik az OSATS hi ányoss ágaival Objekt ív m érés Kev ésb é laborintenz ív Sz ámítógépes adatgy űjt és és feldolgoz ás Virtuális valóság rendszerek a rezidensképzésben Várvölgyi Nándor. (desertspringsdesign.net)
  • Researchers generally report a rapid increase in psychomotor proficiency from about the age of five years to the end of the second decade, followed by a few years of relative stability and then by a slow, almost linear decrease as the ninth decade is approached. (britannica.com)
  • In this study, a method for evaluating visuospatial and visuomotor (psychomotor) skills related to ultrasound proficiency was developed and used to collect data from 59 participants. (sonosim.com)
  • Clinical Psychomotor Skills is presented in a concise and easy-to-read style, offering a unique blend of solid theoretical content and practice based competency tables, to enable students and instructors to translate their skills and knowledge into provable competencies that fulfill the required standards. (australiangeographic.com.au)
  • A validated and scalable method for assessing psychomotor skills is a prerequisite for widespread implementation of ultrasound training and integration into clinical practice. (sonosim.com)
  • Psychomotor ability may be measured by accuracy or speed (reaction time). (edu.au)
  • It was concluded that a daily half-hour psychomotor test of space crews is probably not sufficiently stable to meet biomedical monitoring requirements. (dtic.mil)