Myelography: X-ray visualization of the spinal cord following injection of contrast medium into the spinal arachnoid space.Meningocele: A congenital or acquired protrusion of the meninges, unaccompanied by neural tissue, through a bony defect in the skull or vertebral column.Iophendylate: An inert iodine-containing agent which is opaque to X-RAYS. It is used mainly for BRAIN and SPINAL CORD visualization.Arachnoiditis: Acute or chronic inflammation of the arachnoid membrane of the meninges most often involving the spinal cord or base of the brain. This term generally refers to a persistent inflammatory process characterized by thickening of the ARACHNOID membrane and dural adhesions. Associated conditions include prior surgery, infections, trauma, SUBARACHNOID HEMORRHAGE, and chemical irritation. Clinical features vary with the site of inflammation, but include cranial neuropathies, radiculopathies, and myelopathies. (From Joynt, Clinical Neurology, 1997, Ch48, p25)Intracranial Hypotension: Reduction of CEREBROSPINAL FLUID pressure characterized clinically by HEADACHE which is maximal in an upright posture and occasionally by an abducens nerve palsy (see ABDUCENS NERVE DISEASES), neck stiffness, hearing loss (see DEAFNESS); NAUSEA; and other symptoms. This condition may be spontaneous or secondary to SPINAL PUNCTURE; NEUROSURGICAL PROCEDURES; DEHYDRATION; UREMIA; trauma (see also CRANIOCEREBRAL TRAUMA); and other processes. Chronic hypotension may be associated with subdural hematomas (see HEMATOMA, SUBDURAL) or hygromas. (From Semin Neurol 1996 Mar;16(1):5-10; Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, pp637-8)Spinal Cord Compression: Acute and chronic conditions characterized by external mechanical compression of the SPINAL CORD due to extramedullary neoplasm; EPIDURAL ABSCESS; SPINAL FRACTURES; bony deformities of the vertebral bodies; and other conditions. Clinical manifestations vary with the anatomic site of the lesion and may include localized pain, weakness, sensory loss, incontinence, and impotence.Subdural Effusion: Leakage and accumulation of CEREBROSPINAL FLUID in the subdural space which may be associated with an infectious process; CRANIOCEREBRAL TRAUMA; BRAIN NEOPLASMS; INTRACRANIAL HYPOTENSION; and other conditions.Meningism: A condition characterized by neck stiffness, headache, and other symptoms suggestive of meningeal irritation, but without actual inflammation of the meninges (MENINGITIS). Spinal fluid pressure may be elevated but spinal fluid is normal. (DeJong, The Neurologic Examination, 4th ed, p673)Laminectomy: A surgical procedure that entails removing all (laminectomy) or part (laminotomy) of selected vertebral lamina to relieve pressure on the SPINAL CORD and/or SPINAL NERVE ROOTS. Vertebral lamina is the thin flattened posterior wall of vertebral arch that forms the vertebral foramen through which pass the spinal cord and nerve roots.Metrizamide: A solute for density gradient centrifugation offering higher maximum solution density without the problems of increased viscosity. It is also used as a resorbable, non-ionic contrast medium.Spinal Nerve Roots: Paired bundles of NERVE FIBERS entering and leaving the SPINAL CORD at each segment. The dorsal and ventral nerve roots join to form the mixed segmental spinal nerves. The dorsal roots are generally afferent, formed by the central projections of the spinal (dorsal root) ganglia sensory cells, and the ventral roots are efferent, comprising the axons of spinal motor and PREGANGLIONIC AUTONOMIC FIBERS.Spinal Cord Diseases: Pathologic conditions which feature SPINAL CORD damage or dysfunction, including disorders involving the meninges and perimeningeal spaces surrounding the spinal cord. Traumatic injuries, vascular diseases, infections, and inflammatory/autoimmune processes may affect the spinal cord.Brachial Plexus: The large network of nerve fibers which distributes the innervation of the upper extremity. The brachial plexus extends from the neck into the axilla. In humans, the nerves of the plexus usually originate from the lower cervical and the first thoracic spinal cord segments (C5-C8 and T1), but variations are not uncommon.Spinal Canal: The cavity within the SPINAL COLUMN through which the SPINAL CORD passes.Spinal Puncture: Tapping fluid from the subarachnoid space in the lumbar region, usually between the third and fourth lumbar vertebrae.Nerve Compression Syndromes: Mechanical compression of nerves or nerve roots from internal or external causes. These may result in a conduction block to nerve impulses (due to MYELIN SHEATH dysfunction) or axonal loss. The nerve and nerve sheath injuries may be caused by ISCHEMIA; INFLAMMATION; or a direct mechanical effect.Iopamidol: A non-ionic, water-soluble contrast agent which is used in myelography, arthrography, nephroangiography, arteriography, and other radiological procedures.Epidural Space: Space between the dura mater and the walls of the vertebral canal.Radiography, Dual-Energy Scanned Projection: A method of producing a high-quality scan by digitizing and subtracting the images produced by high- and low-energy x-rays.Dura Mater: The outermost of the three MENINGES, a fibrous membrane of connective tissue that covers the brain and the spinal cord.Intervertebral Disc Displacement: An INTERVERTEBRAL DISC in which the nucleus pulposus has protruded through surrounding fibrocartilage. This occurs most frequently in the lower lumbar region.Spinal Stenosis: Narrowing of the spinal canal.Pneumoradiography: Radiography using air, oxygen, or some other gas as a contrast medium.Iothalamic Acid: A contrast medium in diagnostic radiology with properties similar to those of diatrizoic acid. It is used primarily as its sodium and meglumine (IOTHALAMATE MEGLUMINE) salts.Spinal Osteophytosis: Outgrowth of immature bony processes or bone spurs (OSTEOPHYTE) from the VERTEBRAE, reflecting the presence of degenerative disease and calcification. It commonly occurs in cervical and lumbar SPONDYLOSIS.Cervical Vertebrae: The first seven VERTEBRAE of the SPINAL COLUMN, which correspond to the VERTEBRAE of the NECK.Cerebrospinal Fluid: A watery fluid that is continuously produced in the CHOROID PLEXUS and circulates around the surface of the BRAIN; SPINAL CORD; and in the CEREBRAL VENTRICLES.Tomography, X-Ray Computed: Tomography using x-ray transmission and a computer algorithm to reconstruct the image.Brachial Plexus Neuritis: A syndrome associated with inflammation of the BRACHIAL PLEXUS. Clinical features include severe pain in the shoulder region which may be accompanied by MUSCLE WEAKNESS and loss of sensation in the upper extremity. This condition may be associated with VIRUS DISEASES; IMMUNIZATION; SURGERY; heroin use (see HEROIN DEPENDENCE); and other conditions. The term brachial neuralgia generally refers to pain associated with brachial plexus injury. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, pp1355-6)Cerebrospinal Fluid Pressure: Manometric pressure of the CEREBROSPINAL FLUID as measured by lumbar, cerebroventricular, or cisternal puncture. Within the cranial cavity it is called INTRACRANIAL PRESSURE.Neuroleptanalgesia: A form of analgesia accompanied by general quiescence and psychic indifference to environmental stimuli, without loss of consciousness, and produced by the combined administration of a major tranquilizer (neuroleptic) and a narcotic.Arachnoid Cysts: Intracranial or spinal cavities containing a cerebrospinal-like fluid, the wall of which is composed of arachnoidal cells. They are most often developmental or related to trauma. Intracranial arachnoid cysts usually occur adjacent to arachnoidal cistern and may present with HYDROCEPHALUS; HEADACHE; SEIZURES; and focal neurologic signs. (From Joynt, Clinical Neurology, 1994, Ch44, pp105-115)Thoracic Vertebrae: A group of twelve VERTEBRAE connected to the ribs that support the upper trunk region.Syringomyelia: Longitudinal cavities in the spinal cord, most often in the cervical region, which may extend for multiple spinal levels. The cavities are lined by dense, gliogenous tissue and may be associated with SPINAL CORD NEOPLASMS; spinal cord traumatic injuries; and vascular malformations. Syringomyelia is marked clinically by pain and PARESTHESIA, muscular atrophy of the hands, and analgesia with thermoanesthesia of the hands and arms, but with the tactile sense preserved (sensory dissociation). Lower extremity spasticity and incontinence may also develop. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p1269)Spinal NeoplasmsLumbar Vertebrae: VERTEBRAE in the region of the lower BACK below the THORACIC VERTEBRAE and above the SACRAL VERTEBRAE.Iohexol: An effective non-ionic, water-soluble contrast agent which is used in myelography, arthrography, nephroangiography, arteriography, and other radiographic procedures. Its low systemic toxicity is the combined result of low chemotoxicity and low osmolality.Spinal Cord Neoplasms: Benign and malignant neoplasms which occur within the substance of the spinal cord (intramedullary neoplasms) or in the space between the dura and spinal cord (intradural extramedullary neoplasms). The majority of intramedullary spinal tumors are primary CNS neoplasms including ASTROCYTOMA; EPENDYMOMA; and LIPOMA. Intramedullary neoplasms are often associated with SYRINGOMYELIA. The most frequent histologic types of intradural-extramedullary tumors are MENINGIOMA and NEUROFIBROMA.Cauda Equina: The lower part of the SPINAL CORD consisting of the lumbar, sacral, and coccygeal nerve roots.Meningomyelocele: Congenital, or rarely acquired, herniation of meningeal and spinal cord tissue through a bony defect in the vertebral column. The majority of these defects occur in the lumbosacral region. Clinical features include PARAPLEGIA, loss of sensation in the lower body, and incontinence. This condition may be associated with the ARNOLD-CHIARI MALFORMATION and HYDROCEPHALUS. (From Joynt, Clinical Neurology, 1992, Ch55, pp35-6)Subarachnoid Space: The space between the arachnoid membrane and PIA MATER, filled with CEREBROSPINAL FLUID. It contains large blood vessels that supply the BRAIN and SPINAL CORD.Magnetic Resonance Imaging: Non-invasive method of demonstrating internal anatomy based on the principle that atomic nuclei in a strong magnetic field absorb pulses of radiofrequency energy and emit them as radiowaves which can be reconstructed into computerized images. The concept includes proton spin tomographic techniques.Blood Patch, Epidural: The injection of autologous blood into the epidural space either as a prophylactic treatment immediately following an epidural puncture or for treatment of headache as a result of an epidural puncture.Spinal DiseasesParesthesia: Subjective cutaneous sensations (e.g., cold, warmth, tingling, pressure, etc.) that are experienced spontaneously in the absence of stimulation.Headache: The symptom of PAIN in the cranial region. It may be an isolated benign occurrence or manifestation of a wide variety of HEADACHE DISORDERS.Inpatients: Persons admitted to health facilities which provide board and room, for the purpose of observation, care, diagnosis or treatment.MaineSouth Australia: A state in south central Australia. Its capital is Adelaide. It was probably first visited by F. Thyssen in 1627. Later discoveries in 1802 and 1830 opened up the southern part. It became a British province in 1836 with this self-descriptive name and became a state in 1901. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p1135)Glycopyrrolate: A muscarinic antagonist used as an antispasmodic, in some disorders of the gastrointestinal tract, and to reduce salivation with some anesthetics.Oxymorphone: An opioid analgesic with actions and uses similar to those of MORPHINE, apart from an absence of cough suppressant activity. It is used in the treatment of moderate to severe pain, including pain in obstetrics. It may also be used as an adjunct to anesthesia. (From Martindale, The Extra Pharmacopoeia, 30th ed, p1092)Fourth Ventricle: An irregularly shaped cavity in the RHOMBENCEPHALON, located between the MEDULLA OBLONGATA; the PONS; and the isthmus in front, and the CEREBELLUM behind. It is continuous with the central canal of the cord below and with the CEREBRAL AQUEDUCT above, and through its lateral and median apertures it communicates with the SUBARACHNOID SPACE.Dog Diseases: Diseases of the domestic dog (Canis familiaris). This term does not include diseases of wild dogs, WOLVES; FOXES; and other Canidae for which the heading CARNIVORA is used.
... myelography, CT-myelography, discography, and CT-discography". Spine. 14 (12): 1356-61. doi:10.1097/00007632-198912000-00012. ... or myelography. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a medical imaging technique used in radiology to visualize the internal ...
Jinkins JR (June 2013). "Large volume full columnar lumbar myelography". Neuroradiology. 29 (4): 371-3. PMC 3627420 . Berti M, ...
Pseudomeningocele can be shown on cervical myelography. On the other hand, through central mechanism, the head and neck is ...
... failing to have myelography carried out before traction was applied; applying traction when there was a likelihood of tethering ...
Often, myelography prior to the introduction of Metrizamide was the cause of arachnoiditis. It can also be caused by the long ... Myelography is inadequate to completely evaluate the patient for recurrent disc disease, and CT or MRI scanning is necessary. ... This effect was very clear in patients with total block in the preoperative myelography. The surgical result of a patient with ... In the days of CT scanning and Pantopaque and later, Metrizamide myelography, the presence of arachnoiditis could be speculated ...
Also, with the advent of MRI, myelography became much less-commonly performed. Modern iodinated contrast agents - especially ... which was an iodinated oil-based substance that was commonly used in myelography. Due to it being oil-based, it was recommended ...
"Heavily T2-weighted MR myelography vs CT myelography in spontaneous intracranial hypotension". Neurology. 73 (22): 1892-8. doi: ... An alternate method of locating the site of a CSF leak is to use heavily T2-weighted MR myelography. This has been effective in ... Another highly successful method of locating a CSF leak is intrathecal contrast and MR Myelography. When cranial CSF leak is ...
Less commonly used are myelography, positron emission tomography (PET), and diagnostic angiography. Lumbar puncture (LP) and ...
MRI, CT and myelography are all ineffective at localizing the at-fault level. The typical degenerative changes seen on most ...
... is a molecule that was used as a radiocontrast agent, typically for performing myelography studies. It was marketed ... Also, with the advent of MRI, myelography studies are nowadays much less-frequently performed. Dunlevy, Sue (10 December 2016 ... and as such it was recommended that the physician remove it from the patient at the end of the myelography study, which was a ...
da Costa R, Parent J, Dobson H, Holmberg D, Partlow G (2006). "Comparison of magnetic resonance imaging and myelography in 18 ...
A lumbar puncture can be performed after the MRI or at the time of CT myelography. Corticosteroids are often given in high ...
CT myelography). Electromyogram and Nerve conduction studies (EMG/NCS): These tests measure the electrical impulse along nerve ...
Other types of tests that could be used are cranial CT, cranial MRI, spinal MRI, and CT myelography. A cranial MRI can be ...
When this occurs, an intrathecal myelography contrast is conducted with the CT scan to fix the abnormal contrast. A CT scan can ...
Myelography is used to confirm the diagnosis of AVMs and it shows 'snake-like' vessels on the cord's surface. If the myelogram ...
Urografin is not to be used for myelography, ventriculography or cisternography, since it is likely to provoke neurotoxic ...
Historically, Lipiodol was the first iodinated contrast agent (used for myelography by two French physicians, Jacques Forestier ...
Historically Metrizamide replaced Pantopaque as the contrast agent of choice for Myelography (an X-ray study of the spine now ...
579-580 J. Hennig; H. Friedburg; B. Strobel (1986), "Rapid nontomographic approach to MR myelography without contrast agents" ( ...
CT and CT myelography are other options and were used prior to the advent of MRI, but they characterize syringomyelia and other ...
... or from contrast media used in myelography prior to the introduction of Metrizamide. Other noninfectious inflammatory processes ...
... myelography etc. was established in 1954 Child guidance clinic in 1950 Rural mental health clinic at Mander in 1967 ...
The cisternal tap may be used in myelography when the upper margin of a spinal block needs to be defined, however, magnetic ...
Epidural myelography: a pioneering technique for evaluating spine problems in the pre-axial tomography days (1965) Lord Riddell ...
Although cine MRI has been found to be superior to myelography or CT-myelography, it fails to identify the location of the ... CT-myelography has traditionally been the most frequently used diagnostic test for syringomyelia.17 The technique is no longer ... In this subgroup, myelography only identified the point of blockage in 2 patients, whereas cine MRI detected blockage in 33; no ... myelography). All these scenarios have a common pathogenic mechanism: obstruction of normal CSF circulation. ...
Heavily T2-weighted MR myelography vs CT myelography in spontaneous intracranial hypotension. Neurology 2009;73:1892-8. ... Further, MRI cisternography/myelography for CSF leak localisation can be added with ease. Currently, the medical practice in ... Computed tomography myelography and radionuclide cisternography are available locally but seldom performed. These are more ... Magnetic resonance imaging cisternography or myelography can be easily added to routine MRI examination. Using a heavy T2- ...
Myelography, Bone scan, CT scan, XR S S-RT or RT-S (17%) RT alone: 25-40/10-20# (83%) 46% OS , 6 mos 20% , 2 mos 5% had ... Myelography, Bone scan, CT scan, XR S S-RT or RT-S (17%) RT alone: 25-40/10-20# (83%) 46% OS , 6 mos 20% , 2 mos 5% had ... Myelography, Bone scan, CT scan, XR S S-RT or RT-S (17%) RT alone: 25-40/10-20# (83%) 46% OS , 6 mos 20% , 2 mos 5% had ... Complete myelography (Dexamethasone 100 mg, then 24 mg QID x 3 days then tapered, RT) Median RT dose: 30 Gy/10# + for OS: ...
Myelography punction Conventional myelography in oblique projection. You can see the individual nerve root sheaths. Computed ... Today, myelography has largely been replaced by the use of MRI scans, although the technique is still sometimes used under ... Myelography is a type of radiographic examination that uses a contrast medium to detect pathology of the spinal cord, including ... This led to extensive litigation around the world since the substance was administered to millions of myelography patients over ...
myelography synonyms, myelography pronunciation, myelography translation, English dictionary definition of myelography. n. An x ... myelography. Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.. Related to myelography: lumbar puncture, ... Myelography - definition of myelography by The Free Dictionary https://www.thefreedictionary.com/myelography ... Myelography can show the location and extent of a CSF leak.. Transferrin isoforms in cerebrospinal fluid and their relation to ...
Myelography is an imaging test that checks for problems in the spinal canal. The test is done using a type of x-ray called ... What happens during myelography?. A myelography may be done at a radiology center or in the radiology department of a hospital ... What is myelography?. Myelography, also called a myelogram, is an imaging test that checks for problems in your spinal canal. ... Why do I need myelography?. You may need this test if you have symptoms of a spinal disorder, such as:. *Pain in the back, neck ...
Care guide for Computed Tomographic Myelography (Inpatient Care). Includes: possible causes, signs and symptoms, standard ... CT myelography may increase your risk for a headache, neck or back pain, nausea, or vomiting. You may have bleeding, or spinal ... Computed tomographic (CT) myelography is a procedure to examine your spinal canal. Contrast dye is used to help healthcare ... Learn more about Computed Tomographic Myelography (Inpatient Care). Micromedex® Care Notes. *Cardiac Computerized Axial ...
Free flashcards to help memorize facts about advanced positioning myelography. Other activities to help include hangman, ... adv pos myelography. advanced positioning myelography. Question. Answer. Myelography the radiographic study of CNS structures ... Contrast is injected where during myelography? the subarachnoid space. What interspace is used for the needle placement? L2-L3 ... Contraindications for myelography blood in the CSF, arachnoiditis, increased ICP, recent LP. ...
Often, your doctor will perform a CT scan after myelography. This is to see the spread of the contrast dye. ... Myelography. Radiology Info-Radiological Society of North America website. Available at: https://www.radiologyinfo.org/en/info. ... cfm?pg=myelography&bhcp=1. Updated January 23, 2017. Accessed December 18, 2017 ...
Learn more about Myelography at Doctors Hospital of Augusta DefinitionReasons for ProcedurePossible ComplicationsWhat to ... Often, your doctor will perform a CT scan after myelography. This is to see the spread of the contrast dye. ... Myelography. Radiological Society of North America Radiology Info website. Available at: http://www.radiologyinfo.org/en/info. ... cfm?pg=myelography&bhcp=1. Updated June 14, 2013. Accessed December 18, 2014. ...
ASYSTOLE ASSOCIATED WITH IOHEXOL MYELOGRAPHY IN A DOG. Authors. *. Gwendolyn L. Carroll MS, DVM,. Corresponding author. * ... Ronaldo C. da Costa, Joane M. Parent, Howard Dobson, Incidence of and risk factors for seizures after myelography performed ... Risk factors associated with development of seizures after use of iohexol for myelography in dogs: 182 cases (1998), Journal of ...
Infrared thermographic imaging, magnetic resonance imaging, CT scan and myelography in low back pain.. Thomas D1, Cullum D, ... All 19 cases with radicular involvement on CT and all 18 with radicular involvement on myelography demonstrated significant leg ... and myelography in 80%. IRT correlated with MRI in 94% of cases, and with CT in 87% of cases. Of 22 MRI positive disc and root ...
Intraoperative Myelography in Cervical Multilevel Stenosis Using 3D Rotational Fluoroscopy: Assessment of Feasibility and Image ... "Intraoperative Myelography in Cervical Multilevel Stenosis Using 3D Rotational Fluoroscopy: Assessment of Feasibility and Image ...
Intraoperative myelography during LLIF is able to assess adequacy of indirect canal decompression for DLSS, thus promising ... Intraoperative Myelography in Transpsoas Lateral Lumbar Interbody Fusion for Degenerative Lumbar Spinal Stenosis: A Preliminary ... All patients underwent LLIF and subsequently received intraoperative myelography to determine the effect of indirect spinal ... To investigate the feasibility and effectiveness of intraoperative myelography in determining adequacy of indirect spinal canal ...
Coloured sagittal computed tomography (CT) myelography (contrast medium) scan of the thoracic spinal cord of a 34-year-old ... Coloured sagittal computed tomography (CT) myelography (contrast medium) scan of the thoracic spinal cord of a 34-year-old ...
The site of the tear was not adequately defined by myelography, postmyelography CT, or dynamic CT myelography, but digital ... Localization of a Rapid CSF Leak with Digital Subtraction Myelography. J.M. Hoxworth, A.C. Patel, E.P. Bosch and K.D. Nelson ... Dynamic CT myelography has been used to overcome this problem1 but still has temporal limitations inherent to the volume of ... Digital subtraction myelography is a useful tool as an adjunct to the more commonly accepted imaging techniques to evaluate ...
Get exceptional Myelography services from highly experienced & loving pet care professionals in Mesa, AZ. Visit VCA Animal ... CT Myelography. CT myelography is often done following standard myelography. CT provides exquisite spatial resolution. The ... Myelography. Myelography is a contrast iodinated radiographic study used to highlight the spinal cord within the vertebral ... Our Neurology services include: Brain and Spinal MRI, CT Myelography, CT scan (brain, bullae, skull, spine), Myelography, ...
Myelography Neck Muscles Paresis Respiration Seizures Spasm Spinal Cord Subarachnoid Space Urination ... Some authors have advocated the use of new contrast media, Conray(Meglumine iothalamate), Dimer-X, for the lumbar myelography ... After recovery from the anesthesia, myelography was performed by lumbar subarachnoid injection of Conray by variations in ... spinal cord including the dura and the nerve roots were taken for the pathologic study in variable durations after myelography ...
Oil myelography was gradually replaced by water soluble contrast agent myelography and, in recent years, by non-invasive CT and ... Myelography and Neurotoxic Substances. A Myelography Retrospective: From Innovative Technique to Obsolescent Technology. The ... Water-Soluble Myelography. It must be recognized today that the effort by Scandinavian radiologists to develop safer ... Myelography, is an invasive diagnostic test in which a substance, radio-opaque on x-ray, is placed in the subarachnoid space ...
It Is Not Necessary to Discontinue Seizure Threshold-Lowering Medications Prior to Myelography. M. Krupa, H. Salts and F. ... RESULTS: A total of 311 patients underwent myelography during 2016. One hundred eleven patients (36%) were on at least 1 ... Decubitus CT Myelography for Detecting Subtle CSF Leaks in Spontaneous Intracranial Hypotension ... BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: There is no consensus on whether patients undergoing myelography should discontinue medications that ...
cervical spondylosis; computerized tomography myelography; intramedullary cavitation; spinal cord compression Page Count: 363- ... myelography. These high-density areas are believed to represent cavities or areas of cystic necrosis. In all seven cases the ...
CT-myelography (myelo-CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for the diagnosis of lumbar herniated nucleus pulposus (HNP) is ... A comparison of computed tomography (CT), myelography, CT-myelography, and magnetic resonance imaging Spine (Phila Pa 1976). ... The accuracy of computed tomography (CT), myelography, CT-myelography (myelo-CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for the ... and myelography (44.1%). In that subset of 19 patients who had prior surgery, myelography was the most accurate means of ...
Hoxworth JMTrentman TLKotsenas ALThielen KRNelson KDDodick DW: The role of digital subtraction myelography in the diagnosis and ... Hoxworth JMTrentman TLKotsenas ALThielen KRNelson KDDodick DW: The role of digital subtraction myelography in the diagnosis and ... Hoxworth JMPatel ACBosch EPNelson KD: Localization of a rapid CSF leak with digital subtraction myelography. AJNR Am J ... Hoxworth JMPatel ACBosch EPNelson KD: Localization of a rapid CSF leak with digital subtraction myelography. AJNR Am J ...
Five of them had myelography after an abnormal result. The estimated annual direct cost of myelography in the unit was at least ... request to myelography and from myelography to discharge was nought, one and three days respectively. The proportion of ... The role of ancillary investigations and their effect on myelography was unclear. Only 16 of the patients with suspected cord ... A prospective audit of the use and costs of myelography in a regional neuroscience unit. ...
... uses the same technology as radiography, but is specific to the neck and back and utilizes a dye to highlight and ... Myelography is used to evaluate a variety of conditions such as herniated disks, spinal tumors, vascular malformations (blood ... Myelography is no longer routinely used at the Veterinary Neurological Center because the alternative, MRI, is non-invasive, ...
  • DR 800's robust and reliable solution can handle a full range of radiography (including static exams and tilting exams), fluoroscopy exams (including barium meals, swallows and enemas, arthrograms and cysto-urethrograms, myelography and catheter placement, etc.), as well as tomosynthesis exams, concluded the company. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • Rarely, myelography results in inflammation of the arachnoid membranes around the spinal nerves (arachnoiditis), which may cause chronic pain and paresthesias in the lower back and extremities. (merckmanuals.com)
  • The purpose of this study was to document the most commonly prescribed seizure threshold-lowering medications in patients undergoing myelography and determine whether withholding such medications decreases the incidence of seizures. (ajnr.org)
  • Continuing seizure threshold-lowering medications during myelography does not increase the risk of seizures. (ajnr.org)
  • Objective - To investigate the frequency of seizures associated with acepromazine administration when used as a premedicant with methadone for dogs undergoing myelography. (edu.au)
  • Conclusions - The administration of acepromazine combined with methadone as a premedicant used with propofol and isoflurane anesthesia did not significantly increase the frequency of seizures following myelography compared to dogs who received methadone alone. (edu.au)
  • CONCLUSIONS: CT is a more sensitive imaging technique than myelography for localizing disc extrusions when compared to a reference standard of CT myelography. (avmi.net)
  • The authors describe seven cases of cervical spondylosis in which small high-density areas were detected in the spinal cord on delayed computerized tomographic (CT) myelography. (thejns.org)
  • A prospective comparison was made of standard two-dimensional MRI sequences, at both high and midfield strength, with CT myelography in 23 patients with cervical spondylosis. (worktribe.com)