Proteus vulgaris: A species of gram-negative, facultatively anaerobic, rod-shaped bacteria that occurs in soil, fecal matter, and sewage. It is an opportunistic pathogen and causes cystitis and pyelonephritis.Proteus: A genus of gram-negative, facultatively anaerobic, rod-shaped bacteria that occurs in the intestines of humans and a wide variety of animals, as well as in manure, soil, and polluted waters. Its species are pathogenic, causing urinary tract infections and are also considered secondary invaders, causing septic lesions at other sites of the body.Proteus mirabilis: A species of gram-negative, facultatively anaerobic, rod-shaped bacteria that is frequently isolated from clinical specimens. Its most common site of infection is the urinary tract.Proteus Infections: Infections with bacteria of the genus PROTEUS.Proteus penneri: A genus of gram-negative bacteria isolated from individuals in LONG-TERM CARE facilities and HOSPITALS.Tryptophanase: An enzyme that catalyzes the conversion of L-tryptophan and water to indole, pyruvate, and ammonia. It is a pyridoxal-phosphate protein, requiring K+. It also catalyzes 2,3-elimination and beta-replacement reactions of some indole-substituted tryptophan analogs of L-cysteine, L-serine, and other 3-substituted amino acids. (From Enzyme Nomenclature, 1992) EC 4.1.99.1.Providencia: Gram-negative rods isolated from human urine and feces.Proteus Syndrome: Hamartoneoplastic malformation syndrome of uncertain etiology characterized by partial GIGANTISM of the hands and/or feet, asymmetry of the limbs, plantar hyperplasia, hemangiomas (HEMANGIOMA), lipomas (LIPOMA), lymphangiomas (LYMPHANGIOMA), epidermal NEVI; MACROCEPHALY; cranial HYPEROSTOSIS, and long-bone overgrowth. Joseph Merrick, the so-called "elephant man", apparently suffered from Proteus syndrome and not NEUROFIBROMATOSIS, a disorder with similar characteristics.Desulfovibrio vulgaris: A species of gram-negative, anaerobic, rod-shaped bacteria isolated from soil, animal intestines and feces, and fresh and salt water.Enterobacteriaceae: A family of gram-negative, facultatively anaerobic, rod-shaped bacteria that do not form endospores. Its organisms are distributed worldwide with some being saprophytes and others being plant and animal parasites. Many species are of considerable economic importance due to their pathogenic effects on agriculture and livestock.Acne Vulgaris: A chronic disorder of the pilosebaceous apparatus associated with an increase in sebum secretion. It is characterized by open comedones (blackheads), closed comedones (whiteheads), and pustular nodules. The cause is unknown, but heredity and age are predisposing factors.Cefmenoxime: A cephalosporin antibiotic that is administered intravenously or intramuscularly. It is active against most common gram-positive and gram-negative microorganisms, is a potent inhibitor of Enterobacteriaceae, and is highly resistant to hydrolysis by beta-lactamases. The drug has a high rate of efficacy in many types of infection and to date no severe side effects have been noted.Bacteria: One of the three domains of life (the others being Eukarya and ARCHAEA), also called Eubacteria. They are unicellular prokaryotic microorganisms which generally possess rigid cell walls, multiply by cell division, and exhibit three principal forms: round or coccal, rodlike or bacillary, and spiral or spirochetal. Bacteria can be classified by their response to OXYGEN: aerobic, anaerobic, or facultatively anaerobic; by the mode by which they obtain their energy: chemotrophy (via chemical reaction) or PHOTOTROPHY (via light reaction); for chemotrophs by their source of chemical energy: CHEMOLITHOTROPHY (from inorganic compounds) or chemoorganotrophy (from organic compounds); and by their source for CARBON; NITROGEN; etc.; HETEROTROPHY (from organic sources) or AUTOTROPHY (from CARBON DIOXIDE). They can also be classified by whether or not they stain (based on the structure of their CELL WALLS) with CRYSTAL VIOLET dye: gram-negative or gram-positive.Chlorella vulgaris: A species of green microalgae in the family Chlorellaceae. It is used as a model organism for PHOTOSYNTHESIS, and as a food supplement (DIETARY SUPPLEMENTS).beta-Lactamases: Enzymes found in many bacteria which catalyze the hydrolysis of the amide bond in the beta-lactam ring. Well known antibiotics destroyed by these enzymes are penicillins and cephalosporins.Chondroitin ABC Lyase: An enzyme that catalyzes the eliminative degradation of polysaccharides containing 1,4-beta-D-hexosaminyl and 1,3-beta-D-glucuronosyl or 1,3-alpha-L-iduronosyl linkages to disaccharides containing 4-deoxy-beta-D-gluc-4-enuronosyl groups. (Enzyme Nomenclature, 1992)Beta vulgaris: A species of the Beta genus. Cultivars are used as a source of beets (root) or chard (leaves).L-Amino Acid Oxidase: An enzyme that catalyzes the oxidative deamination of L-amino acids to KETO ACIDS with the generation of AMMONIA and HYDROGEN PEROXIDE. L-amino acid oxidase is widely distributed in and is thought to contribute to the toxicity of SNAKE VENOMS.Microbial Sensitivity Tests: Any tests that demonstrate the relative efficacy of different chemotherapeutic agents against specific microorganisms (i.e., bacteria, fungi, viruses).Phaseolus: A plant genus in the family FABACEAE which is the source of edible beans and the lectin PHYTOHEMAGGLUTININS.Cephalosporins: A group of broad-spectrum antibiotics first isolated from the Mediterranean fungus ACREMONIUM. They contain the beta-lactam moiety thia-azabicyclo-octenecarboxylic acid also called 7-aminocephalosporanic acid.O Antigens: The lipopolysaccharide-protein somatic antigens, usually from gram-negative bacteria, important in the serological classification of enteric bacilli. The O-specific chains determine the specificity of the O antigens of a given serotype. O antigens are the immunodominant part of the lipopolysaccharide molecule in the intact bacterial cell. (From Singleton & Sainsbury, Dictionary of Microbiology and Molecular Biology, 2d ed)CephalosporinasePemphigus: Group of chronic blistering diseases characterized histologically by ACANTHOLYSIS and blister formation within the EPIDERMIS.Anti-Bacterial Agents: Substances that reduce the growth or reproduction of BACTERIA.Gram-Negative Bacteria: Bacteria which lose crystal violet stain but are stained pink when treated by Gram's method.Escherichia coli: A species of gram-negative, facultatively anaerobic, rod-shaped bacteria (GRAM-NEGATIVE FACULTATIVELY ANAEROBIC RODS) commonly found in the lower part of the intestine of warm-blooded animals. It is usually nonpathogenic, but some strains are known to produce DIARRHEA and pyogenic infections. Pathogenic strains (virotypes) are classified by their specific pathogenic mechanisms such as toxins (ENTEROTOXIGENIC ESCHERICHIA COLI), etc.Enterobacter: Gram-negative gas-producing rods found in feces of humans and other animals, sewage, soil, water, and dairy products.Citrobacter: A genus of gram-negative, rod-shaped enterobacteria that can use citrate as the sole source of carbon.Serratia marcescens: A species of gram-negative, facultatively anaerobic, rod-shaped bacteria found in soil, water, food, and clinical specimens. It is a prominent opportunistic pathogen for hospitalized patients.Gram-Positive Bacteria: Bacteria which retain the crystal violet stain when treated by Gram's method.Urinary Tract Infections: Inflammatory responses of the epithelium of the URINARY TRACT to microbial invasions. They are often bacterial infections with associated BACTERIURIA and PYURIA.Hydrogen Sulfide: A flammable, poisonous gas with a characteristic odor of rotten eggs. It is used in the manufacture of chemicals, in metallurgy, and as an analytical reagent. (From Merck Index, 11th ed)Encyclopedias as Topic: Works containing information articles on subjects in every field of knowledge, usually arranged in alphabetical order, or a similar work limited to a special field or subject. (From The ALA Glossary of Library and Information Science, 1983)Guyana: A republic in the north of South America, east of VENEZUELA and west of SURINAME. Its capital is Georgetown.Algorithms: A procedure consisting of a sequence of algebraic formulas and/or logical steps to calculate or determine a given task.Terminology as Topic: The terms, expressions, designations, or symbols used in a particular science, discipline, or specialized subject area.Bacteriology: The study of the structure, growth, function, genetics, and reproduction of bacteria, and BACTERIAL INFECTIONS.Quality Control: A system for verifying and maintaining a desired level of quality in a product or process by careful planning, use of proper equipment, continued inspection, and corrective action as required. (Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed)Iron-Sulfur Proteins: A group of proteins possessing only the iron-sulfur complex as the prosthetic group. These proteins participate in all major pathways of electron transport: photosynthesis, respiration, hydroxylation and bacterial hydrogen and nitrogen fixation.Reflex, Vestibulo-Ocular: A reflex wherein impulses are conveyed from the cupulas of the SEMICIRCULAR CANALS and from the OTOLITHIC MEMBRANE of the SACCULE AND UTRICLE via the VESTIBULAR NUCLEI of the BRAIN STEM and the median longitudinal fasciculus to the OCULOMOTOR NERVE nuclei. It functions to maintain a stable retinal image during head rotation by generating appropriate compensatory EYE MOVEMENTS.Amino Acid Sequence: The order of amino acids as they occur in a polypeptide chain. This is referred to as the primary structure of proteins. It is of fundamental importance in determining PROTEIN CONFORMATION.Regeneration: The physiological renewal, repair, or replacement of tissue.Chondroitinases and Chondroitin Lyases: Enzymes which catalyze the elimination of glucuronate residues from chondroitin A,B, and C or which catalyze the hydrolysis of sulfate groups of the 2-acetamido-2-deoxy-D-galactose 6-sulfate units of chondroitin sulfate. EC 4.2.2.-.Penicillin-Binding Proteins: Bacterial proteins that share the property of binding irreversibly to PENICILLINS and other ANTIBACTERIAL AGENTS derived from LACTAMS. The penicillin-binding proteins are primarily enzymes involved in CELL WALL biosynthesis including MURAMOYLPENTAPEPTIDE CARBOXYPEPTIDASE; PEPTIDE SYNTHASES; TRANSPEPTIDASES; and HEXOSYLTRANSFERASES.L Forms: Bacterial variants, unable to form a complete cell wall, which are formed in cultures by various bacteria; granules (L bodies) appear, unite, and grow into amorphous bodies which multiply and give rise to bacterial cells morphologically indistinguishable from the parent strain.Muramoylpentapeptide Carboxypeptidase: Enzyme which catalyzes the peptide cross-linking of nascent CELL WALL; PEPTIDOGLYCAN.Peptidyl Transferases: Acyltransferases that use AMINO ACYL TRNA as the amino acid donor in formation of a peptide bond. There are ribosomal and non-ribosomal peptidyltransferases.Hexosyltransferases: Enzymes that catalyze the transfer of hexose groups. EC 2.4.1.-.PeptidoglycanNeomycin: Antibiotic complex produced by Streptomyces fradiae. It is composed of neomycins A, B, and C. It acts by inhibiting translation during protein synthesis.Hepatic Encephalopathy: A syndrome characterized by central nervous system dysfunction in association with LIVER FAILURE, including portal-systemic shunts. Clinical features include lethargy and CONFUSION (frequently progressing to COMA); ASTERIXIS; NYSTAGMUS, PATHOLOGIC; brisk oculovestibular reflexes; decorticate and decerebrate posturing; MUSCLE SPASTICITY; and bilateral extensor plantar reflexes (see REFLEX, BABINSKI). ELECTROENCEPHALOGRAPHY may demonstrate triphasic waves. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, pp1117-20; Plum & Posner, Diagnosis of Stupor and Coma, 3rd ed, p222-5)Streptomycin: An antibiotic produced by the soil actinomycete Streptomyces griseus. It acts by inhibiting the initiation and elongation processes during protein synthesis.Blind Loop Syndrome: A malabsorption syndrome that is associated with a blind loop in the upper SMALL INTESTINE that is characterized by the lack of peristaltic movement, stasis of INTESTINAL CONTENTS, and the overgrowth of BACTERIA. Such bacterial overgrowth interferes with BILE SALTS action, FATTY ACIDS processing, MICROVILLI integrity, and the ABSORPTION of nutrients such as VITAMIN B12 and FOLIC ACID.Breath Tests: Any tests done on exhaled air.Ammonia: A colorless alkaline gas. It is formed in the body during decomposition of organic materials during a large number of metabolically important reactions. Note that the aqueous form of ammonia is referred to as AMMONIUM HYDROXIDE.

New antibiotics, enaminomycins A, B and C. II. Physico-chemical and biological properties. (1/203)

Physico-chemical characterization of enaminomycins revealed that these antibiotics are new members of the epoxy quinone family. From elementary analysis and mass spectroscopic measurements the molecular formulae of enaminomycins A, B and C appear to be C7H5NO5, C10H11N06 and C7H7NO5, respectively. They are very unique in their chemical properties, possessing various functions, such as epoxy, primary amine and carboxylic acid, in their small structural units. Enaminomycin A, the most potent component, has activity against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria and shows cytostatic effect on L1210 mouse leukemia cells in vitro, but enaminomycins B and C are only weakly active against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria.  (+info)

Investigation of the types and characteristics of the proteolytic enzymes formed by diverse strains of Proteus species. (2/203)

Many diverse clinical isolates of Proteus mirabilis (48 strains), P. penneri (25), P. vulgaris biogroup 2 (48) and P. vulgaris biogroup 3 (21) from man were examined for their ability to produce proteolytic enzymes and the nature and characteristics of the proteases were studied. All the P. penneri isolates, most (94-90%) of the P. mirabilis and P. vulgaris biogroup 2 isolates, but only 71% of the P. vulgaris biogroup 3 isolates, secreted proteolytic enzymes. These were detected most readily at pH 8 with gelatin as substrate. A strong correlation was found between the ability of a strain to form swarming growth and its ability to secrete proteases. Non-swarming isolates invariably appeared to be non-proteolytic. However, some isolates, particularly of P. vulgaris biogroup 3, were non-proteolytic even when they formed swarming growth. Analysis of the secreted enzymes of the different Proteus spp. on polyacrylamide-gelatin gels under various constraints of pH and other factors showed that they were all EDTA-sensitive metalloproteinases. Analysis of the kinetics of production of the proteases revealed the formation of an additional protease of undefined type and function that was cell-associated and formed before the others were secreted. The secreted protease was subsequently modified to two isoforms whose mass (53-46 kDa) varied with the Proteus spp. and the strain. There was no evidence that the secreted proteases of strains of Proteus spp. were of types other than metalloproteinases.  (+info)

Role and mechanism of action of C. PvuII, a regulatory protein conserved among restriction-modification systems. (3/203)

The PvuII restriction-modification system is a type II system, which means that its restriction endonuclease and modification methyltransferase are independently active proteins. The PvuII system is carried on a plasmid, and its movement into a new host cell is expected to be followed initially by expression of the methyltransferase gene alone so that the new host's DNA is protected before endonuclease activity appears. Previous studies have identified a regulatory gene (pvuIIC) between the divergently oriented genes for the restriction endonuclease (pvuIIR) and modification methyltransferase (pvuIIM), with pvuIIC in the same orientation as and partially overlapping pvuIIR. The product of pvuIIC, C. PvuII, was found to act in trans and to be required for expression of pvuIIR. In this study we demonstrate that premature expression of pvuIIC prevents establishment of the PvuII genes, consistent with the model that requiring C. PvuII for pvuIIR expression provides a timing delay essential for protection of the new host's DNA. We find that the opposing pvuIIC and pvuIIM transcripts overlap by over 60 nucleotides at their 5' ends, raising the possibility that their hybridization might play a regulatory role. We furthermore characterize the action of C. PvuII, demonstrating that it is a sequence-specific DNA-binding protein that binds to the pvuIIC promoter and stimulates transcription of both pvuIIC and pvuIIR into a polycistronic mRNA. The apparent location of C. PvuII binding, overlapping the -10 promoter hexamer and the pvuIICR transcriptional starting points, is highly unusual for transcriptional activators.  (+info)

Structure of a glycerol teichoic acid-like O-specific polysaccharide of Proteus vulgaris O12. (4/203)

A phosphorylated O-specific polysaccharide (O-antigen) was obtained by mild acid degradation of Proteus vulgaris O12 lipopolysaccharide and studied by sugar and methylation analyses, 1H-, 13C- and 31P-NMR spectroscopy, including two-dimensional COSY, TOCSY, NOESY, H-detected 1H, 13C and 1H, 31P heteronuclear multiple-quantum coherence experiments. It was found that the polysaccharide consists of pentasaccharide repeating units connected via a glycerol phosphate group, and has the following structure: where FucNAc is 2-acetamido-2,6-dideoxygalactose and the degree of O-acetylation at position 4 of GalNAc is approximately 25%. Immunochemical studies with P. vulgaris O12 O-antiserum suggested that the lipopolysaccharide studied shares common epitopes with the lipopolysaccharide core of P. vulgaris O8 and with the O-antigens of P. penneri strains 8 and 63.  (+info)

Problems related to determination of MICs of oximino-type expanded-spectrum cephems for Proteus vulgaris. (5/203)

During in vitro susceptibility testing of clinical isolates of Proteus vulgaris, we noted that the MICs of several expanded-spectrum cephems were much higher in the broth microdilution method than in the agar dilution method (termed the MIC gap phenomenon). Here we investigated the mechanism of the MIC gap phenomenon. Cephems with the MIC gap phenomenon were of the oximino type, such as cefotaxime, cefteram, and cefpodoxime, which serve as good substrates for inducible class A beta-lactamase (CumA) enzymes produced by P. vulgaris; this finding suggests a relationship between the MIC gap phenomenon and CumA. Since peptidoglycan recycling shares a system common to that inducing CumA, we analyzed the mechanism of the MIC gap phenomenon using P. vulgaris B317 and isogenic mutants with mutations in the peptidoglycan recycling and beta-lactamase induction systems. The MIC gap phenomenon was observed in the parent strain B317 but not in B317G (cumG-defective mutant; defective peptidoglycan recycling) and B317R (cumR-defective mutant; defective CumA transcriptional regulator). No beta-lactamase activity was detected in B317G and B317R. beta-Lactamase activity and the MIC gap phenomenon were restored in B317G/pMD301 (strain transcomplemented by a cloned cumG gene) and B317R/pMD501 (strain transcomplemented by a cloned cumR gene). MICs determined by the agar dilution method increased when lower agar concentrations were used. Our results indicated that the mechanism of the MIC gap phenomenon is related to peptidoglycan recycling and CumA induction systems. However, it remains unclear how beta-lactamase induction of P. vulgaris is suppressed on agar plates.  (+info)

Cloning of L-amino acid deaminase gene from Proteus vulgaris. (6/203)

The L-amino acid degrading enzyme gene from Proteus vulgaris was cloned and the nucleotide sequence of the enzyme gene was clarified. An open reading frame of 1,413 bp starting at an ATG methionine codon was found, which encodes a protein of 471 amino acid residues, the calculated molecular weight of which is 51,518. The amino acid sequence of P. vulgaris was 58.6% identical with the L-amino acid deaminase of P. mirabilis. A significantly conserved sequence was found around the FAD-binding sequence of flavo-proteins. The partially purified wild and recombinant enzymes had the same substrate specificity for L-amino acids to form the respective keto-acids, however not for D-amino acids.  (+info)

Biological activities of lipopolysaccharides of Proteus spp. and their interactions with polymyxin B and an 18-kDa cationic antimicrobial protein (CAP18)-derived peptide. (7/203)

The saccharide constituents of lipopolysaccharides (LPS) of Proteus spp. vary with the strain and contain unique components about which little is known. The biological activities of LPS and lipid A from S- and R-forms of 10 Proteus strains were examined. LPS from all S-form Proteus strains was lethal to D-(+)-galactosamine (GalN)-loaded, LPS-responsive, C3H/HeN mice, but not to LPS-hypo-responsive C3H/HeJ mice. P. vulgaris 025 LPS evoked strong anaphylactoid reactions in N-acetylmuramyl-L-alanyl-D-isoglutamine (MDP)-primed C3H/HeJ mice. LPS from S- and R-form Proteus strains induced production of nitric oxide (NO) and tumour necrosis factor (TNF) by macrophages isolated from C3H/HeN but not C3H/HeJ mice. Lipid A from Proteus strains also induced NO and TNF production, although lipid A was less potent than LPS. The effects of LPS were mainly dependent on CD14; LPS-induced NO and TNF production in CD14+ J774.1 cells was significantly greater than in CD14-J7.DEF.3 cells. All LPS from Proteus strains, and especially from P. vulgaris 025, exhibited higher anti-complementary activity than LPS from Escherichia coli or Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Polymyxin B inactivated proteus LPS in a dose-dependent manner, but these LPS preparations were more resistant to polymyxin B than E. coli LPS. CAP18(109-135), a granulocyte-derived peptide, inhibited proteus LPS endotoxicity only when the LPS:CAP18(109-135) ratio was appropriate, which suggests that CAP18(109-135) acts through a different mechanism than polymyxin B. The results indicate that LPS from Proteus spp. are potently endotoxic, but that the toxicity is different from that of LPS from E. coli or Salmonella spp. and even varies among different Proteus strains. The variation in biological activities among proteus LPS may be due to unique components within the respective LPS.  (+info)

R factors from Proteus mirabilis and P. vulgaris. (8/203)

Eighty-nine R factors were transmitted by conjugation to Escherichia coli K12 from isolates of Proteus hauseri (P. mirabilis plus P vulgaris). More than half were non-selftranmissible. The remainder included plasmids assigned to the previously defined groups FII,A-C complex, J, N and P, as well as some not belonging to any knwon compatibility groups. R factors from strains isolated in India, Thailand and Japan carried plasmids whose inheritance was extremely unstable in E. coli K12. All belonged to a new compatibility group, V.  (+info)

  • Biogroup one was indole negative and represented a new species, P. penneri, while biogroups two and three remained together as P. vulgaris. (wikipedia.org)
  • The term Proteus signifies changeability of form, as personified in the Homeric poems in Proteus, "the old man of the sea", who tends the sealflocks of Poseidon and has the gift of endless transformation. (wikipedia.org)
  • The concentric rings that form while a Proteus vulgaris colony migrates across the surface of an agar plate result from the bacterium's swarming behavior and extremely actively motile natures, notes Schenectady County Community College. (reference.com)
  • When P. vulgaris is tested using the API 20E identification system it produces positive results for sulfur reduction, urease production, tryptophan deaminase production, indole production, sometimes positive gelatinase activity, and saccharose fermentation, and negative results for the remainder of the tests on the testing strip. (wikipedia.org)
  • The International Organization for Standardization (ISO) published the new EN ISO 6579-1 standard in 2017, which specifies a horizontal method for the detection of Salmonella spp. (sigmaaldrich.com)
  • Despite the pronounced similarity of the three restriction-modification systems, the flanking sequences in Proteus and Salmonella are completely different. (asm.org)
  • High inhibitions over the growth of Enterobacter aerogenes, Salmonella typhi and Proteus vulgaris were witnessed against the concentrations of 100 μg/disc. (ijpsonline.com)
  • Proteus vulgaris also causes diarrhea in infants and some wound infections when the wound comes in direct contact with the bacteria. (reference.com)
  • en] The originally penicillin-induced, wall-less stable L-forms of Proteus vulgaris P18, isolated by Tulasne in 1949 and since then cultured in he absence of penicillin, have kept the ability to synthesize the seven penicillin-binding proteins and the various DD- and LD-peptidase activities found in the parental bacteria and known to be involved in wall peptidoglycan metabolism. (ac.be)
  • The aim of this study was to isolate and characterise metal-resistant endophytic bacteria from the tissues of Silene vulgaris collected within the vicinity of non-ferrous steelworks in Katowice, Upper Silesia, Southern Poland.Twenty-four strains of metal-resistant endophytic bacteria that belong to 15 genera were isolated from the stems and leaves of Silene vulgaris. (usda.gov)
  • The acidic nature of polysaccharides, which are present on the surface of Proteus strains, is believed to contribute to the formation of stones in urinary tract and to facilitate the migration of swarm cells from these bacteria. (toukach.ru)
  • Any of various gram-negative, rod-shaped bacteria of the genus Proteus, certain species of which are associated with human enteritis and urinary tract infections. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • Proteus vulgaris is a rod-shaped, nitrate-reducing, indole+ and catalase-positive, hydrogen sulfide-producing, Gram-negative bacterium that inhabits the intestinal tracts of humans and animals. (wikipedia.org)
  • When the indole-positive Proteus strains are tested, cefazolin MICs can be used to predict MICs of all tested orally administered cephems (8 to 13% total errors, with only a 0 to 1% very major error. (asm.org)
  • The AgNPs, as well as BIsH, showed high antimicrobial and bactericidal activity against the Gram-positive Bacillus subtilis and Gram-negative Micrococcus luteus and Proteus vulgaris , as well as antifungal activities against Saccharomyces cerevisiae . (dovepress.com)
  • Patients with recurrent infections, those with structural abnormalities of the urinary tract, those who have had urethral instrumentation, and those whose infections were acquired in the hospital have an increased frequency of infection caused by Proteus and other organisms (e.g. (wikipedia.org)
  • P. vulgaris and P. penneri are easily isolated from individuals in long-term care facilities and hospitals and from patients with underlying diseases or compromised immune systems. (wikipedia.org)
  • Presence of plasmid DNA in the wild type and its absence in the cured P. vulgaris suggested that the resistance were plasmid mediated. (who.int)
  • Identification of a novel conjugative plasmid carrying the multiresistance gene cfr in Proteus vulgaris isolated from swine origin in China. (infectoforum.net)
  • In this study, a novel conjugative plasmid carrying cfr, designated as pPvSC3, was characterized in a Proteus vulgaris strain isolated from swine in China. (infectoforum.net)
  • We have completed the sequence characterization of the Pvu II plasmid pPvu1, originally from Proteus vulgaris , making this the first completely sequenced plasmid from the genus Proteus . (asm.org)
  • Alteration in P. vulgaris' Characteristics Title: Phenotyping and Genotyping Characterization of Proteus vulgaris After Biofield Treatment Publication: International Journal of Genetics and Genomics Select license: Creative Commons Attributions-NonCommercial-ShareAlike Nitrophenols for the Preparation of Pharmaceuticals Nitrophenols are the synthetic organic chemicals used for the preparation of synthetic intermediates, organophosphorus pesticides, and pharmaceuticals. (pearltrees.com)
  • When P. vulgaris is tested using the API 20E identification system it produces positive results for sulfur reduction, urease production, tryptophan deaminase production, indole production, sometimes positive gelatinase activity, and saccharose fermentation, and negative results for the remainder of the tests on the testing strip. (wikipedia.org)
  • P. vulgaris can also test urease negative in solid media (such as in Enterotube), but will be urease positive in liquid media. (wikipedia.org)
  • The current study was attempted to investigate the effects of Mr. Trivedi's biofield treatment on lyophilized as well as revived state of P. vulgaris for antimicrobial susceptibility pattern, biochemical characteristics, and biotype. (pearltrees.com)
  • said buffering agent compound and said antimicrobial agent component being present within said pH control system in a weight ratio of from about 3:1 to 2000:1 with said pH control system being present in said absorbent article in an amount which is effective to maintain the pH of Proteus vulgaris-contaminated, bicarbonate-containing urine discharged into said article at a value below about 7.5. (google.es)
  • Exhibits strong antimicrobial activity against Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Proteus vulgaris. (rcsb.org)
  • Kinetic studies on the inhibition of Proteus vulgaris beta-lactamase by imipenem. (asm.org)
  • Imipenem was found to inhibit Proteus vulgaris beta-lactamase in a progressive manner. (asm.org)
  • Intraperitoneal administration of Proteus vulgaris living culture of various age (12 hrs and one day) caused impairments in lipid metabolism in mice liver, kidney and heart tissues. (msk.ru)
  • The concentric rings that form while a Proteus vulgaris colony migrates across the surface of an agar plate result from the bacterium's swarming behavior and extremely actively motile natures, notes Schenectady County Community College. (reference.com)
  • Typical habitats of Proteus vulgaris include the human intestinal tract, plants, water and soil. (reference.com)
  • Three members of the tribe Proteeae (Proteus vulgaris, Providencia rettgeri, and Providencia stuartii) were tested against five newer orally administered cephalosporins (cefdinir, cefprozil, cefuroxime, cefetamet, and loracarbef) by the disk diffusion and reference broth microdilution methods. (asm.org)
  • This strain is no longer the type strain of Proteus vulgaris . (atcc.org)
  • A Proteus vulgaris isolated from external ulcers of the fresh water fish Channa punctatus showed multidrug resistance and heavy metal tolerance. (who.int)
  • Acidic components, which are characteristic for many Proteus O-specific polysaccharides play an important role in manifesting immunospecificity of three out of four P. vulgaris O-antigens investigated in this paper. (toukach.ru)
Neomycin - Wikipedia
Neomycin - Wikipedia (en.wikipedia.org)
Proteus Vulgaris Genotyping Analysis | Pearltrees
Proteus Vulgaris Genotyping Analysis | Pearltrees (pearltrees.com)
Colonies of E. coli and Proteus vulgaris - Stock Image - B220/0095 - Science Photo Library
Colonies of E. coli and Proteus vulgaris - Stock Image - B220/0095 - Science Photo Library (sciencephoto.com)
Proteus Vulgaris - Hospital Acquired Infections | Pearltrees
Proteus Vulgaris - Hospital Acquired Infections | Pearltrees (pearltrees.com)
Calaméo - Phenotyping and Genotyping Characterization of Proteus vulgaris After Biofield Treatment
Calaméo - Phenotyping and Genotyping Characterization of Proteus vulgaris After Biofield Treatment (en.calameo.com)
Floxin Tablets - FDA prescribing information, side effects and uses
Floxin Tablets - FDA prescribing information, side effects and uses (drugs.com)
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Rocephin (Ceftriaxone): Uses, Dosage, Side Effects, Interactions, Warning (rxlist.com)
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Floxin (Ofloxacin): Side Effects, Interactions, Warning, Dosage & Uses (rxlist.com)
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Gatifloxacin (gatifloxacin): Uses, Dosage, Side Effects, Interactions, Warning (rxlist.com)
Cefotetan (Cefotetan for Injection): Side Effects, Interactions, Warning, Dosage & Uses
Cefotetan (Cefotetan for Injection): Side Effects, Interactions, Warning, Dosage & Uses (rxlist.com)
Zosyn (Piperacillin and Tazobactam Injection): Side Effects, Interactions, Warning, Dosage & Uses
Zosyn (Piperacillin and Tazobactam Injection): Side Effects, Interactions, Warning, Dosage & Uses (rxlist.com)
Noroxin (Norfloxacin): Side Effects, Interactions, Warning, Dosage & Uses
Noroxin (Norfloxacin): Side Effects, Interactions, Warning, Dosage & Uses (rxlist.com)
Cefpodoxime Proxetil - FDA prescribing information, side effects and uses
Cefpodoxime Proxetil - FDA prescribing information, side effects and uses (drugs.com)
Cefepime - FDA prescribing information, side effects and uses
Cefepime - FDA prescribing information, side effects and uses (drugs.com)
Ceftriaxone - FDA prescribing information, side effects and uses
Ceftriaxone - FDA prescribing information, side effects and uses (drugs.com)
Ciprofloxacin Tablets - FDA prescribing information, side effects and uses
Ciprofloxacin Tablets - FDA prescribing information, side effects and uses (drugs.com)
Suprax (Cefixime): Side Effects, Interactions, Warning, Dosage & Uses
Suprax (Cefixime): Side Effects, Interactions, Warning, Dosage & Uses (rxlist.com)
Zerbaxa (Ceftolozane and Tazobactam for Injection): Uses, Dosage, Side Effects, Interactions, Warning
Zerbaxa (Ceftolozane and Tazobactam for Injection): Uses, Dosage, Side Effects, Interactions, Warning (rxlist.com)
Escherichia coli (E coli) Infections: Background, Pathophysiology, Epidemiology
Escherichia coli (E coli) Infections: Background, Pathophysiology, Epidemiology (emedicine.medscape.com)
Commercial Buildings | SpringerLink
Commercial Buildings | SpringerLink (link.springer.com)
Cipro XR (Ciprofloxacin Extended-Release): Side Effects, Interactions, Warning, Dosage & Uses
Cipro XR (Ciprofloxacin Extended-Release): Side Effects, Interactions, Warning, Dosage & Uses (rxlist.com)
Ciprofloxacin Oral Suspension - FDA prescribing information, side effects and uses
Ciprofloxacin Oral Suspension - FDA prescribing information, side effects and uses (drugs.com)
Factive (Gemifloxacin Mesylate): Uses, Dosage, Side Effects, Interactions, Warning
Factive (Gemifloxacin Mesylate): Uses, Dosage, Side Effects, Interactions, Warning (rxlist.com)
Levofloxacin Injection Concentrate - FDA prescribing information, side effects and uses
Levofloxacin Injection Concentrate - FDA prescribing information, side effects and uses (drugs.com)
Silvadene (Silver Sulfadiazine): Uses, Dosage, Side Effects, Interactions, Warning
Silvadene (Silver Sulfadiazine): Uses, Dosage, Side Effects, Interactions, Warning (rxlist.com)
Iquix - FDA prescribing information, side effects and uses
Iquix - FDA prescribing information, side effects and uses (drugs.com)
Levaquin (Levofloxacin): Side Effects, Interactions, Warning, Dosage & Uses
Levaquin (Levofloxacin): Side Effects, Interactions, Warning, Dosage & Uses (rxlist.com)
Tissue Dissociation Enzymes  | Enzymes Products & Reviews on SelectScience
Tissue Dissociation Enzymes | Enzymes Products & Reviews on SelectScience (selectscience.net)
Cefotaxime - FDA prescribing information, side effects and uses
Cefotaxime - FDA prescribing information, side effects and uses (drugs.com)
Sideromycins: tools and antibiotics | SpringerLink
Sideromycins: tools and antibiotics | SpringerLink (link.springer.com)
Claforan (Cefotaxime): Side Effects, Interactions, Warning, Dosage & Uses
Claforan (Cefotaxime): Side Effects, Interactions, Warning, Dosage & Uses (rxlist.com)
DailyMed - SULFAMETHOXAZOLE AND TRIMETHOPRIM tablet
DailyMed - SULFAMETHOXAZOLE AND TRIMETHOPRIM tablet (dailymed.nlm.nih.gov)
Metallo-β-Lactamase-Producing Gram-Negative Bacilli: Laboratory-Based Surveillance in Cooperation with 13 Clinical Laboratories...
Metallo-β-Lactamase-Producing Gram-Negative Bacilli: Laboratory-Based Surveillance in Cooperation with 13 Clinical Laboratories... (jcm.asm.org)