Pseudomonas fluorescens: A species of nonpathogenic fluorescent bacteria found in feces, sewage, soil, and water, and which liquefy gelatin.Pseudomonas: A genus of gram-negative, aerobic, rod-shaped bacteria widely distributed in nature. Some species are pathogenic for humans, animals, and plants.Pseudomonas aeruginosa: A species of gram-negative, aerobic, rod-shaped bacteria commonly isolated from clinical specimens (wound, burn, and urinary tract infections). It is also found widely distributed in soil and water. P. aeruginosa is a major agent of nosocomial infection.Phloroglucinol: A trinitrobenzene derivative with antispasmodic properties that is used primarily as a laboratory reagent.Pseudomonas Infections: Infections with bacteria of the genus PSEUDOMONAS.Pseudomonas putida: A species of gram-negative, aerobic bacteria isolated from soil and water as well as clinical specimens. Occasionally it is an opportunistic pathogen.4-Hydroxybenzoate-3-Monooxygenase: A flavoprotein that catalyzes the synthesis of protocatechuic acid from 4-hydroxybenzoate in the presence of molecular oxygen. EC 1.14.13.2.Pyrrolnitrin: 3-Chloro-4-(3-chloro-2-nitrophenyl)pyrrole. Antifungal antibiotic isolated from Pseudomonas pyrrocinia. It is effective mainly against Trichophyton, Microsporium, Epidermophyton, and Penicillium.Pest Control, Biological: Use of naturally-occuring or genetically-engineered organisms to reduce or eliminate populations of pests.Pseudomonas Phages: Viruses whose host is Pseudomonas. A frequently encountered Pseudomonas phage is BACTERIOPHAGE PHI 6.Pythium: A genus of destructive root-parasitic OOMYCETES in the family Pythiaceae, order Peronosporales, commonly found in cultivated soils all over the world. Differentiation of zoospores takes place in a vesicle.Bacterial Proteins: Proteins found in any species of bacterium.Hydrogen Cyanide: Hydrogen cyanide (HCN); A toxic liquid or colorless gas. It is found in the smoke of various tobacco products and released by combustion of nitrogen-containing organic materials.Soil Microbiology: The presence of bacteria, viruses, and fungi in the soil. This term is not restricted to pathogenic organisms.Exopeptidases: A sub-class of PEPTIDE HYDROLASES that act only near the ends of polypeptide chains.Mannitol Dehydrogenases: Sugar alcohol dehydrogenases that have specificity for MANNITOL. Enzymes in this category are generally classified according to their preference for a specific reducing cofactor.Gene Expression Regulation, Bacterial: Any of the processes by which cytoplasmic or intercellular factors influence the differential control of gene action in bacteria.Molecular Sequence Data: Descriptions of specific amino acid, carbohydrate, or nucleotide sequences which have appeared in the published literature and/or are deposited in and maintained by databanks such as GENBANK, European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), National Biomedical Research Foundation (NBRF), or other sequence repositories.Genes, Bacterial: The functional hereditary units of BACTERIA.Plant Diseases: Diseases of plants.Plant Roots: The usually underground portions of a plant that serve as support, store food, and through which water and mineral nutrients enter the plant. (From American Heritage Dictionary, 1982; Concise Dictionary of Biology, 1990)Oxidoreductases Acting on CH-NH2 Group Donors: Enzymes catalyzing the dehydrogenation of or oxidation of compounds containing primary amines.Antibiosis: A natural association between organisms that is detrimental to at least one of them. This often refers to the production of chemicals by one microorganism that is harmful to another.Fusaric Acid: A picolinic acid derivative isolated from various Fusarium species. It has been proposed for a variety of therapeutic applications but is primarily used as a research tool. Its mechanisms of action are poorly understood. It probably inhibits DOPAMINE BETA-HYDROXYLASE, the enzyme that converts dopamine to norepinephrine. It may also have other actions, including the inhibition of cell proliferation and DNA synthesis.DNA, Bacterial: Deoxyribonucleic acid that makes up the genetic material of bacteria.Siderophores: Low-molecular-weight compounds produced by microorganisms that aid in the transport and sequestration of ferric iron. (The Encyclopedia of Molecular Biology, 1994)Rhizosphere: The immediate physical zone surrounding plant roots that include the plant roots. It is an area of intense and complex biological activity involving plants, microorganisms, other soil organisms, and the soil.Pseudomonas syringae: A species of gram-negative, fluorescent, phytopathogenic bacteria in the genus PSEUDOMONAS. It is differentiated into approximately 50 pathovars with different plant pathogenicities and host specificities.PhenazinesCulture Media: Any liquid or solid preparation made specifically for the growth, storage, or transport of microorganisms or other types of cells. The variety of media that exist allow for the culturing of specific microorganisms and cell types, such as differential media, selective media, test media, and defined media. Solid media consist of liquid media that have been solidified with an agent such as AGAR or GELATIN.Biodegradation, Environmental: Elimination of ENVIRONMENTAL POLLUTANTS; PESTICIDES and other waste using living organisms, usually involving intervention of environmental or sanitation engineers.Amino Acid Sequence: The order of amino acids as they occur in a polypeptide chain. This is referred to as the primary structure of proteins. It is of fundamental importance in determining PROTEIN CONFORMATION.Aspartate Ammonia-Lyase: An enzyme that catalyzes the conversion of aspartic acid to ammonia and fumaric acid in plants and some microorganisms. EC 4.3.1.1.Colony Count, Microbial: Enumeration by direct count of viable, isolated bacterial, archaeal, or fungal CELLS or SPORES capable of growth on solid CULTURE MEDIA. The method is used routinely by environmental microbiologists for quantifying organisms in AIR; FOOD; and WATER; by clinicians for measuring patients' microbial load; and in antimicrobial drug testing.Cucumis sativus: A creeping annual plant species of the CUCURBITACEAE family. It has a rough succulent, trailing stem and hairy leaves with three to five pointed lobes.Anti-Bacterial Agents: Substances that reduce the growth or reproduction of BACTERIA.Biofilms: Encrustations, formed from microbes (bacteria, algae, fungi, plankton, or protozoa) embedding in extracellular polymers, that adhere to surfaces such as teeth (DENTAL DEPOSITS); PROSTHESES AND IMPLANTS; and catheters. Biofilms are prevented from forming by treating surfaces with DENTIFRICES; DISINFECTANTS; ANTI-INFECTIVE AGENTS; and antifouling agents.Base Sequence: The sequence of PURINES and PYRIMIDINES in nucleic acids and polynucleotides. It is also called nucleotide sequence.Pseudomonas stutzeri: A species of gram-negative bacteria in the genus PSEUDOMONAS, containing multiple genomovars. It is distinguishable from other pseudomonad species by its ability to use MALTOSE and STARCH as sole carbon and energy sources. It can degrade ENVIRONMENTAL POLLUTANTS and has been used as a model organism to study denitrification.Mutation: Any detectable and heritable change in the genetic material that causes a change in the GENOTYPE and which is transmitted to daughter cells and to succeeding generations.Beta vulgaris: A species of the Beta genus. Cultivars are used as a source of beets (root) or chard (leaves).Escherichia coli: A species of gram-negative, facultatively anaerobic, rod-shaped bacteria (GRAM-NEGATIVE FACULTATIVELY ANAEROBIC RODS) commonly found in the lower part of the intestine of warm-blooded animals. It is usually nonpathogenic, but some strains are known to produce DIARRHEA and pyogenic infections. Pathogenic strains (virotypes) are classified by their specific pathogenic mechanisms such as toxins (ENTEROTOXIGENIC ESCHERICHIA COLI), etc.Cloning, Molecular: The insertion of recombinant DNA molecules from prokaryotic and/or eukaryotic sources into a replicating vehicle, such as a plasmid or virus vector, and the introduction of the resultant hybrid molecules into recipient cells without altering the viability of those cells.Oxygenases: Oxidases that specifically introduce DIOXYGEN-derived oxygen atoms into a variety of organic molecules.Pyrus: A plant genus of the family ROSACEAE known for the edible fruit.Pantoea: A genus of gram-negative, facultatively anaerobic, straight rods which are motile by peritrichous flagella. Most strains produce a yellow pigment. This organism is isolated from plant surfaces, seeds, soil, and water, as well as from animals and human wounds, blood, and urine. (From Bergey's Manual of Determinative Bacteriology, 9th ed)Phenols: Benzene derivatives that include one or more hydroxyl groups attached to the ring structure.Sequence Analysis, DNA: A multistage process that includes cloning, physical mapping, subcloning, determination of the DNA SEQUENCE, and information analysis.GluconatesBenzoin: A white crystalline compound prepared by condensation of benzaldehyde in potassium cyanide and used in organic syntheses. This should not be confused with benzoin gum from STYRAX.Mutagenesis, Insertional: Mutagenesis where the mutation is caused by the introduction of foreign DNA sequences into a gene or extragenic sequence. This may occur spontaneously in vivo or be experimentally induced in vivo or in vitro. Proviral DNA insertions into or adjacent to a cellular proto-oncogene can interrupt GENETIC TRANSLATION of the coding sequences or interfere with recognition of regulatory elements and cause unregulated expression of the proto-oncogene resulting in tumor formation.Substrate Specificity: A characteristic feature of enzyme activity in relation to the kind of substrate on which the enzyme or catalytic molecule reacts.Bacteria: One of the three domains of life (the others being Eukarya and ARCHAEA), also called Eubacteria. They are unicellular prokaryotic microorganisms which generally possess rigid cell walls, multiply by cell division, and exhibit three principal forms: round or coccal, rodlike or bacillary, and spiral or spirochetal. Bacteria can be classified by their response to OXYGEN: aerobic, anaerobic, or facultatively anaerobic; by the mode by which they obtain their energy: chemotrophy (via chemical reaction) or PHOTOTROPHY (via light reaction); for chemotrophs by their source of chemical energy: CHEMOLITHOTROPHY (from inorganic compounds) or chemoorganotrophy (from organic compounds); and by their source for CARBON; NITROGEN; etc.; HETEROTROPHY (from organic sources) or AUTOTROPHY (from CARBON DIOXIDE). They can also be classified by whether or not they stain (based on the structure of their CELL WALLS) with CRYSTAL VIOLET dye: gram-negative or gram-positive.Plasmids: Extrachromosomal, usually CIRCULAR DNA molecules that are self-replicating and transferable from one organism to another. They are found in a variety of bacterial, archaeal, fungal, algal, and plant species. They are used in GENETIC ENGINEERING as CLONING VECTORS.Coumaric Acids: Hydroxycinnamic acid and its derivatives. Act as activators of the indoleacetic acid oxidizing system, thereby producing a decrease in the endogenous level of bound indoleacetic acid in plants.Galactose Dehydrogenases: D-Galactose:NAD(P)+ 1-oxidoreductases. Catalyzes the oxidation of D-galactose in the presence of NAD+ or NADP+ to D-galactono-gamma-lactone and NADH or NADPH. Includes EC 1.1.1.48 and EC 1.1.1.120.Pigments, Biological: Any normal or abnormal coloring matter in PLANTS; ANIMALS or micro-organisms.Mandelic Acids: Analogs or derivatives of mandelic acid (alpha-hydroxybenzeneacetic acid).Parabens: Methyl, propyl, butyl, and ethyl esters of p-hydroxybenzoic acid. They have been approved by the FDA as antimicrobial agents for foods and pharmaceuticals. (From Hawley's Condensed Chemical Dictionary, 11th ed, p872)Alginates: Salts of alginic acid that are extracted from marine kelp and used to make dental impressions and as absorbent material for surgical dressings.DNA Transposable Elements: Discrete segments of DNA which can excise and reintegrate to another site in the genome. Most are inactive, i.e., have not been found to exist outside the integrated state. DNA transposable elements include bacterial IS (insertion sequence) elements, Tn elements, the maize controlling elements Ac and Ds, Drosophila P, gypsy, and pogo elements, the human Tigger elements and the Tc and mariner elements which are found throughout the animal kingdom.Mixed Function Oxygenases: Widely distributed enzymes that carry out oxidation-reduction reactions in which one atom of the oxygen molecule is incorporated into the organic substrate; the other oxygen atom is reduced and combined with hydrogen ions to form water. They are also known as monooxygenases or hydroxylases. These reactions require two substrates as reductants for each of the two oxygen atoms. There are different classes of monooxygenases depending on the type of hydrogen-providing cosubstrate (COENZYMES) required in the mixed-function oxidation.Fusarium: A mitosporic Hypocreales fungal genus, various species of which are important parasitic pathogens of plants and a variety of vertebrates. Teleomorphs include GIBBERELLA.Temperature: The property of objects that determines the direction of heat flow when they are placed in direct thermal contact. The temperature is the energy of microscopic motions (vibrational and translational) of the particles of atoms.Operon: In bacteria, a group of metabolically related genes, with a common promoter, whose transcription into a single polycistronic MESSENGER RNA is under the control of an OPERATOR REGION.Hexuronic Acids: Term used to designate tetrahydroxy aldehydic acids obtained by oxidation of hexose sugars, i.e. glucuronic acid, galacturonic acid, etc. Historically, the name hexuronic acid was originally given to ascorbic acid.Vanillic Acid: A flavoring agent. It is the intermediate product in the two-step bioconversion of ferulic acid to vanillin. (J Biotechnol 1996;50(2-3):107-13).Sequence Homology, Amino Acid: The degree of similarity between sequences of amino acids. This information is useful for the analyzing genetic relatedness of proteins and species.Glucuronic Acid: A sugar acid formed by the oxidation of the C-6 carbon of GLUCOSE. In addition to being a key intermediate metabolite of the uronic acid pathway, glucuronic acid also plays a role in the detoxification of certain drugs and toxins by conjugating with them to form GLUCURONIDES.Carbon: A nonmetallic element with atomic symbol C, atomic number 6, and atomic weight [12.0096; 12.0116]. It may occur as several different allotropes including DIAMOND; CHARCOAL; and GRAPHITE; and as SOOT from incompletely burned fuel.4-Butyrolactone: One of the FURANS with a carbonyl thereby forming a cyclic lactone. It is an endogenous compound made from gamma-aminobutyrate and is the precursor of gamma-hydroxybutyrate. It is also used as a pharmacological agent and solvent.Lycopersicon esculentum: A plant species of the family SOLANACEAE, native of South America, widely cultivated for their edible, fleshy, usually red fruit.Triticum: A plant genus of the family POACEAE that is the source of EDIBLE GRAIN. A hybrid with rye (SECALE CEREALE) is called TRITICALE. The seed is ground into FLOUR and used to make BREAD, and is the source of WHEAT GERM AGGLUTININS.Bacterial Adhesion: Physicochemical property of fimbriated (FIMBRIAE, BACTERIAL) and non-fimbriated bacteria of attaching to cells, tissue, and nonbiological surfaces. It is a factor in bacterial colonization and pathogenicity.Carboxylic Ester Hydrolases: Enzymes which catalyze the hydrolysis of carboxylic acid esters with the formation of an alcohol and a carboxylic acid anion.

Phe161 and Arg166 variants of p-hydroxybenzoate hydroxylase. Implications for NADPH recognition and structural stability. (1/912)

Phe161 and Arg166 of p-hydroxybenzoate hydroxylase from Pseudomonas fluorescens belong to a newly discovered sequence motif in flavoprotein hydroxylases with a putative dual function in FAD and NADPH binding [1]. To study their role in more detail, Phe161 and Arg166 were selectively changed by site-directed mutagenesis. F161A and F161G are catalytically competent enzymes having a rather poor affinity for NADPH. The catalytic properties of R166K are similar to those of the native enzyme. R166S and R166E show impaired NADPH binding and R166E has lost the ability to bind FAD. The crystal structure of substrate complexed F161A at 2.2 A is indistinguishable from the native enzyme, except for small changes at the site of mutation. The crystal structure of substrate complexed R166S at 2.0 A revealed that Arg166 is important for providing an intimate contact between the FAD binding domain and a long excursion of the substrate binding domain. It is proposed that this interaction is essential for structural stability and for the recognition of the pyrophosphate moiety of NADPH.  (+info)

Inhibition of vibrio anguillarum by Pseudomonas fluorescens AH2, a possible probiotic treatment of fish. (2/912)

To study the possible use of probiotics in fish farming, we evaluated the in vitro and in vivo antagonism of antibacterial strain Pseudomonas fluorescens strain AH2 against the fish-pathogenic bacterium Vibrio anguillarum. As iron is important in virulence and bacterial interactions, the effect of P. fluorescens AH2 was studied under iron-rich and iron-limited conditions. Sterile-filtered culture supernatants from iron-limited P. fluorescens AH2 inhibited the growth of V. anguillarum, whereas sterile-filtered supernatants from iron-replete cultures of P. fluorescens AH2 did not. P. fluorescens AH2 inhibited the growth of V. anguillarum during coculture, independently of the iron concentration, when the initial count of the antagonist was 100 to 1, 000 times greater that of the fish pathogen. These in vitro results were successfully repeated in vivo. A probiotic effect in vivo was tested by exposing rainbow trout (Oncorynchus mykiss Walbaum) to P. fluorescens AH2 at a density of 10(5) CFU/ml for 5 days before a challenge with V. anguillarum at 10(4) to 10(5) CFU/ml for 1 h. Some fish were also exposed to P. fluorescens AH2 at 10(7) CFU/ml during the 1-h infection. The combined probiotic treatment resulted in a 46% reduction of calculated accumulated mortality; accumulated mortality was 25% after 7 days at 12 degrees C in the probiotic-treated fish, whereas mortality was 47% in fish not treated with the probiont.  (+info)

Identification of the tliDEF ABC transporter specific for lipase in Pseudomonas fluorescens SIK W1. (3/912)

Pseudomonas fluorescens, a gram-negative psychrotrophic bacterium, secretes a thermostable lipase into the extracellular medium. In our previous study, the lipase of P. fluorescens SIK W1 was cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli, but it accumulated as inactive inclusion bodies. Amino acid sequence analysis of the lipase revealed a potential C-terminal targeting sequence recognized by the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter. The genetic loci around the lipase gene were searched, and a secretory gene was identified. Nucleotide sequencing of an 8.5-kb DNA fragment revealed three components of the ABC transporter, tliD, tliE, and tliF, upstream of the lipase gene, tliA. In addition, genes encoding a protease and a protease inhibitor were located upstream of tliDEF. tliDEF showed high similarity to ABC transporters of Pseudomonas aeruginosa alkaline protease, Erwinia chrysanthemi protease, Serratia marcescens lipase, and Pseudomonas fluorescens CY091 protease. tliDEF and the lipase structural gene in a single operon were sufficient for E. coli cells to secrete the lipase. In addition, E. coli harboring the lipase gene secreted the lipase by complementation of tliDEF in a different plasmid. The ABC transporter of P. fluorescens was optimally functional at 20 and 25 degrees C, while the ABC transporter, aprD, aprE, and aprF, of P. aeruginosa secreted the lipase irrespective of temperature between 20 and 37 degrees C. These results demonstrated that the lipase is secreted by the P. fluorescens SIK W1 ABC transporter, which is organized as an operon with tliA, and that its secretory function is temperature dependent.  (+info)

Purification, characterization and gene cloning of 6-hydroxynicotinate 3-monooxygenase from Pseudomonas fluorescens TN5. (4/912)

6-Hydroxynicotinate 3-monooxygenase, a membrane-bound, 42-kDa monomeric enzyme from Pseudomonas fluorescens TN5 was purified and characterized. The enzyme catalyzes the oxidative decarboxylation of 6-hydroxynicotinate and depends on O2, NADH and FAD with the holoenzyme containing 1 M of FAD per 1 M of enzyme. The isolated enzyme was used for the synthesis of 2,5-dihydroxypyridine, a precursor for the chemical synthesis of 5-aminolevulinic acid, which is applied as a plant growth hormone, a herbicide and in cancer therapy. A 1.8-kbp DNA fragment, which contains the ORF encoding 6-hydroxynicotinic acid 3-monooxygenase, was cloned, sequenced and expressed in Escherichia coli. The deduced 385 amino acid sequence of the cloned ORF is in agreement with the enzyme molecular mass, amino acid sequence of an internal peptide, contains a putative FAD-binding site and is homologous to similar flavoproteins such as salicylate 1-monoxygenase.  (+info)

Characterization of the pyoluteorin biosynthetic gene cluster of Pseudomonas fluorescens Pf-5. (5/912)

Ten genes (plt) required for the biosynthesis of pyoluteorin, an antifungal compound composed of a bichlorinated pyrrole linked to a resorcinol moiety, were identified within a 24-kb genomic region of Pseudomonas fluorescens Pf-5. The deduced amino acid sequences of eight plt genes were similar to the amino acid sequences of genes with known biosynthetic functions, including type I polyketide synthases (pltB, pltC), an acyl coenzyme A (acyl-CoA) dehydrogenase (pltE), an acyl-CoA synthetase (pltF), a thioesterase (pltG), and three halogenases (pltA, pltD, and pltM). Insertions of the transposon Tn5 or Tn3-nice or a kanamycin resistance gene in each of these genes abolished pyoluteorin production by Pf-5. The presumed functions of the eight plt products are consistent with biochemical transformations involved in pyoluteorin biosynthesis from proline and acetate precursors. Isotope labeling studies demonstrated that proline is the primary precursor to the dichloropyrrole moiety of pyoluteorin. The deduced amino acid sequence of the product of another plt gene, pltR, is similar to those of members of the LysR family of transcriptional activators. pltR and pltM are transcribed divergently from the pltLABCDEFG gene cluster, and a sequence with the characteristics of a LysR binding site was identified within the 486-bp intergenic region separating pltRM from pltLABCDEFG. Transcription of the pyoluteorin biosynthesis genes pltB, pltE, and pltF, assessed with transcriptional fusions to an ice nucleation reporter gene, was significantly greater in Pf-5 than in a pltR mutant of Pf-5. Therefore, PltR is proposed to be a transcriptional activator of linked pyoluteorin biosynthesis genes.  (+info)

Promotion of antibiotic production by high ethanol, high NaCl concentration, or heat shock in Pseudomonas fluorescens S272. (6/912)

A stress imposed by a continuous feed of high ethanol, high NaCl concentration, or a high temperature shock increased antibiotic production by several times in Pseudomonas fluorescens S272. A tentative bioassay showed that the stress caused about 40-fold elevation in the autoinducer activity. Addition of synthetic autoinducers, N-(3-oxododecanoyl)-L-homoserine lactone or N-(3-oxohexanoyl)-L-homoserine lactone at a concentration of more than 100 micrograms/l to a non-stressed culture also increased the antibiotic production by several times. These results suggested that the antibiotic production in P. fluorescens S272 was regulated by N-acyl-homoserine lactone and the promotive effect by stress occurred through any function that increased the autoinducer production.  (+info)

Expression of Escherichia coli K-12 arginine genes in Pseudomonas fluorescens. (7/912)

Escherichia coli argE and argH gene products were detected in Pseudomonas fluorescens argH122 carrying the E. coli F110 plasmid.  (+info)

Identification and characterization of a gene cluster for synthesis of the polyketide antibiotic 2,4-diacetylphloroglucinol from Pseudomonas fluorescens Q2-87. (8/912)

The polyketide metabolite 2,4-diacetylphloroglucinol (2,4-DAPG) is produced by many strains of fluorescent Pseudomonas spp. with biocontrol activity against soilborne fungal plant pathogens. Genes required for 2,4-DAPG synthesis by P. fluorescens Q2-87 are encoded by a 6.5-kb fragment of genomic DNA that can transfer production of 2,4-DAPG to 2,4-DAPG-nonproducing recipient Pseudomonas strains. In this study the nucleotide sequence was determined for the 6.5-kb fragment and flanking regions of genomic DNA from strain Q2-87. Six open reading frames were identified, four of which (phlACBD) comprise an operon that includes a set of three genes (phlACB) conserved between eubacteria and archaebacteria and a gene (phlD) encoding a polyketide synthase with homology to chalcone and stilbene synthases from plants. The biosynthetic operon is flanked on either side by phlE and phlF, which code respectively for putative efflux and regulatory (repressor) proteins. Expression in Escherichia coli of phlA, phlC, phlB, and phlD, individually or in combination, identified a novel polyketide biosynthetic pathway in which PhlD is responsible for the production of monoacetylphloroglucinol (MAPG). PhlA, PhlC, and PhlB are necessary to convert MAPG to 2,4-DAPG, and they also may function in the synthesis of MAPG.  (+info)

  • We investigated the phylogeny of 93 sequenced strains within the Pseudomonas fluorescens complex using state-of-the-art whole-genome sequence-based methods such as the Genome Blast Distance Phylogeny approach. (meier-kolthoff.com)
  • Bioinformatic predictions of RpoN-regulated genes show a close correspondence with phenotypic analyses of RpoN-regulated traits and suggest novel functions for RpoN in P. fluorescens, including regulation of poly(A) polymerase. (ox.ac.uk)
  • The results presented here show that in P. fluorescens, AmrZ determines c-di-GMP levels through the regulation of a complex network of genes encoding DGCs and PDEs. (uea.ac.uk)
  • The Pseudomonas fluorescens pho regulon and its role in modulating biofilm formation in response to environmental cues. (dartmouth.edu)
  • The Pseudomonas fluorescens Pho regulon and its role in modulating biofilm formation in response to environmental cues A Thesis Submitted to the Faculty in partial fulfillment of the requirements of the Degree of Doctor of Philosophy in Microbiology and Immunology by Russell D. Monds DARTMOUTH COLLEGE Hanover, New Hampshire 10th June 2008 Examining Committee: (Chair) George A. O'Toole William T. Wickner Ronald K. Taylor Jack A. Heinemann Charles K. Barlowe, Ph. (dartmouth.edu)
  • The focus of my doctoral studies has been to understand how environmental cues are sensed by P . fluorescens and integrated with mechanisms to regulate an important step in biofilm formation , the transition to committed association with the surface . (dartmouth.edu)
  • Mutations to Pfl5137 were found to inhibit Pho regulon activation and promote biofilm formation by P . fluorescens . (dartmouth.edu)
  • The second goal was an attempt to resolve the complex taxonomic situation at least for subgroups within the bacilli (the genus Geobacillus) and pseudomonads (the Pseudomonas fluorescens group). (ugent.be)
  • As a consequence, members of these groups were often poorly identified based on identification tools with insufficient resolution, and usually only two major species were recognized in the issue of milk spoilage, namely Bacillus cereus and Pseudomonas fluorescens. (ugent.be)
  • The reduced plant colonization ability observed for an rpoN mutant of P. fluorescens is therefore likely to be due to defects in multiple traits including nutrient assimilation, protein secretion and stress tolerance. (ox.ac.uk)
  • In addition, gfp was shown to be an excellent conservative marker for monitoring the root colonization and survival of P. fluorescens BRG100. (usask.ca)
  • Nonetheless, several studies on the identity of bacterial milk flora indicated diversity was much bigger than originally thought, and the dairy product spoilage issue is clearly not a story of Bacillus cereus and Pseudomonas fluorescens alone. (ugent.be)
  • Colony morphology, growth rate in liquid media, weed biocontrol efficacy (plant growth pouch), carbon utilization (Biolog GN) and root colonization of green foxtail by several P. fluorescens BRG100gfp transformants were determined to be the same as the wild type. (usask.ca)
  • These results suggest that Pseudomonas fluorescens BRG100 has considerable potential as a bioherbicide because of its successful root colonization of green foxtail and wheat. (usask.ca)
  • PFE shows highest structural similarity, including the active-site environment, to a family of non-heme bacterial haloperoxidases, with an r.m.s. deviation in 271 C(alpha) atoms between PFE and its five closest structural neighbors averaging 0.8 A. PFE has far less similarity (r.m.s. deviation in 218 C(alpha) atoms of 5.0 A) to P. fluorescens carboxyl esterase. (rcsb.org)
  • The microbicidal activity of four different biocides was studied in synthetic metalworking fluid (MWF) against Mycobacterium immunogenum, a suspected causative agent for hypersensitivity pneumonitis, and Pseudomonas fluorescens, a representative for the predominant gram-negative bacterial contaminants of MWF. (cdc.gov)
  • An oxadiazon-degrading bacterial, Pseudomonas strain CG5, was isolated from an agricultural contaminated soil. (sigmaaldrich.com)
  • Characterization of multicopper oxidase CopA from Pseudomonas putida KT2440 and Pseudomonas fluorescens Pf-5: Involvement in bacterial lignin oxidation. (bioportfolio.com)
  • Coopting the Lap system of Pseudomonas fluorescens to reversibly customize bacterial cell surfaces. (bioportfolio.com)
  • The 16S rDNA sequencing was carried out to correlate the phylogenetic relationship of P. fluorescens with other bacterial species after treatment. (vixra.org)
  • The bacterial strain Pseudomonas fluorescens was isolated by using Kings'B media and Cladosporium sp. (uzh.ch)
  • This study focuses on the role of RpoS, a central regulator of stationary-phase gene expression in bacterial cells, in stress response and environmental fitness of Pseudomonas fluorescens Pf-5. (microbiologyresearch.org)
  • Pseudomonas enters the plant vascular system, reach various parts of the plant system and act as a systematic biocontrol agent against various bacterial and fungal diseases. (jaipurbiofertilizers.com)
  • Tn5 Insertion Mutants of Pseudomonas fluorescens Defective in Adhesion to Soil and Seeds. (nih.gov)
  • Tn5 insertion mutants of a soil isolate, Pseudomonas fluorescens Pf0-1, were selected for decreased ability to adhere to quartz sand in a column assay. (nih.gov)
  • Inoculating the rice rhizosphere with A . brasilense and P. fluorescens greatly improved the ammonification activities in the soil, and the effects were more favorable in the M bp treatment. (springer.com)
  • Co-inoculation with A . brasilense and P. fluorescens in the rice rhizosphere greatly increased the nitrogenase activities in the soil, and inoculating with A . brasilense alone in the rice rhizosphere also showed good results. (springer.com)
  • Inoculating A . brasilense and P. fluorescens in the rice rhizosphere accelerated N transformations and improved the N-supplying capacity of the rhizosphere soil, and increased rice biomass. (springer.com)
  • Biodegradation of oxadiazon by a soil isolated Pseudomonas fluorescens strain CG5: Implementation in an herbicide removal reactor and modelling. (sigmaaldrich.com)
  • Transport of a genetically engineered Pseudomonas fluorescens strain through a soil microcosm. (asm.org)
  • Vertical soil microcosms flushed with groundwater were used to study the influence of water movement on survival and transport of a genetically engineered Pseudomonas fluorescens C5t strain through a loamy sand and a loam soil. (asm.org)
  • The presence of wheat roots growing downward in the microcosms contributed only slightly to the movement of P. fluorescens C5t cells to lower soil regions of the loamy sand microcosms, but enhanced downward transport in the loam microcosms. (asm.org)
  • A Pseudomonas fluorescens DUS1-27 isolate was screened for its effect on Brassica napus L. growth over 14 days in a soil-based system and a hydroponic system. (springer.com)
  • Pseudomonas fluorescens is capable of enhancing the growth of B. napus in a soil-based system, whereas in a hydroponic system its addition leads to growth inhibition due to the increased levels of H 2 O 2 in the system. (springer.com)
  • Treatment of cottonseed with pyoluteorin or with P. fluorescens at the time of planting in P. ultimum-infested soil increased seedling survival from 33 to 65% and from 28 to 71%, respectively. (eurekamag.com)
  • Maize shoot P content, grain yield, yield components, harvest index, grain N and P, soil available P, root colonization percentage and water use efficiency increased significantly with the G. intraradices inoculation and P. fluorescens, alone or in combination under water deficit stress. (orgprints.org)
  • The aim of this present study is to investigate the antimicrobial activity of rhamnolipid biosurfactant produced by Pseudomonas fluorescens MFS03 isolated from mangrove forest soil using groundnut oil cake as substrate. (oalib.com)
  • Pseudomonas fluorescens are Gram-negativ, rod shaped bacteria that inhabit soil, plants, and water surfaces. (agrotekno-lab.com)
  • Pseudomonas fluorescens PFO-1 is well adapted to the soil where it was first isolated in agricultural soil. (agrotekno-lab.com)
  • Pseudomonas fluorescens is a gram negative rod shaped bacterium commonly found in decaying organic material such as leaves, soil, plants and water surfaces. (wikispaces.com)
  • The P solubilized by Pseudomonas fluorescens is more easily taken up by the plants through a mycorrhizae mediated channel between roots and surrounding soil. (organicsoiltechnology.com)
  • Maintain optimum moisture for better multiplication of Pseudomonas spores within the soil. (pjmargo.com)
  • Bioremediation of chromium contaminated soil by Pseudomonas fluorescens and indigenous microorganisms. (bvsalud.org)
  • In this study, the feasibility of remediating chromium contaminated soil using indigenous microorganisms and Pseudomonas fluorescens was evaluated. (bvsalud.org)
  • Sequence analysis of the chromosomal Tn 5lacZ flanking regions of the Pseudomonas fluorescens WCS365 competitive root colonization mutant PCL1206 showed that the Tn 5lacZ is inserted between genes homologous to bioA and potF . (apsnet.org)
  • There were no further cases of P. fluorescens colonization after the contaminated dispenser was removed. (asm.org)
  • Colony morphology, growth rate in liquid media, weed biocontrol efficacy (plant growth pouch), carbon utilization (Biolog GN) and root colonization of green foxtail by several P. fluorescens BRG100gfp transformants were determined to be the same as the wild type. (usask.ca)
  • These results suggest that Pseudomonas fluorescens BRG100 has considerable potential as a bioherbicide because of its successful root colonization of green foxtail and wheat. (usask.ca)
  • In addition, gfp was shown to be an excellent conservative marker for monitoring the root colonization and survival of P. fluorescens BRG100. (usask.ca)
  • The reduced plant colonization ability observed for an rpoN mutant of P. fluorescens is therefore likely to be due to defects in multiple traits including nutrient assimilation, protein secretion and stress tolerance. (ox.ac.uk)
  • AB039476 Pseudomonas fluorescens gyrB gene for DNA gyrase subunit B, partial cds, strain:ATCC 17561. (atcc.org)
  • AB039531 Pseudomonas fluorescens rpoD gene for DNA-directed RNA polymerase subunit D, partial cds, strain:ATCC 17561. (atcc.org)
  • L24790 Pseudomonas fluorescens (ATCC 13525) ribosomal RNA gene fragment. (atcc.org)
  • AF094725 Pseudomonas fluorescens strain ATCC 13525 16S ribosomal RNA gene, partial sequence. (atcc.org)
  • P. fluorescens cells were procured from MicroBioLogics Inc., USA in sealed packs bearing the American Type Culture Collection (ATCC 49838) number and divided in control and treated group. (vixra.org)
  • Phylogenetic and genomic analysis, though, has revealed that the entire phl gene cluster is ancestral to P. fluorescens, many strains have lost the capacity, and it exists on different genomic regions among strains. (wikipedia.org)
  • L13747 Pseudomonas fluorescens p-hydroxy benzoate hydroxylase gene, complete cds. (atcc.org)
  • AF056495 Pseudomonas fluorescens glutaminase-asparaginase precursor, gene, complete cds. (atcc.org)
  • Tn5-B20 (lacZ as reporter gene) transcriptional fusion mutants of Pseudomonas fluorescens R2f Rpr were screened for their response to carbon limitation. (wur.nl)
  • Genomic integrants of P. fluorescens (Pf int1 and Pf int2) containing artificial oxalate operon (plac-FpOAR-oah) and artificial oxalate gene cluster (plac-FpOAR-oah, vgb, egfp) secreted 4.8 mM and 5.4 mM oxalic acid, released 329 mM and 351 mM P, respectively, in alfisol. (psu.edu)
  • CopA is a protein formed as part of a copper resistance operon in Pseudomonas syringae pv tomato, but CopA has also been identified from gene library screening as a potential lignin-oxidising enzyme. (bioportfolio.com)
  • Quantitative real-time PCR was used to determine catalase gene expression levels in both B. napus roots and P. fluorescens . (springer.com)
  • Catalase gene expression in B. napus and P. fluorescens was up-regulated in both organisms when co-cultured in a hydroponic system. (springer.com)
  • Pseudomonas fluorescens is an opportunistic pathogen that can cause ecthyma gangrenosum, which necessitates rapid diagnosis and treatment to prevent mortality. (mdedge.com)
  • NCIMB 10525 produserer ikke alginat, mens Pf201 er en alginatproduserende NCIMB 10525-mutant. (bibsys.no)
  • Optimal temperatures for growth of P. fluorescens are 25-30°C. It tests positive for the oxidase test. (wikipedia.org)
  • In contrast, T3SS mutants were unable to promote mycorrhization, suggesting that type III secretion plays an important role in the mycorrhizal helper effect of P. fluorescens BBc6R8 independent of the promotion of hyphal growth that BBc6R8 exhibits in vitro. (nih.gov)
  • Maximum cyanogenesis by two strains of P. fluorescens in a defined growth medium occurred at 25 to 30 degrees C over a pH range of 6.6 to 8.9. (asm.org)
  • In solid medium, the pyrimidine analogue 5-fluorouracil or 5-fluorouridine could prevent P. fluorescens biotype F growth at a low concentration while a 20-fold higher concentration of 5-fluorocytosine, 5-fluorodeoxyuridine or 6-azauracil was necessary to block its growth. (nih.gov)
  • Pseudomonas fluorescens strain Pf-5, which produces many antifungal metabolites including pyrrolnitrin, inhibited mycelial growth of Pyrenophora tritici-repentis in agar culture and suppressed ascocarp formation by the fungus on axenically infested wheat straw kept moist during incubation. (apsnet.org)
  • Total peroxidase activity and H 2 O 2 levels in the hydroponic growth media were higher in plants inoculated with the P. fluorescens isolate. (springer.com)
  • Belimov A, Dodd I, Safronova V, Hontzeas N, Davies W (2007) Pseudomonas brassicacearum strain Am3 containing 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate deaminase can show both pathogenic and growth-promoting properties in its interaction with tomato. (springer.com)
  • Two concentrations (1% & 2%) of liquid medium grown Pseudomonas fluorescens (3×109 cells/ml) were used in borewell water and the growth performance of the banana plantlets was assessed. (nepjol.info)
  • Biological positive effects of the micro organisms on plant growth, nutrient uptake, grain yield and yield components in maize plants was recorded in the treatment receiving mixed inoculums of G. intraradices and P. fluorescens. (orgprints.org)
  • The highest profitability was observed in the combined treatment of inoculation with G. intraradices and P. fluorescens, which synergistically increased plant growth compared with other treatments. (orgprints.org)
  • The use of the mixture of chitosan 1.5% (w/v) + extract of P. fluorescens 50% (v/v) resulted in 60 and 100% of in vitro inhibition of mycelial growth and conidia germination of A. alternata respectively. (scielo.org.mx)
  • 1) 3-deoxy-3-fluoro-D-glucose cannot serve as a source of carbon for the growth of Ps.fluorescens A.3.12. (bath.ac.uk)
  • Optimal temperatures for growth of Pseudomonas fluorescens are 25-30 degree Celsius. (wikispaces.com)
  • It is well known that Pseudomonas fluorescens, in association with the plant rhizosphere, is able to exert a beneficial effect upon plant growth. (organicsoiltechnology.com)
  • NDLI: Growth of pseudomonas fluorescens on cassava starch hydrolysate for. (iitkgp.ac.in)
  • This study explored whether A . brasilense and P. fluorescens are involved in modifying N transformations, N-supplying capacity, and enzyme activities in the rice rhizosphere, and the performance of rice biomass after inoculation with A . brasilense and P. fluorescens was also evaluated. (springer.com)
  • Rice inoculation was conducted under pot culture conditions in 2014 and 2015, and the experiment included four treatments: a control (CT), rice seedling roots inoculated with A . brasilense (M b ), rice seedling roots inoculated with P. fluorescens (M p ), and rice seedling roots inoculated with a mixture of A . brasilense and P. fluorescens (M bp ). (springer.com)
  • Finally, rice biomass increased greatly after A . brasilense and P. fluorescens inoculation in the rhizosphere. (springer.com)
  • The most beneficial effects were observed with A . brasilense and P. fluorescens co-inoculation in the rice rhizosphere. (springer.com)
  • Multistate outbreak of Pseudomonas fluorescens bloodstream infection after exposure to contaminated heparinized saline flush prepared by a compounding pharmacy. (mdedge.com)
  • Outbreak of Pseudomonas fluorescens bacteremia among oncology patients. (mdedge.com)
  • Outbreak of Pseudomonas fluorescens bloodstream infection in a coronary care unit. (mdedge.com)
  • The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recently described an outbreak of P. fluorescens bacteremia in cancer outpatients for whom syringes with an intravenous heparin catheter flush were being used on implantable venous ports ( 5 ). (asm.org)
  • We experienced a long-lasting outbreak of Pseudomonas fluorescens BSI limited to a coronary care unit (CCU). (ovid.com)
  • The nosocomial outbreak of P fluorescens BSI in our CCU over 2 years was associated with a contaminated ice bath used for CO measurement within the unit. (ovid.com)
  • Pseudomonas fluorescens is a rod-shaped aerobic, non-lactose-fermenting, Gram-negative bacterium ( 2 ). (asm.org)
  • This involved hydrolysis of starch extracted from freshly harvested cassava tubers using enzyme-enzyme method of hydrolysis, followed by aerobic fermentation of Pseudomonas fluorescens on a mixture of the hydrolysate and nutrient media in a fermentor in batch cultures. (iitkgp.ac.in)
  • P. fluorescens cells and biofilms changed their morphology and architecture, as well as the distribution and abundance of biomacromolecules, in particular the exopolymer matrix. (biomedsearch.com)
  • Pseudomonas fluorescens BRG100 produces secondary metabolites with herbicidal activity to the grass weeds wild oat, Avena fatua, and green foxtail, Setaria viridis. (usask.ca)
  • Pseudomonas fluorescens BBc6R8 type III secretion mutants no longer promote ectomycorrhizal symbiosis. (nih.gov)
  • Carbohydrate oxidation by Pseudomonas fluorescens. (wikipedia.org)
Pseudomonas fluorescens infections | GreenMedInfo | Disease | Natural
Pseudomonas fluorescens infections | GreenMedInfo | Disease | Natural (greenmedinfo.com)
SWISS-MODEL Repository | C3K5G7
SWISS-MODEL Repository | C3K5G7 (swissmodel.expasy.org)
Mutations of intermediate effect are responsible for adaptation in evolving Pseudomonas fluorescens populations | Biology...
Mutations of intermediate effect are responsible for adaptation in evolving Pseudomonas fluorescens populations | Biology... (rsbl.royalsocietypublishing.org)
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Purification and properties of pantohenase from Pseudomonas fluorescens | Biochemical Journal (biochemj.org)
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Investigations on the Active Site of Glucose Dehydrogenase from Pseudomonas fluorescens | SpringerLink (link.springer.com)
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RCSB PDB - 1QZ9: The Three Dimensional Structure of Kynureninase from Pseudomonas fluorescens (rcsb.org)
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Russell Monds - Mendeley (mendeley.com)
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Protein production - Wikipedia (en.wikipedia.org)
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Reduce Risk from Water | HAI | CDC (cdc.gov)
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Zeitschrift für Naturforschung C (degruyter.com)
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Intrinsic Fluorescence of Proteins | SpringerLink (link.springer.com)
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Search Results - - 641 Results - Digital Library (digital.library.unt.edu)
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ATCC 17581 Strain Passport - StrainInfo (straininfo.net)
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Bacteria Isolated from Bats Inhibit the Growth of Pseudogymnoascus destructans, the Causative Agent of White-Nose Syndrome (journals.plos.org)
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Noroxin (Norfloxacin): Side Effects, Interactions, Warning, Dosage & Uses (rxlist.com)
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Toxins | Free Full-Text | Microbial Inhibition of Fusarium Pathogens and Biological Modification of Trichothecenes in Cereal... (mdpi.com)
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Levofloxacin Injection Concentrate - FDA prescribing information, side effects and uses (drugs.com)
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Iquix - FDA prescribing information, side effects and uses (drugs.com)
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Levaquin (Levofloxacin): Side Effects, Interactions, Warning, Dosage & Uses (rxlist.com)
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IUCr) Acta Crystallographica Section F Volume 63, Part 5, May 2007 (journals.iucr.org)
A global regulator of secondary metabolite production in Pseudomonas fluorescens Pf-5. | Journal of Bacteriology
A global regulator of secondary metabolite production in Pseudomonas fluorescens Pf-5. | Journal of Bacteriology (jb.asm.org)
BRENDA - Information on Organism Pseudomonas fluorescens
BRENDA - Information on Organism Pseudomonas fluorescens (brenda-enzymes.org)
Effects of Azospirillum brasilense and Pseudomonas fluorescens on nitrogen transformation and enzyme activity in the rice...
Effects of Azospirillum brasilense and Pseudomonas fluorescens on nitrogen transformation and enzyme activity in the rice... (link.springer.com)
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The sigma factor sigma s affects antibiotic production and biological control activity of Pseudomonas fluorescens Pf-5 | PNAS (pnas.org)
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Chemtrails Explained - Putting the Pieces Together (bibliotecapleyades.net)
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DailyMed - LEVOFLOXACIN tablet, film coated (dailymed.nlm.nih.gov)
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Search Federallabs.org | Federal Labs (federallabs.org)
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Polymers | Free Full-Text | Enzyme-Catalyzed Modifications of Polysaccharides and Poly(ethylene glycol) | HTML (mdpi.com)