Hernia: Protrusion of tissue, structure, or part of an organ through the bone, muscular tissue, or the membrane by which it is normally contained. Hernia may involve tissues such as the ABDOMINAL WALL or the respiratory DIAPHRAGM. Hernias may be internal, external, congenital, or acquired.Hernia, Inguinal: An abdominal hernia with an external bulge in the GROIN region. It can be classified by the location of herniation. Indirect inguinal hernias occur through the internal inguinal ring. Direct inguinal hernias occur through defects in the ABDOMINAL WALL (transversalis fascia) in Hesselbach's triangle. The former type is commonly seen in children and young adults; the latter in adults.Hernia, Diaphragmatic: Protrusion of abdominal structures into the THORAX as a result of congenital or traumatic defects in the respiratory DIAPHRAGM.Hernia, Ventral: A hernia caused by weakness of the anterior ABDOMINAL WALL due to midline defects, previous incisions, or increased intra-abdominal pressure. Ventral hernias include UMBILICAL HERNIA, incisional, epigastric, and spigelian hernias.Hernia, Abdominal: A protrusion of abdominal structures through the retaining ABDOMINAL WALL. It involves two parts: an opening in the abdominal wall, and a hernia sac consisting of PERITONEUM and abdominal contents. Abdominal hernias include groin hernia (HERNIA, FEMORAL; HERNIA, INGUINAL) and VENTRAL HERNIA.Hernia, Hiatal: STOMACH herniation located at or near the diaphragmatic opening for the ESOPHAGUS, the esophageal hiatus.Hernia, Femoral: A groin hernia occurring inferior to the inguinal ligament and medial to the FEMORAL VEIN and FEMORAL ARTERY. The femoral hernia sac has a small neck but may enlarge considerably when it enters the subcutaneous tissue of the thigh. It is caused by defects in the ABDOMINAL WALL.Hernia, Umbilical: A HERNIA due to an imperfect closure or weakness of the umbilical ring. It appears as a skin-covered protrusion at the UMBILICUS during crying, coughing, or straining. The hernia generally consists of OMENTUM or SMALL INTESTINE. The vast majority of umbilical hernias are congenital but can be acquired due to severe abdominal distention.Herniorrhaphy: Surgical procedures undertaken to repair abnormal openings through which tissue or parts of organs can protrude or are already protruding.Surgical Mesh: Any woven or knit material of open texture used in surgery for the repair, reconstruction, or substitution of tissue. The mesh is usually a synthetic fabric made of various polymers. It is occasionally made of metal.Cell Surface Extensions: Specialized structures of the cell that extend the cell membrane and project out from the cell surface.Hernia, Diaphragmatic, Traumatic: The type of DIAPHRAGMATIC HERNIA caused by TRAUMA or injury, usually to the ABDOMEN.Pseudopodia: A dynamic actin-rich extension of the surface of an animal cell used for locomotion or prehension of food.Hernia, Obturator: A pelvic hernia through the obturator foramen, a large aperture in the hip bone normally covered by a membrane. Obturator hernia can lead to intestinal incarceration and INTESTINAL OBSTRUCTION.Polypropylenes: Propylene or propene polymers. Thermoplastics that can be extruded into fibers, films or solid forms. They are used as a copolymer in plastics, especially polyethylene. The fibers are used for fabrics, filters and surgical sutures.Laparoscopy: A procedure in which a laparoscope (LAPAROSCOPES) is inserted through a small incision near the navel to examine the abdominal and pelvic organs in the PERITONEAL CAVITY. If appropriate, biopsy or surgery can be performed during laparoscopy.Abdominal Wall: The outer margins of the ABDOMEN, extending from the osteocartilaginous thoracic cage to the PELVIS. Though its major part is muscular, the abdominal wall consists of at least seven layers: the SKIN, subcutaneous fat, deep FASCIA; ABDOMINAL MUSCLES, transversalis fascia, extraperitoneal fat, and the parietal PERITONEUM.Actins: Filamentous proteins that are the main constituent of the thin filaments of muscle fibers. The filaments (known also as filamentous or F-actin) can be dissociated into their globular subunits; each subunit is composed of a single polypeptide 375 amino acids long. This is known as globular or G-actin. In conjunction with MYOSINS, actin is responsible for the contraction and relaxation of muscle.Cell Movement: The movement of cells from one location to another. Distinguish from CYTOKINESIS which is the process of dividing the CYTOPLASM of a cell.Fascia: Layers of connective tissue of variable thickness. The superficial fascia is found immediately below the skin; the deep fascia invests MUSCLES, nerves, and other organs.Suture Techniques: Techniques for securing together the edges of a wound, with loops of thread or similar materials (SUTURES).Sutures: Materials used in closing a surgical or traumatic wound. (From Dorland, 28th ed)Intestinal Obstruction: Any impairment, arrest, or reversal of the normal flow of INTESTINAL CONTENTS toward the ANAL CANAL.Laparotomy: Incision into the side of the abdomen between the ribs and pelvis.Postoperative Complications: Pathologic processes that affect patients after a surgical procedure. They may or may not be related to the disease for which the surgery was done, and they may or may not be direct results of the surgery.Surgical Stomas: Artificial openings created by a surgeon for therapeutic reasons. Most often this refers to openings from the GASTROINTESTINAL TRACT through the ABDOMINAL WALL to the outside of the body. It can also refer to the two ends of a surgical anastomosis.Groin: The external junctural region between the lower part of the abdomen and the thigh.Actin Cytoskeleton: Fibers composed of MICROFILAMENT PROTEINS, which are predominately ACTIN. They are the smallest of the cytoskeletal filaments.Actin-Related Protein 2-3 Complex: A complex of seven proteins including ARP2 PROTEIN and ARP3 PROTEIN that plays an essential role in maintenance and assembly of the CYTOSKELETON. Arp2-3 complex binds WASP PROTEIN and existing ACTIN FILAMENTS, and it nucleates the formation of new branch point filaments.Cytoskeleton: The network of filaments, tubules, and interconnecting filamentous bridges which give shape, structure, and organization to the cytoplasm.rac1 GTP-Binding Protein: A rac GTP-binding protein involved in regulating actin filaments at the plasma membrane. It controls the development of filopodia and lamellipodia in cells and thereby influences cellular motility and adhesion. It is also involved in activation of NADPH OXIDASE. This enzyme was formerly listed as EC 3.6.1.47.Recurrence: The return of a sign, symptom, or disease after a remission.Prognathism: A condition marked by abnormal protrusion of the mandible. (Dorland, 27th ed)Microfilament Proteins: Monomeric subunits of primarily globular ACTIN and found in the cytoplasmic matrix of almost all cells. They are often associated with microtubules and may play a role in cytoskeletal function and/or mediate movement of the cell or the organelles within the cell.Wiskott-Aldrich Syndrome Protein Family: A family of microfilament proteins whose name derives from the fact that mutations in members of this protein family have been associated with WISKOTT-ALDRICH SYNDROME. They are involved in ACTIN polymerization and contain a polyproline-rich region that binds to PROFILIN, and a verprolin homology domain that binds G-ACTIN.Cell Shape: The quality of surface form or outline of CELLS.cdc42 GTP-Binding Protein: A member of the Rho family of MONOMERIC GTP-BINDING PROTEINS. It is associated with a diverse array of cellular functions including cytoskeletal changes, filopodia formation and transport through the GOLGI APPARATUS. This enzyme was formerly listed as EC 3.6.1.47.Anesthesia, Local: A blocking of nerve conduction to a specific area by an injection of an anesthetic agent.Treatment Outcome: Evaluation undertaken to assess the results or consequences of management and procedures used in combating disease in order to determine the efficacy, effectiveness, safety, and practicability of these interventions in individual cases or series.Cell Adhesion: Adherence of cells to surfaces or to other cells.Rectus Abdominis: A long flat muscle that extends along the whole length of both sides of the abdomen. It flexes the vertebral column, particularly the lumbar portion; it also tenses the anterior abdominal wall and assists in compressing the abdominal contents. It is frequently the site of hematomas. In reconstructive surgery it is often used for the creation of myocutaneous flaps. (From Gray's Anatomy, 30th American ed, p491)Cell Membrane: The lipid- and protein-containing, selectively permeable membrane that surrounds the cytoplasm in prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells.Ambulatory Surgical Procedures: Surgery performed on an outpatient basis. It may be hospital-based or performed in an office or surgicenter.Microscopy, Video: Microscopy in which television cameras are used to brighten magnified images that are otherwise too dark to be seen with the naked eye. It is used frequently in TELEPATHOLOGY.Tongue: A muscular organ in the mouth that is covered with pink tissue called mucosa, tiny bumps called papillae, and thousands of taste buds. The tongue is anchored to the mouth and is vital for chewing, swallowing, and for speech.Pain, Postoperative: Pain during the period after surgery.Intervertebral Disc Displacement: An INTERVERTEBRAL DISC in which the nucleus pulposus has protruded through surrounding fibrocartilage. This occurs most frequently in the lower lumbar region.Actin Depolymerizing Factors: A family of low MOLECULAR WEIGHT actin-binding proteins found throughout eukaryotes. They remodel the actin CYTOSKELETON by severing ACTIN FILAMENTS and increasing the rate of monomer dissociation.Round Ligament: A fibromuscular band that attaches to the UTERUS and then passes along the BROAD LIGAMENT, out through the INGUINAL RING, and into the labium majus.Microscopy, Electron, Scanning: Microscopy in which the object is examined directly by an electron beam scanning the specimen point-by-point. The image is constructed by detecting the products of specimen interactions that are projected above the plane of the sample, such as backscattered electrons. Although SCANNING TRANSMISSION ELECTRON MICROSCOPY also scans the specimen point by point with the electron beam, the image is constructed by detecting the electrons, or their interaction products that are transmitted through the sample plane, so that is a form of TRANSMISSION ELECTRON MICROSCOPY.Actin-Related Protein 2: A PROFILIN binding domain protein that is part of the Arp2-3 complex. It is related in sequence and structure to ACTIN and binds ATP.Mandibular Advancement: Moving a retruded mandible forward to a normal position. It is commonly performed for malocclusion and retrognathia. (From Jablonski's Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992)Occlusal Splints: Rigid or flexible appliances that overlay the occlusal surfaces of the teeth. They are used to treat clenching and bruxism and their sequelae, and to provide temporary relief from muscle or temporomandibular joint pain.Surgical Procedures, Operative: Operations carried out for the correction of deformities and defects, repair of injuries, and diagnosis and cure of certain diseases. (Taber, 18th ed.)Phenyl Ethers: Ethers that are linked to a benzene ring structure.rac GTP-Binding Proteins: A sub-family of RHO GTP-BINDING PROTEINS that is involved in regulating the organization of cytoskeletal filaments. This enzyme was formerly listed as EC 3.6.1.47.Cortactin: A microfilament protein that interacts with F-ACTIN and regulates cortical actin assembly and organization. It is also an SH3 DOMAIN containing phosphoprotein, and it mediates tyrosine PHOSPHORYLATION based SIGNAL TRANSDUCTION by PROTO-ONCOGENE PROTEIN PP60(C-SRC).Cell Polarity: Orientation of intracellular structures especially with respect to the apical and basolateral domains of the plasma membrane. Polarized cells must direct proteins from the Golgi apparatus to the appropriate domain since tight junctions prevent proteins from diffusing between the two domains.Fundoplication: Mobilization of the lower end of the esophagus and plication of the fundus of the stomach around it (fundic wrapping) in the treatment of GASTROESOPHAGEAL REFLUX that may be associated with various disorders, such as hiatal hernia. (From Dorland, 28th ed)Gastroesophageal Reflux: Retrograde flow of gastric juice (GASTRIC ACID) and/or duodenal contents (BILE ACIDS; PANCREATIC JUICE) into the distal ESOPHAGUS, commonly due to incompetence of the LOWER ESOPHAGEAL SPHINCTER.Retrospective Studies: Studies used to test etiologic hypotheses in which inferences about an exposure to putative causal factors are derived from data relating to characteristics of persons under study or to events or experiences in their past. The essential feature is that some of the persons under study have the disease or outcome of interest and their characteristics are compared with those of unaffected persons.Focal Adhesions: An anchoring junction of the cell to a non-cellular substrate. It is composed of a specialized area of the plasma membrane where bundles of the ACTIN CYTOSKELETON terminate and attach to the transmembrane linkers, INTEGRINS, which in turn attach through their extracellular domains to EXTRACELLULAR MATRIX PROTEINS.Surgical Wound Dehiscence: Pathologic process consisting of a partial or complete disruption of the layers of a surgical wound.Jaw: Bony structure of the mouth that holds the teeth. It consists of the MANDIBLE and the MAXILLA.Testicular Hydrocele: Accumulation of serous fluid between the layers of membrane (tunica vaginalis) covering the TESTIS in the SCROTUM.Follow-Up Studies: Studies in which individuals or populations are followed to assess the outcome of exposures, procedures, or effects of a characteristic, e.g., occurrence of disease.Laparoscopes: ENDOSCOPES for examining the abdominal and pelvic organs in the peritoneal cavity.Microscopy, Fluorescence: Microscopy of specimens stained with fluorescent dye (usually fluorescein isothiocyanate) or of naturally fluorescent materials, which emit light when exposed to ultraviolet or blue light. Immunofluorescence microscopy utilizes antibodies that are labeled with fluorescent dye.Models, Biological: Theoretical representations that simulate the behavior or activity of biological processes or diseases. For disease models in living animals, DISEASE MODELS, ANIMAL is available. Biological models include the use of mathematical equations, computers, and other electronic equipment.Actin-Related Protein 3: A component of the Arp2-3 complex that is related in sequence and structure to ACTIN and that binds ATP. It is expressed at higher levels than ARP2 PROTEIN and does not contain a PROFILIN binding domain.Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Fetal Diseases: Pathophysiological conditions of the FETUS in the UTERUS. Some fetal diseases may be treated with FETAL THERAPIES.Cell Membrane Structures: Structures which are part of the CELL MEMBRANE or have cell membrane as a major part of their structure.Jaw Relation Record: A registration of any positional relationship of the mandible in reference to the maxillae. These records may be any of the many vertical, horizontal, or orientation relations. (Jablonski, Illustrated Dictionary of Dentistry)Cephalometry: The measurement of the dimensions of the HEAD.Reoperation: A repeat operation for the same condition in the same patient due to disease progression or recurrence, or as followup to failed previous surgery.Tomography, X-Ray Computed: Tomography using x-ray transmission and a computer algorithm to reconstruct the image.Wiskott-Aldrich Syndrome Protein, Neuronal: A member of the Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein family that is found at high levels in NERVE CELLS. It interacts with GRB2 ADAPTOR PROTEIN and with CDC42 PROTEIN.rhoA GTP-Binding Protein: A RHO GTP-BINDING PROTEIN involved in regulating signal transduction pathways that control assembly of focal adhesions and actin stress fibers. This enzyme was formerly listed as EC 3.6.1.47.Colostomy: The surgical construction of an opening between the colon and the surface of the body.rho GTP-Binding Proteins: A large family of MONOMERIC GTP-BINDING PROTEINS that are involved in regulation of actin organization, gene expression and cell cycle progression. This enzyme was formerly listed as EC 3.6.1.47.Mandible: The largest and strongest bone of the FACE constituting the lower jaw. It supports the lower teeth.Dendritic Spines: Spiny processes on DENDRITES, each of which receives excitatory input from one nerve ending (NERVE ENDINGS). They are commonly found on PURKINJE CELLS and PYRAMIDAL CELLS.Time-Lapse Imaging: Recording serial images of a process at regular intervals spaced out over a longer period of time than the time in which the recordings will be played back.Tissue Adhesions: Pathological processes consisting of the union of the opposing surfaces of a wound.Microscopy, Electron: Microscopy using an electron beam, instead of light, to visualize the sample, thereby allowing much greater magnification. The interactions of ELECTRONS with specimens are used to provide information about the fine structure of that specimen. In TRANSMISSION ELECTRON MICROSCOPY the reactions of the electrons that are transmitted through the specimen are imaged. In SCANNING ELECTRON MICROSCOPY an electron beam falls at a non-normal angle on the specimen and the image is derived from the reactions occurring above the plane of the specimen.Inguinal Canal: The tunnel in the lower anterior ABDOMINAL WALL through which the SPERMATIC CORD, in the male; ROUND LIGAMENT, in the female; nerves; and vessels pass. Its internal end is at the deep inguinal ring and its external end is at the superficial inguinal ring.Nonmuscle Myosin Type IIA: A nonmuscle isoform of myosin type II found predominantly in platelets, lymphocytes, neutrophils and brush border enterocytes.Length of Stay: The period of confinement of a patient to a hospital or other health facility.Cytoskeletal Proteins: Major constituent of the cytoskeleton found in the cytoplasm of eukaryotic cells. They form a flexible framework for the cell, provide attachment points for organelles and formed bodies, and make communication between parts of the cell possible.Mesocolon: The fold of peritoneum by which the COLON is attached to the posterior ABDOMINAL WALL.Prospective Studies: Observation of a population for a sufficient number of persons over a sufficient number of years to generate incidence or mortality rates subsequent to the selection of the study group.Appendectomy: Surgical removal of the vermiform appendix. (Dorland, 28th ed)Growth Cones: Bulbous enlargement of the growing tip of nerve axons and dendrites. They are crucial to neuronal development because of their pathfinding ability and their role in synaptogenesis.Diaphragmatic Eventration: A congenital abnormality characterized by the elevation of the DIAPHRAGM dome. It is the result of a thinned diaphragmatic muscle and injured PHRENIC NERVE, allowing the intra-abdominal viscera to push the diaphragm upward against the LUNG.Hyoid Bone: A mobile U-shaped bone that lies in the anterior part of the neck at the level of the third CERVICAL VERTEBRAE. The hyoid bone is suspended from the processes of the TEMPORAL BONES by ligaments, and is firmly bound to the THYROID CARTILAGE by muscles.Overbite: A malocclusion in which maxillary incisor and canine teeth project over the mandiblar teeth excessively. The overlap is measured perpendicular to the occlusal plane and is also called vertical overlap. When the overlap is measured parallel to the occlusal plane it is referred to as overjet.Orchiopexy: A surgical procedure in which an undescended testicle is sutured inside the SCROTUM in male infants or children to correct CRYPTORCHIDISM. Orchiopexy is also performed to treat TESTICULAR TORSION in adults and adolescents.Spermatic Cord: Either of a pair of tubular structures formed by DUCTUS DEFERENS; ARTERIES; VEINS; LYMPHATIC VESSELS; and nerves. The spermatic cord extends from the deep inguinal ring through the INGUINAL CANAL to the TESTIS in the SCROTUM.Scrotum: A cutaneous pouch of skin containing the testicles and spermatic cords.Surgical Wound Infection: Infection occurring at the site of a surgical incision.Peritoneal Diseases: Pathological processes involving the PERITONEUM.Green Fluorescent Proteins: Protein analogs and derivatives of the Aequorea victoria green fluorescent protein that emit light (FLUORESCENCE) when excited with ULTRAVIOLET RAYS. They are used in REPORTER GENES in doing GENETIC TECHNIQUES. Numerous mutants have been made to emit other colors or be sensitive to pH.Polytetrafluoroethylene: Homopolymer of tetrafluoroethylene. Nonflammable, tough, inert plastic tubing or sheeting; used to line vessels, insulate, protect or lubricate apparatus; also as filter, coating for surgical implants or as prosthetic material. Synonyms: Fluoroflex; Fluoroplast; Ftoroplast; Halon; Polyfene; PTFE; Tetron.Fibroblasts: Connective tissue cells which secrete an extracellular matrix rich in collagen and other macromolecules.Prolapse: The protrusion of an organ or part of an organ into a natural or artificial orifice.Actomyosin: A protein complex of actin and MYOSINS occurring in muscle. It is the essential contractile substance of muscle.Gastropexy: Surgical fixation of the stomach to the abdominal wall.Infant, Newborn: An infant during the first month after birth.Cecal Diseases: Pathological developments in the CECUM.Microtubules: Slender, cylindrical filaments found in the cytoskeleton of plant and animal cells. They are composed of the protein TUBULIN and are influenced by TUBULIN MODULATORS.Surgical Stapling: A technique of closing incisions and wounds, or of joining and connecting tissues, in which staples are used as sutures.Centric Relation: The location of the maxillary and the mandibular condyles when they are in their most posterior and superior positions in their fossae of the temporomandibular joint.Nonmuscle Myosin Type IIB: A nonmuscle isoform of myosin type II found predominantly in neuronal tissue.Digestive System Surgical Procedures: Surgery performed on the digestive system or its parts.Malocclusion, Angle Class I: Malocclusion in which the mandible and maxilla are anteroposteriorly normal as reflected by the relationship of the first permanent molar (i.e., in neutroclusion), but in which individual teeth are abnormally related to each other.Microscopy, Confocal: A light microscopic technique in which only a small spot is illuminated and observed at a time. An image is constructed through point-by-point scanning of the field in this manner. Light sources may be conventional or laser, and fluorescence or transmitted observations are possible.Cells, Cultured: Cells propagated in vitro in special media conducive to their growth. Cultured cells are used to study developmental, morphologic, metabolic, physiologic, and genetic processes, among others.Fascia Lata: CONNECTIVE TISSUE of the anterior compartment of the THIGH that has its origins on the anterior aspect of the iliac crest and anterior superior iliac spine, and its insertion point on the iliotibial tract. It plays a role in medial rotation of the THIGH, steadying the trunk, and in KNEE extension.Diaphragm: The musculofibrous partition that separates the THORACIC CAVITY from the ABDOMINAL CAVITY. Contraction of the diaphragm increases the volume of the thoracic cavity aiding INHALATION.Vinculin: A cytoskeletal protein associated with cell-cell and cell-matrix interactions. The amino acid sequence of human vinculin has been determined. The protein consists of 1066 amino acid residues and its gene has been assigned to chromosome 10.Protein Transport: The process of moving proteins from one cellular compartment (including extracellular) to another by various sorting and transport mechanisms such as gated transport, protein translocation, and vesicular transport.Abdominal Injuries: General or unspecified injuries involving organs in the abdominal cavity.Appendix: A worm-like blind tube extension from the CECUM.Paxillin: Paxillin is a signal transducing adaptor protein that localizes to FOCAL ADHESIONS via its four LIM domains. It undergoes PHOSPHORYLATION in response to integrin-mediated CELL ADHESION, and interacts with a variety of proteins including VINCULIN; FOCAL ADHESION KINASE; PROTO-ONCOGENE PROTEIN PP60(C-SRC); and PROTO-ONCOGENE PROTEIN C-CRK.Cypriniformes: An order of fish with 26 families and over 3,000 species. This order includes the families CYPRINIDAE (minnows and CARPS), Cobitidae (loaches), and Catostomidae (suckers).Diskectomy, Percutaneous: Percutaneous excision of a herniated or displaced INTERVERTEBRAL DISC by posterolateral approach, always remaining outside the spinal canal. Percutaneous nucleotomy was first described by Hijikata in Japan in 1975. In 1985 Onik introduced automated percutaneous nucleotomy which consists in percutaneous aspiration of the nucleus pulposus. It is carried out under local anesthesia, thus reducing the surgical insult and requiring brief hospitalization, often performed on an outpatient basis. It appears to be a well-tolerated alternative to surgical diskectomy and chymopapain nucleolysis.Broad Ligament: A broad fold of peritoneum that extends from the side of the uterus to the wall of the pelvis.Cell Line: Established cell cultures that have the potential to propagate indefinitely.Signal Transduction: The intracellular transfer of information (biological activation/inhibition) through a signal pathway. In each signal transduction system, an activation/inhibition signal from a biologically active molecule (hormone, neurotransmitter) is mediated via the coupling of a receptor/enzyme to a second messenger system or to an ion channel. Signal transduction plays an important role in activating cellular functions, cell differentiation, and cell proliferation. Examples of signal transduction systems are the GAMMA-AMINOBUTYRIC ACID-postsynaptic receptor-calcium ion channel system, the receptor-mediated T-cell activation pathway, and the receptor-mediated activation of phospholipases. Those coupled to membrane depolarization or intracellular release of calcium include the receptor-mediated activation of cytotoxic functions in granulocytes and the synaptic potentiation of protein kinase activation. Some signal transduction pathways may be part of larger signal transduction pathways; for example, protein kinase activation is part of the platelet activation signal pathway.Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation: Application of a life support system that circulates the blood through an oxygenating system, which may consist of a pump, a membrane oxygenator, and a heat exchanger. Examples of its use are to assist victims of smoke inhalation injury, respiratory failure, and cardiac failure.Fetal Organ Maturity: Functional competence of specific organs or body systems of the FETUS in utero.Dental Occlusion, Centric: Contact between opposing teeth during a person's habitual bite.Surgical Procedures, Elective: Surgery which could be postponed or not done at all without danger to the patient. Elective surgery includes procedures to correct non-life-threatening medical problems as well as to alleviate conditions causing psychological stress or other potential risk to patients, e.g., cosmetic or contraceptive surgery.Wound Healing: Restoration of integrity to traumatized tissue.Cell Size: The quantity of volume or surface area of CELLS.Esophagogastric Junction: The area covering the terminal portion of ESOPHAGUS and the beginning of STOMACH at the cardiac orifice.Abdomen: That portion of the body that lies between the THORAX and the PELVIS.Peritoneum: A membrane of squamous EPITHELIAL CELLS, the mesothelial cells, covered by apical MICROVILLI that allow rapid absorption of fluid and particles in the PERITONEAL CAVITY. The peritoneum is divided into parietal and visceral components. The parietal peritoneum covers the inside of the ABDOMINAL WALL. The visceral peritoneum covers the intraperitoneal organs. The double-layered peritoneum forms the MESENTERY that suspends these organs from the abdominal wall.Pregnancy: The status during which female mammals carry their developing young (EMBRYOS or FETUSES) in utero before birth, beginning from FERTILIZATION to BIRTH.Esophagitis: INFLAMMATION, acute or chronic, of the ESOPHAGUS caused by BACTERIA, chemicals, or TRAUMA.Chemotaxis: The movement of cells or organisms toward or away from a substance in response to its concentration gradient.Ultrasonography, Prenatal: The visualization of tissues during pregnancy through recording of the echoes of ultrasonic waves directed into the body. The procedure may be applied with reference to the mother or the fetus and with reference to organs or the detection of maternal or fetal disease.Appendicitis: Acute inflammation of the APPENDIX. Acute appendicitis is classified as simple, gangrenous, or perforated.Enterostomy: Creation of an artificial external opening or fistula in the intestines.Abdominal Wound Closure Techniques: Methods to repair breaks in abdominal tissues caused by trauma or to close surgical incisions during abdominal surgery.Cell Line, Tumor: A cell line derived from cultured tumor cells.Dictyostelium: A genus of protozoa, formerly also considered a fungus. Its natural habitat is decaying forest leaves, where it feeds on bacteria. D. discoideum is the best-known species and is widely used in biomedical research.Extracellular Matrix: A meshwork-like substance found within the extracellular space and in association with the basement membrane of the cell surface. It promotes cellular proliferation and provides a supporting structure to which cells or cell lysates in culture dishes adhere.Biomechanical Phenomena: The properties, processes, and behavior of biological systems under the action of mechanical forces.Pneumoperitoneum, Artificial: Deliberate introduction of air into the peritoneal cavity.Esophagitis, Peptic: INFLAMMATION of the ESOPHAGUS that is caused by the reflux of GASTRIC JUICE with contents of the STOMACH and DUODENUM.Ileostomy: Surgical creation of an external opening into the ILEUM for fecal diversion or drainage. This replacement for the RECTUM is usually created in patients with severe INFLAMMATORY BOWEL DISEASES. Loop (continent) or tube (incontinent) procedures are most often employed.Heterocyclic Compounds with 4 or More Rings: A class of organic compounds containing four or more ring structures, one of which is made up of more than one kind of atom, usually carbon plus another atom. The heterocycle may be either aromatic or nonaromatic.Esophagus: The muscular membranous segment between the PHARYNX and the STOMACH in the UPPER GASTROINTESTINAL TRACT.Abnormalities, MultipleDental Occlusion: The relationship of all the components of the masticatory system in normal function. It has special reference to the position and contact of the maxillary and mandibular teeth for the highest efficiency during the excursive movements of the jaw that are essential for mastication. (From Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992, p556, p472)Gestational Age: The age of the conceptus, beginning from the time of FERTILIZATION. In clinical obstetrics, the gestational age is often estimated as the time from the last day of the last MENSTRUATION which is about 2 weeks before OVULATION and fertilization.Thoracotomy: Surgical incision into the chest wall.Thiazolidines: Reduced (protonated) form of THIAZOLES. They can be oxidized to THIAZOLIDINEDIONES.Protein Binding: The process in which substances, either endogenous or exogenous, bind to proteins, peptides, enzymes, protein precursors, or allied compounds. Specific protein-binding measures are often used as assays in diagnostic assessments.Endoscopy, Digestive System: Endoscopic examination, therapy or surgery of the digestive tract.Guanine Nucleotide Exchange Factors: Protein factors that promote the exchange of GTP for GDP bound to GTP-BINDING PROTEINS.Omentum: A double-layered fold of peritoneum that attaches the STOMACH to other organs in the ABDOMINAL CAVITY.Manometry: Measurement of the pressure or tension of liquids or gases with a manometer.Wiskott-Aldrich Syndrome Protein: WASP protein is mutated in WISKOTT-ALDRICH SYNDROME and is expressed primarily in hematopoietic cells. It is the founding member of the WASP protein family and interacts with CDC42 PROTEIN to help regulate ACTIN polymerization.Cytoplasmic Streaming: The movement of CYTOPLASM within a CELL. It serves as an internal transport system for moving essential substances throughout the cell, and in single-celled organisms, such as the AMOEBA, it is responsible for the movement (CELL MOVEMENT) of the entire cell.Protein Structure, Tertiary: The level of protein structure in which combinations of secondary protein structures (alpha helices, beta sheets, loop regions, and motifs) pack together to form folded shapes called domains. Disulfide bridges between cysteines in two different parts of the polypeptide chain along with other interactions between the chains play a role in the formation and stabilization of tertiary structure. Small proteins usually consist of only one domain but larger proteins may contain a number of domains connected by segments of polypeptide chain which lack regular secondary structure.Imaging, Three-Dimensional: The process of generating three-dimensional images by electronic, photographic, or other methods. For example, three-dimensional images can be generated by assembling multiple tomographic images with the aid of a computer, while photographic 3-D images (HOLOGRAPHY) can be made by exposing film to the interference pattern created when two laser light sources shine on an object.Epithelial Cells: Cells that line the inner and outer surfaces of the body by forming cellular layers (EPITHELIUM) or masses. Epithelial cells lining the SKIN; the MOUTH; the NOSE; and the ANAL CANAL derive from ectoderm; those lining the RESPIRATORY SYSTEM and the DIGESTIVE SYSTEM derive from endoderm; others (CARDIOVASCULAR SYSTEM and LYMPHATIC SYSTEM) derive from mesoderm. Epithelial cells can be classified mainly by cell shape and function into squamous, glandular and transitional epithelial cells.NIH 3T3 Cells: A continuous cell line of high contact-inhibition established from NIH Swiss mouse embryo cultures. The cells are useful for DNA transfection and transformation studies. (From ATCC [Internet]. Virginia: American Type Culture Collection; c2002 [cited 2002 Sept 26]. Available from http://www.atcc.org/)Learning Curve: The course of learning of an individual or a group. It is a measure of performance plotted over time.Surgery, Veterinary: A board-certified specialty of VETERINARY MEDICINE, requiring at least four years of special education, training, and practice of veterinary surgery after graduation from veterinary school. In the written, oral, and practical examinations candidates may choose either large or small animal surgery. (From AVMA Directory, 43d ed, p278)Polyglactin 910: A polyester used for absorbable sutures & surgical mesh, especially in ophthalmic surgery. 2-Hydroxy-propanoic acid polymer with polymerized hydroxyacetic acid, which forms 3,6-dimethyl-1,4-dioxane-dione polymer with 1,4-dioxane-2,5-dione copolymer of molecular weight about 80,000 daltons.Movement: The act, process, or result of passing from one place or position to another. It differs from LOCOMOTION in that locomotion is restricted to the passing of the whole body from one place to another, while movement encompasses both locomotion but also a change of the position of the whole body or any of its parts. Movement may be used with reference to humans, vertebrate and invertebrate animals, and microorganisms. Differentiate also from MOTOR ACTIVITY, movement associated with behavior.Lip: Either of the two fleshy, full-blooded margins of the mouth.Sciatica: A condition characterized by pain radiating from the back into the buttock and posterior/lateral aspects of the leg. Sciatica may be a manifestation of SCIATIC NEUROPATHY; RADICULOPATHY (involving the SPINAL NERVE ROOTS; L4, L5, S1, or S2, often associated with INTERVERTEBRAL DISK DISPLACEMENT); or lesions of the CAUDA EQUINA.Polar Bodies: Minute cells produced during development of an OOCYTE as it undergoes MEIOSIS. A polar body contains one of the nuclei derived from the first or second meiotic CELL DIVISION. Polar bodies have practically no CYTOPLASM. They are eventually discarded by the oocyte. (from King & Stansfield, A Dictionary of Genetics, 4th ed)Perineum: The body region lying between the genital area and the ANUS on the surface of the trunk, and to the shallow compartment lying deep to this area that is inferior to the PELVIC DIAPHRAGM. The surface area is between the VULVA and the anus in the female, and between the SCROTUM and the anus in the male.Abdomen, Acute: A clinical syndrome with acute abdominal pain that is severe, localized, and rapid in onset. Acute abdomen may be caused by a variety of disorders, injuries, or diseases.Cofilin 1: Cofilin 1 is a member of the cofilin family of proteins that is expressed in non-muscle CELLS. It has ACTIN depolymerization activity that is dependent on HYDROGEN-ION CONCENTRATION.Lim Kinases: Serine protein kinases involved in the regulation of ACTIN polymerization and MICROTUBULE disassembly. Their activity is regulated by phosphorylation of a threonine residue within the activation loop by intracellular signaling kinases such as P21-ACTIVATED KINASES and by RHO KINASE.Cryoelectron Microscopy: Electron microscopy involving rapid freezing of the samples. The imaging of frozen-hydrated molecules and organelles permits the best possible resolution closest to the living state, free of chemical fixatives or stains.Barium Sulfate: A compound used as an x-ray contrast medium that occurs in nature as the mineral barite. It is also used in various manufacturing applications and mixed into heavy concrete to serve as a radiation shield.Surgical Procedures, Minimally Invasive: Procedures that avoid use of open, invasive surgery in favor of closed or local surgery. These generally involve use of laparoscopic devices and remote-control manipulation of instruments with indirect observation of the surgical field through an endoscope or similar device.Fibrin Tissue Adhesive: An autologous or commercial tissue adhesive containing FIBRINOGEN and THROMBIN. The commercial product is a two component system from human plasma that contains more than fibrinogen and thrombin. The first component contains highly concentrated fibrinogen, FACTOR VIII, fibronectin, and traces of other plasma proteins. The second component contains thrombin, calcium chloride, and antifibrinolytic agents such as APROTININ. Mixing of the two components promotes BLOOD CLOTTING and the formation and cross-linking of fibrin. The tissue adhesive is used for tissue sealing, HEMOSTASIS, and WOUND HEALING.Polymerization: Chemical reaction in which monomeric components are combined to form POLYMERS (e.g., POLYMETHYLMETHACRYLATE).Microscopy, Interference: The science and application of a double-beam transmission interference microscope in which the illuminating light beam is split into two paths. One beam passes through the specimen while the other beam reflects off a reference mirror before joining and interfering with the other. The observed optical path difference between the two beams can be measured and used to discriminate minute differences in thickness and refraction of non-stained transparent specimens, such as living cells in culture.Phalloidine: Very toxic polypeptide isolated mainly from AMANITA phalloides (Agaricaceae) or death cup; causes fatal liver, kidney and CNS damage in mushroom poisoning; used in the study of liver damage.Maxilla: One of a pair of irregularly shaped bones that form the upper jaw. A maxillary bone provides tooth sockets for the superior teeth, forms part of the ORBIT, and contains the MAXILLARY SINUS.Germination: The initial stages of the growth of SEEDS into a SEEDLINGS. The embryonic shoot (plumule) and embryonic PLANT ROOTS (radicle) emerge and grow upwards and downwards respectively. Food reserves for germination come from endosperm tissue within the seed and/or from the seed leaves (COTYLEDON). (Concise Dictionary of Biology, 1990)Lumbar Vertebrae: VERTEBRAE in the region of the lower BACK below the THORACIC VERTEBRAE and above the SACRAL VERTEBRAE.Cryptorchidism: A developmental defect in which a TESTIS or both TESTES failed to descend from high in the ABDOMEN to the bottom of the SCROTUM. Testicular descent is essential to normal SPERMATOGENESIS which requires temperature lower than the BODY TEMPERATURE. Cryptorchidism can be subclassified by the location of the maldescended testis.Intestinal Perforation: Opening or penetration through the wall of the INTESTINES.Rho Guanine Nucleotide Exchange Factors: Signaling proteins which function as master molecular switches by activating Rho GTPases through conversion of guanine nucleotides. Rho GTPases in turn control many aspects of cell behavior through the regulation of multiple downstream signal transduction pathways.Morphogenesis: The development of anatomical structures to create the form of a single- or multi-cell organism. Morphogenesis provides form changes of a part, parts, or the whole organism.Equipment Design: Methods of creating machines and devices.Recombinant Fusion Proteins: Recombinant proteins produced by the GENETIC TRANSLATION of fused genes formed by the combination of NUCLEIC ACID REGULATORY SEQUENCES of one or more genes with the protein coding sequences of one or more genes.Skin, Artificial: Synthetic material used for the treatment of burns and other conditions involving large-scale loss of skin. It often consists of an outer (epidermal) layer of silicone and an inner (dermal) layer of collagen and chondroitin 6-sulfate. The dermal layer elicits new growth and vascular invasion and the outer layer is later removed and replaced by a graft.Actin Capping Proteins: Actin capping proteins are cytoskeletal proteins that bind to the ends of ACTIN FILAMENTS to regulate actin polymerization.Radiography, Thoracic: X-ray visualization of the chest and organs of the thoracic cavity. It is not restricted to visualization of the lungs.
... ventral incisional hernias are often also classified as ventral hernias due to their location. Not all ventral hernias are from ... Clinically, incisional hernias present as a bulge or protrusion at or near the area of a surgical incision. Virtually any prior ... An incisional hernia is a type of hernia caused by an incompletely-healed surgical wound. Since median incisions in the abdomen ... "Long term Outcomes in Laparoscopic vs Open Ventral Hernia Repair". Arch Surg. 142 (6): 562-7. doi:10.1001/archsurg.142.6.562. ...
Spigelian hernia, also known as spontaneous lateral ventral hernia Amyand's hernia: containing the appendix vermiformis within ... They involve protrusion of intraabdominal contents through a weakness at the site of passage of the umbilical cord through the ... Double indirect hernia: an indirect inguinal hernia with two hernia sacs, without a concomitant direct hernia component (as ... Paraumbilical hernia: a type of umbilical hernia occurring in adults Perineal hernia: a perineal hernia protrudes through the ...
Laparoscopic Ventral Hernia Repair, ISBN 2287597557 R. K. Mishra (2012), Laparoscopic Hernia Repair, ISBN 9350258722 Dana ... A hiatial hernia is the protrusion of an organ through its wall or cavity. There are several different methods that can be used ... or inability to repair the hernia, is approximately 5%. The outcomes of laparoscopic hernia repair versus open hernia repair ... Some complications can arise from the need for general anesthesia in having an open ventral hernia repair. Inherent risks are ...
This continues to grow caudally until it opens into the ventral part of the cloaca; beyond the pronephros it is termed the ... On the other hand, sex-dependent development include further protrusion of the genital tubercle in the male to form the glans ... A failure in this process can cause indirect inguinal hernia or an infantile hydrocoele. After the separation of the rectum ... After the separation of the rectum from the dorsal part of the cloaca, the ventral part of the cloacal membrane becomes the ...
Inguinal hernia* is a protrusion of abdominal contents through the inguinal canal. They are corrected through surgery. Canine ... Spondylosis*, known as spondylosis deformans in dogs, is growth of osteophytes on the ventral and lateral surfaces of the ... Umbilical hernia* is a failure of the umbilical ring of the abdominal wall to close. They are very common and can be caused by ... It is caused by degeneration and protrusion of the disk and compression of the spinal cord. It occurs most commonly in the ...
These latter bones are probably homologous with the ventral ribs of fish. The number of vertebrae in the spines of reptiles is ... Where the condition does not involve this protrusion it is known as Spina bifida occulta. Sometimes all of the vertebral arches ... bulge out in a hernia. Spinal stenosis is a narrowing of the spinal canal which can occur in any region of the spine though ...
Chordee release is the cutting of ventral penile skin and connective tissue to free and straighten the penis. A mild chordee, ... If the inguinal canal is open it must be closed to prevent hernia. Potential surgical problems include maintaining the blood ... Lateral wedges of the erectile tissue of the clitoris are removed to reduce the size and protrusion. The neurovascular tissue ... This was commonly done from the 1970s through the 1980s to reduce protrusion without sacrificing sensation. Outcomes were often ...
... obstruction or obstructive disorders Paralytic ileus Volvulus Hernia Intussusception Adhesions Obstruction from ... using small finger-like protrusions called villi. The length of the small intestine can vary greatly, from as short as 2.75 m ( ... The liver has been removed and the two layers of the ventral mesogastrium (lesser omentum) have been cut. The vessels are ...
Where the condition does not involve this protrusion it is known as Spina bifida occulta. Sometimes all of the vertebral arches ... These latter bones are probably homologous with the ventral ribs of fish. The number of vertebrae in the spines of reptiles is ... bulge out in a hernia. ...
This continues to grow caudally until it opens into the ventral part of the cloaca; beyond the pronephros it is termed the ... On the other hand, sex-dependent development include further protrusion of the genital tubercle in the male to form the glans ... A failure in this process can cause indirect inguinal hernia or an infantile hydrocoele. ... After the separation of the rectum from the dorsal part of the cloaca, the ventral part of the cloacal membrane becomes the ...
This normal anatomical structure is just below the pubic bone in the groin and widening of this defect allows the protrusion of ... About Femoral Hernia A femoral hernia results from an enlargement of the femoral canal. ... Open Inguinal Hernia Repair * Parastomal Hernia Repair * Umbilical Hernia Repair * Ventral Hernia Repair ... Femoral Hernia. About Femoral Hernia. A femoral hernia results from an enlargement of the femoral canal. This normal anatomical ...
... mesh repair was introduced in 2006 to decrease the risk of postoperative inguinal pain in hernia surgery. For the r... ... Abdominal hernias include groin hernia (HERNIA, FEMORAL; HERNIA, INGUINAL) and VENTRAL HERNIA. ... Hernia, Abdominal. A protrusion of abdominal structures through the retaining ABDOMINAL WALL. It involves two parts: an opening ... pain in hernia surgery. For the repair of a recurrent inguinal hernia after a primary TREPP an alternative open anterior route ...
Bochdalek Hernias are one of the most common types of diaphragmatic hernia, a congenital pathology diagnosed during the ... Abdominal hernias include groin hernia (HERNIA, FEMORAL; HERNIA, INGUINAL) and VENTRAL HERNIA. ... Hernia, Abdominal. A protrusion of abdominal structures through the retaining ABDOMINAL WALL. It involves two parts: an opening ... Bochdalek Hernias are one of the most common types of diaphragmatic hernia, a congenital pathology diagnosed during the ...
The hernia creates a protrusion of tissue that is noticeable when standing or engaged... ... An incisional hernia is a hernia that develops at the site of a surgical scar, according to Mount Sinai Hospital. ... Incisional hernias account for up to 20 percent of abdominal hernias. They are ventral hernias because they usually develop ... An incisional hernia is a hernia that develops at the site of a surgical scar, according to Mount Sinai Hospital. The hernia ...
The most common type of hernia occurs when there is a tear or weakness in the abdominal wall muscles. ... One of the most commonly performed general surgeries is a hernia repair. ... This bulge or protrusion is generally known as a hernia. Though hernias are often painless, they can cause discomfort and ... There are many types of hernias including:. *Abdominal (ventral) hernias. *Inguinal hernias ...
... false hernia explanation free. What is false hernia? Meaning of false hernia medical term. What does false hernia mean? ... Looking for online definition of false hernia in the Medical Dictionary? ... Stangulated hernia, Umbilical hernia, Ventral hernia. her·ni·a. , pl. hernias, pl. herniae (hĕrnē-ă, -ăz, -ē) Protrusion of a ... ventral hernia. A hernia through the abdominal wall. See: incisional hernia. hernia. Abnormal protrusion of an organ or tissue ...
This Presentation describes the historical background of ALMOST ALL types of hernia that general surgery resident can face, ... Spigelian Hernia (Lateral Ventral Hernia) • type of interparietal hernia occurring at the level of arcuate line through ... Hernia without sac: • Epigastric hernia-it is protrusion of extra-peritoneal pad of fat • Covering - layers of the abdominal ... concurrent direct and indirect inguinal hernias * 33. Pantaloon Hernia (Double/Dual Hernia, Saddle Hernia & Romberg Hernia) ...
25-9 Exomphalos, or omphalocele (Gk, umbilical hernia), is a ventral protrusion of intestine through a large defect at the ... Herniae (figs. 25-8 and 25-11) A hernia is an abnormal protrusion of a structure through tissues which normally contain it. ... Umbilical herniae are usually congenital and result from an incomplete closure of the abdominal wall. Ventral herniae may also ... including ventral herniae, such as omphalocele (or exomphalos), which involves a protrusion of intestine through a large defect ...
... ventral incisional hernias are often also classified as ventral hernias due to their location. Not all ventral hernias are from ... Clinically, incisional hernias present as a bulge or protrusion at or near the area of a surgical incision. Virtually any prior ... An incisional hernia is a type of hernia caused by an incompletely-healed surgical wound. Since median incisions in the abdomen ... "Long term Outcomes in Laparoscopic vs Open Ventral Hernia Repair". Arch Surg. 142 (6): 562-7. doi:10.1001/archsurg.142.6.562. ...
Ventral body wall defects comprise a group of congenital malformations that includes gastroschisis and omphalocele, which are ... In 1967, Schuster developed a more expeditious technique to close giant omphaloceles and large ventral hernias. [45] A ... Alloderm stretches, and the ultimate result is a large, but epithelialized protrusion that ultimately will require repair. [47 ... "Component separation" is a technique pioneered in adult patients to repair ventral hernias. Bilateral incisions are made along ...
... but now it is a ventral or incisional hernia with a protrusion. The protrusion is causing twisting and obstruction to my ... but now it is a ventral or incisional hernia with a protrusion. The protrusion is causing twisting and obstruction to my ... That is good info and a possible way to spot a hernia or relapsing hernia like yours. Thanks for that and best wishes for your ... Do you by chance, have, or ever had a hiatal or incisional/ventral hernia? ...
Each year, more than 400,000 ventral hernia repairs are performed in the United States. A hernia is the protrusion of an organ ... Large ventral hernias (hernias that occur in the abdominal wall) are typically treated by suturing in a surgical mesh to cover ... However, in 25-40% of patients, the hernia repair fails, resulting in recurrence of the hernia, along with other complications ... thus decreasing the rate of hernia recurrence. Furthermore, our long term goal is to design a hernia mesh that contains strain ...
... incisional hernia. An incisional hernia, also called a ventral hernia, is a bulge or protrusion that occurs near or directly ... An incisional hernia, also called a ventral hernia, is a bulge or protrusion that occurs near or directly along a prior ... 1.Use of hernia belt to prevent the protrusion and reduce pain. Special type of hernia belts is available for each type of ... Having Ventral Hernia repair on 10-23-12 to repair two hernias caused by past surgeries for colon removel due to ulcertive ...
A ventral hernia is often noticed as a painless bulge in the abdominal area that usually disappears when lying down and is more ... These balloon-like protrusions may change in size according to position and may disappear when the abdominal wall is completely ... Ventral Hernia Laparoscopic Ventral and Incisional Hernia Repair. Trapped Intestine. Laparoscopic view showing loop of colon ... Symptoms that prompt ventral hernia repair. With a ventral hernia, the you may find a bulge in the abdominal area, which is ...
Ventral hernias. Ventral hernias like groin hernias are abnormal protrusions through a weakened area in the abdominal wall. ... Recovery: Ventral hernia. The recovery from a ventral hernia can be a bit more arduous than that of an out-patient groin hernia ... Groin hernias can be direct inguinal hernias, indirect inguinal hernias or femoral canal hernias. All of these types of hernia ... 99 percent of hernias are either hiatal hernias, abdominal wall hernias or groin hernias. Hiatal hernias are discussed in the ...
Incisional (ventral) hernias. Umbilical hernias (protrusions through the umbilical ring) are mostly congenital, but some are ... Sports hernias. A sports hernia is not a true hernia because there is no abdominal wall defect through which abdominal contents ... Classification of Abdominal Hernias. Abdominal hernias are classified as either abdominal wall or groin hernias. Strangulated ... About 75% of all abdominal hernias are inguinal. Incisional hernias comprise another 10 to 15%. Femoral and unusual hernias ...
Doctors in Ho Chi Minh City have operated on a baby that was born without sexual organs and a severe hernia that caused its ... said the baby suffers from ventral and umbilical hernias, which is not a rare condition, but protrusion of the intestines is ... Doctors in Ho Chi Minh City have operated on a baby that was born without sexual organs and a severe hernia that caused its ...
... ventral hernias). Other types of hernias are inguinal hernia, femoral hernia, diaphragmatic hernia, epigastric hernia, lumbar ... Examples of hernias are umbilical hernias--resulting in a protrusion of intraabdominal contents through a weakness at the site ... Richters hernia, sliding hernia, sciatic hernia, spigelian hernia, sports hernia, Velpeau hernia and spinal disc hernia. The ... hernia, Littres hernia, obturator hernia, paraumbilical hernia, perineal hernia, properitoneal hernia, ...
Hernia Conditions A hernia is a protrusion of an internal organ or tissue through a weakness in the bodys muscular wall. ... There are several types of hernias:. *Abdominal Wall *Ventral/incisional at the site of a previous incision ... Hernias can occur throughout the body but most are in the abdomen. Hernias are common conditions that affect men and women of ... We repair hernias with small incisions through laparoscopic techniques that result in less post-surgical pain and a quicker ...
Spigelian hernia, also known as spontaneous lateral ventral hernia Amyands hernia: containing the appendix vermiformis within ... They involve protrusion of intraabdominal contents through a weakness at the site of passage of the umbilical cord through the ... Double indirect hernia: an indirect inguinal hernia with two hernia sacs, without a concomitant direct hernia component (as ... Paraumbilical hernia: a type of umbilical hernia occurring in adults Perineal hernia: a perineal hernia protrudes through the ...
Ventral Hernia Repair Combined with Abdominoplasty While it is important to keep in mind that ventral hernia surgery and ... These balloon-like protrusions may change in size according to position and may disappear when the abdominal wall is completely ... Paraesophageal hernias account for only 5% of all hiatal hernias. A paraesophageal hernia is a type of hiatal hernia where the ... Ventral Hernia A hernia might develop at a point of weakness caused by a previous surgical incision. A small out pouching that ...
... of increased pressure in the abdominal cavity that causes stress at the weak points of the abdominal wall leading to protrusion ... Hernias of the groin (inguinal hernia) and of the diaphragm (hiatal hernia) are some of the common hernias. Hernias may be ... Umbilical hernia is also a common form of hernia that occurs around the belly button. The abdominal hernias occur as a result ... Hernia in the abdomen occurs when a piece of intestine or its lining, also called the omentum, protrudes through a weak area ...
Ventral hernia is a form of abdominal hernia and may either be developmental disorder or associated with failure of healing of ... Hernia most commonly affect the abdomen and are characterized by weakened abdominal wall which results in protrusion of the ... How To Treat Ventral Hernia, Ventral Hernia, Ventral Hernia Symptoms 0 Comment ... Ventral Hernia Treatment. Use of abdominal support is often recommended in the management of ventral hernia. While using of ...
Hernia Protrusion or projection of an organ (or part) through the wall of the cavity that normally contains it ... Types of hernia Congenital. Umbilical. Direct/indirect inguinal. Incisional. Ventral. Sliding. Incarcerated. Strangulated ... Increases intra-abdominal pressure which may also protrude hernias and /or separate the recti muscles ... Blood supply to an incarcerated hernia is compromised, contents may become gangrenous ...
"Epigastric, umbilical and paraumbilical hernias are primary ventral hernias. Incisional hernia is a form of ventral hernia that ... Yes, it is definitely possible and that is what you call a Hernia. "A hernia is an abnormal protrusion of a part of an organ ... Types of Hernia. "When it comes to abdominal hernias, broadly they could be groin hernias and ventral (front of the abdomen) ... hernias. Groin hernias are subdivided to inguinal and femoral. Inguinal hernias form about 70% of all hernias that we see," ...
  • This normal anatomical structure is just below the pubic bone in the groin and widening of this defect allows the protrusion of usually some fat down the femoral canal just medial (inside) to the femoral artery and vein as they travel down the thigh into the leg. (brisbanesurgeon.com.au)
  • With contributions by key opinion leaders in the field, this book describes the latest trends and detailed technical modifications for both routine and complex hernias. (lowdowntracks4impact.com)
  • A technique referred to as "component separation" is used for larger and more complex hernias. (oregonclinic.com)