A personality disorder whose essential feature is a pervasive pattern of disregard for, and violation of, the rights of others that begins in childhood or early adolescence and continues into adulthood. The individual must be at least age 18 and must have a history of some symptoms of CONDUCT DISORDER before age 15. (From DSM-IV, 1994)
A repetitive and persistent pattern of behavior in which the basic rights of others or major age-appropriate societal norms or rules are violated. These behaviors include aggressive conduct that causes or threatens physical harm to other people or animals, nonaggressive conduct that causes property loss or damage, deceitfulness or theft, and serious violations of rules. The onset is before age 18. (From DSM-IV, 1994)
Behaviors which are at variance with the expected social norm and which affect other individuals.
Any observable response or action of a child from 24 months through 12 years of age. For neonates or children younger than 24 months, INFANT BEHAVIOR is available.
Psychiatric illness or diseases manifested by breakdowns in the adaptational process expressed primarily as abnormalities of thought, feeling, and behavior producing either distress or impairment of function.
The antisocial acts of children or persons under age which are illegal or lawfully interpreted as constituting delinquency.
Behavior which may be manifested by destructive and attacking action which is verbal or physical, by covert attitudes of hostility or by obstructionism.
Disturbances considered to be pathological based on age and stage appropriateness, e.g., conduct disturbances and anaclitic depression. This concept does not include psychoneuroses, psychoses, or personality disorders with fixed patterns.
The observable response an animal makes to any situation.
Any behavior caused by or affecting another individual, usually of the same species.
Resumption of normal work routine following a hiatus or period of absence due to injury, disability, or other reasons.
Child who has lost both parents through death or desertion.
Predetermined sets of questions used to collect data - clinical data, social status, occupational group, etc. The term is often applied to a self-completed survey instrument.
Behavioral responses or sequences associated with eating including modes of feeding, rhythmic patterns of eating, and time intervals.
Any observable response or action of an adolescent.
Stress wherein emotional factors predominate.
Involuntary discharge of URINE during sleep at night after expected age of completed development of urinary control.
Injuries resulting when a person is struck by particles impelled with violent force from an explosion. Blast causes pulmonary concussion and hemorrhage, laceration of other thoracic and abdominal viscera, ruptured ear drums, and minor effects in the central nervous system. (From Dorland, 27th ed)
Studies in which variables relating to an individual or group of individuals are assessed over a period of time.
A medical specialty concerned with the provision of continuing, comprehensive primary health care for the entire family.
Performing the role of a parent by care-giving, nurturance, and protection of the child by a natural or substitute parent. The parent supports the child by exercising authority and through consistent, empathic, appropriate behavior in response to the child's needs. PARENTING differs from CHILD REARING in that in child rearing the emphasis is on the act of training or bringing up the children and the interaction between the parent and child, while parenting emphasizes the responsibility and qualities of exemplary behavior of the parent.
The determination and evaluation of personality attributes by interviews, observations, tests, or scales. Articles concerning personality measurement are considered to be within scope of this term.
The aggregate of social and cultural institutions, forms, patterns, and processes that influence the life of an individual or community.
A generic term for the treatment of mental illness or emotional disturbances primarily by verbal or nonverbal communication.
Persons who have committed a crime or have been convicted of a crime.
Calamities producing great damage, loss of life, and distress. They include results of natural phenomena and man-made phenomena. Normal conditions of existence are disrupted and the level of impact exceeds the capacity of the hazard-affected community.
Behaviors expressed by individuals to protect, maintain or promote their health status. For example, proper diet, and appropriate exercise are activities perceived to influence health status. Life style is closely associated with health behavior and factors influencing life style are socioeconomic, educational, and cultural.
A state of harmony between internal needs and external demands and the processes used in achieving this condition. (From APA Thesaurus of Psychological Index Terms, 8th ed)
Child with one or more parents afflicted by a physical or mental disorder.
The interactions between parent and child.
The observable response of a man or animal to a situation.
A social group consisting of parents or parent substitutes and children.
A violation of the criminal law, i.e., a breach of the conduct code specifically sanctioned by the state, which through its administrative agencies prosecutes offenders and imposes and administers punishments. The concept includes unacceptable actions whether prosecuted or going unpunished.
Includes two similar disorders: oppositional defiant disorder and CONDUCT DISORDERS. Symptoms occurring in children with these disorders include: defiance of authority figures, angry outbursts, and other antisocial behaviors.
The state wherein the person is well adjusted.
The continuous sequential physiological and psychological changes during ADOLESCENCE, approximately between the age of 13 and 18.
Depressive states usually of moderate intensity in contrast with major depression present in neurotic and psychotic disorders.
An aspect of personal behavior or lifestyle, environmental exposure, or inborn or inherited characteristic, which, on the basis of epidemiologic evidence, is known to be associated with a health-related condition considered important to prevent.
Sexual activities of humans.
Theoretical representations that simulate psychological processes and/or social processes. These include the use of mathematical equations, computers, and other electronic equipment.
Expressing unconscious emotional conflicts or feelings, often of hostility or love, through overt behavior.
Feeling or emotion of dread, apprehension, and impending disaster but not disabling as with ANXIETY DISORDERS.
An enzyme that catalyzes the oxidative deamination of naturally occurring monoamines. It is a flavin-containing enzyme that is localized in mitochondrial membranes, whether in nerve terminals, the liver, or other organs. Monoamine oxidase is important in regulating the metabolic degradation of catecholamines and serotonin in neural or target tissues. Hepatic monoamine oxidase has a crucial defensive role in inactivating circulating monoamines or those, such as tyramine, that originate in the gut and are absorbed into the portal circulation. (From Goodman and Gilman's, The Pharmacological Basis of Therapeutics, 8th ed, p415) EC 1.4.3.4.
Individual or group aggressive behavior which is socially non-acceptable, turbulent, and often destructive. It is precipitated by frustrations, hostility, prejudices, etc.
Voluntary acceptance of a child of other parents to be as one's own child, usually with legal confirmation.
The behavior patterns associated with or characteristic of a mother.
Studies in which the presence or absence of disease or other health-related variables are determined in each member of the study population or in a representative sample at one particular time. This contrasts with LONGITUDINAL STUDIES which are followed over a period of time.
Group composed of associates of same species, approximately the same age, and usually of similar rank or social status.
Sexual activities of animals.
An individual's objective and insightful awareness of the feelings and behavior of another person. It should be distinguished from sympathy, which is usually nonobjective and noncritical. It includes caring, which is the demonstration of an awareness of and a concern for the good of others. (From Bioethics Thesaurus, 1992)
Disorders affecting TWINS, one or both, at any age.
Personality construct referring to an individual's perception of the locus of events as determined internally by his or her own behavior versus fate, luck, or external forces. (ERIC Thesaurus, 1996).
Unlawful act of taking property.
The training or molding of an individual through various relationships, educational agencies, and social controls, which enables him to become a member of a particular society.
The interactions between physician and patient.
Disorders related to substance abuse.
Maleness or femaleness as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from SEX CHARACTERISTICS, anatomical or physiological manifestations of sex, and from SEX DISTRIBUTION, the number of males and females in given circumstances.
The combined effects of genotypes and environmental factors together on phenotypic characteristics.
Country located in EUROPE. It is bordered by the NORTH SEA, BELGIUM, and GERMANY. Constituent areas are Aruba, Curacao, Sint Maarten, formerly included in the NETHERLANDS ANTILLES.
Social and economic factors that characterize the individual or group within the social structure.
Health services for employees, usually provided by the employer at the place of work.
Standardized procedures utilizing rating scales or interview schedules carried out by health personnel for evaluating the degree of mental illness.
The tendency to explore or investigate a novel environment. It is considered a motivation not clearly distinguishable from curiosity.
A compulsion to set fires.
Struggle or disagreement between parents, parent and child or other members of a family.
An act performed without delay, reflection, voluntary direction or obvious control in response to a stimulus.
A class of traumatic stress disorders with symptoms that last more than one month. There are various forms of post-traumatic stress disorder, depending on the time of onset and the duration of these stress symptoms. In the acute form, the duration of the symptoms is between 1 to 3 months. In the chronic form, symptoms last more than 3 months. With delayed onset, symptoms develop more than 6 months after the traumatic event.
Abuse of children in a family, institutional, or other setting. (APA, Thesaurus of Psychological Index Terms, 1994)
Assessment of psychological variables by the application of mathematical procedures.
The branch of psychology which investigates the psychology of crime with particular reference to the personality factors of the criminal.
The expected function of a member of the medical profession.
The state of not being engaged in a gainful occupation.
Studies in which individuals or populations are followed to assess the outcome of exposures, procedures, or effects of a characteristic, e.g., occurrence of disease.
The application of an unpleasant stimulus or penalty for the purpose of eliminating or correcting undesirable behavior.
Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.
Persons who have experienced a prolonged survival after serious disease or who continue to live with a usually life-threatening condition as well as family members, significant others, or individuals surviving traumatic life events.
A person's view of himself.
The practice of sending a patient to another program or practitioner for services or advice which the referring source is not prepared to provide.
The application of modern theories of learning and conditioning in the treatment of behavior disorders.
The process by which individuals internalize standards of right and wrong conduct.
An absence from work permitted because of illness or the number of days per year for which an employer agrees to pay employees who are sick. (Webster's New Collegiate Dictionary, 1981)
Manipulation of the behavior of persons or animals by biomedical, physical, psychological, or social means, including for nontherapeutic reasons.
Continuous sequential changes which occur in the physiological and psychological functions during the life-time of an individual.
The process by which an aspect of self image is developed based on in-group preference or ethnocentrism and a perception of belonging to a social or cultural group. (From APA, Thesaurus of Psychological Index Terms, 8th ed.)
Undertaking a task involving a challenge for achievement or a desirable goal in which there is a lack of certainty or a fear of failure. It may also include the exhibiting of certain behaviors whose outcomes may present a risk to the individual or to those associated with him or her.
Female parents, human or animal.
Legal dissolution of an officially recognized marriage relationship.
The level of health of the individual, group, or population as subjectively assessed by the individual or by more objective measures.
The reciprocal interaction of two or more persons.
Relatively invariant mode of behavior elicited or determined by a particular situation; may be verbal, postural, or expressive.
Growth of habitual patterns of behavior in childhood and adolescence.
Two off-spring from the same PREGNANCY. They are from a single fertilized OVUM that split into two EMBRYOS. Such twins are usually genetically identical and of the same sex.
The study of normal and abnormal behavior of children.
Statistical models which describe the relationship between a qualitative dependent variable (that is, one which can take only certain discrete values, such as the presence or absence of a disease) and an independent variable. A common application is in epidemiology for estimating an individual's risk (probability of a disease) as a function of a given risk factor.
The seeking and acceptance by patients of health service.
The total number of cases of a given disease in a specified population at a designated time. It is differentiated from INCIDENCE, which refers to the number of new cases in the population at a given time.
Persons functioning as natural, adoptive, or substitute parents. The heading includes the concept of parenthood as well as preparation for becoming a parent.
Prolonged separation of the offspring from the father.
Two offspring from the same PREGNANCY. They are from two OVA, fertilized at about the same time by two SPERMATOZOA. Such twins are genetically distinct and can be of different sexes.
A primary, chronic disease with genetic, psychosocial, and environmental factors influencing its development and manifestations. The disease is often progressive and fatal. It is characterized by impaired control over drinking, preoccupation with the drug alcohol, use of alcohol despite adverse consequences, and distortions in thinking, most notably denial. Each of these symptoms may be continuous or periodic. (Morse & Flavin for the Joint Commission of the National Council on Alcoholism and Drug Dependence and the American Society of Addiction Medicine to Study the Definition and Criteria for the Diagnosis of Alcoholism: in JAMA 1992;268:1012-4)
Standards of conduct that distinguish right from wrong.
Tendency to feel anger toward and to seek to inflict harm upon a person or group.
Predisposition to react to one's environment in a certain way; usually refers to mood changes.
The perceiving of attributes, characteristics, and behaviors of one's associates or social groups.
A subclass of alpha-amylase ISOENZYMES that are secreted into SALIVA.
Two individuals derived from two FETUSES that were fertilized at or about the same time, developed in the UTERUS simultaneously, and born to the same mother. Twins are either monozygotic (TWINS, MONOZYGOTIC) or dizygotic (TWINS, DIZYGOTIC).
Behavioral, psychological, and social relations among various members of the nuclear family and the extended family.
Observation of a population for a sufficient number of persons over a sufficient number of years to generate incidence or mortality rates subsequent to the selection of the study group.
The experimental study of the relationship between the genotype of an organism and its behavior. The scope includes the effects of genes on simple sensory processes to complex organization of the nervous system.
Individuals who leave school, secondary or college, prior to completion of specified curriculum requirements.
The training or bringing-up of children by parents or parent-substitutes. It is used also for child rearing practices in different societies, at different economic levels, in different ethnic groups, etc. It differs from PARENTING in that in child rearing the emphasis is on the act of training or bringing up the child and the interaction between the parent and child, while parenting emphasizes the responsibility and qualities of exemplary behavior of the parent.
Studies in which subsets of a defined population are identified. These groups may or may not be exposed to factors hypothesized to influence the probability of the occurrence of a particular disease or other outcome. Cohorts are defined populations which, as a whole, are followed in an attempt to determine distinguishing subgroup characteristics.
A generic concept reflecting concern with the modification and enhancement of life attributes, e.g., physical, political, moral and social environment; the overall condition of a human life.
The absence of appropriate stimuli in the physical or social environment which are necessary for the emotional, social, and intellectual development of the individual.
Any behavior associated with conflict between two individuals.
The act of making a selection among two or more alternatives, usually after a period of deliberation.
Interaction between a mother and child.
Support systems that provide assistance and encouragement to individuals with physical or emotional disabilities in order that they may better cope. Informal social support is usually provided by friends, relatives, or peers, while formal assistance is provided by churches, groups, etc.
An affective disorder manifested by either a dysphoric mood or loss of interest or pleasure in usual activities. The mood disturbance is prominent and relatively persistent.
Animal behavior associated with the nest; includes construction, effects of size and material; behavior of the adult during the nesting period and the effect of the nest on the behavior of the young.
Australia, New Zealand and neighboring islands in the South Pacific Ocean. (Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed.)
The interactions between individuals of different generations. These interactions include communication, caring, accountability, loyalty, and even conflict between related or non-related individuals.
A form of group psychotherapy. It involves treatment of more than one member of the family simultaneously in the same session.
A behavior disorder originating in childhood in which the essential features are signs of developmentally inappropriate inattention, impulsivity, and hyperactivity. Although most individuals have symptoms of both inattention and hyperactivity-impulsivity, one or the other pattern may be predominant. The disorder is more frequent in males than females. Onset is in childhood. Symptoms often attenuate during late adolescence although a minority experience the full complement of symptoms into mid-adulthood. (From DSM-V)
The relating of causes to the effects they produce. Causes are termed necessary when they must always precede an effect and sufficient when they initiate or produce an effect. Any of several factors may be associated with the potential disease causation or outcome, including predisposing factors, enabling factors, precipitating factors, reinforcing factors, and risk factors.
Principles applied to the analysis and explanation of psychological or behavioral phenomena.
Disorders of verbal and nonverbal communication caused by receptive or expressive LANGUAGE DISORDERS, cognitive dysfunction (e.g., MENTAL RETARDATION), psychiatric conditions, and HEARING DISORDERS.
Behavior in which persons hurt or harm themselves without the motive of suicide or of sexual deviation.
Adaptation of the person to the social environment. Adjustment may take place by adapting the self to the environment or by changing the environment. (From Campbell, Psychiatric Dictionary, 1996)
Patterns of practice related to diagnosis and treatment as especially influenced by cost of the service requested and provided.
The ability to learn and to deal with new situations and to deal effectively with tasks involving abstractions.
Behaviors associated with the ingesting of alcoholic beverages, including social drinking.
The physical activity of a human or an animal as a behavioral phenomenon.
A learning situation involving more than one alternative from which a selection is made in order to attain a specific goal.
The study of significant causes and processes in the development of mental illness.
Animal searching behavior. The variable introductory phase of an instinctive behavior pattern or sequence, e.g., looking for food, or sequential courtship patterns prior to mating.
Categorical classification of MENTAL DISORDERS based on criteria sets with defining features. It is produced by the American Psychiatric Association. (DSM-IV, page xxii)
Instinctual behavior pattern in which food is obtained by killing and consuming other species.
Method for obtaining information through verbal responses, written or oral, from subjects.
The observable, measurable, and often pathological activity of an organism that portrays its inability to overcome a habit resulting in an insatiable craving for a substance or for performing certain acts. The addictive behavior includes the emotional and physical overdependence on the object of habit in increasing amount or frequency.
Educational institutions.
The social institution involving legal and/or religious sanction whereby individuals are joined together.
An enzyme that catalyzes the hydroxylation of TRYPTOPHAN to 5-HYDROXYTRYPTOPHAN in the presence of NADPH and molecular oxygen. It is important in the biosynthesis of SEROTONIN.
Behavior-response patterns that characterize the individual.
Age as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or the effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from AGING, a physiological process, and TIME FACTORS which refers only to the passage of time.
Elements of residence that characterize a population. They are applicable in determining need for and utilization of health services.
Interaction between the father and the child.
Behaviors associated with the ingesting of water and other liquids; includes rhythmic patterns of drinking (time intervals - onset and duration), frequency and satiety.
Inhaling and exhaling the smoke of burning TOBACCO.
Coordinate set of non-specific behavioral responses to non-psychiatric illness. These may include loss of APPETITE or LIBIDO; disinterest in ACTIVITIES OF DAILY LIVING; or withdrawal from social interaction.
The part of CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM that is contained within the skull (CRANIUM). Arising from the NEURAL TUBE, the embryonic brain is comprised of three major parts including PROSENCEPHALON (the forebrain); MESENCEPHALON (the midbrain); and RHOMBENCEPHALON (the hindbrain). The developed brain consists of CEREBRUM; CEREBELLUM; and other structures in the BRAIN STEM.
Individuals subjected to and adversely affected by criminal activity. (APA, Thesaurus of Psychological Index Terms, 1994)
Methods for visualizing REGIONAL BLOOD FLOW, metabolic, electrical, or other physiological activities in the CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM using various imaging modalities.
A directed conversation aimed at eliciting information for psychiatric diagnosis, evaluation, treatment planning, etc. The interview may be conducted by a social worker or psychologist.
The consequences of exposing the FETUS in utero to certain factors, such as NUTRITION PHYSIOLOGICAL PHENOMENA; PHYSIOLOGICAL STRESS; DRUGS; RADIATION; and other physical or chemical factors. These consequences are observed later in the offspring after BIRTH.
A situation in which the level of living of an individual, family, or group is below the standard of the community. It is often related to a specific income level.
Check list, usually to be filled out by a person about himself, consisting of many statements about personal characteristics which the subject checks.
The behavior of performing an act persistently and repetitively without it leading to reward or pleasure. The act is usually a small, circumscribed behavior, almost ritualistic, yet not pathologically disturbing. Examples of compulsive behavior include twirling of hair, checking something constantly, not wanting pennies in change, straightening tilted pictures, etc.
Reduction of high-risk choices and adoption of low-risk quantity and frequency alternatives.
A systematic collection of factual data pertaining to health and disease in a human population within a given geographic area.
Those affective states which can be experienced and have arousing and motivational properties.
Disorders related to or resulting from abuse or mis-use of alcohol.
Educational attainment or level of education of individuals.
An act which constitutes the termination of a given instinctive behavior pattern or sequence.
The status during which female mammals carry their developing young (EMBRYOS or FETUSES) in utero before birth, beginning from FERTILIZATION to BIRTH.
Any observable response or action of a neonate or infant up through the age of 23 months.
Knowledge, attitudes, and associated behaviors which pertain to health-related topics such as PATHOLOGIC PROCESSES or diseases, their prevention, and treatment. This term refers to non-health workers and health workers (HEALTH PERSONNEL).
The strengthening of a conditioned response.
The presence of co-existing or additional diseases with reference to an initial diagnosis or with reference to the index condition that is the subject of study. Comorbidity may affect the ability of affected individuals to function and also their survival; it may be used as a prognostic indicator for length of hospital stay, cost factors, and outcome or survival.
The science and art of collecting, summarizing, and analyzing data that are subject to random variation. The term is also applied to the data themselves and to the summarization of the data.
Procedures for finding the mathematical function which best describes the relationship between a dependent variable and one or more independent variables. In linear regression (see LINEAR MODELS) the relationship is constrained to be a straight line and LEAST-SQUARES ANALYSIS is used to determine the best fit. In logistic regression (see LOGISTIC MODELS) the dependent variable is qualitative rather than continuously variable and LIKELIHOOD FUNCTIONS are used to find the best relationship. In multiple regression, the dependent variable is considered to depend on more than a single independent variable.
An animal's cleaning and caring for the body surface. This includes preening, the cleaning and oiling of feathers with the bill or of hair with the tongue.
A plan for collecting and utilizing data so that desired information can be obtained with sufficient precision or so that an hypothesis can be tested properly.
Those factors which cause an organism to behave or act in either a goal-seeking or satisfying manner. They may be influenced by physiological drives or by external stimuli.
A statistical technique that isolates and assesses the contributions of categorical independent variables to variation in the mean of a continuous dependent variable.
The process of making a selective intellectual judgment when presented with several complex alternatives consisting of several variables, and usually defining a course of action or an idea.
Theoretical representations that simulate the behavior or activity of biological processes or diseases. For disease models in living animals, DISEASE MODELS, ANIMAL is available. Biological models include the use of mathematical equations, computers, and other electronic equipment.
A group of islands in the southwest Pacific. Its capital is Wellington. It was discovered by the Dutch explorer Abel Tasman in 1642 and circumnavigated by Cook in 1769. Colonized in 1840 by the New Zealand Company, it became a British crown colony in 1840 until 1907 when colonial status was terminated. New Zealand is a partly anglicized form of the original Dutch name Nieuw Zeeland, new sea land, possibly with reference to the Dutch province of Zeeland. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p842 & Room, Brewer's Dictionary of Names, 1992, p378)
Sodium chloride-dependent neurotransmitter symporters located primarily on the PLASMA MEMBRANE of serotonergic neurons. They are different than SEROTONIN RECEPTORS, which signal cellular responses to SEROTONIN. They remove SEROTONIN from the EXTRACELLULAR SPACE by high affinity reuptake into PRESYNAPTIC TERMINALS. Regulates signal amplitude and duration at serotonergic synapses and is the site of action of the SEROTONIN UPTAKE INHIBITORS.
Innate response elicited by sensory stimuli associated with a threatening situation, or actual confrontation with an enemy.
The outward appearance of the individual. It is the product of interactions between genes, and between the GENOTYPE and the environment.
The behavior patterns associated with or characteristic of a father.
The main glucocorticoid secreted by the ADRENAL CORTEX. Its synthetic counterpart is used, either as an injection or topically, in the treatment of inflammation, allergy, collagen diseases, asthma, adrenocortical deficiency, shock, and some neoplastic conditions.
Those occurrences, including social, psychological, and environmental, which require an adjustment or effect a change in an individual's pattern of living.
Persons or animals having at least one parent in common. (American College Dictionary, 3d ed)
A set of statistical methods for analyzing the correlations among several variables in order to estimate the number of fundamental dimensions that underlie the observed data and to describe and measure those dimensions. It is used frequently in the development of scoring systems for rating scales and questionnaires.
A stratum of people with similar position and prestige; includes social stratification. Social class is measured by criteria such as education, occupation, and income.
Actions which have a high risk of being harmful or injurious to oneself or others.
Statistical formulations or analyses which, when applied to data and found to fit the data, are then used to verify the assumptions and parameters used in the analysis. Examples of statistical models are the linear model, binomial model, polynomial model, two-parameter model, etc.
The genetic constitution of the individual, comprising the ALLELES present at each GENETIC LOCUS.
An activity in which the body is propelled through water by specific movement of the arms and/or the legs. Swimming as propulsion through water by the movement of limbs, tail, or fins of animals is often studied as a form of PHYSICAL EXERTION or endurance.
Situations affecting a significant number of people, that are believed to be sources of difficulty or threaten the stability of the community, and that require programs of amelioration.
The interaction of two or more persons or organizations directed toward a common goal which is mutually beneficial. An act or instance of working or acting together for a common purpose or benefit, i.e., joint action. (From Random House Dictionary Unabridged, 2d ed)
Individuals enrolled in a school or formal educational program.
Learning situations in which the sequence responses of the subject are instrumental in producing reinforcement. When the correct response occurs, which involves the selection from among a repertoire of responses, the subject is immediately reinforced.
Reactions of an individual or groups of individuals with relation to the immediate surrounding area including the animate or inanimate objects within that area.
... display sensation-seeking behavior, and be short-tempered. Addictive behavior such as substance abuse and gambling are common. ... Parent training may improve a number of behavioral problems including oppositional and non compliant behaviors. There is little ... Additionally, it is classified as a disruptive behavior disorder along with ODD, CD, and antisocial personality disorder. A ... Psychological therapies used include: psychoeducational input, behavior therapy, cognitive behavioral therapy, interpersonal ...
... display sensation-seeking behavior, and be short-tempered. Addictive behavior such as substance abuse and gambling are common. ... The most important factor in reducing later psychological problems, such as major depression, criminality, school failure, and ... They are characterized by antisocial behaviors such as stubbornness, aggression, frequent temper tantrums, deceitfulness, lying ... Oregon Health & Science University (2009). Black box warnings of ADHD drugs approved by the US Food and Drug Administration. ...
He created a large theoretical corpus which his disciples applied to such psychological problems as kleptomania. In 1924, one ... a need or desire condition before taking part in the problematic behavior; and a positive pleasure-seeking condition throughout ... The characteristics of the behaviors associated with stealing could result in other problems as well, which include social ... and the thieving is not better accounted for by behavior disorder, a manic episode, or antisocial personality disorder. ...
Psychological factors such as stress, abuse, poor social or familial situations, and poverty can be linked to anger problems. ... Wright, S.; Day, A. & Howells, K. (2009). "Mindfulness and the treatment of anger problems". Aggression and Violent Behavior. ... "The impact of antisocial personality characteristics on anger management treatment for veterans with PTSD". Psychological ... These drugs specifically do not target anger directly, but they have a calming outcome that can support control of rage and ...
... drinking often associated with antisocial behavior, spontaneous alcohol-seeking behavior (inability to abstain), low associated ... Reward dependence drives behavior maintenance systems, and in addictive behaviors, maintenance of behaviors occurs despite ... "Drug Dependency". Retrieved 2011-11-17. Tercyak, K. P.; Audrain-Mcgovern, J. (2003). "Personality differences associated with ... Proposed Type 1 Alcoholism is clinically characterized by a late onset (after the age of 25) of alcohol-related problems ( ...
Since antisocial groups encourage antisocial behavior, aggressive behaviors tend to escalate rapidly within groups of ... but also on their involvement in problem behavior and drug use." Similar taste in music and clothing signal others with ... Shedler, J.; Block, J. (May 1990). "Adolescent drug use and psychological health: A longitudinal inquiry". American ... Single-sex cliques begin to seek out the company of opposite-sex cliques, although at first almost all direct interaction ...
... tobacco and illegal drugs, and risk-taking behaviors. Like parental discipline, these health related behaviors are genetically ... For example, because parents who have histories of antisocial behavior (which is moderately heritable) are at elevated risk of ... "Genotype-environment interaction and correlation in the analysis of human behavior". Psychological Bulletin. 84 (2): 309-322. ... divorce would have had little impact on offspring risk for emotional problems (although the findings for alcohol problems in ...
Children who grow up in constant environments of exploitation frequently exhibit antisocial behavior, over-sexualized behavior ... The problems against anti-trafficking raids are related to the problem of the trafficking concept itself, as raids' purpose of ... Human trafficking is one of the most profitable illegal industries that is second to the drug trade. While drugs are ... Abolitionists who seek an end to sex trafficking explain the nature of sex trafficking as an economic supply and demand model. ...
High openness can be perceived as unpredictability or lack of focus, and more likely to engage in risky behavior or drug-taking ... and comorbidity of DSM-IV antisocial personality syndromes and alcohol and specific drug use disorders in the United States: ... Odessa, FL: Psychological Assessment Resources. McCrae RR, Costa PT (January 1987). "Validation of the five-factor model of ... Role theory suggests that role senders provide cues to elicit desired behaviors. In this context, role senders (i.e.: ...
Learning the behaviors of psychological manipulation from parents or peers.[22]. Moreover, the research reported in "Modernity ... The International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems, 10th Edition (ICD-10), of the World ... Sperry, Lynn (1999), Narcissistic Personality Disorder, Cognitive Behavior Therapy of DSM-IV Personality Disorders: Highly ... Seeks to counteract or cancel out deep feelings of inferiority and lack of self-esteem; offsets deficits by creating illusions ...
The Science of Antisocial Behavior". Law and Contemporary Problems. 69 (1-2): 7-46. PMC 2174903. PMID 18176636.. ... attention deficit behaviors, and adolescent alcohol, tobacco, and illicit drug use". Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology. ... "Adolescence-limited and life-course-persistent antisocial behavior: A developmental taxonomy". Psychological Review. 100 (4): ... patients seeking treatment (mandated or otherwise) may appear to be "cured" in order to get out of treatment.[93] Without ...
The patient may believe that he/she has been drugged, spied upon, harmed, harassed and so on and may seek "justice" by making ... and there is usually no general disturbance of behavior. If disturbed behavior does occur, it is directly related to the ... A psychological questionnaire used in the diagnosis of the delusional disorder is the Peters Delusion Inventory (PDI) which ... The delusion, if acted out, often leads to behaviors which are abnormal and/or out of character, although perhaps ...
Young mothers are more likely to engage in high risk behaviors, such as using alcohol, drugs, or smoking, resulting in negative ... For instance, they may have behavioral problems and might be antisocial. The stress that the mother experiences affects the ... Many women who deal with maternal stress do not seek treatment. Similar to stress, Reilly stated that in recent studies, ... Eisenberg, R. B. (1976). Auditory Competence in Early Life: The Roots of Communicate Behavior Baltimore: University Park Press. ...
This may explain why women are more likely to experience negative psychological problems such as depression and anxiety based ... including sedentary behavior, drug and alcohol use, and too much or too little sleep. Lack of social support in college ... students naturally seek support from family and friends in order to alleviate psychological distress. A study by Chao found a ... The effect of social support that is perceived by children in early adolescence and its relationship with antisocial behavior ...
Neurodata can be used to diagnose and predict behavioral disorders and patterns such as psychopathy and antisocial behavior, ... to predict future behaviors and actions could help create or inform preventive measures to treat people before problems happen ... There have been concerns over the potential use of memory dampening drugs such as propranolol to beat brain fingerprinting. ... Psychological Bulletin. 112 (2): 284-309. doi:10.1037/0033-2909.112.2.284. PMID 1454896. Proverbio, Alice Mado; La Mastra, ...
"Examining antisocial behavior through the lens of the five factor model of personality". Aggressive Behavior. 29 (6): 497-514. ... drug problems, etc.[citation needed] Social Positivism, which is often referred to as Sociological Positivism, discusses the ... Other researchers suggested an added social-psychological link. Edwin Sutherland suggested that people learn criminal behavior ... anti-social tendencies, and aggressive behaviors. There is no evidence of causation between these personality traits and ...
Journal of Drug Issues 39: 905-929, doi:10.1177/002204260903900407 Ray, Susan L, Vanstone, Meredith. "The impact of PTSD on ... For some victims of psychological or emotional abuse the damage has been done over a long period of time by a characteristic ... A decision to "live life forward", and to not seek the emotional validation of getting the other parties to agree about what ... The Karpman drama triangle is a model of three dysfunctional social behaviors, the persecutor, the rescuer, and the victim. The ...
Drug and alcohol reviews. Vol. 5. Addictive behaviors in women. Totowa, NJ, Humana Press, 1995. McDonald M, ed. Gender, drink ... providing the opportunity for antisocial behavior. Thus people are more likely to act violently when drunk because they do not ... executive functioning problems, perception/memory system problems, arousal/motivation system deficits, and problems in the ... The research that seeks to support this model (penile plethysmography) has not been able to reliably find differences in the ...
The remaining motives included an attempt to solve a problem (34%), suicide or depression (27%), and seeking attention or ... One bad day may not reflect a student's real personality or usual behavior, and 3) Many of these traits and behaviors are seen ... chronic anger or antisocial traits, and a tendency to blame others for problems. However, they note that attempting to "profile ... According surveys commissioned by to the National Institute on Drug Abuse between 20 and 30% of teenagers used/abused illicit ...
A Neurocriminology Program Model for Prevention and Treatment of Antisocial Behavior.CS1 maint: multiple names: authors list ( ... "The effects of sponsorship in twelve-step treatment of injection drug users". Drug and Alcohol Dependence. 65 (3): 291-301. doi ... Whilst it is assumed that all humans seek out all the primary goods to some degree, the weightings or priorities given to ... Nolan Jr., James L. (2009). Legal accents, legal borrowing: the international problem-solving court movement. Princeton ...
... drug problems.[60][61] Similar results have been found among children.[62] Religious coping has especially been shown to ... students naturally seek support from family and friends in order to alleviate psychological distress. A study by Chao found a ... It has been found that men's behaviors are overall more antisocial, with less regard to the impact their coping may have upon ... including sedentary behavior, drug and alcohol use, and too much or too little sleep.[77] Lack of social support in college ...
... "antisocial or violent behavior or through self-medication with illegal drugs." Women of color also feel pressured to fit into ... "Caught in the Net: The Impact of Drug Problems on Women and Families". Mauer, Marc. "Gender and Justice: Women, Drugs, and ... Seeking Safety: Program for women that have substance dependence and also PTSD. This focuses on five key elements: safety, ... Sexual abuse can range from numerous different actions and behaviors, and some forms of sexual abuse, such as pat downs, are ...
More subtle emotionally abusive behaviors include insults, putdowns, arbitrary and unpredictable behavior, and gaslighting (e.g ... It is often difficult for abuse victims to acknowledge their situation and to seek help. For those who do seek help, research ... also argue that antisocial men exhibit two distinct types of interpersonal aggression (one against strangers, the other against ... Field, T.; Winterfield, A., "Abuse, part 2: sexual abuse", in Englewood, C.O. (ed.), Tough problems, tough choices: guidelines ...
DRD4 is the dopamine D4 receptor gene and is associated with ADHD and novelty seeking behaviors. It has been proposed that ... Perry, Jennifer L.; Carroll, Marilyn E. (2008). "The role of impulsive behavior in drug abuse". Psychopharmacology. 200 (1): 1- ... consists of 60 items describing common obsessional and compulsive behavior and allows investigation of such problems in normal ... Washington, DC: American Psychological Association. pp. 23-37. doi:10.1037/10500-002. ISBN 978-1-55798-208-7. Madden, Gregory J ...
High openness can be perceived as unpredictability or lack of focus, and more likely to engage in risky behavior or drug-taking ... Toronto, Canada: Psychological Services Press.. [page needed] *^ a b c d e Trofimova IN (2016). "The interlocking between ... and comorbidity of DSM-IV antisocial personality syndromes and alcohol and specific drug use disorders in the United States: ... research further categorized the Big 5 behaviors into 3 perspectives: task performance, organizational citizenship behavior, ...
This behavior can result in maladaptive coping skills and may lead to personal problems that induce extreme anxiety, distress, ... In a study looking at female children who were detained for disciplinary actions found that psychological problems were most ... Histrionic personality disorder: pervasive pattern of attention-seeking behavior, excessive emotions, and egocentrism. ... that contributed to popularly linking the term to anti-social behavior. Hervey M. Cleckley's 1941 text, The Mask of Sanity, ...
... "a more complex problem profile, i.e. more legal, psychological, and work-related problems when compared with female alcoholics ... Mattila, Maurice J. (2001). Encyclopedia of drugs, alcohol and addictive behavior. Macmillan Reference USA. ISBN 0028655419. ... typically more antisocial, among repeat DUI offenders. It is not uncommon for them to actually be diagnosed with antisocial ... sensation seeking and impulsivity". It is also common for offenders to use drinking as a coping mechanism, not necessarily for ...
The Science of Antisocial Behavior". Law and Contemporary Problems. 69 (1-2): 7-46. PMC 2174903. PMID 18176636.. ... attention deficit behaviors, and adolescent alcohol, tobacco, and illicit drug use". Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology. 23 ( ... "Adolescence-limited and life-course-persistent antisocial behavior: A developmental taxonomy". Psychological Review. 100 (4): ... Rapacious, begrudging, discontentedly yearning; an angle was seen as assertively hostile as to dominate; was envious, seek more ...
Essentially, this system permits humans to self-regulate their behavior so as to sustain action and problem solving toward ... Initial drug studies were done only with the ADHD medication methylphenidate (e.g. Ritalin®), and even then only with children ... It has not been used here because it implies a knowledge of psychological processes that is not yet available, and it suggests ... They seem to lack energy to deal with mundane tasks and will consequently seek to concentrate on things that are mentally ...
Delirium is often drug induced or secondary to general medical illness(es) (see ICD-10 Chapter V: Mental and behavioural ... We come up with the idea as a possible answer to our problem position (threat to ourselves, our mate or our resources) and ... Normal psychological mechanisms for control of property, partner or personal safety may not appear to be sufficient under ... When triggering factors are sought regarding homicidal fantasies the majority seem to be linked in some way to the disruption ...
Their research also concluded that people who lack emotional expression are inclined to anti-social behaviors (e.g., drug and ... Since more women than men seek help regarding a mental health problem, this has led to not only gender stereotyping but also ... A behavior or misbehavior might not be an illness but exercise of their free will and today's immediacy in drug administration ... "Psychological Medicine. 46 (14): 2883-2906. doi:10.1017/S0033291716001653. PMID 27523506.. *^ Clark, Wayne; Welch, Stephanie N ...
... and increasing problem-solving behavior.[37]. HumorEdit. Humor, an example of cognitive change, has been shown to be an ... Infants may also engage in self-distraction and help-seeking behaviors for regulatory purposes.[53] At one year, infants are ... Drug useEdit. Drug use, an example of response modulation, can be a way to alter emotion-associated physiological responses. ... "Maternal expressed emotion predicts children's antisocial behaviour problems: Using monozygotic-twin differences to identify ...
Groups of popular children showed a propensity to increase risky, drug-related and delinquent behavior when this behavior was ... Affiliation with friends who engage in risk behaviors has been shown to be a strong predictor of an adolescent's own behavior.[ ... "Social comparison on Facebook: Its antecedents and psychological outcomes". Computers in Human Behavior. 62 (Supplement C): ... However, a person does not need to be a member or be seeking membership of a group to be affected by peer pressure.peer ...
... "break through the stigma and discrimination that people with drug or drinking problems often face."[134] ... Psychological Science. 25 (7): 1504-1505. doi:10.1177/0956797614533802. PMID 24866920.. *^ "The Power of Names". The New York ... In human social behavior, discrimination is treatment or consideration of, or making a distinction towards, a person based on ... In the housing setting, there could be claims that a person was refused negotiations on seeking a house, contracting/leasing a ...
... such as in drug addiction, where drug cues can elicit drug seeking (Chapter 15), or in attention deficit hyperactivity disorder ... Essentially, this system permits humans to self-regulate their behavior so as to sustain action and problem solving toward ... psychological processes that could be explained by the reproduction of learned schemas or set behaviors. Psychologists Don ... sexual promiscuity and antisocial behavior.[5]. Furthermore, in their review, Alvarez and Emory state that: "The frontal lobes ...
... to nonspecific behavior problems including destructive behaviors; developmental lags; refusal to make eye contact; cruelty to ... Lilienfeld SO (2007), "Psychological treatments that cause harm", Perspectives on Psychological Science, 2 (1): 53-70, doi: ... and antisocial behaviors if left untreated.[16] The tone in which the attributes of these children are described has been ... Andrea, having asked her foster parents what would happen if she took an overdose of drugs or slit her wrist, and been told she ...
The use of drugs (legal or illegal, including alcohol), when it persists despite significant problems related to its use, may ... or behavior that reflects a dysfunction in the psychological, biological, or developmental processes underlying mental ... "Prevention of Mental Disorders, Substance Abuse, and Problem Behaviors: A Developmental Perspective. National Academies Press. ... Concepts of antisocial, borderline and schizoid personality disorders have also been applied to non-human great apes.[195][196] ...
It is common for individuals with drugs use disorder to have other psychological problems.[53] The terms "dual diagnosis" or " ... "drug contract". Concerned physicians are educating themselves on how to identify medication-seeking behavior in their patients ... In some cases criminal or anti-social behaviour occurs when the person is under the influence of a drug, and long term ... "Addictive Behaviors. 37 (12): 1325-1334. doi:10.1016/j.addbeh.2012.07.001. PMC 3496394. PMID 22958865.. ...
This behavior can result in maladaptive coping skills and may lead to personal problems that induce extreme anxiety, distress, ... In a study looking at female children who were detained for disciplinary actions found that psychological problems were most ... Histrionic personality disorder: pervasive pattern of attention-seeking behavior and excessive emotions. ... that contributed to popularly linking the term to anti-social behavior. Hervey M. Cleckley's 1941 text, The Mask of Sanity, ...
... which can include body-focused repetitive behavior disorder (behaviors like nail biting, lip biting, and cheek chewing, other ... British Psychological Society responseEdit. The British Psychological Society stated in its June 2011 response to DSM-5 draft ... problems or 'symptoms' or 'complaints'... We would like to see the base unit of measurement as specific problems (e.g. hearing ... Antisocial personality disorder is listed here and in the chapter on personality disorders (but ADHD is listed under ...
... and decreased antisocial and violent behavior compared with those who were not in an animal-assisted program.[198] ... "Dog bites: how big a problem?" (PDF): 53.. *^ a b "Dog bites have risen in number and severity since the 1980s". Kenneth M. ... Domestic dogs inherited complex behaviors, such as bite inhibition, from their wolf ancestors, which would have been pack ... Batson, K.; McCabe, B.; Baun, M.M.; Wilson, C. (1998). "The effect of a therapy dog on socialization and psychological ...
Homeless women are especially impacted by certain mental health illnesses including antisocial personality behavior, depression ... Street prostitution and drugs[edit]. Women under the age to find legal work are left with very few options to survive. Often ... "HEALTH PROBLEMS OF SHELTERED HOMELESS WOMEN AND THEIR DEPENDENT CHILDREN: Start Your Search!". eds.a.ebscohost.com. Retrieved ... Prior to the women's movement of the 1960s, female victims of domestic violence had few options for seeking safety.[8] With the ...
... and less likely to engage in antisocial behavior like delinquency and drug use."[104] ... psychologists familiar with the evolutionary theory of Darwin began seeking an evolutionary description of psychological ... The drug also encourages behavioural problems in the affected children, as well as defects of various vital organs.[54] ... Different roles, behaviors and ideologies must be tried out to select an identity. Role confusion and inability to choose ...
Schejter, A.M.; Tirosh, N. (2015). ""Seek the meek, seek the just": Social media and social justice". Telecommunications Policy ... "Computers in Human Behavior. 26.. *^ Turkle, S. (2012). Alone together: Why we expect more from technology and less from each ... "Addictive Behaviors. 91: 119-127. doi:10.1016/j.addbeh.2018.09.008. PMC 6358470. PMID 30253933.. ... At the end of this study, researchers found evidence for similar negative psychological states among sexual minority men when ...
Their research also concluded that people who lack emotional expression are inclined to anti-social behaviors (e.g., drug and ... Since more women than men seek help regarding a mental health problem, this has led to not only gender stereotyping but also ... Mental health is a level of psychological well-being, or an absence of mental illness. It is the "psychological state of ... "Journal of Vocational Behavior. 74: 264-282. doi:10.1016/j.jvb.2009.01.001. Retrieved 2015-04-16.. ...
More subtle emotionally abusive behaviors include insults, putdowns, arbitrary and unpredictable behavior, and gaslighting (e.g ... Some scholars state that wife abuse stems from "normal psychological and behavioral patterns of most men ... feminists seek to ... Field, T.; Winterfield, A., "Abuse, part 2: sexual abuse", in Englewood, C.O. (ed.), Tough problems, tough choices: guidelines ... Moffitt, Terrie E.; Caspi, Avshalom; Rutter, Michael; Silva, Phil A. (2001). Sex differences in antisocial behaviour conduct ...
... found testosterone to be associated with behaviors or personality traits linked with criminality such as antisocial behavior ... "Association between a marker for prenatal testosterone exposure and externalizing behavior problems in children". Development ... Mozayani A, Raymon L (18 September 2011). Handbook of Drug Interactions: A Clinical and Forensic Guide. Springer Science & ... Miller SL, Maner JK (Feb 2010). "Scent of a woman: men's testosterone responses to olfactory ovulation cues". Psychological ...
A physical examination to check for ill health or the effects of medications or other drugs may be conducted. Psychological ... and Problem Behaviors: A Developmental Perspective. National Academies Press. p. 530. doi:10.17226/12480. ISBN 978-0-309-12674- ... or behavior that reflects a dysfunction in the psychological, biological, or developmental processes underlying mental ... Concepts of antisocial, borderline and schizoid personality disorders have also been applied to non-human great apes.[201][202] ...
Extreme antisocial behaviors in obtaining continued supplies and severe drug-seeking behavior when withdrawals occur. The ... See also: Drug-related crime. Problem benzodiazepine use can be associated with various deviant behaviors, including drug- ... Benzodiazepines can induce a severe benzodiazepine withdrawal syndrome as well as drug seeking behavior. ... "Adverse effects of stimulant drugs in a community sample of drug users". Drug and Alcohol Dependence. 44 (2-3): 87-94. doi: ...
Controlled Drugs and Substances Act, S.C. 1996, c. 19, s. 4(7) (Controlled Drugs and Substances Act at Department of Justice) ... Liver problemsEdit. High doses of oral AAS compounds can cause liver damage.[4] Peliosis hepatis has been increasingly ... Psychiatric/neurological: mood swings, irritability, aggression, violent behavior, impulsivity/recklessness, hypomania/mania, ... The mechanism of these variable reactions could not be explained by demographic, psychological, laboratory, or physiological ...
... and antisocial behavior and involvement with antisocial peers (aggregates of parent, teacher, and subject ratings). The only ... who typically have higher rates of problem behaviors than females. These selections served to focus on externalizing behaviors ... In seeking to compensate for the lack of peer relations, furthermore, the unpopular adolescent may be forced to turn to other ... This type of unpopularity can result in psychological harm to the rejected child and an "increased risk of depression and ...
... antisocial behavior and risk-taking behavior such as substance misuse (Raising Children Network, 2014). Drug abuse can be the ... The Problem Of Adolescent Drug Abuse. 1822 Words , 8 Pages Adolescent drug abuse is a prevalent issue in todays society. ... how spiritual development effects adolescent risky behavior. Risky behaviors can include any behavior… ... During brain development teenagers are likely to seek out new experiences that can lead to risky behavior. Nevertheless, that ...
Drug addiction is a problem that is becoming much too common within families. As addiction rates have increased dramatically ... Alcohol seeking behaviours and Substance use is an individual behavior that reflects underlying dysfunction in the family ( ... It was also found to be a predictor of antisocial behaviors and substance abuse (Velleman, Templeton ... The quality of parenting has been linked to psychological well-being, stress and social support. ...
... continued drug use overtime will lead to a loss of control where drug users loose many defenses against drug seeking behavior. ... Addiction is now described as a complex problem, and recovery is described as having biological, psychological, social, and ... Antisocial behavior syndrome in drug treatment for cannabis and cocaine. Posted on 2013-07-23 23:38:59 ... feelings and behaviors that may have been the cause for their drug and alcohol consumption, and learn how to manage them. ...
... an awareness of the need for protective/prevention based behaviors and for identification of early warning signs of a problem. ... As with any health condition, the more risk factors an individual has for developing a problem, the more there needs to be ... Legrand, Iacono and McGue (2005) sought to explore the markers that put young people at risk for developing addictive behavior ... In 2012, an estimated 23.1 million Americans (8.9%) needed treatment for a drug/alcohol problem but only 2.5 million (1%) ...
Call 866.852.0605 to get them antisocial personality disorder therapy they need. ... Does your loved one need an antisocial personality disorder treatment program? ... Substance abuse - may develop problems with drugs or alcohol in an attempt to relieve tension, irritability or boredom ... How Is Antisocial Personality Disorder Treated?. People with antisocial personality disorder are not likely to seek treatment ...
... pertinent for members of the interprofessional team should they encounter patients who misuse or have misused this drug. ... As a classic hallucinogen, LSD does not typically create compulsive drug-seeking behavior as is with most other drugs, but it ... Most acute medical problems related to recreational drug toxicity do not have links to LSD. In the emergency department, the ... The hope was to eliminate or decrease risky behaviors and resulting in harmful consequences that were brought on by the drug. ...
... aggressive behavior, drug-seeking behavior, promiscuity, or involvement in dangerous behaviors such as exotic dancing, drug- ... Antisocial personality disorder is not an excuse for criminal behavior because the sociopaths understand right from wrong and ... behaviors such as sexual promiscuity or substance abuse, and constant need for psychological support. Borderline personality ... Comorbid substance abuse is common in persons with specific types of personality disorder creating the management problem of ...
... display sensation-seeking behavior, and be short-tempered. Addictive behavior such as substance abuse and gambling are common. ... Parent training may improve a number of behavioral problems including oppositional and non compliant behaviors. There is little ... Additionally, it is classified as a disruptive behavior disorder along with ODD, CD, and antisocial personality disorder. A ... Psychological therapies used include: psychoeducational input, behavior therapy, cognitive behavioral therapy, interpersonal ...
Treating Conduct Problems, Aggression and Antisocial Behavior in Children and Adolescents: An Integrated View. Frick, Paul ... Bootstrapped mediation analyses were conducted to test direct effects of CU traits on risky sexual behaviors, as well as ... 2017) Can probation officers identify remorse among male adolescent offenders? Psychological Assessment. 29(6), pp. 754 - 761. ... 2008) Treating Conduct Problems, Aggression and Antisocial Behavior in Children and Adolescents: An Integrated View. In ...
... engage in certain antisocial behaviors, have financial problems and engage in risky sexual behavior. The studies, conducted at ... were more likely to use certain illicit drugs, ... drug use and anti-social behaviors; health, lifestyle, money ... The most common standard treatments include educational approaches, psychological or behavioral modification, and medication. ... and I hope these findings serve as an impetus for adults with ADHD to seek medical advice from their healthcare providers," ...
... and effective discipline and problem-solving. In addition, they seek to reduce problem behaviors in children. The programs for ... smoking and drug use, driving recklessly or under the influence of alcohol, engaging in violent and antisocial behavior, and ... Psychological Bulletin, 117, 67-86.. Pindar, C. (1994). Effects of the Active Parenting program on the interpersonal behavior ... preventing problem behavior; reducing inappropriate behavior; promoting childrens problem-solving skills and helping them to ...
measures of externalizing behavior (i.e., rule-breaking behaviors and conduct problems, including physical and verbal ... drug abuse, school achievement, truancy, or psychological adjustment). However, some of the benefits of the intervention ... depression and antisocial behavior. Am J Community Psychol 1999;27:599--641. * Olweus D. Bully/victim problems in school: facts ... While searching for evidence on violent outcomes, the team also sought information about effects on other outcomes not related ...
Race differences in antisocial behaviors and attitudes and early initiation of substance use. Journal of Drug Education, 22(2 ... and problem behavior: Replication in two samples. Drug & Alcohol Dependence, 138, 161-168. Epstein, Marina, Manhart, Lisa E., ... Washington, DC: American Psychological Association. Icard, Larry D., Zamora-Hernandez, C. E., Spencer, M. S., Catalano, Richard ... The social networks of cocaine users seeking treatment. Addiction Research, 3(1), 17-32. ODonnell, Julie, Hawkins, J. David, ...
... together with the attention and caution not to hypercodify as pathological normal behaviors.Keywords: behavioral dependence, ... Psychological predictors of problem mobile phone use. Cyberpsychol Behav. 2005;8:39-51. ... and sexual behaviors) and personality disorders (borderline, antisocial, and avoiding, above all).36 All these pathologies ... Grellhesl M. Using the Uses and Gratifications Theory to Understand Gratifications Sought through Text Messaging Practices of ...
Antisocial behaviors. *Delinquent behaviors. *Alcohol or drug abuse. *Neurotic traits. *Habit disorders (sucking, nail biting, ... Psychoneurotic reactions (hysteria, obsessive-compulsive behaviors, phobias, hypochondria). *Extreme behavior (compliant or ... "I have a problem, but if I tell you about it, you have to promise not to tell anyone else." Most children know that negative ... Seeks affection from any adult. (Mayo Clinic, 2015). Presence of the following parent or other persons legally responsible ...
Seeking and taking the drug becomes compulsive. This is mostly due to the effects of long-term drug exposure on brain function ... Over time, this behavior can turn into a substance dependency, or drug addiction. At Costa Rica Treatment Center we ensure that ... Drug addiction causes sufferers to experience physical and psychological dependency on illicit, mind-altering substances. ... treatment programs work on the premise that it is possible to deal with problems resulting from drug and alcohol abuse in life ...
If the patient has an antisocial personality (ie, severe problems with family, peers, school, and police before age 15 y and ... Drugs are built to interfere with those messages, causing the release of too many neurotransmitters for the wrong behavior- ... Most abuse other drugs in addition to alcohol. Approximately 33 percent seek treatment for alcoholism; some of these ... Counselors help individuals with identifying behaviors and problems related to their addiction. It can be done on an individual ...
antisocial personality disorder, which is pattern of behavior in which individuals consistently exploit, manipulate, and ... medical professionals may order a toxicology screen to rule out use/abuse of drugs and alcohol as the cause of the behaviors. ... They believe it may stem from a combination of biological, psychological, social, and environmental factors. There does not ... histrionic personality disorder, which involves constant attention-seeking, an excessive need for approval, and inappropriate ...
Source for information on Genetics and Human Behavior: II. Philosophical and Ethical Issues: Encyclopedia of Bioethics ... Children who are identified as having ADHD benefit greatly from drugs such as Ritalin. The practical moral problem is that the ... "Genetic Predispositions to Violent and Antisocial Behavior: Responsibility, Character, and Identity." In Genetics and Criminal ... These questions are raised in the context of a liberal, pluralistic, secular, tolerant democratic state that seeks to maximize ...
To escape from or relieve stress, some people engage in high-risk sexual behaviors or use drugs and alcohol, just as others may ... antisocial personality, impulsivity, tendency to take risks and to seek out new sensations are stated to be related to "sexual ... Additionally it is stated that psychological orders including such as "personality disorders, self-destructive behaviors, ... A Positive Life Aids Service Organizations, 2009) Those who believe that AIDS is a "relatively minor or remote problem are less ...
... such as antisocial personality disorder ). Often heroin users have had health problems early in life, behavioral problems ... may develop a tolerance to the drug and experience physiological and psychological symptoms when they stop using the drug. The ... Among opioid-dependent adolescents, a "heroin behavior syndrome" has sometimes been described. This syndrome consists of ... Methadone maintenance therapy can decrease criminal activity, decrease HIV-risk behaviors, and increase stability of employment ...
Drug dependence is a complex, chronic, relapsing condition that is often accompanied by severe health, ps... ... Read chapter 1 HIV/AIDS in Injecting Drug Users: ... or reduce the problem it seeks to address if a significant ... Antisocial personality in treatment-seeking cocaine abusers: Psychological functioning and HIV risk. Journal of Substance Abuse ... Drug use behavior and the type of drugs used vary substantially across regions. HIV epidemics driven by injecting drug use tend ...
Attention-seeking behavior designed to gain admiration.. These broad categories of behavior may cause a narcissistic person to ... Never disregard professional psychological or medical advice or delay in seeking professional advice or treatment because of ... Or they may adopt attention-seeking behaviors, such as becoming angry or withdrawn when they dont get what they want. ... However, the traits of antisocial personality disorder (APD) closely mirror many of the traits people associate with sociopaths ...
... tendencies toward various anti-social behaviors, and habits regarding nonmedical drug and alcohol consumption. The YASR also ... Subject Terms: adolescents, behavior problems, birth, caregivers, child care, child development, child health, childhood, ... human behavior, infants, neighborhoods, parent child relationship, parental influence, prenatal care, psychological evaluation ... sought to identify personality traits and behaviors that might be classified as unusual. The goal of the YASR was to obtain an ...
... of the students reported at least one problem behavior. More boys (54%) reported having one or more problem behaviors than ... pushed or carried any drugs, carried a gun, knife, screwdriver or cutlass to use as a weapon, had sex and used marijuana or ... problem behaviors, it may be important to understand the values associated with specific problem behaviors. Further exploration ... The objectives of the study are to (1) describe adolescents personal values, their problem behaviors, and the relationships ...
However, people with NPD may suffer from depression and anxiety, suicidal thoughts or behavior, drug or alcohol misuse, and ... A physical exam to rule out any physical problems. *An in-depth psychological evaluation ... "When these [patients] feel exposed, their inadequacies revealed, there is a risk for aggression and more antisocial behavior," ... Seeking admiration. A diagnosis of narcissism requires that these personality traits continue over time, are consistent in ...
... display sensation-seeking behavior, and be short-tempered. Addictive behavior such as substance abuse and gambling are common. ... The most important factor in reducing later psychological problems, such as major depression, criminality, school failure, and ... They are characterized by antisocial behaviors such as stubbornness, aggression, frequent temper tantrums, deceitfulness, lying ... Oregon Health & Science University (2009). Black box warnings of ADHD drugs approved by the US Food and Drug Administration. ...

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