Pseudomonas Infections: Infections with bacteria of the genus PSEUDOMONAS.Pseudomonas aeruginosa: A species of gram-negative, aerobic, rod-shaped bacteria commonly isolated from clinical specimens (wound, burn, and urinary tract infections). It is also found widely distributed in soil and water. P. aeruginosa is a major agent of nosocomial infection.Carbenicillin: Broad-spectrum semisynthetic penicillin derivative used parenterally. It is susceptible to gastric juice and penicillinase and may damage platelet function.Pseudomonas: A genus of gram-negative, aerobic, rod-shaped bacteria widely distributed in nature. Some species are pathogenic for humans, animals, and plants.Cystic Fibrosis: An autosomal recessive genetic disease of the EXOCRINE GLANDS. It is caused by mutations in the gene encoding the CYSTIC FIBROSIS TRANSMEMBRANE CONDUCTANCE REGULATOR expressed in several organs including the LUNG, the PANCREAS, the BILIARY SYSTEM, and the SWEAT GLANDS. Cystic fibrosis is characterized by epithelial secretory dysfunction associated with ductal obstruction resulting in AIRWAY OBSTRUCTION; chronic RESPIRATORY INFECTIONS; PANCREATIC INSUFFICIENCY; maldigestion; salt depletion; and HEAT PROSTRATION.Gentamicins: A complex of closely related aminoglycosides obtained from MICROMONOSPORA purpurea and related species. They are broad-spectrum antibiotics, but may cause ear and kidney damage. They act to inhibit PROTEIN BIOSYNTHESIS.Anti-Bacterial Agents: Substances that reduce the growth or reproduction of BACTERIA.Pseudomonas putida: A species of gram-negative, aerobic bacteria isolated from soil and water as well as clinical specimens. Occasionally it is an opportunistic pathogen.Pseudomonas fluorescens: A species of nonpathogenic fluorescent bacteria found in feces, sewage, soil, and water, and which liquefy gelatin.Pseudomonas syringae: A species of gram-negative, fluorescent, phytopathogenic bacteria in the genus PSEUDOMONAS. It is differentiated into approximately 50 pathovars with different plant pathogenicities and host specificities.Pseudomonas Phages: Viruses whose host is Pseudomonas. A frequently encountered Pseudomonas phage is BACTERIOPHAGE PHI 6.Pseudomonas stutzeri: A species of gram-negative bacteria in the genus PSEUDOMONAS, containing multiple genomovars. It is distinguishable from other pseudomonad species by its ability to use MALTOSE and STARCH as sole carbon and energy sources. It can degrade ENVIRONMENTAL POLLUTANTS and has been used as a model organism to study denitrification.Bacterial Proteins: Proteins found in any species of bacterium.Pseudomonadaceae: A family of gram-negative bacteria usually found in soil or water and including many plant pathogens and a few animal pathogens.Pyocyanine: Antibiotic pigment produced by Pseudomonas aeruginosa.Moraxellaceae: A family of gram-negative, aerobic bacteria in the order Pseudomonadales. Some strains are parasites of the mucosal membranes of animals and humans; others are found in association with food products or in the environment.Soft Tissue Infections: Infections of non-skeletal tissue, i.e., exclusive of bone, ligaments, cartilage, and fibrous tissue. The concept is usually referred to as skin and soft tissue infections and usually subcutaneous and muscle tissue are involved. The predisposing factors in anaerobic infections are trauma, ischemia, and surgery. The organisms often derive from the fecal or oral flora, particularly in wounds associated with intestinal surgery, decubitus ulcer, and human bites. (From Cecil Textbook of Medicine, 19th ed, p1688)Staphylococcal Skin Infections: Infections to the skin caused by bacteria of the genus STAPHYLOCOCCUS.Skin Diseases, Infectious: Skin diseases caused by bacteria, fungi, parasites, or viruses.Phloroglucinol: A trinitrobenzene derivative with antispasmodic properties that is used primarily as a laboratory reagent.Biological Products: Complex pharmaceutical substances, preparations, or matter derived from organisms usually obtained by biological methods or assay.Access to Information: Individual's rights to obtain and use information collected or generated by others.Microbiology: The study of microorganisms such as fungi, bacteria, algae, archaea, and viruses.Quorum Sensing: A phenomenon where microorganisms communicate and coordinate their behavior by the accumulation of signaling molecules. A reaction occurs when a substance accumulates to a sufficient concentration. This is most commonly seen in bacteria.Peptide Nucleic Acids: DNA analogs containing neutral amide backbone linkages composed of aminoethyl glycine units instead of the usual phosphodiester linkage of deoxyribose groups. Peptide nucleic acids have high biological stability and higher affinity for complementary DNA or RNA sequences than analogous DNA oligomers.Drug Resistance, Multiple, Bacterial: The ability of bacteria to resist or to become tolerant to several structurally and functionally distinct drugs simultaneously. This resistance may be acquired through gene mutation or foreign DNA in transmissible plasmids (R FACTORS).Microbial Sensitivity Tests: Any tests that demonstrate the relative efficacy of different chemotherapeutic agents against specific microorganisms (i.e., bacteria, fungi, viruses).Tobramycin: An aminoglycoside, broad-spectrum antibiotic produced by Streptomyces tenebrarius. It is effective against gram-negative bacteria, especially the PSEUDOMONAS species. It is a 10% component of the antibiotic complex, NEBRAMYCIN, produced by the same species.Drug Resistance, Microbial: The ability of microorganisms, especially bacteria, to resist or to become tolerant to chemotherapeutic agents, antimicrobial agents, or antibiotics. This resistance may be acquired through gene mutation or foreign DNA in transmissible plasmids (R FACTORS).Honey: A sweet viscous liquid food, produced in the honey sacs of various bees from nectar collected from flowers. The nectar is ripened into honey by inversion of its sucrose sugar into fructose and glucose. It is somewhat acidic and has mild antiseptic properties, being sometimes used in the treatment of burns and lacerations.Leptospermum: A plant genus of the family MYRTACEAE. The common name of tea tree is also used for MELALEUCA and KUNZEA.Apitherapy: The medical use of honey bee products such as BEE VENOM; HONEY; bee pollen; PROPOLIS; and royal jelly.Cross Infection: Any infection which a patient contracts in a health-care institution.Copyright: It is a form of protection provided by law. In the United States this protection is granted to authors of original works of authorship, including literary, dramatic, musical, artistic, and certain other intellectual works. This protection is available to both published and unpublished works. (from Circular of the United States Copyright Office, 6/30/2008)Equipment Reuse: Further or repeated use of equipment, instruments, devices, or materials. It includes additional use regardless of the original intent of the producer as to disposability or durability. It does not include the repeated use of fluids or solutions.Garlic: One of the Liliaceae used as a spice (SPICES) and traditional remedy. It contains alliin lyase and alliin, which is converted by alliin lyase to allicin, the pungent ingredient responsible for the aroma of fresh cut garlic.Biofilms: Encrustations, formed from microbes (bacteria, algae, fungi, plankton, or protozoa) embedding in extracellular polymers, that adhere to surfaces such as teeth (DENTAL DEPOSITS); PROSTHESES AND IMPLANTS; and catheters. Biofilms are prevented from forming by treating surfaces with DENTIFRICES; DISINFECTANTS; ANTI-INFECTIVE AGENTS; and antifouling agents.Foundations: Organizations established by endowments with provision for future maintenance.Sweat: The fluid excreted by the SWEAT GLANDS. It consists of water containing sodium chloride, phosphate, urea, ammonia, and other waste products.Clinical Trials as Topic: Works about pre-planned studies of the safety, efficacy, or optimum dosage schedule (if appropriate) of one or more diagnostic, therapeutic, or prophylactic drugs, devices, or techniques selected according to predetermined criteria of eligibility and observed for predefined evidence of favorable and unfavorable effects. This concept includes clinical trials conducted both in the U.S. and in other countries.Catheters, Indwelling: Catheters designed to be left within an organ or passage for an extended period of time.Catheter-Related Infections: Infections resulting from the use of catheters. Proper aseptic technique, site of catheter placement, material composition, and virulence of the organism are all factors that can influence possible infection.Catheterization, Central Venous: Placement of an intravenous CATHETER in the subclavian, jugular, or other central vein.Drug Resistance, Bacterial: The ability of bacteria to resist or to become tolerant to chemotherapeutic agents, antimicrobial agents, or antibiotics. This resistance may be acquired through gene mutation or foreign DNA in transmissible plasmids (R FACTORS).Dog Diseases: Diseases of the domestic dog (Canis familiaris). This term does not include diseases of wild dogs, WOLVES; FOXES; and other Canidae for which the heading CARNIVORA is used.Agar: A complex sulfated polymer of galactose units, extracted from Gelidium cartilagineum, Gracilaria confervoides, and related red algae. It is used as a gel in the preparation of solid culture media for microorganisms, as a bulk laxative, in making emulsions, and as a supporting medium for immunodiffusion and immunoelectrophoresis.Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator: A chloride channel that regulates secretion in many exocrine tissues. Abnormalities in the CFTR gene have been shown to cause cystic fibrosis. (Hum Genet 1994;93(4):364-8)Mutation: Any detectable and heritable change in the genetic material that causes a change in the GENOTYPE and which is transmitted to daughter cells and to succeeding generations.Selection, Genetic: Differential and non-random reproduction of different genotypes, operating to alter the gene frequencies within a population.Staphylococcus aureus: Potentially pathogenic bacteria found in nasal membranes, skin, hair follicles, and perineum of warm-blooded animals. They may cause a wide range of infections and intoxications.Virulence: The degree of pathogenicity within a group or species of microorganisms or viruses as indicated by case fatality rates and/or the ability of the organism to invade the tissues of the host. The pathogenic capacity of an organism is determined by its VIRULENCE FACTORS.Virulence Factors: Those components of an organism that determine its capacity to cause disease but are not required for its viability per se. Two classes have been characterized: TOXINS, BIOLOGICAL and surface adhesion molecules that effect the ability of the microorganism to invade and colonize a host. (From Davis et al., Microbiology, 4th ed. p486)

Clindamycin plus gentamicin as expectant therapy for presumed mixed infections. (1/3200)

The prevalence of obligate anaerobes was studied prospectively in 60 patients with severe sepsis of intra-abdominal, soft tissue, female genital or oropulmonary origin. In addition, the efficacy of clindamycin (for anaerobes) plus gentamicin (for aerobic bacteria, especially coliforms) as initial empiric therapy in these patients was evaluated. Among 54 patients with cultural proof of infection, anaerobic pathogens were recovered from 52%. Nineteen patients had bacteremia; Bacteroides fragilis and Klebsiella pneumoniae were the most prevalent pathogens, being isolated in five patients each. Infection was eradicated in 56 of the 60 patients (93%). Mortality related to sepsis was 7% in the entire group, 16% in patients with bacteremia and 2% in patients without bacteremia. Eighty-five percent of aerobic isolates tested were susceptible in vitro to either gentamicin or clindamycin; 97% of anaerobic isolates were inhibited by 5 mug/ml of clindamycin.  (+info)

Route and type of nutrition influence mucosal immunity to bacterial pneumonia. (2/3200)

OBJECTIVE: To develop a model of established respiratory immunity against Pseudomonas aeruginosa pneumonia and to investigate the effects of route and type of nutrition on this immunity. SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA: Diet influences the ability of gut-associated lymphoid tissue (GALT) to maintain mucosal immunity. Complex enteral diets and chow maintain normal GALT populations against established IgA-mediated antiviral respiratory immunity. Both intravenous and intragastric total parenteral nutrition (TPN) produce GALT atrophy, but only intragastric TPN preserves established antiviral immunity. The authors hypothesized that both GALT-depleting diets (intragastric and intravenous TPN) would impair immunity against bacterial pneumonia. METHODS: P. aeruginosa was administered intratracheally to determine the mortality rate at increasing doses, and liposomes containing P. aeruginosa antigens were used to generate effective respiratory immunization. In the final experiment, mice received liposomes containing P. aeruginosa antigens to establish immunity and then were randomized to chow, complex enteral diets, intragastric TPN, or intravenous TPN. After 5 days of diet, mice received live intratracheal P. aeruginosa, and the death rate was recorded at 24 and 48 hours. RESULTS: The LD50 and LD100 were 9 x 10(7) and 12 x 10(7), respectively. Immunization reduced the mortality rate from 66% to 12%. This immunization was maintained in mice fed chow or a complex enteral diet and was lost in animals receiving intravenous TPN. Intragastric TPN partially preserved this respiratory immunity. CONCLUSIONS: Protection against bacterial pneumonia can be induced by prior antigenic immunization. This protection is lost with intravenous TPN, partially preserved with a chemically defined enteral diet, and completely preserved with chow or complex enteral diets. Both route and type of nutrition influence antibacterial respiratory tract immunity.  (+info)

Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator-mediated corneal epithelial cell ingestion of Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a key component in the pathogenesis of experimental murine keratitis. (3/3200)

Previous findings indicate that the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) is a ligand for Pseudomonas aeruginosa ingestion into respiratory epithelial cells. In experimental murine keratitis, P. aeruginosa enters corneal epithelial cells. We determined the importance of CFTR-mediated uptake of P. aeruginosa by corneal cells in experimental eye infections. Entry of noncytotoxic (exoU) P. aeruginosa into human and rabbit corneal cell cultures was inhibited with monoclonal antibodies and peptides specific to CFTR amino acids 108 to 117. Immunofluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry demonstrated CFTR in the intact murine corneal epithelium, and electron microscopy showed that CFTR binds to P. aeruginosa following corneal cell ingestion. In experimental murine eye infections, multiple additions of 5 nM CFTR peptide 103-117 to inocula of either cytotoxic (exoU+) or noncytotoxic P. aeruginosa resulted in large reductions in bacteria in the eye and markedly lessened eye pathology. Compared with wild-type C57BL/6 mice, heterozygous DeltaF508 Cftr mice infected with P. aeruginosa had an approximately 10-fold reduction in bacterial levels in the eye and consequent reductions in eye pathology. Homozygous DeltaF508 Cftr mice were nearly completely resistant to P. aeruginosa corneal infection. CFTR-mediated internalization of P. aeruginosa by buried corneal epithelial cells is critical to the pathogenesis of experimental eye infection, while in the lung, P. aeruginosa uptake by surface epithelial cells enhances P. aeruginosa clearance from this tissue.  (+info)

The sialylation of bronchial mucins secreted by patients suffering from cystic fibrosis or from chronic bronchitis is related to the severity of airway infection. (4/3200)

Bronchial mucins were purified from the sputum of 14 patients suffering from cystic fibrosis and 24 patients suffering from chronic bronchitis, using two CsBr density-gradient centrifugations. The presence of DNA in each secretion was used as an index to estimate the severity of infection and allowed to subdivide the mucins into four groups corresponding to infected or noninfected patients with cystic fibrosis, and to infected or noninfected patients with chronic bronchitis. All infected patients suffering from cystic fibrosis were colonized by Pseudomonas aeruginosa. As already observed, the mucins from the patients with cystic fibrosis had a higher sulfate content than the mucins from the patients with chronic bronchitis. However, there was a striking increase in the sialic acid content of the mucins secreted by severely infected patients as compared to noninfected patients. Thirty-six bronchial mucins out of 38 contained the sialyl-Lewis x epitope which was even expressed by subjects phenotyped as Lewis negative, indicating that at least one alpha1,3 fucosyltransferase different from the Lewis enzyme was involved in the biosynthesis of this epitope. Finally, the sialyl-Lewis x determinant was also overexpressed in the mucins from severely infected patients. Altogether these differences in the glycosylation process of mucins from infected and noninfected patients suggest that bacterial infection influences the expression of sialyltransferases and alpha1,3 fucosyltransferases in the human bronchial mucosa.  (+info)

Cellular fatty acids and metabolic products of Pseudomonas species obtained from clinical specimens. (5/3200)

The cellular fatty acid composition of 112 reference strains and clinical isolates of Pseudomonas species was determined by gas-liquid chromatography (GLC). The presence and relative amounts of cyclopropane, hydroxy, and branched-chain fatty acids were distinguishing features of these strains. Determination of short-chain fatty acids extracted from spent growth media provided an additional means for identifying some strains. Our results show that clinical isolates of pseudomonads can be divided into eight distinct GLC groups. The procedures were especially useful for distinguishing glucose-nonoxidizing pseudomonads, which are difficult to identify by conventional criteria. Since the GLC procedures are simple, rapid, and highly reproducible, they are useful in diagnostic laboratories that process large numbers of cultures. Coupled with selected conventional tests, the analysis of short-chain and cellular fatty acids can be very useful for rapid screening of clinical isolates of Pseudomonas species.  (+info)

Pathogenesis of experimental Pseudomonas keratitis in the guinea pig: bacteriologic, clinical, and microscopic observations. (6/3200)

Uniformly severe corneal infections were produced in guinea pigs by intracorneal injection of about 10 viable Pseudomonas aeruginosa. After a brief lag period, multiplication of bacteria was rapid, reaching geometric means of 280,000 after 24 hr and of 5 million after 48 hr. Within 8 hr after inoculation, polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs) began to infiltrate the anterior two thirds of the stroma. Stromal cells adjacent to the injection site became necrotic and appeared to be engulfed by PMNs. By 14 to 16 hr, an abscess containing a dense aggregate of PMNs and multiplying bacteria developed in the central stroma. By 16 to 24 hr, collagen breakdown was apparent within and around the abscess. Ultrastructural evidence of collagen breakdown included loss of intact collagen fibrils, tactoid formation, and accumulation of amorphous electron-dense material. The area of liquefactive necrosis gradually enlarged, and many corneas perforated after 3 to 4 days. Because the course of infection is highly reproducible, this model should prove useful for many studies of experimental Pseudomonas keratitis.  (+info)

Bacteriologic cure of experimental Pseudomonas keratitis. (7/3200)

Two long-term therapy trials with high concentrations of antibiotic were carried out to determine the duration of therapy required to achieve bacteriologic cure of experimental Pseudomonas keratitis in guinea pigs. In the first study, corneas still contained Pseudomonas after 4 days of continual topical therapy with either tobramycin 400 mg/ml, amikacin 250 mg/ml, ticarcillin 400 mg/ml, or carbenicillin 400 mg/ml. In an 11-day trial of topical therapy with tobramycin 20 mg/ml, 34 of 36 corneas grew no Pseudomonas after 6 or more days of therapy. The bacteriologic response to therapy in this model occurred in two phases. About 99.9% or more of the organisms in the cornea were killed in the first 24 hr of therapy. The numbers of bacteria remaining in the cornea declined gradually over the next several days until the corneas were sterile. Optimal antibiotic therapy may include two stages: initial intensive therapy with high concentrations of antibiotic applied frequently to achieve a large rapid decrease in numbers of organisms in the cornea, followed by prolonged, less intensive therapy to eradicate organisms and prevent relapse.  (+info)

Comparison of flagellin genes from clinical and environmental Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates. (8/3200)

Pseudomonas aeruginosa, an important opportunistic pathogen, was isolated from environmental samples and compared to clinically derived strains. While P. aeruginosa was isolated readily from an experimental mushroom-growing unit, it was found only rarely in other environmental samples. A flagellin gene PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis of the isolates revealed that environmental and clinical P. aeruginosa strains are not readily distinguishable. The variation in the central regions of the flagellin genes of seven of the isolates was investigated further. The strains used included two strains with type a genes (998 bp), four strains with type b genes (1,258 bp), and one strain, K979, with a novel flagellin gene (2,199 bp). The route by which flagellin gene variation has occurred in P. aeruginosa is discussed.  (+info)

Pseudomonas aeruginosa bloodstream infection (BSI) is predominantly acquired in the hospital setting. Community-onset infection is less common. Differences in epidemiology, clinical features, microbiological factors and BSI outcomes led to the separation of bacterial community-onset BSI into the categories of healthcare-associated infection (HCAI) and community-acquired infection (CAI). Community-acquired P. aeruginosa BSI epidemiology is not well defined in the literature. In addition, it is also not clear if the same factors separate CAI and HCAI BSI caused by P. aeruginosa alone. A retrospective multicentre cohort study was performed looking at P. aeruginosa BSI from January 2008 to January 2011. Strict definitions for HCAI and CAI were applied. Extensive epidemiological, clinical and outcome data were obtained. Thirty-four CAI episodes and 156 HCAI episodes were analysed. The CAI group could be characterised into seven distinct categories based on comorbidities and clinically suspected ...
Pseudomonas infections are diseases caused by a bacterium from the genus Pseudomonas. The bacteria are found widely in the environment, such as in soil, water, and plants. They usually do not cause infections in healthy people. If an infection does occur in a healthy person, it is generally mild. More severe infections occur in people who are already hospitalized with another illness or condition, or people who have a weak immune system. Pseudomonades are fairly common pathogens involved in infections acquired in a hospital setting. A pathogen is a microorganism that causes disease. Infections acquired in a hospital are called nosocomial infections. Infections can occur in any part of the body. Symptoms depend on which part of the body is infected. Antibiotics are used to treat the infections. Pseudomonas infection could be fatal in people who are already very ill.. ...
PubMed comprises more than 30 million citations for biomedical literature from MEDLINE, life science journals, and online books. Citations may include links to full-text content from PubMed Central and publisher web sites.
CF is an inherited disease that causes mucus to build up in the lungs and digestive tract, which can cause lung infections and digestive problems. It is the most common type of chronic lung disease in children and young adults and may result in early death. There is no cure for this disease. The primary cause of death in individuals with CF is progressive obstructive pulmonary disease associated with chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PA) infection. PA infection can occur early in life and can become highly resistant to antibiotics. Once an individual has been diagnosed with chronic PA infection, it is almost impossible to manage effectively. The need exists for an effective treatment to control and eliminate PA infection. Past research has shown that if PA infection is treated early, there is a greater likelihood that it may be eliminated completely. This study will examine two treatment regimens to compare which is more effective at eliminating PA infection. In the first regimen, participants ...
Sánchez-Diener I1, Zamorano L2, Peña C3, Ocampo-Sosa A4, Cabot G1, Gómez-Zorrilla S5, Almirante B6, Aguilar M7, Granados A8, Calbo E9, Baño JR10, Rodríguez-López F11, Tubau F12, Martínez-Martínez L11, Navas A13, and Oliver A14. 1Servicio de Microbiología and Unidad de Investigación, Hospital Son Espases, Instituto de Investigación Sanitaria de les Illes Balears (IdISBa), Palma de Mallorca,…
Sigma-Aldrich offers abstracts and full-text articles by [Amber L Jolly, Desire Takawira, Olufolarin O Oke, Sarah A Whiteside, Stephanie W Chang, Emily R Wen, Kevin Quach, David J Evans, Suzanne M J Fleiszig].
MBio. 2013 Mar 12;4(2):e00032-13. doi: 10.1128/mBio.00032-13. Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural; Research Support, Non-U.S. Govt
This chapter reviews the observations supporting the idea that acute and chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections represent distinct modes of host-pathogen interaction. The virulence factors associated with acute infections and chronic infections are discussed, with a focus on data obtained from human subject-based studies, when possible. P. aeruginosa expresses many virulence factors that can damage host cells and which contribute to infection in both humans and animal models. Ectopic expression of virulence factor regulator (Vfr) in mucA22 strains restored expression of ExoS, type IV pilus (TFP), and elastase, confirming that downregulation of Vfr is responsible for decreased virulence factor expression in mucoid strains under the conditions evaluated in this study. While it is clear that regulators of TFP biogenesis and function are intimately associated with the control of Vfr and cyclic AMP (cAMP) expression, the mechanism that links twitching motility and Vfr remains to be elucidated. rsmZ and
That research had shown that the bacteria "travelled up to 4m and stayed viable for 45 minutes after being coughed into the air," says lead researcher Lidia Morawska in a university press release.. For their experiment, the researchers recruited two individuals- one of whom had cystic fibrosis, and the other of whom had a chronic pseudomonas aeruginosa infection. Airborne cough droplets were collected from both patients, although there was more focus on the patient who was infected.. Despite the droplets of infected saliva quickly losing moisture, contaminated particles remained airborne for quite some time after the infected individual coughed or sneezed, the researchers found. This was particularly the case for larger droplets.. "We found that the concentration of active bacteria in the dried droplets showed rapid decay with a 10-second half-life for most of the bacteria but a subset of bacteria had a half-life of more than 10 minutes," reveals Morawska.. LIKE STUDIES? FOLLOW STUDYFINDS.ORG ON ...
A seventh baby is believed to have contracted the Pseudomonas infection at the Royal hospital. A seventh baby is believed to have contracted the Pseudomonas infection at the Royal hospi
Takei Y, however, is often short meidcation so take into account side-effects such as proximal myopathy and poor wound healing. Opal SM, Jhung JW, Keith JC Jr, et al Recombinant human interleukin-11 in experimental Pseudomonas aeruginosa sepsis in immunocompromised animals. The size of the system and the amount of in-house (vs.
Introduction: Changes in the prevalence of respiratory pathogens in CF may reflect improved therapeutic strategies and clinical practice within a CF centre.. Aims: We hypothesized that active microbiological surveillance and a low threshold for long term nebulised antibiotics might reduce the prevalence of respiratory pathogens in patients with CF.. Methods: Retrospective review of data of patients under full care at a paediatric CF centre in Cardiff between 1998(n=80) and 2011(n=70). We calculated the number of isolates for common pathogens from 1998 onward (expressed as a percentage for each year); mean number of respiratory cultures taken for each patient per year; and the rate of chronic P aeruginosa (Lee 2003) from 2002 onward. Changes in prevalence over time were assesed by linear regression.. Results:Non-significant increase in mean (SD) number of respiratory cultures from 5.3(3.22) to 7.4(2.89) per patient/year.The prevalence of P aeruginosa infection decreased significantly from 43.8% ...
... Aeruginosa lung infection and antibiotic resistance is a growing problem. 'New classes of inhaled
Community acquired pneumonia (CAP) is a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. The contribution of Pseudomonas aeruginosa to both disease burden and antibiotic resistance is unclear; Restrepo et al (European Respiratory Journal 2018;52: 1701190) present a point-prevalence study to address this gap in the data. This multinational study of hospitalised patients investigated the prevalence, risk factors and antibiotic resistance profiles of P. aeruginosa-CAP in 54 countries. A total of 3193 patients were included, all had microbiological testing on admission and had a confirmed diagnosis of CAP. Prevalence of P. aeruginosa-CAP was 4.2 % (133/3193) which represented 11.3 % (133/1173) of all patients with a positive bacterial culture result. Almost half of these patients had an antibiotic-resistant strain (64/133, 48 %; 2.0 % of total cohort) and a quarter had a multi-drug resistant strain of P. aeruginosa (33/133, 25 %; 1.0 % of total cohort). Prior Pseudomonas infection/colonisation (OR ...
Throat cultures werent as good this time. She had 2 clean cultures since her first pseudomonas infection last April. I was really hoping for a 3rd clean culture, but luck was not on our side. Her lungs are culturing MRSA, so were going to do a round of bactrum and see if it can eradicate it. The nurse coordinator explained that, just like with the pseudos, they want to try to catch and treat a MRSA infection quickly so it doesnt become a more serious issue and so they can reduce the amount of potential damage it can do to the lungs. I did give her a heads up about Judiths 2 MRSA infections in the abscesses over the summer, just in case they wanted to move to a stronger antibiotic. Since the cultures for the lungs are slightly different than the skin cultures, she said they can still try the bactrum and take it from there. One good point we discovered from the culture is she is still pseudo-free, so at least we dont have to worry about that on top of the MRSA ...
My senior year, he developed an intramuscular sarcoma that appeared very histologically aggressive. He had an entire muscle in his leg removed, a large skin graft, got a Pseudomonas infection, spent a week in the hospital. He was a great patient until you put him in a kennel. He broke out of the ICU and went wandering to find the technician in the night. He developed a slough from extravascular administration of antibiotics in his other front leg and wore two full leg bandages for weeks. In July after graduation and months after surgery, he threw a clot to his front leg and I thought we were toast, but he recovered after 24 hours in the hospital again. He never was aggressive or even resistant to treatment, but by the end of vet school he hated hospitals. I promised him then Id never leave him in one again ...
The philosophy in traditional drug design, i.e., the "one gene, one drug, one disease" paradigm, focuses on the individual properties of a protein, for example, whether the deletion of a gene is lethal to an organism and if it is, then inhibition of the product of the gene by a drug should also be lethal. However, many effective drugs have been found to affect a handful of targets instead of a single protein. Recently, understanding of biological networks and molecule functionality has given rise to a new discipline, network pharmacology, that provides the opportunity to identify new drug targets in an infectious organism, while avoiding targets that cause toxicity in the host. Our group recently combined a genes essentiality and network properties to facilitate the identification of potential drug targets in treating Pseudomonas infection.. ...
I havent swore on this blog much, coz its a limited form of communication, isnt it? Yesterday I felt like it but it would have just turned out like "the fucking fuckers fucked, it can get fucked for fucks sake" or something. And all I really have is questions with no answers. And I feel like Ive been hit by a stealth CF infection with added wheeze factor. Last summer I was 10 stone 10, now Ive dropped down to 9 stone 12 which has completely mystified me; I have no idea how this happened. Can a stealth pseudomonas infection really rob me of so many calories? The doctor reckons it could be but I remain baffled...On the plus side my stomach is really flat ...
HIPS researchers produced a molecule that provides a way to visualise Pseudomonas infections weiter … Source:: http://idw-online.de/de/news686100. ...
1 Answer - Posted in: cancer, chronic, hospital, pseudomonas - Answer: Hi, my name is Liz, how did they treat the pseudomonis? What antibiotics ...
Semantic Scholar extracted view of Experimental Pseudomonas burn sepsis--evaluation of topical therapy. by Thomas J. Krizek et al.
Pseudomonas aeruginosa lung infections are a major cause of death in cystic fibrosis and hospitalized patients. Treating these infections is becoming difficult due to the emergence of conventional antimicrobial multiresistance. While monosaccharides have proved beneficial against such bacterial lung infection, the design of several multivalent glycosylated macromolecules has been shown to be also beneficial on biofilm dispersion. In this study, calix[4]arene-based glycoclusters functionalized with galactosides or fucosides have been synthesized. The characterization of their inhibitory properties on Pseudomonas aeruginosa aggregation, biofilm formation, adhesion on epithelial cells, and destruction of alveolar tissues were performed. The antiadhesive properties of the designed glycoclusters were demonstrated through several in vitro bioassays. An in vivo mouse model of lung infection provided an almost complete protection against Pseudomonas aeruginosa with the designed glycoclusters.. ...
Gilead is developing a broad spectrum combination antibiotic (FTI) consisting of fosfomycin (an antibiotic with activity against gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria) and tobramycin (an aminoglycoside antibiotic with potent gram-negative activity) for treatment of patients with CF. FTI offers a potential option for treatment of CF lung infections. It is important to note that the concentration of tobramycin in FTI is lower than that of the approved dose of inhaled tobramycin alone, thereby demonstrating the potential of FTI to minimize long-term toxicity from repeated exposure to aminoglycosides like tobramycin. This study will evaluate the safety and efficacy of 2 dose combinations of fosfomycin/tobramycin for inhalation (FTI), following a 28-day course of Aztreonam for Inhalation (AZLI) in patients with cystic fibrosis and Pseudomonas aeruginosa lung infection ...
Emond et al are reporting in Nat Genetics the identification of DCTN4 as a modifier for P.aeruginosa infection in patients with cystic fibrosis. It is a well-established fact that the majority of patients with cystic fibrosis develop acute and chronic P.aerugonisa infections which are associated with a worse clinical outcome. The authors selected and exome sequenced 91 patients from the EPIC collection with cystic fibrosis and P.aeruginosa and after performing logistic regression adjusted for ancestry and for CFTR mutation risk group identified DCTN4 as the only modifier gene. Dynactin 4 is a component of the dynein-dependent motor that moves autophagosomes along microtubules into lysosomes for degradation as part of the autophagy process which has an essential role in the clearance of P. aeruginosa. The presence of at least one DCTN4 missense variant was significantly associated with both early age of first P. aeruginosaâ€"positive culture and with early age at onset of chronic P. aeruginosa ...
Clinical trial: Efficacy & Tolerability of Tobramycin Podhaler in Bronchiectasis Patients With Chronic Pseudomonas Aeruginosa Infection
The opportunistic human pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa is the predominant micro-organism of chronic lung infections in cystic fibrosis patients. P. aeruginosa colonizes the lungs by forming biofilm microcolonies throughout the lung. Quorum sensing (QS) renders the biofilm bacteria highly tolerant t …
A total of 3,700 Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates were collected from 17 general hospitals in Japan from 1992 to 1994. Of these isolates, 132 carbapenem-resistant strains were subjected to DNA hybridization analysis with the metallo-beta-lactamase gene (blaIMP)-specific probe. Fifteen strains carrying the metallo-beta-lactamase gene were identified in five hospitals in different geographical areas. Three strains of P. aeruginosa demonstrated high-level imipenem resistance (MIC, , or = 128 micrograms/ml), two strains exhibited low-level imipenem resistance (MIC, , or = 4 micrograms/ml), and the rest of the strains were in between. These results revealed that the acquisition of a metallo-beta-lactamase gene alone does not necessarily confer elevated resistance to carbapenems. In several strains, the metallo-beta-lactamase gene was carried by large plasmids, and carbapenem resistance was transferred from P. aeruginosa to Escherichia coli by electroporation in association with the acquisition of the ...
A total of 183 patients were colonized or infected with multidrug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates at a hospital in Spain during 2007-2010; prevalence increased over this period from 2.8% to 15.3%. To characterize these isolates, we performed molecular epidemiologic and drug resistance analysis. Genotyping showed that 104 (56.8%) isolates belonged to a single major clone (clone B), which was identified by multilocus sequence typing as sequence type (ST) 175. This clone was initially isolated from 5 patients in 2008, and then isolated from 23 patients in 2009 and 76 patients in 2010. PCR analysis of clone B isolates identified the bla(VIM-2) gene in all but 1 isolate, which harbored bla(IMP-22). ST175 isolates were susceptible to only amikacin (75%) and colistin (100%). Emergence of the ST175 clone represents a major health problem because it compromises therapy for treatment of P. aeruginosa nosocomial infections ...
Resistant Pseudomonas Aeruginosa Infections Drugs Market Insights: Global Industry Analysis, Market Drivers, Restraints, Opportunities, Applications, Trends And Forecasts 2020-2026
Summary Pharmaceutical and Healthcare disease pipeline guide Resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa Infections - Pipeline Review, H1 2017, provides an overview o
Twenty-three patients (85.2%) were infected with MDR P. aeruginosa, confirmed with cultures and resistance tests, during the ICU stay. In greater part, they were isolated from respiratory and urinary tract infections (33.3% and 25.9%, respectively). Four patients were treated empirically, with 50% of therapy response. The study group presented a mean age of 63 years, 51.9% males, with a mean Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II score of 24.63. Sixty-three percent of our patients were first admitted to the hospital with community-acquired infection, none caused by P. aeruginosa. The most frequent cause for ICU admission was communitarian or nosocomial respiratory tract infection (29.9%). The mean time of polimixin B use was 15.59 days. Twelve patients (44%) used imipinem, 12 patients (44%) used teicoplanin and three patients (11%) used vancomicin, for more than 3 days, during the ICU stay before polimixin B use. After treatment with polimixin B, we had 40.7% response and improvement ...
Cyclic-diguanylate (c-di-GMP) is a widespread bacterial signal molecule that plays a major role in the modulation of cellular surface components, such as exopolysaccharides and fimbriae, and in the establishment of a sessile life style. Here, we report that intracellular c-di-GMP levels influence cupA-encoded fimbriae expression in Pseudomonas aeruginosa. In an autoaggregative P. aeruginosa small colony variant (SCV) CupA fimbriae and the intracellular c-di-GMP concentration were found to be enhanced as compared with the clonal wild-type. The SCV morphology and the expression of CupA fimbriae were dependent on a functional PA1120 and morA gene both encoding a GGDEF domain. Overexpression of the GGDEF domain protein PA1120 complemented the PA1120 and the morA mutant with respect to CupA fimbriae expression. In agreement with these findings, overexpression of the EAL domain containing phenotypic variance regulator (PvrR) in the SCV resulted in a decreased intracellular level of c-di-GMP, a reduced ...
Many of the virulence factors produced by the opportunistic human pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa are quorum-sensing (QS) regulated. Among these are rhamnolipids, which have been shown to cause lysis of several cellular components of the human immune system, e.g. monocyte-derived macrophages and polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs). We have previously shown that rhamnolipids produced by P. aeruginosa cause necrotic death of PMNs in vitro. This raises the possibility that rhamnolipids may function as a biofilm shieldin vivo, which contributes significantly to the increased tolerance of P. aeruginosa biofilms to PMNs. In the present study, we demonstrate the importance of the production of rhamnolipids in the establishment and persistence of P. aeruginosa infections, using an in vitro biofilm system, an intraperitoneal foreign-body model and a pulmonary model of P. aeruginosa infections in mice. Our experimental data showed that a P. aeruginosa strain, unable to produce any detectable ...
Purpose of reviewRecent articles of clinical interest on Pseudomonas aeruginosa respiratory tract infections including CAP, nosocomially-acquired pneumonia, particularly in the ventilated patient, and chronic infections in cystic fibrosis patients are reviewed.Recent findingsThe growing importance o
Los mecanismos innatos y adquiridos de resistencia a los antibióticos en Pseudomonas representan un reto para los médicos que buscan una quimioterapia oportuna y eficaz. Esto es par- ticularmente importante en las áreas de cuidados intesnsivos de los hospitales. Este estudio está dirigido a lograr una comprensión a nivel molecular de dos de los más importantes mecanismos de resistencia a los fármacos en Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Cien aislados clínicos de Pseudomonas aeruginosa se obtuvieron de un hospital de tercer nivel en Quito, Ecuador. Se analizó la expresión de ampC y oprD mediante PCR cuantitativa en tiempo real. Se realizó una comparación entre los perfiles de expresión ampC y oprD y los fenotipos obtenidos en la prueba de susceptibilidad antimicrobiana (AST), con más del 50% de los aislados con perfiles concordantes para la expresión ampC y oprD. Nuestros resultados sugieren que la expresión ampC y oprD podría proporcionar información útil sobre mecanismos de resistencia ...
Pseudomonas aeruginosa Serotype 2B antibody LS-C538938 is an FITC-conjugated mouse monoclonal antibody to pseudomonas aeruginosa Pseudomonas aeruginosa Serotype 2B. Validated for ELISA.
Cluster II che Genes from Pseudomonas aeruginosa Are Required for an Optimal Chemotactic Response: Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a γ-proteobacterium, is motile by mea
Haji SH. Detection of Biofilm Formation in Pseudomonas aeruginosa Isolates from Clinical Specimens. Zanco J Pure Appl Sci. 2018; 30[4]:83-89. doi: https://doi.org/10.21271/ZJPAS.30.4.9 Saha S, Devi KM, Damrolien S, Devi KS, . K, Sharma KT. Biofilm production and its correlation with antibiotic resistance pattern among clinical isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in a tertiary care hospital in north-east India. Int J Adv Med. 2018;5[4]:964. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.18203/2349-3933.ijam20183129 Vallés J, Mariscal D, Cortés P, Coll P, Villagrá A, Díaz E, et al. Patterns of colonization by Pseudomonas aeruginosa in intubated patients: A 3-year prospective study of 1,607 isolates using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis with implications for prevention of ventilator-associated pneumonia. Intensive Care Med. 2004; 30[9]:1768-1775. doi: https://doi.org/10.1007/s00134-004-2382-6. Gales AC, Jones RN, Turnidge J, Rennie R, Ramphal R. Characterization of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Isolates: Occurrence Rates, ...
Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an ubiquitous organism. Its ability to survive on minimal nutritional requirements and to tolerate a variety of physical conditions allows its persistence in both community and hospital settings [12]. P. aeruginosa is a serious therapeutic challenge for treatment of both community-acquired and nosocomial infections, due to the ability of this microorganism to develop resistance to multiple classes of antibacterial agents, even during the course of therapy [13, 14]. The increasing frequency of MDR or XDR P. aeruginosa strains is of concern as effective antimicrobial options are limited [15, 16]. Moreover, only a few new antibiotics are currently under development [6]. An increase in MDR bacterial infections among companion animals has been documented in multiple veterinary hospital settings [17]. This is of particular importance due to the risk of transmission to humans and other companion animals in close contact with infected animals, even because in our countries the ...
Functional analysis of genes responsible for the synthesis of the B-band O antigen of Pseudomonas aeruginosa serotype O6 lipopolysaccharide Academic Article ...
Anti Pseudomonas aeruginosa Serotype 8 Antibody, clone 1017/87 , Mouse Anti-Bacterial Monoclonal Antibody validated in WB (ABD12646), Abgent
Prime Journal of Microbiology Research (PJMR) ISSN: 2251-1261. susceptible and P. aeruginosa the least. Antibiotic use is suggested to be a major risk factor for.. chromID ™ P.aeruginosa Chromogenic medium for direct ID of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Deliver rapid direct identification of Pseudomonas aeruginosa to contribute to.chromID™ P.aeruginosa Chromogenic medium for direct ID of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Deliver rapid direct identification of Pseudomonas aeruginosa to contribute to.RESEARCH ARTICLE Open Access Screening of Lactobacillus spp. for the prevention of Pseudomonas aeruginosa pulmonary infections Youenn Alexandre1, Rozenn Le Berre1,2*.tetracycline, Tetracycline is an antibiotic used to treat a number of bacterial infections. It is commonly used to treat acne and rosacea. Historically it was.Original article Antibiotic resistance and virulence properties of Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains from mechanically ventilated patients with pneumonia in intensive ...
RESULTS: As a result of the antibiotic resistance analysis, 11 different antibiotypes for Hospital 1 and Hospital 3, while 6 different antibiotypes for Hospital 2 were determined. The highest incidence of MDR strains was observed in Hospital 1. It was found that MDR strains were frequently isolated from patients who underwent surgical interventions or patients in the intensive care units. As a result of genotyping, 9 different genotypes were determined in Hospital 1, 7 in Hospital 2, and 17 in Hospital 3. There was no significant correlation between the antibiotypes and genotypes. A clonal relationship between the MDR strains that were isolated from both the same service and from different services was observed in Hospital 1. These findings support the hypothesis that the strains are spread within the hospital via cross or horizontal transmission through hospital employees or medical instruments. According to Simpsons diversity index, the RAPD-PCR methods discrimination power was found as 0.92 ...
TY - JOUR. T1 - Slime production a virulence marker in Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains isolated from clinical and environmental specimens. T2 - A comparative study of two methods. AU - Prasad, S. Vishnu. AU - Ballal, Mamatha. AU - Shivananda, P. G.. PY - 2009/4/1. Y1 - 2009/4/1. N2 - Detection of slime in Pseudomonas aeruginosa can be useful in understanding the virulence of this organism. Here, comparative studies of two phenotypic methods using the tube method and the spectrophotometric method for slime production from 100 clinically and 21 environmentally significant isolates of P. aeruginosa were performed. A total of 68 isolates were positive by either of the tests whereas only 34 were positive by both the tests. The tube method detected slime significantly in more number of isolates than the spectrophotometric method. The tube test was found to be superior to the spectrophotometric method in ease of performance, interpretation and sensitivity. Among the clinical isolates, systemic isolates ...
BioAssay record AID 164894 submitted by ChEMBL: In vitro antibacterial activity against AZT resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa 69 was determined.
BioAssay record AID 164900 submitted by ChEMBL: In vitro antibacterial activity against IPM resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa 56 was determined.
An organism of concern, Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a water-loving bacteria that works and builds biofilms with other threatening bacteria. Understanding that disinfection alone will not rid an engineered water system of bacteria means we need to look toward biofilm-resistant material and disinfection at the source of use as opposed to where the water enters the building.. Antibiotic Resistance of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in Pneumonia at a Single University Hospital Center in Germany over a 10-Year Perioddetermines that "while P. aeruginosa and MDR P. aeruginosa were resistant to a variety of commonly used antibiotics, they were not resistant to colistin in the few isolates recovered from patients with pneumonia.". Inhibition of Aspergillus fumigatus and Its Biofilm by Pseudomonas aeruginosa Is Dependent on the Source, Phenotype and Growth Conditions of the Bacterium reports that "Aspergillus fumigatus (Af) and Pseudomonas aeruginosa (Pa) are leading fungal and bacterial pathogens, respectively, in ...
Plasma ferritin is an important extracellular iron storage molecule, whose concentration increases drastically in cancer and infection. During infection, the pathogen usurps host iron for its survival and pathogenicity; hence, maintenance of the plasma ferritin level during infection is a crucial host defence mechanism. In this study, the horseshoe crab plasma ferritin complex was purified, characterized, and its involvement in innate immune defence was investigated. The plasma ferritin appears as a 21-kDa subunit on SDS-PAGE. Full-length ferritin-H cDNAs (CrFer-H1 and CrFer-H2) were cloned. Analysis of the 5′ UTR indicates the existence of a functional iron-response element, suggesting that both the CrFer-H genes may be post-transcriptionally regulated. Northern analysis shows that the CrFer-H is ubiquitously expressed. Within 3 h of lipopolysaccharide challenge, the gene is up-regulated by > 12-fold. In contrast, iron-loading did not result in any significant change. When challenged with ...
Author Summary Pathogens face a hostile and often novel environment when infecting a new host, and adaptation to this environment can be critical to a pathogens survival. The genetic basis of pathogen adaptation is in turn important for treatment, since the consistency with which therapies succeed may depend on the extent to which a pathogen adapts via the same routes in different patients. In this study, we investigate adaptation of the bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa to laboratory conditions that resemble the lungs of cystic fibrosis patients and to quinolone antibiotics. We find that a handful of genes and genetic pathways are repeatedly involved in adaptation to each condition. Nonetheless, other, less common mutations can play important roles in determining fitness, complicating strategies aimed at reducing the prevalence of antibiotic resistance.
Author Summary Pathogens face a hostile and often novel environment when infecting a new host, and adaptation to this environment can be critical to a pathogens survival. The genetic basis of pathogen adaptation is in turn important for treatment, since the consistency with which therapies succeed may depend on the extent to which a pathogen adapts via the same routes in different patients. In this study, we investigate adaptation of the bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa to laboratory conditions that resemble the lungs of cystic fibrosis patients and to quinolone antibiotics. We find that a handful of genes and genetic pathways are repeatedly involved in adaptation to each condition. Nonetheless, other, less common mutations can play important roles in determining fitness, complicating strategies aimed at reducing the prevalence of antibiotic resistance.
Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection. *Small bowel bacterial overgrowth syndrome. *Strongyloidiasis. *Tropical sprue. *Weight gain ... In rare cases, bloating may occur in individuals who have milk intolerance (lactose intolerance), parasite infections like ... Persistent or recurrent bloating may be caused by intestinal parasites, other infections, or other medical conditions. ...
"Pseudomonas aeruginosa Pyocyanin Is Critical for Lung Infection in Mice". Infection and Immunity. 72 (7): 4275-4278. doi: ... Lau G, Hassett D, Ran H, Kong F (2004). "The role of pyocyanin in Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection". Trends in Molecular ... "Infection and Immunity. 66 (12): 5777-5784. PMC 108730. PMID 9826354.. *^ Kerr J, Taylor G, Rutman A, Hoiby N, Cole P, Wilson R ... Pyocyanin (PCN−) is one of the many toxins produced and secreted by the Gram negative bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa. ...
"Study to Evaluate Arikayce™ in CF Patients With Chronic Pseudomonas Aeruginosa Infections". ClinicalTrials.gov. Archived from ... This includes joint infections, intra-abdominal infections, meningitis, pneumonia, sepsis, and urinary tract infections.[2] It ... Mycobacterial infections, including as a second-line agent for active tuberculosis.[14] It is also used for infections by ... Skin and suture-site infections[9]. *Urinary tract infections that are caused by bacteria resistant to less toxic drugs (often ...
One specific research topic of interest is how microbes such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa invade the eye and cause infection. ... This might partly explain why Pseudomonas infections are the most predominant. However, another study conducted with worn and ... A recent study showed that Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus epidermis adhere much more strongly to unworn silicone ... Many eye diseases prohibits contact lens wear, such as active infections, allergies, and dry eye.[55] Keratometry is especially ...
It can be caused by infection, particularly from Pseudomonas species, such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Clostridium species, ... Bodey, G. P.; Bolivar, R.; Fainstein, V.; Jadeja, L. (1983). "Infections Caused by Pseudomonas aeruginosa". Clinical Infectious ... and ecthyma gangrenosum in an immunocompromised host with pseudomonas septicemia". American Journal of Ophthalmology. 137 (1): ...
... , also known as chloronychia, is a paronychial infection caused due to Pseudomonas aeruginosa that can ... "Pseudomonas aeruginosa Infections: Clinical Presentation". eMedicine. Retrieved 1 February 2014. James, William; Berger, ... It may also occur as transverse green stripes that are ascribed to intermittent episodes of infection. Green nails List of ...
... due to a Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection causing a green nail syndrome or (2) the result of copper in tap water. Pseudomonas ... ISBN 0-7216-2921-0. Balcht, Aldona; Smith, Raymond (1994). Pseudomonas Aeruginosa: Infections and Treatment. Informa Health ... The symptoms of such infections are generalized inflammation and sepsis. If such colonizations occur in critical body organs, ... causing cross-infections in hospitals and clinics. It is implicated in hot-tub rash. It is also able to decompose hydrocarbons ...
LeVine AM, Kurak KE, Bruno MD (1998). "Surfactant Protein-A-Deficient Mice Are Susceptible to Pseudomonas aeruginosa Infection ... LeVine AM, Kurak KE, Bruno MD (1998). "Surfactant Protein-A-Deficient Mice Are Susceptible to Pseudomonas aeruginosa Infection ... "Surfactant Protein A and D Differently Regulate the Immune Response to Nonmucoid Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Its ...
Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an unusual agent to cause a urinary tract infection which appeared to have caused the sepsis. Later ... "Brazilian Model Dies of Pseudomonas Infection". Newsarticle. medHeadlines.com. 2009-01-24. Retrieved 2009-01-26. "Brazilian ... she was diagnosed with a urinary tract infection that worsened to become septic shock caused by a bacterial infection, probably ... "Miss World finalist who had hands and feet amputated after being hit by infection dies". Newsarticle. London: Daily Mail, Tom ...
Green, foul-smelling pus is found in certain infections of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The greenish color is a result of the ... During infection, macrophages release cytokines which trigger neutrophils to seek the site of infection by chemotaxis. There, ... Topazian RG, Goldberg MH, Hupp JR (2002). Oral and maxillofacial infections (4 ed.). Philadelphia: W.B. Saunders. ISBN 978- ... "Infections Caused by Common Pyogenic Bacteria", Dermatopathology, Berlin Heidelberg: Springer, 2006, pp. 83-85, doi:10.1007/3- ...
Koike, K (Dec 1976). "Protective effect of schizophyllan on Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection of mouse". Japanese Journal of ... Itoh, W (1997). "Augemtnation of protective immune responses against viral infection by oral administration of schizophyllan". ... "Augemtnation of protective immune responses against Sendai virus infection by fungal polysaccharide schizophyllan". ...
Gallium compounds are active against infection-related biofilms, particularly those caused by Pseudomonas aeruginosa. In ... "Gallium maltolate treatment eradicates Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection in thermally injured mice". Antimicrobial Agents and ... "The transition metal gallium disrupts Pseudomonas aeruginosa iron metabolism and has antimicrobial and antibiofilm activity". J ... related research, locally administered gallium maltolate has shown efficacy against P. aeruginosa in a mouse burn/infection ...
"Surfactant protein-A-deficient mice are susceptible to Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection". Am. J. Respir. Cell Mol. Biol. 19: ... This research has shown that mice deficient in SP-A are more susceptible to infections from group B Streptoccoal organisms, ... Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and likely other organisms. The immune functions of SP-A are time, temperature, and concentration ... "Surfactant protein A-deficient mice are susceptible to group B streptococcal infection". The Journal of Immunology. 158 (9): ...
"Role of Iron Uptake Systems in Pseudomonas aeruginosa Virulence and Airway Infection". Infection and Immunity. 84 (8): 2324- ... "Impact of siderophore production on Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections in immunosuppressed mice". Infection and Immunity. 68 (4 ... 1882: Pseudomonas aeruginosa grown for first time in pure culture by Carle Gessard, reported in "On the Blue and Green ... In Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 there are 14 pvd genes involved in the biosynthesis of pyoverdine. Pyoverdine biosynthesis seems ...
Høiby N (June 1995). "Isolation and treatment of cystic fibrosis patients with lung infections caused by Pseudomonas ( ... May 2016). "IL-17A impairs host tolerance during airway chronic infection by Pseudomonas aeruginosa". Scientific Reports. 6: ... Pseudomonas can develop special characteristics that allow the formation of large colonies, known as "mucoid" Pseudomonas, ... Antibiotics by mouth such as ciprofloxacin or azithromycin are given to help prevent infection or to control ongoing infection ...
Ong DS, Wang L, Zhu Y, Ho B, Ding JL (2005). "The response of ferritin to LPS and acute phase of Pseudomonas infection". ... However it is less sensitive, since its levels are increased in the blood by infection or any type of chronic inflammation, and ... For example, ferritins may be high in infection without signaling body iron overload. Ferritin is also used as a marker for ... Ferritin concentrations increase drastically in the presence of an infection or cancer. Endotoxins are an up-regulator of the ...
McVay CS, Velásquez M, Fralick JA (2007). "Phage therapy of Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection in a mouse burn wound model". ... for Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections (otitis). Documentation of the Phase-1/Phase-2 study was published in August 2009 in the ... that the use of phages could improve the success of skin grafts by reducing the underlying Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection. ... For example, jazz bassist Alfred Gertler had a bacterial infection in his bones after breaking an ankle. A physician in the U.S ...
Green, foul-smelling pus is found in certain infections of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The greenish color is a result of the ... During infection, macrophages release cytokines which trigger neutrophils to seek the site of infection by chemotaxis. There, ... Oral and maxillofacial infections (4 ed.). Philadelphia: W.B. Saunders. ISBN 978-0721692715. "Infections Caused by Common ... Pus from anaerobic infections can more often have a foul odor. In almost all cases when there is a collection of pus in the ...
"Targeting bacterial adherence inhibits multidrug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection following burn injury". Scientific ... This has led to the exploration of adhesin activity interruption as a method of bacterial infection treatment. The study of ... Additionally, UPEC causes about 90% of urinary tract infections. Of those E. coli which cause UTIs, 95% express type 1 fimbriae ... Adherence is an essential step in bacterial pathogenesis or infection, required for colonizing a new host. Adhesion and ...
For instance, infection of Pseudomonas aeruginosa by the temperate phage PaP3 changed the expression of 38% (2160/5633) of its ... treatment of ear infections caused by Pseudomonas aeruginosa) was reported shortly after this in the journal Clinical ... "Frontiers in Cellular and Infection Microbiology. 2: 161. doi:10.3389/fcimb.2012.00161. PMC 3522046 . PMID 23248780.. ... "Novel Phage Therapy Saves Patient with Multidrug-Resistant Bacterial Infection". UC Health - UC San Diego. Retrieved 2018-05-13 ...
2011). "Fosfomycin/Tobramycin for Inhalation in Cystic Fibrosis Patients with Pseudomonas Airway Infection". Am J Respir Crit ...
"Fosfomycin/tobramycin for inhalation in patients with cystic fibrosis with pseudomonas airway infection". American Journal of ... "Study Evaluating Fosfomycin/Tobramycin for Inhalation in Cystic Fibrosis Patients With Pseudomonas Aeruginosa Lung Infection" ... Its use in combination with tobramycin to treat lung infections in patients with cystic fibrosis was also explored. The drug is ... Fosfomycin is indicated in the treatment of urinary tract infections (UTIs), where it is usually administered as a single oral ...
"Garlic blocks quorum sensing and promotes rapid clearing of pulmonary Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections". Microbiology. 151 (4 ... The opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa uses quorum sensing to coordinate the formation of biofilms, swarming ... Garlic and ginseng experimentally block quorum sensing in Pseudomonas aeruginosa. It is hoped that the therapeutic enzymatic ... Cornelis, P. (ed.) (2008). Pseudomonas: Genomics and Molecular Biology (1st ed.). Caister Academic Press. ISBN 1-904455-19-0. ...
Rahal J (2006). "Novel antibiotic combinations against infections with almost completely resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa and ... It can cause various other infections, including skin and wound infections, bacteremia, and meningitis, but A. lwoffi is mostly ... urinary tract infections (UTIs), secondary meningitis, infective endocarditis, and wound and burn infections. In particular, A ... "Air ionizers wipe out hospital infections". The New Scientist. Retrieved 2006-08-30. Palmen R, Vosman B, Buijsman P, Breek CK, ...
"The neutrophil serine protease inhibitor serpinb1 preserves lung defense functions in Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection". The ... "SerpinB2 is critical to Th2 immunity against enteric nematode infection". Journal of Immunology. 190 (11): 5779-87. doi:10.4049 ...
Monsanto's tomato was engineered with the ACC deaminase gene from the soil bacterium Pseudomonas chlororaphis that lowered ... "Heterologous expression of taro cystatin protects transgenic tomato against Meloidogyne incognita infection by means of ...
It can cause pneumonia, infections in the blood or in the body after surgery. ... Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a type of germ that can cause infections in humans, mostly in hospital patients. ... How are these infections treated?. Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections are generally treated with antibiotics. Unfortunately, in ... CDC tracks Pseudomonas aeruginosa and the infections this germ can cause, including antibiotic-resistant infections. ...
Definition Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a gram-negative, oxidase-positive, motile rod, which frequently grows on agar in yellow- ... Diagnosis of pseudomonas infection is established by culturing the organism from infection sites. ... Pseudomonas is a common cause of urinary tract infections and usually is seen in patients who have had urologic manipulation or ... Pseudomonas infections occur most often in hospitals, where the organism is frequently found in moist areas such as sinks, ...
While these infections are usually mild in healthy people, they can be life-threatening for people who are in a hospital or ... Pseudomonas infections occur due to a specific type of bacteria and can affect different areas of the body. ... Pseudomonas infections are illnesses that occur due to the bacteria Pseudomonas. For many people, a Pseudomonas infection will ... Pseudomonas is a type of bacteria that can cause infections.. Pseudomonas is a common genus of bacteria, which can create ...
Pseudomonas is a gram-negative rod that belongs to the family Pseudomonadaceae. More than half of all clinical isolates produce ... encoded search term (Pseudomonas%20aeruginosa%20Infections) and Pseudomonas aeruginosa Infections What to Read Next on Medscape ... Pseudomonas aeruginosa Infections Medication. Updated: Dec 05, 2016 * Author: Marcus Friedrich, MD, MBA, FACP; Chief Editor: ... Infections with Pseudomonas aeruginosa in Charcot arthropathy of the foot. Foot Ankle Int. 2013 Feb. 34(2):234-7. [Medline]. ...
Pseudomonas pseudomallei infection in camels.. Forbes-Faulkner JC, Townsend WL, Thomas AD. ...
Complications depend on the site of infection. Chronic glanders may lead to multiple abscesses within the muscles of the arms ... Drugs & Diseases , Pediatrics: General Medicine , Pseudomonas Infection Q&A What are the possible complications of Pseudomonas ... Life-threatening Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections in patients with human immunodeficiency virus infection. Clin Infect Dis. ... Pseudomonas Infections in Children with Human Immunodeficiency Virus Infection. Pediatric Infect Dis J. 1992. 11:547-53. ...
CNS infections Ceftazidime, cefepime, or meropenem are the antibiotics of choice because of their high CNS penetration. ... Drugs & Diseases , Pediatrics: General Medicine , Pseudomonas Infection Q&A What are the treatment options for Pseudomonas CNS ... Life-threatening Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections in patients with human immunodeficiency virus infection. Clin Infect Dis. ... Pseudomonas Infections in Children with Human Immunodeficiency Virus Infection. Pediatric Infect Dis J. 1992. 11:547-53. ...
Consideration of this organism is important because it causes severe hospital-acquired infections, e ... Pseudomonas aeruginosais one of the most commonly considered gram-negative aerobic bacilli in the differential diagnosis of ... Pseudomonas aeruginosa bacteremia and endocarditis. *Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections of the eye, ear, urinary tract, ... Pseudomonas aeruginosa skin and soft tissue infections. Authors. Souha S Kanj, MD. Souha S Kanj, MD ...
Pseudomonas is a gram-negative rod that belongs to the family Pseudomonadaceae. More than half of all clinical isolates produce ... encoded search term (Pseudomonas aeruginosa Infections) and Pseudomonas aeruginosa Infections What to Read Next on Medscape. ... Pseudomonas aeruginosa Infections. Updated: Dec 20, 2018 * Author: Marcus Friedrich, MD, MBA, FACP; Chief Editor: Michael ... Infections with Pseudomonas aeruginosa in Charcot arthropathy of the foot. Foot Ankle Int. 2013 Feb. 34(2):234-7. [Medline]. ...
Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a bacterium responsible for severe nosocomial infections, life-threatening infections in ... Cell-to-cell signaling and Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections.. Van Delden C1, Iglewski BH. ... We discuss the possible role of cell-to-cell signaling in the pathogenesis of P. aeruginosa infections and present a rationale ... immunocompromised persons, and chronic infections in cystic fibrosis patients. The bacteriums virulence depends on a large ...
... it is also an important cause of infections associated with ... An outbreak of Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection caused by ... Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a gram-negative nonfermenting bacillus, is a much-feared pathogen. The organism is common in the ... Epidemiology, microbiology, and pathogenesis of Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection. Authors. Souha S Kanj, MD. Souha S Kanj, MD ... Pseudomonas exit-site infections in CAPD patients: evolution and outcome of treatment. Perit Dial Int 1998; 18:637. ...
Pseudomonas nail infection represents an unpleasant nail disease for the patients due to the green discoloration of the nail. ... Pseudomonas fingernail infection successfully treated with topical nadifloxacin in HIV-positive patients: report of two cases. ... To our knowledge, this is the second report [3] of the successful treatment of Pseudomonas nail infection with topical ... Treatment of pseudomonas nail infections with 0.1% octenidine dihydrochloride solution. Dermatology 2009; 218:67-68.. * Cited ...
... we are still faced with the morbidity and mortality due to lung infections caused by Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Pseudomonas ... we are still faced with the morbidity and mortality due to lung infections caused by Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Pseudomonas ... Cystic fibrosis and endobronchial pseudomonas infection Curr Opin Pediatr. 1993 Jun;5(3):247-54. doi: 10.1097/00008480- ... Cross-infection in CF centers and during social contacts between CF patients out of the hospital environment has been described ...
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Pseudomonas aeruginosais a key opportunistic pathogen causing severe acute and chronic nosocomial infections in ... Burn wound infection Global transcription profiling Microarrays Pseudomonas aeruginosa This is a preview of subscription ... Ha U, Jin S (1999) Expression of the soxR gene of Pseudomonas aeruginosa is inducible during infection of burn wounds in mice ... Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a key opportunistic pathogen causing severe acute and chronic nosocomial infections in ...
Spatial determinants of quorum signaling in a Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection model. Sophie E. Darch, Olja Simoska, Mignon ... Spatial determinants of quorum signaling in a Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection model. Sophie E. Darch, Olja Simoska, Mignon ... Spatial determinants of quorum signaling in a Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection model Message Subject (Your Name) has sent you a ... Spatial determinants of quorum signaling in a Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection model. Sophie E. Darch, Olja Simoska, Mignon ...
... Fernando Cobo, Gemma Jiménez, Javier Rodríguez-Granger, ... We report a case of posttraumatic skin and soft-tissue infection in a patient with a left thigh wound after a traffic accident. ... Pseudomonas fulva was isolated from a wound aspirate and was identified to the species level by Maldi-tof. The patient ...
Diseases : Infection: Antibiotic Resistant, Pseudomonas Infections, Staphylococcus aureus infection, Streptococcus Infections. ... Diseases : Bacterial Infections and Mycoses, Escherichia coli Infections, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Pseudomonas Infections, ... Diseases : Aspergillosis, Candida Infection , Escherichia coli Infections, Klebsiella Infections, Pseudomonas Infections, ... Diseases : Bacillus subtilis infections, Escherichia coli Infections, Pseudomonas Infections, Salmonella Infections, ...
Escherichia coli Infections, HIV Infections, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Pseudomonas fluorescens infections, Staphylococcus aureus ... Brevibacterium linens infections, Micrococcus luteus infections, Pseudomonas fluorescens infections, Skin Infections, ... Diseases : Citrobacter Infection, Pseudomonas fluorescens infections, Staphylococcus aureus infection. Pharmacological Actions ... 3 Abstracts with Pseudomonas fluorescens infections Research. Filter by Study Type. Bacterial. ...
Pseudomonas aeruginosaposes a significant threat to patients within the healthcare system. Its intrinsic and acquired... ... Ceftolozane/tazobactam for the treatment of MDR Pseudomonas aeruginosa left ventricular assist device infection as a bridge to ... Multidrug-Resistant Pseudomonas Infections: Hard to Treat, But Hope on the Horizon?. ... Determination of alternative ceftolozane/tazobactam dosing regimens for patients with infections due to Pseudomonas aeruginosa ...
... depending on the site of infection: Culture of the purulent discharge helps diagnose suppurative otitis media or malignant ... Pseudomonas Infection Q&A Which lab tests may be indicated to diagnose Pseudomonas infections in specific sites?. Updated: Dec ... Life-threatening Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections in patients with human immunodeficiency virus infection. Clin Infect Dis. ... Pseudomonas Infections in Children with Human Immunodeficiency Virus Infection. Pediatric Infect Dis J. 1992. 11:547-53. ...
Pseudomonas infections often have a characteristic sweet odor and have become a substantial cause of infection in patients with ... Skeletal infections manifest differently depending upon the location of the infection. Vertebral infections may involve the ... as the infection can manifest in many ways depending upon the site of infection. The pathogenesis of Pseudomonas is ... Since Pseudomonas infections are most often seen in those with compromised immune systems, which can be due to a variety of ...
This is mainly because Pseudomonas aeruginosa are mainly found in unclean environments, and when the immunity of the ... The infection may be passed by direct contact or contaminated fecal droppings. ... infection with Pseudomonas aeruginosais bacteria is the most common bacterial infection. ... Pseudomonas aeruginosa Infection in Chinchillas. In chinchillas, infection with Pseudomonas aeruginosais bacteria is the most ...
Pseudomonas aeruginosa has become an important cause of infection, especially in patients with compromised host defense ... Resistant Pseudomonas Aeruginosa Infections Pipeline Overview & Precise Analysis, H1 2017. Pseudomonas aeruginosa has become an ... Pseudomonas aeruginosa has become an important cause of infection, especially in patients with compromised host defense ... The Resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa Infections (Infectious Disease) pipeline guide also reviews of key players involved in ...
76:88-92.• Sanderson AR.: The role of biofi lms in otolaryngologic infections: update 2007.: Pseudomonas aeruginosa hypoxic or ... aeruginosa infection in CF patients. with infections most commonly caused by H. Biofilms have been identified on middle ear ... and chronic infections Chronic rhinosinusitis Cystic fibrosis-related respiratory infections Otitis media Device-related ... biofi lm-related upper airway infections may promote lower pulmonary infections and aggravate other chronic pulmonary ...
  • Learn more about how CDC's Antibiotic Resistance Laboratory Network detects highly resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections. (cdc.gov)
  • Albany, NY, May 24, 2017 --( PR.com )-- Market Research Hub's latest Pharmaceutical and Healthcare disease pipeline guide Resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa Infections Pipeline Review, H1 2017, provides an overview of the Resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa Infections (Infectious Disease) pipeline landscape. (pr.com)
  • Global Markets Direct's Pharmaceutical and Healthcare latest pipeline guide Resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa Infections Pipeline Review, H1 2017, provides comprehensive information on the therapeutics under development for Resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa Infections (Infectious Disease), complete with analysis by stage of development, drug target, mechanism of action (MoA), route of administration (RoA) and molecule type. (pr.com)
  • The Resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa Infections (Infectious Disease) pipeline guide also reviews of key players involved in therapeutic development for Resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa Infections and features dormant and discontinued projects. (pr.com)
  • Resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa Infections (Infectious Disease) pipeline guide helps in identifying and tracking emerging players in the market and their portfolios, enhances decision making capabilities and helps to create effective counter strategies to gain competitive advantage. (pr.com)
  • The pipeline guide provides a snapshot of the global therapeutic landscape of Resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa Infections (Infectious Disease). (pr.com)
  • The pipeline guide reviews pipeline therapeutics for Resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa Infections (Infectious Disease) by companies and universities/research institutes based on information derived from company and industry-specific sources. (pr.com)
  • The pipeline guide reviews key companies involved in Resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa Infections (Infectious Disease) therapeutics and enlists all their major and minor projects. (pr.com)
  • The pipeline guide evaluates Resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa Infections (Infectious Disease) therapeutics based on mechanism of action (MoA), drug target, route of administration (RoA) and molecule type. (pr.com)
  • Resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa Infections (Infectious Disease) pipeline guide helps in identifying and tracking emerging players in the market and their portfolios, enhances decision making capabilities and helps to create effective counter strategies to gain competitive advantage Additionally, various dynamic tracking processes ensure that the most recent developments are captured on a real time basis. (medgadget.com)
  • Find and recognize significant and varied types of therapeutics under development for Resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa Infections (Infectious Disease). (medgadget.com)
  • Formulate corrective measures for pipeline projects by understanding Resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa Infections (Infectious Disease) pipeline depth and focus of Indication therapeutics. (medgadget.com)
  • Although commonly seen, the treatment for this disorder remains challenging, and this is further punctuated in HIV infection, as there are no controlled studies assessing systemic or topical treatments [1, . (lww.com)
  • Next Folliculitis and AOE aetiology relating to pools and experimental disease induction are reviewed, including uncertainties, notably whether P. aeruginosa might be autochthonous and whether Folliculitis should be viewed as multiple localised infections rather than a systemic infection. (epa.gov)
  • This result indicates that MBL plays a key role in containing and preventing a systemic spread of P. aeruginosa infection following burn injury and suggests that MBL deficiency in humans maybe a premorbid variable in the predisposition to infection in burn victims. (jimmunol.org)
  • The frequency, systemic and local therapy, and morbidity of P. aeruginosa infection in the burns unit of RCH have not been documented previously. (scielo.org.za)
  • What is a systemic infection? (healthtap.com)
  • There are many causes of longitudinal melanonychia, including drugs, radiation, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection, inflammatory nail disorders, Laugier-Hunziker syndrome, vitamin B12 or folate deficiency, and systemic lupus erythematosus. (oncologynurseadvisor.com)
  • Although CF is a systemic disease, long-term lung infections are primarily responsible for poor patient outcomes ( 1 ). (asm.org)
  • Gregory Priebe, MD, of the BWH Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Medicine, and Boston Children's Hospital Division of Critical Care Medicine, Department of Anesthesiology, Perioperative and Pain Medicine, along with researchers from Harvard Medical School, constructed a vaccine based on a new mechanism of immunity to Pseudomonas mediated by T helper 17 (Th17) cells. (infectioncontroltoday.com)
  • Therefore, animal models of infection may be useful to explore the activity of a candidate antibacterial drug and may help to predict whether the drug will be efficacious in humans. (fda.gov)
  • A discussion of the additional scientific work needed to evaluate current animal models of infection and evaluate potential animal models that may predict response in humans could advance the development of antibacterial drugs targeting a single species. (fda.gov)
  • A growing consensus from studies in humans and mice suggests that lack of MBL together with other comorbid factors predisposes the host to infection. (jimmunol.org)
  • There are several species of pseudomonas that cause infections in humans. (healthtap.com)