TATA Box: A conserved A-T rich sequence which is contained in promoters for RNA polymerase II. The segment is seven base pairs long and the nucleotides most commonly found are TATAAAA.TATA-Binding Protein Associated Factors: Factors that associate with TATA-BOX BINDING PROTEIN. Many of them are components of TRANSCRIPTION FACTOR TFIIDTranscription Factor TFIID: The major sequence-specific DNA-binding component involved in the activation of transcription of RNA POLYMERASE II. It was originally described as a complex of TATA-BOX BINDING PROTEIN and TATA-BINDING PROTEIN ASSOCIATED FACTORS. It is now know that TATA BOX BINDING PROTEIN-LIKE PROTEINS may take the place of TATA-box binding protein in the complex.TATA-Box Binding Protein: A general transcription factor that plays a major role in the activation of eukaryotic genes transcribed by RNA POLYMERASES. It binds specifically to the TATA BOX promoter element, which lies close to the position of transcription initiation in RNA transcribed by RNA POLYMERASE II. Although considered a principal component of TRANSCRIPTION FACTOR TFIID it also takes part in general transcription factor complexes involved in RNA POLYMERASE I and RNA POLYMERASE III transcription.Promoter Regions, Genetic: DNA sequences which are recognized (directly or indirectly) and bound by a DNA-dependent RNA polymerase during the initiation of transcription. Highly conserved sequences within the promoter include the Pribnow box in bacteria and the TATA BOX in eukaryotes.Transcription, Genetic: The biosynthesis of RNA carried out on a template of DNA. The biosynthesis of DNA from an RNA template is called REVERSE TRANSCRIPTION.Base Sequence: The sequence of PURINES and PYRIMIDINES in nucleic acids and polynucleotides. It is also called nucleotide sequence.Molecular Sequence Data: Descriptions of specific amino acid, carbohydrate, or nucleotide sequences which have appeared in the published literature and/or are deposited in and maintained by databanks such as GENBANK, European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), National Biomedical Research Foundation (NBRF), or other sequence repositories.Transcription Factors: Endogenous substances, usually proteins, which are effective in the initiation, stimulation, or termination of the genetic transcription process.TATA Box Binding Protein-Like Proteins: A class of proteins related in structure and function to TATA-BOX BINDING PROTEIN that can take the place of TATA-BOX BINDING PROTEIN in the transcription initiation complex. They are found in most multicellular organisms and may be involved in tissue-specific promoter regulation. They bind to DNA and interact with TATA-BINDING PROTEIN ASSOCIATED FACTORS, however they may lack specificity for the TATA-BOX.Histone Acetyltransferases: Enzymes that catalyze acyl group transfer from ACETYL-CoA to HISTONES forming CoA and acetyl-histones.DNA-Binding Proteins: Proteins which bind to DNA. The family includes proteins which bind to both double- and single-stranded DNA and also includes specific DNA binding proteins in serum which can be used as markers for malignant diseases.Transcription Factors, TFII: The so-called general transcription factors that bind to RNA POLYMERASE II and that are required to initiate transcription. They include TFIIA; TFIIB; TFIID; TFIIE; TFIIF; TFIIH; TFII-I; and TFIIJ. In vivo they apparently bind in an ordered multi-step process and/or may form a large preinitiation complex called RNA polymerase II holoenzyme.RNA Polymerase II: A DNA-dependent RNA polymerase present in bacterial, plant, and animal cells. It functions in the nucleoplasmic structure and transcribes DNA into RNA. It has different requirements for cations and salt than RNA polymerase I and is strongly inhibited by alpha-amanitin. EC 2.7.7.6.Amino Acid Sequence: The order of amino acids as they occur in a polypeptide chain. This is referred to as the primary structure of proteins. It is of fundamental importance in determining PROTEIN CONFORMATION.HeLa Cells: The first continuously cultured human malignant CELL LINE, derived from the cervical carcinoma of Henrietta Lacks. These cells are used for VIRUS CULTIVATION and antitumor drug screening assays.Cloning, Molecular: The insertion of recombinant DNA molecules from prokaryotic and/or eukaryotic sources into a replicating vehicle, such as a plasmid or virus vector, and the introduction of the resultant hybrid molecules into recipient cells without altering the viability of those cells.Binding Sites: The parts of a macromolecule that directly participate in its specific combination with another molecule.Saccharomyces cerevisiae: A species of the genus SACCHAROMYCES, family Saccharomycetaceae, order Saccharomycetales, known as "baker's" or "brewer's" yeast. The dried form is used as a dietary supplement.Transcriptional Activation: Processes that stimulate the GENETIC TRANSCRIPTION of a gene or set of genes.DNA: A deoxyribonucleotide polymer that is the primary genetic material of all cells. Eukaryotic and prokaryotic organisms normally contain DNA in a double-stranded state, yet several important biological processes transiently involve single-stranded regions. DNA, which consists of a polysugar-phosphate backbone possessing projections of purines (adenine and guanine) and pyrimidines (thymine and cytosine), forms a double helix that is held together by hydrogen bonds between these purines and pyrimidines (adenine to thymine and guanine to cytosine).Gene Expression Regulation: Any of the processes by which nuclear, cytoplasmic, or intercellular factors influence the differential control (induction or repression) of gene action at the level of transcription or translation.Sp1 Transcription Factor: Promoter-specific RNA polymerase II transcription factor that binds to the GC box, one of the upstream promoter elements, in mammalian cells. The binding of Sp1 is necessary for the initiation of transcription in the promoters of a variety of cellular and viral GENES.Saccharomyces cerevisiae Proteins: Proteins obtained from the species SACCHAROMYCES CEREVISIAE. The function of specific proteins from this organism are the subject of intense scientific interest and have been used to derive basic understanding of the functioning similar proteins in higher eukaryotes.Regulatory Sequences, Nucleic Acid: Nucleic acid sequences involved in regulating the expression of genes.Protein Binding: The process in which substances, either endogenous or exogenous, bind to proteins, peptides, enzymes, protein precursors, or allied compounds. Specific protein-binding measures are often used as assays in diagnostic assessments.Mutation: Any detectable and heritable change in the genetic material that causes a change in the GENOTYPE and which is transmitted to daughter cells and to succeeding generations.Trans-Activators: Diffusible gene products that act on homologous or heterologous molecules of viral or cellular DNA to regulate the expression of proteins.Restriction Mapping: Use of restriction endonucleases to analyze and generate a physical map of genomes, genes, or other segments of DNA.Genes: A category of nucleic acid sequences that function as units of heredity and which code for the basic instructions for the development, reproduction, and maintenance of organisms.Transfection: The uptake of naked or purified DNA by CELLS, usually meaning the process as it occurs in eukaryotic cells. It is analogous to bacterial transformation (TRANSFORMATION, BACTERIAL) and both are routinely employed in GENE TRANSFER TECHNIQUES.Plasmids: Extrachromosomal, usually CIRCULAR DNA molecules that are self-replicating and transferable from one organism to another. They are found in a variety of bacterial, archaeal, fungal, algal, and plant species. They are used in GENETIC ENGINEERING as CLONING VECTORS.Gene Expression Regulation, Fungal: Any of the processes by which nuclear, cytoplasmic, or intercellular factors influence the differential control of gene action in fungi.Transcription Initiation Site: The first nucleotide of a transcribed DNA sequence where RNA polymerase (DNA-DIRECTED RNA POLYMERASE) begins synthesizing the RNA transcript.Cell Line: Established cell cultures that have the potential to propagate indefinitely.Exons: The parts of a transcript of a split GENE remaining after the INTRONS are removed. They are spliced together to become a MESSENGER RNA or other functional RNA.Introns: Sequences of DNA in the genes that are located between the EXONS. They are transcribed along with the exons but are removed from the primary gene transcript by RNA SPLICING to leave mature RNA. Some introns code for separate genes.Nuclear Proteins: Proteins found in the nucleus of a cell. Do not confuse with NUCLEOPROTEINS which are proteins conjugated with nucleic acids, that are not necessarily present in the nucleus.RNA, Messenger: RNA sequences that serve as templates for protein synthesis. Bacterial mRNAs are generally primary transcripts in that they do not require post-transcriptional processing. Eukaryotic mRNA is synthesized in the nucleus and must be exported to the cytoplasm for translation. Most eukaryotic mRNAs have a sequence of polyadenylic acid at the 3' end, referred to as the poly(A) tail. The function of this tail is not known for certain, but it may play a role in the export of mature mRNA from the nucleus as well as in helping stabilize some mRNA molecules by retarding their degradation in the cytoplasm.Sequence Homology, Nucleic Acid: The sequential correspondence of nucleotides in one nucleic acid molecule with those of another nucleic acid molecule. Sequence homology is an indication of the genetic relatedness of different organisms and gene function.Chloramphenicol O-Acetyltransferase: An enzyme that catalyzes the acetylation of chloramphenicol to yield chloramphenicol 3-acetate. Since chloramphenicol 3-acetate does not bind to bacterial ribosomes and is not an inhibitor of peptidyltransferase, the enzyme is responsible for the naturally occurring chloramphenicol resistance in bacteria. The enzyme, for which variants are known, is found in both gram-negative and gram-positive bacteria. EC 2.3.1.28.Genomic Library: A form of GENE LIBRARY containing the complete DNA sequences present in the genome of a given organism. It contrasts with a cDNA library which contains only sequences utilized in protein coding (lacking introns).Genes, Fungal: The functional hereditary units of FUNGI.DNA Footprinting: A method for determining the sequence specificity of DNA-binding proteins. DNA footprinting utilizes a DNA damaging agent (either a chemical reagent or a nuclease) which cleaves DNA at every base pair. DNA cleavage is inhibited where the ligand binds to DNA. (from Rieger et al., Glossary of Genetics: Classical and Molecular, 5th ed)Pol1 Transcription Initiation Complex Proteins: Factors that form a preinitiation complex at promoters that are specifically transcribed by RNA POLYMERASE I.Fungal Proteins: Proteins found in any species of fungus.Sequence Deletion: Deletion of sequences of nucleic acids from the genetic material of an individual.Sequence Homology, Amino Acid: The degree of similarity between sequences of amino acids. This information is useful for the analyzing genetic relatedness of proteins and species.Protein Structure, Tertiary: The level of protein structure in which combinations of secondary protein structures (alpha helices, beta sheets, loop regions, and motifs) pack together to form folded shapes called domains. Disulfide bridges between cysteines in two different parts of the polypeptide chain along with other interactions between the chains play a role in the formation and stabilization of tertiary structure. Small proteins usually consist of only one domain but larger proteins may contain a number of domains connected by segments of polypeptide chain which lack regular secondary structure.Deoxyribonuclease I: An enzyme capable of hydrolyzing highly polymerized DNA by splitting phosphodiester linkages, preferentially adjacent to a pyrimidine nucleotide. This catalyzes endonucleolytic cleavage of DNA yielding 5'-phosphodi- and oligonucleotide end-products. The enzyme has a preference for double-stranded DNA.Protein Subunits: Single chains of amino acids that are the units of multimeric PROTEINS. Multimeric proteins can be composed of identical or non-identical subunits. One or more monomeric subunits may compose a protomer which itself is a subunit structure of a larger assembly.Histones: Small chromosomal proteins (approx 12-20 kD) possessing an open, unfolded structure and attached to the DNA in cell nuclei by ionic linkages. Classification into the various types (designated histone I, histone II, etc.) is based on the relative amounts of arginine and lysine in each.Podophyllin: Caustic extract from the roots of Podophyllum peltatum and P. emodi. It contains PODOPHYLLOTOXIN and its congeners and is very irritating to mucous membranes and skin. Podophyllin is a violent purgative that may cause CNS damage and teratogenesis. It is used as a paint for warts, skin neoplasms, and senile keratoses.Transcription Factor TFIIA: An RNA POLYMERASE II specific transcription factor. It may play a role in transcriptional activation of gene expression by interacting with the TATA-BOX BINDING PROTEIN component of TRANSCRIPTION FACTOR TFIID.Drosophila: A genus of small, two-winged flies containing approximately 900 described species. These organisms are the most extensively studied of all genera from the standpoint of genetics and cytology.Membrane Transport Proteins: Membrane proteins whose primary function is to facilitate the transport of molecules across a biological membrane. Included in this broad category are proteins involved in active transport (BIOLOGICAL TRANSPORT, ACTIVE), facilitated transport and ION CHANNELS.Recombinant Fusion Proteins: Recombinant proteins produced by the GENETIC TRANSLATION of fused genes formed by the combination of NUCLEIC ACID REGULATORY SEQUENCES of one or more genes with the protein coding sequences of one or more genes.Sequence Alignment: The arrangement of two or more amino acid or base sequences from an organism or organisms in such a way as to align areas of the sequences sharing common properties. The degree of relatedness or homology between the sequences is predicted computationally or statistically based on weights assigned to the elements aligned between the sequences. This in turn can serve as a potential indicator of the genetic relatedness between the organisms.Gene Expression Regulation, Viral: Any of the processes by which cytoplasmic factors influence the differential control of gene action in viruses.Genes, Reporter: Genes whose expression is easily detectable and therefore used to study promoter activity at many positions in a target genome. In recombinant DNA technology, these genes may be attached to a promoter region of interest.Conserved Sequence: A sequence of amino acids in a polypeptide or of nucleotides in DNA or RNA that is similar across multiple species. A known set of conserved sequences is represented by a CONSENSUS SEQUENCE. AMINO ACID MOTIFS are often composed of conserved sequences.Transcription Initiation, Genetic: The process that starts the transcription of an RNA molecule. It includes the assembly of the initiation complex and establishment of the start site.Enhancer Elements, Genetic: Cis-acting DNA sequences which can increase transcription of genes. Enhancers can usually function in either orientation and at various distances from a promoter.Oligodeoxyribonucleotides: A group of deoxyribonucleotides (up to 12) in which the phosphate residues of each deoxyribonucleotide act as bridges in forming diester linkages between the deoxyribose moieties.Consensus Sequence: A theoretical representative nucleotide or amino acid sequence in which each nucleotide or amino acid is the one which occurs most frequently at that site in the different sequences which occur in nature. The phrase also refers to an actual sequence which approximates the theoretical consensus. A known CONSERVED SEQUENCE set is represented by a consensus sequence. Commonly observed supersecondary protein structures (AMINO ACID MOTIFS) are often formed by conserved sequences.Acetyltransferases: Enzymes catalyzing the transfer of an acetyl group, usually from acetyl coenzyme A, to another compound. EC 2.3.1.Drosophila Proteins: Proteins that originate from insect species belonging to the genus DROSOPHILA. The proteins from the most intensely studied species of Drosophila, DROSOPHILA MELANOGASTER, are the subject of much interest in the area of MORPHOGENESIS and development.AT-Hook Motifs: DNA-binding motifs, first described in one of the HMGA PROTEINS: HMG-I(Y) PROTEIN. They consist of positively charged sequences of nine amino acids centered on the invariant tripeptide glycine-arginine-proline. They act to fasten the protein to an AT RICH SEQUENCE in the DNA.Nucleotide Mapping: Two-dimensional separation and analysis of nucleotides.Recombinant Proteins: Proteins prepared by recombinant DNA technology.Genes, Regulator: Genes which regulate or circumscribe the activity of other genes; specifically, genes which code for PROTEINS or RNAs which have GENE EXPRESSION REGULATION functions.Cell Nucleus: Within a eukaryotic cell, a membrane-limited body which contains chromosomes and one or more nucleoli (CELL NUCLEOLUS). The nuclear membrane consists of a double unit-type membrane which is perforated by a number of pores; the outermost membrane is continuous with the ENDOPLASMIC RETICULUM. A cell may contain more than one nucleus. (From Singleton & Sainsbury, Dictionary of Microbiology and Molecular Biology, 2d ed)Repetitive Sequences, Nucleic Acid: Sequences of DNA or RNA that occur in multiple copies. There are several types: INTERSPERSED REPETITIVE SEQUENCES are copies of transposable elements (DNA TRANSPOSABLE ELEMENTS or RETROELEMENTS) dispersed throughout the genome. TERMINAL REPEAT SEQUENCES flank both ends of another sequence, for example, the long terminal repeats (LTRs) on RETROVIRUSES. Variations may be direct repeats, those occurring in the same direction, or inverted repeats, those opposite to each other in direction. TANDEM REPEAT SEQUENCES are copies which lie adjacent to each other, direct or inverted (INVERTED REPEAT SEQUENCES).Precipitin Tests: Serologic tests in which a positive reaction manifested by visible CHEMICAL PRECIPITATION occurs when a soluble ANTIGEN reacts with its precipitins, i.e., ANTIBODIES that can form a precipitate.Single-Strand Specific DNA and RNA Endonucleases: Enzymes that catalyze the endonucleolytic cleavage of single-stranded regions of DNA or RNA molecules while leaving the double-stranded regions intact. They are particularly useful in the laboratory for producing "blunt-ended" DNA molecules from DNA with single-stranded ends and for sensitive GENETIC TECHNIQUES such as NUCLEASE PROTECTION ASSAYS that involve the detection of single-stranded DNA and RNA.DNA, Fungal: Deoxyribonucleic acid that makes up the genetic material of fungi.Macromolecular Substances: Compounds and molecular complexes that consist of very large numbers of atoms and are generally over 500 kDa in size. In biological systems macromolecular substances usually can be visualized using ELECTRON MICROSCOPY and are distinguished from ORGANELLES by the lack of a membrane structure.Drosophila melanogaster: A species of fruit fly much used in genetics because of the large size of its chromosomes.DNA, Complementary: Single-stranded complementary DNA synthesized from an RNA template by the action of RNA-dependent DNA polymerase. cDNA (i.e., complementary DNA, not circular DNA, not C-DNA) is used in a variety of molecular cloning experiments as well as serving as a specific hybridization probe.Transcription Factor TFIIIB: One of several general transcription factors that are specific for RNA POLYMERASE III. TFIIIB recruits and positions pol III over the initiation site and remains stably bound to the DNA through multiple rounds of re-initiation by RNA POLYMERASE III.Mutagenesis: Process of generating a genetic MUTATION. It may occur spontaneously or be induced by MUTAGENS.Chromosome Mapping: Any method used for determining the location of and relative distances between genes on a chromosome.Immediate-Early Proteins: Proteins that are coded by immediate-early genes, in the absence of de novo protein synthesis. The term was originally used exclusively for viral regulatory proteins that were synthesized just after viral integration into the host cell. It is also used to describe cellular proteins which are synthesized immediately after the resting cell is stimulated by extracellular signals.DNA Primers: Short sequences (generally about 10 base pairs) of DNA that are complementary to sequences of messenger RNA and allow reverse transcriptases to start copying the adjacent sequences of mRNA. Primers are used extensively in genetic and molecular biology techniques.Histone Chaperones: Proteins involved in the assembly and disassembly of HISTONES into NUCLEOSOMES.Mutagenesis, Site-Directed: Genetically engineered MUTAGENESIS at a specific site in the DNA molecule that introduces a base substitution, or an insertion or deletion.Chromatin: The material of CHROMOSOMES. It is a complex of DNA; HISTONES; and nonhistone proteins (CHROMOSOMAL PROTEINS, NON-HISTONE) found within the nucleus of a cell.Models, Genetic: Theoretical representations that simulate the behavior or activity of genetic processes or phenomena. They include the use of mathematical equations, computers, and other electronic equipment.Oligonucleotide Probes: Synthetic or natural oligonucleotides used in hybridization studies in order to identify and study specific nucleic acid fragments, e.g., DNA segments near or within a specific gene locus or gene. The probe hybridizes with a specific mRNA, if present. Conventional techniques used for testing for the hybridization product include dot blot assays, Southern blot assays, and DNA:RNA hybrid-specific antibody tests. Conventional labels for the probe include the radioisotope labels 32P and 125I and the chemical label biotin.DNA Mutational Analysis: Biochemical identification of mutational changes in a nucleotide sequence.Repressor Proteins: Proteins which maintain the transcriptional quiescence of specific GENES or OPERONS. Classical repressor proteins are DNA-binding proteins that are normally bound to the OPERATOR REGION of an operon, or the ENHANCER SEQUENCES of a gene until a signal occurs that causes their release.RNA-Binding Protein FUS: A multifunctional heterogeneous-nuclear ribonucleoprotein that may play a role in homologous DNA pairing and recombination. The N-terminal portion of protein is a potent transcriptional activator, while the C terminus is required for RNA binding. The name FUS refers to the fact that genetic recombination events result in fusion oncogene proteins (ONCOGENE PROTEINS, FUSION) that contain the N-terminal region of this protein. These fusion proteins have been found in myxoid liposarcoma (LIPOSARCOMA, MYXOID) and acute myeloid leukemia.Adenovirus Early Proteins: Proteins encoded by adenoviruses that are synthesized prior to, and in the absence of, viral DNA replication. The proteins are involved in both positive and negative regulation of expression in viral and cellular genes, and also affect the stability of viral mRNA. Some are also involved in oncogenic transformation.DNA Restriction Enzymes: Enzymes that are part of the restriction-modification systems. They catalyze the endonucleolytic cleavage of DNA sequences which lack the species-specific methylation pattern in the host cell's DNA. Cleavage yields random or specific double-stranded fragments with terminal 5'-phosphates. The function of restriction enzymes is to destroy any foreign DNA that invades the host cell. Most have been studied in bacterial systems, but a few have been found in eukaryotic organisms. They are also used as tools for the systematic dissection and mapping of chromosomes, in the determination of base sequences of DNAs, and have made it possible to splice and recombine genes from one organism into the genome of another. EC 3.21.1.Genes, Viral: The functional hereditary units of VIRUSES.RNA Polymerase I: A DNA-dependent RNA polymerase present in bacterial, plant, and animal cells. The enzyme functions in the nucleolar structure and transcribes DNA into RNA. It has different requirements for cations and salts than RNA polymerase II and III and is not inhibited by alpha-amanitin. EC 2.7.7.6.RNA, Small Nuclear: Short chains of RNA (100-300 nucleotides long) that are abundant in the nucleus and usually complexed with proteins in snRNPs (RIBONUCLEOPROTEINS, SMALL NUCLEAR). Many function in the processing of messenger RNA precursors. Others, the snoRNAs (RNA, SMALL NUCLEOLAR), are involved with the processing of ribosomal RNA precursors.Nucleic Acid Conformation: The spatial arrangement of the atoms of a nucleic acid or polynucleotide that results in its characteristic 3-dimensional shape.Chromosome Deletion: Actual loss of portion of a chromosome.Sequence Analysis, DNA: A multistage process that includes cloning, physical mapping, subcloning, determination of the DNA SEQUENCE, and information analysis.Eurycoma: A plant genus of the family SIMAROUBACEAE. Members contain quassinoids. There is Malaysian folk use of these plants for male virility.Nucleosomes: The repeating structural units of chromatin, each consisting of approximately 200 base pairs of DNA wound around a protein core. This core is composed of the histones H2A, H2B, H3, and H4.Phenotype: The outward appearance of the individual. It is the product of interactions between genes, and between the GENOTYPE and the environment.Response Elements: Nucleotide sequences, usually upstream, which are recognized by specific regulatory transcription factors, thereby causing gene response to various regulatory agents. These elements may be found in both promoter and enhancer regions.Escherichia coli: A species of gram-negative, facultatively anaerobic, rod-shaped bacteria (GRAM-NEGATIVE FACULTATIVELY ANAEROBIC RODS) commonly found in the lower part of the intestine of warm-blooded animals. It is usually nonpathogenic, but some strains are known to produce DIARRHEA and pyogenic infections. Pathogenic strains (virotypes) are classified by their specific pathogenic mechanisms such as toxins (ENTEROTOXIGENIC ESCHERICHIA COLI), etc.Luciferases: Enzymes that oxidize certain LUMINESCENT AGENTS to emit light (PHYSICAL LUMINESCENCE). The luciferases from different organisms have evolved differently so have different structures and substrates.Blotting, Northern: Detection of RNA that has been electrophoretically separated and immobilized by blotting on nitrocellulose or other type of paper or nylon membrane followed by hybridization with labeled NUCLEIC ACID PROBES.DNA, Viral: Deoxyribonucleic acid that makes up the genetic material of viruses.Multiprotein Complexes: Macromolecular complexes formed from the association of defined protein subunits.Genetic Complementation Test: A test used to determine whether or not complementation (compensation in the form of dominance) will occur in a cell with a given mutant phenotype when another mutant genome, encoding the same mutant phenotype, is introduced into that cell.Temperature: The property of objects that determines the direction of heat flow when they are placed in direct thermal contact. The temperature is the energy of microscopic motions (vibrational and translational) of the particles of atoms.Genome, Fungal: The complete gene complement contained in a set of chromosomes in a fungus.Spermatocytes: Male germ cells derived from SPERMATOGONIA. The euploid primary spermatocytes undergo MEIOSIS and give rise to the haploid secondary spermatocytes which in turn give rise to SPERMATIDS.Gene Expression: The phenotypic manifestation of a gene or genes by the processes of GENETIC TRANSCRIPTION and GENETIC TRANSLATION.Two-Hybrid System Techniques: Screening techniques first developed in yeast to identify genes encoding interacting proteins. Variations are used to evaluate interplay between proteins and other molecules. Two-hybrid techniques refer to analysis for protein-protein interactions, one-hybrid for DNA-protein interactions, three-hybrid interactions for RNA-protein interactions or ligand-based interactions. Reverse n-hybrid techniques refer to analysis for mutations or other small molecules that dissociate known interactions.Epsilonretrovirus: A genus in the family RETROVIRIDAE infecting fish. Species include Walleye dermal sarcoma virus, Walleye epidermal hyperplasia virus 1, and Walleye epidermal hyperplasia virus 2.Tumor Cells, Cultured: Cells grown in vitro from neoplastic tissue. If they can be established as a TUMOR CELL LINE, they can be propagated in cell culture indefinitely.Escherichia coli Proteins: Proteins obtained from ESCHERICHIA COLI.Organ Specificity: Characteristic restricted to a particular organ of the body, such as a cell type, metabolic response or expression of a particular protein or antigen.Activating Transcription Factors: Activating transcription factors were originally identified as DNA-BINDING PROTEINS that interact with early promoters from ADENOVIRUSES. They are a family of basic leucine zipper transcription factors that bind to the consensus site TGACGTCA of the cyclic AMP response element, and are closely related to CYCLIC AMP-RESPONSIVE DNA-BINDING PROTEIN.Models, Molecular: Models used experimentally or theoretically to study molecular shape, electronic properties, or interactions; includes analogous molecules, computer-generated graphics, and mechanical structures.Yeasts: A general term for single-celled rounded fungi that reproduce by budding. Brewers' and bakers' yeasts are SACCHAROMYCES CEREVISIAE; therapeutic dried yeast is YEAST, DRIED.Gene Expression Regulation, Developmental: Any of the processes by which nuclear, cytoplasmic, or intercellular factors influence the differential control of gene action during the developmental stages of an organism.RNA: A polynucleotide consisting essentially of chains with a repeating backbone of phosphate and ribose units to which nitrogenous bases are attached. RNA is unique among biological macromolecules in that it can encode genetic information, serve as an abundant structural component of cells, and also possesses catalytic activity. (Rieger et al., Glossary of Genetics: Classical and Molecular, 5th ed)Blotting, Southern: A method (first developed by E.M. Southern) for detection of DNA that has been electrophoretically separated and immobilized by blotting on nitrocellulose or other type of paper or nylon membrane followed by hybridization with labeled NUCLEIC ACID PROBES.Polymerase Chain Reaction: In vitro method for producing large amounts of specific DNA or RNA fragments of defined length and sequence from small amounts of short oligonucleotide flanking sequences (primers). The essential steps include thermal denaturation of the double-stranded target molecules, annealing of the primers to their complementary sequences, and extension of the annealed primers by enzymatic synthesis with DNA polymerase. The reaction is efficient, specific, and extremely sensitive. Uses for the reaction include disease diagnosis, detection of difficult-to-isolate pathogens, mutation analysis, genetic testing, DNA sequencing, and analyzing evolutionary relationships.Alternative Splicing: A process whereby multiple RNA transcripts are generated from a single gene. Alternative splicing involves the splicing together of other possible sets of EXONS during the processing of some, but not all, transcripts of the gene. Thus a particular exon may be connected to any one of several alternative exons to form a mature RNA. The alternative forms of mature MESSENGER RNA produce PROTEIN ISOFORMS in which one part of the isoforms is common while the other parts are different.Adenoviruses, Human: Species of the genus MASTADENOVIRUS, causing a wide range of diseases in humans. Infections are mostly asymptomatic, but can be associated with diseases of the respiratory, ocular, and gastrointestinal systems. Serotypes (named with Arabic numbers) have been grouped into species designated Human adenovirus A-F.Spermatogenesis: The process of germ cell development in the male from the primordial germ cells, through SPERMATOGONIA; SPERMATOCYTES; SPERMATIDS; to the mature haploid SPERMATOZOA.Acetylation: Formation of an acetyl derivative. (Stedman, 25th ed)Base Composition: The relative amounts of the PURINES and PYRIMIDINES in a nucleic acid.Templates, Genetic: Macromolecular molds for the synthesis of complementary macromolecules, as in DNA REPLICATION; GENETIC TRANSCRIPTION of DNA to RNA, and GENETIC TRANSLATION of RNA into POLYPEPTIDES.YY1 Transcription Factor: A ubiquitously expressed zinc finger-containing protein that acts both as a repressor and activator of transcription. It interacts with key regulatory proteins such as TATA-BINDING PROTEIN; TFIIB; and ADENOVIRUS E1A PROTEINS.Globins: A superfamily of proteins containing the globin fold which is composed of 6-8 alpha helices arranged in a characterstic HEME enclosing structure.Erythroid-Specific DNA-Binding Factors: A group of transcription factors that were originally described as being specific to ERYTHROID CELLS.
... is thought to result from a mutation of the TAF1 (TATA-binding protein-associated factor 1) gene ... The prevalence in the Philippines has been estimated at 1/322,000 and as high as 1/4,000 in the province of Capiz's male ... 121 (1): 3-11. doi:10.3109/00207454.2010.526728. PMID 21047175. [1] Orphanet: X-linked dystonia parkinsonism. Accessed December ...
TAF1, TATA binding protein, and Transcription Factor II B. Transcription factor II F GRCh38: Ensembl release 89: ... Siegert JL, Robbins PD (January 1999). "Rb inhibits the intrinsic kinase activity of TATA-binding protein-associated factor ... Fang SM, Burton ZF (May 1996). "RNA polymerase II-associated protein (RAP) 74 binds transcription factor (TF) IIB and blocks ... Fang SM, Burton ZF (1996). "RNA polymerase II-associated protein (RAP) 74 binds transcription factor (TF) IIB and blocks TFIIB- ...
Subunits in the TFIID complex include: TBP (TATA binding protein) TAF1 (TAFII250) TAF2 (CIF150) TAF3 (TAFII140) TAF4 (TAFII130/ ... It consists of RNA polymerase II, a subset of general transcription factors, and regulatory proteins known as SRB proteins. ... Before the start of transcription, the transcription Factor II D (TFIID) complex binds to the TATA box in the core promoter of ... for regulatory signals TFIID is itself composed of TBP and several subunits called TATA-binding protein Associated Factors (TBP ...
... RNA polymerase II, TATA box binding protein (TBP)-associated factor, 250kDa". Sekiguchi T, Yoshida MC, Sekiguchi M, ... Siegert JL, Robbins PD (January 1999). "Rb inhibits the intrinsic kinase activity of TATA-binding protein-associated factor ... TFIID is composed of the TATA-binding protein (TBP) and a group of evolutionarily conserved proteins known as TBP-associated ... or TBP-associated factor 250 kDa (p250), is a protein that in humans is encoded by the TAF1 gene. Initiation of transcription ...
The TATA-binding protein (TBP) is a general transcription factor that binds specifically to a DNA sequence called the TATA box ... TAF1, TAF4, TAF5, TAF6, TAF7, TAF9. TAF10, TAF11, TAF13, and TAF15. The TATA-box binding protein (TBP) is required for the ... "Transcription factor IIA derepresses TATA-binding protein (TBP)-associated factor inhibition of TBP-DNA binding". J. Biol. Chem ... Siegert JL, Robbins PD (January 1999). "Rb inhibits the intrinsic kinase activity of TATA-binding protein-associated factor ...
Similarly to the TATA box, the Inr element facilitates the binding of transcription Factor II D (TAF). TATA box and Inr are ... Two subunits, TAF1 and TAF2, of the TFIID recognize the Inr sequence and bring the complex together. The interaction between ... The Inr element is also believed to interact with activator Sp1, specificity protein 1 transcription factor. Sp1 is then able ... Studies have shown that promoters with a functional Inr are more likely to lack a TATA box or to possess a degenerate TATA ...
EDF1 gene encodes a protein that acts as a transcriptional coactivator by interconnecting the general transcription factor TATA ... TAF1-15, 16 total), TFIIE, TFIIF, TFIIH and TFIIJ. The construction of the polymerase complex takes place on the gene promoter ... The TATA-binding protein (TBP, a subunit of TFIID), TBPL1, or TBPL2 can bind the promoter or TATA box. Most genes lack a TATA ... General transcription factors (GTFs) or basal transcription factors are protein transcription factors that have been shown to ...
The general transcription factor, TFIID, consists of the TATA-binding protein (TBP) associated with a series of TBP-associated ... TAF1, and TATA binding protein. GRCh38: Ensembl release 89: ENSG00000178913 - Ensembl, May 2017 GRCm38: Ensembl release 89: ... "Entrez Gene: TAF7 TAF7 RNA polymerase II, TATA box binding protein (TBP)-associated factor, 55kDa". Munz C, Psichari E, ... The protein encoded by this gene is a component of the TFIID protein complex, a complex which binds to the TATA box in class II ...
TATA-box binding protein associated factor 7-like also known as CT40 is a protein that in humans is encoded by the TAF7l gene. ... amino acids 1170-1226 of TAF1) that TAF7 binds to and inactivates TAF1's acetyltransferase (AT) function. Thus, it is likely ... while TATA-binding protein (TBP) complex is located in the nucleus. Then, TAF7l slowly transitions to the nucleus during the ... Yeast-2-hybrid screens have identified that TAF7l strongly interacts with TAF1 in exactly the same region ( ...
"Entrez Gene: TAF6 TAF6 RNA polymerase II, TATA box binding protein (TBP)-associated factor, 80kDa". Hsieh YJ, Kundu TK, Wang Z ... This gene encodes one of the smaller subunits of TFIID that binds weakly to TBP but strongly to TAF1, the largest subunit of ... TFIID is composed of the TATA-binding protein (TBP) and a group of evolutionarily conserved proteins known as TBP-associated ... Transcription initiation factor TFIID subunit 6 is a protein that in humans is encoded by the TAF6 gene. Initiation of ...
Siegert JL, Robbins PD (January 1999). "Rb Inhibits the Intrinsic Kinase Activity of TATA-Binding Protein-Associated Factor ... The retinoblastoma protein (protein name abbreviated pRb; gene name abbreviated RB or RB1) is a tumor suppressor protein that ... "The retinoblastoma-susceptibility gene product binds directly to the human TATA-binding protein-associated factor TAFII250". ... "Differential specificity for binding of retinoblastoma binding protein 2 to RB, p107, and TATA-binding protein". Mol. Cell. ...
"Rb Inhibits the Intrinsic Kinase Activity of TATA-Binding Protein-Associated Factor TAFII250". Mol. Cell. Biol. 19 (1): 846-54 ... The retinoblastoma protein (protein name abbreviated pRb; gene name abbreviated RB or RB1) is a tumor suppressor protein that ... protein binding. • androgen receptor binding. • identical protein binding. • enzyme binding. • ubiquitin protein ligase binding ... "The retinoblastoma-susceptibility gene product binds directly to the human TATA-binding protein-associated factor TAFII250". ...
... basal transcription factors, structural proteins, polyamines, and proteins involved in nuclear import.[3] Acetylation of these ... TAFII250 (TAF1). S. cerevisiae - H. sapiens. TFIID. H3, H4, (H2A). Bromodomain. ... Gcn5 cannot acetylate nucleosomal histones in the absence of other protein factors.[4] In the context of complexes like SAGA ... Protein Chem. Advances in Protein Chemistry. 67: 181-99. doi:10.1016/S0065-3233(04)67007-0. ISBN 9780120342679. PMID 14969728. ...
Binding of TFIID to a promoter (with or without TATA element) is the initial step in pre-initiation complex (PIC) formation. ... histone acetylation by TAF1), facilitation of DNA opening and initiation of transcription. ... Functions as a component of the DNA-binding general transcription factor complex TFIID. ... The 1.2 MDa TFIID complex is composed of TATA binding protein (TBP) and the 14 TBP-associated factors (one copy of each TAF1, ...
Protein Coding), TATA-Box Binding Protein Associated Factor 1, including: function, proteins, disorders, pathways, orthologs, ... Aliases for TAF1 Gene Aliases for TAF1 Gene. * TATA-Box Binding Protein Associated Factor 1 2 3 5 ... Unigene Clusters for TAF1 Gene. TAF1 RNA polymerase II, TATA box binding protein (TBP)-associated factor, 250kDa:. *Hs.158560 ... GeneCards Summary for TAF1 Gene TAF1 (TATA-Box Binding Protein Associated Factor 1) is a Protein Coding gene. Diseases ...
This protein is active in cells and tissues throughout the body, where it attaches (binds) to DNA. Transcription factor IID ... an essential role in regulating the activity of most genes.The TAF1 gene is part of a complex region of DNA known as the TAF1/ ... The TAF1 gene provides instructions for making part of a protein called transcription factor IID (TFIID). ... URL of this page: https://medlineplus.gov/genetics/gene/taf1/ TAF1 gene. TATA-box binding protein associated factor 1 ...
TAF1: TATA-box binding protein associated factor 1. *TAP1: transporter 1, ATP binding cassette subfamily B member ... TYRP1: tyrosinase related protein 1. Genetics Home Reference has merged with MedlinePlus. Genetics Home Reference content now ... TYROBP: TYRO protein tyrosine kinase binding protein. * ... TBXT: T-box transcription factor T. *TCF4: transcription factor ... TRPM1: transient receptor potential cation channel subfamily M member 1. *TRPM4: transient receptor potential cation channel ...
TBP Associated Factor 1 antibody validated for WB, IHC, ICC/IF and tested in Human. Immunogen corresponding to synthetic ... TAF1 RNA polymerase II TATA box binding protein (TBP) associated factor 250kDa antibody ... TATA box binding protein (TBP) associated factor RNA polymerase II A 250kD antibody ... Lysates/proteins at 10 µg per lane.. Secondary. All lanes : Goat polyclonal to Rabbit IgG - H&L - Pre-Adsorbed (HRP) at 1/3000 ...
Generation of a Monoclonal Antibody Specifically Reacting with Neuron-specific TATA-Box Binding Protein-Associated Factor 1 (N- ... TAF1). Previous Article in Journal / Special Issue. Development of Eastern Blotting Technique for Analysis of Baicalin Using ... Antibodies 2012, 1, 294-307. AMA Style. Uto T, Tung NH, Morinaga O, Shoyama Y. Preparation of Knockout Extract by ... 2012; 1(3):294-307. Chicago/Turabian Style. Uto, Takuhiro; Tung, Nguyen H.; Morinaga, Osamu; Shoyama, Yukihiro. 2012. " ...
Ab165421 is a protein fragment produced in Wheat germ and has been validated in WB, ELISA. Abcam provides free protocols, tips ... TAF1 like RNA polymerase II TATA box binding protein (TBP) associated factor 210kD ... TAF1 like RNA polymerase II TATA box binding protein (TBP) associated factor 210kDa ... TAF1 RNA polymerase II TATA box binding protein (TBP) associated factor 210kDa like ...
TAF1 (untagged)-Human TAF1 RNA polymerase II, TATA box binding protein (TBP)-associated factor, 250kDa (TAF1), transcript ... variant 1 available for purchase from OriGene - Your Gene Company. ... Taf1 (Myc-DDK-tagged) - Mouse TAF1 RNA polymerase II, TATA box binding protein (TBP)-associated factor (Taf1). $2940. 7 weeks. ... Taf1 (myc-DDK-tagged) - Mouse TAF1 RNA polymerase II, TATA box binding protein (TBP)-associated factor (Taf1). $1750. 7 weeks. ...
X-linked dystonia parkinsonism is thought to result from a mutation of the TAF1 (TATA-binding protein-associated factor 1) gene ... The prevalence in the Philippines has been estimated at 1/322,000 and as high as 1/4,000 in the province of Capizs male ... 121 (1): 3-11. doi:10.3109/00207454.2010.526728. PMID 21047175. [1] Orphanet: X-linked dystonia parkinsonism. Accessed December ...
TAF1. GeneProduct. ENSG00000147133 (Ensembl) TAF1 RNA polymerase II, TATA box binding protein (TBP)-associated factor. TAP1. ... methyl CpG binding protein 2. MEF2C. GeneProduct. ENSG00000081189 (Ensembl) myocyte enhancer factor 2C. MPP1. GeneProduct. ... TAF1. NCOR1. FGF2. Serotonin. GABRR2. ARHGEF26. hsa-miR-146b-3p PRPF3. hsa-miR-296-5p. NMDA. MAG. MEF2C. hsa-miR-184 FGF3. TET2 ... PRP3 pre-mRNA processing factor 3 homolog (yeast). RBFOX1. GeneProduct. ENSG00000078328 (Ensembl) ataxin 2 binding protein 1, ...
An important gene associated with Dystonia-Parkinsonism, X-Linked is TAF1 (TATA-Box Binding Protein Associated Factor 1). The ... TAF1 TAF1, SVA RETROTRANSPOSON INSERTION insertion. Pathogenic. 2. TAF1 NR_104387.1(TAF1): n.5894C, T single nucleotide variant ... TATA-Box Binding Protein Associated Factor 1. 1369.28. Molecular basis known 54 ... ATP1A3 GCH1 HPCA PNKD TAF1 THAP1 18. charcot-marie-tooth neuropathy, x-linked recessive, 3 7.4. ATP1A3 GCH1 HPCA PNKD TAF1 ...
TATA box binding protein (TBP)-associated factor, 250kDa (TAF1), transcript variant 1, mRNA. (H00006872-R05) - Products - ... Homo sapiens TAF1 RNA polymerase II, TATA box binding protein (TBP)-associated factor, 250kDa (TAF1), transcript variant 1, ... TAF1 RNA polymerase II, TATA box binding protein (TBP)-associated factor, 250kDa ... TFIID is composed of the TATA-binding protein (TBP) and a group of evolutionarily conserved proteins known as TBP-associated ...
TAF1 TAF1 RNA polymerase II, TATA box binding protein (TBP)-associated factor, 250kDa". Sekiguchi T, Yoshida MC, Sekiguchi M, ... Siegert JL, Robbins PD (January 1999). "Rb inhibits the intrinsic kinase activity of TATA-binding protein-associated factor ... TFIID is composed of the TATA-binding protein (TBP) and a group of evolutionarily conserved proteins known as TBP-associated ... or TBP-associated factor 250 kDa (p250), is a protein that in humans is encoded by the TAF1 gene. Initiation of transcription ...
During eukaryotic transcriptional initiation, TATA binding protein-associated factors 1 and 7 (TAF1 and TAF7) together with two ... subunits of the transcription factor IID (TFIID) form a preinitiation complex (PIC). Current structure suggests that TAF1 is ... not a histone acetyltransferase (HAT). Instead, the new findings suggest new roles for the TAF1/7 complex in the regulation of ... This article is reporting the crystal structure of the yeast TAF1/7 heterodimer and provides also a detailed biochemical ...
Patients and Methods A total of 306 subjects (114 cases and 192 controls) were screened in from the 16 towns and 1 city of ... were screened in from the 16 towns and 1 city of Capiz province. Their responses to the previously developed 4-item ... test that detected the presence of the SVA retrotransposon insertion in intron 32 of the TATA binding protein factor 1 (TAF1) ... Decreased N-TAF1 expression in X-linked dystonia-parkinsonism patient-specific neural stem cells. Dis Model Mech. (2016) 9:451- ...
The TATA-box binding protein associated factor 1 (TAF1) protein is a key unit of the transcription factor II D complex that ... Variants of TAF1 have been associated with neurodevelopmental disorders, but TAF1s molecular functions remain elusive. In this ... A crucial function of human TAF1 during embryogenesis can be inferred from the model, demonstrating that intact taf1 is ... Finally, four factors are argued to contribute to a suggested invisibility of the HIT-induced time burden in nurses work life ...
The TATA-box binding protein associated factor 1 (TAF1) protein is a key unit of the transcription factor II D complex that ... Variants of TAF1 have been associated with neurodevelopmental disorders, but TAF1s molecular functions remain elusive. In this ... A crucial function of human TAF1 during embryogenesis can be inferred from the model, demonstrating that intact taf1 is ... It is common in microscopy images to stain the nuclei in the cells, and to label the DNA and proteins in different ways. ...
... protein transport and mRNA splicing) and exon skipping (in genes related to chromatin repression) suggesting AS as a post- ... Taf1: TATA-box binding protein associated factor 1, on chr X). The male isoform of Son loses the Son domain in the protein, a ... The transcription factor Mga (MAX Dimerization Protein), which forms a complex with Max and represses germ cell-related gene ... transcription factors and regulators (Pola1, Hcfc1, Elf4, Eif2s3x, Tab3, Taf1, Pet2), and chromosome modifications (Xist, Tsix ...
The general transcription factor TFIID sets the mRNA start site and consists of TATA-binding protein and associated factors ( ... The general transcription factor TFIID sets the mRNA start site and consists of TATA-binding protein and associated factors ( ... An extensive requirement for transcription factor IID-specific TAF-1 in Caenorhabditis elegans embryonic transcription J Biol ... C. elegans TAF-1 overlaps functionally with the coactivator p300/CBP (CBP-1), and at some genes it is required along with the ...
... in vivo transcription factor binding sites is one of the central challenges in regulatory genomics. Here, we present our ... and TAF1. As TAF1 (TATA-box binding protein associated factor 1) is associated with transcriptional initiation at the TATA box ... Global mapping of protein-DNA interactions in vivo by digital genomic footprinting. Nat Meth. 2009; 6(4):283-9.Google Scholar. ... Li H, Liu H, Wang Z, Liu X, Guo L, Huang L, Gao L, McNutt MA, Li G. The role of transcription factors Sp1 and YY1 in proximal ...
... a web resource for human protein-protein interactions. It shows genes and PPIs with information about pathways, protein-protein ... TAF1. HIST1H3A. Gene Name. TAF1 RNA polymerase II, TATA box binding protein (TBP)-associated factor, 250kDa. histone cluster 1 ... Protein-Protein Interactions. 47 interactors: APC AR ASF1A ASF1B BRMS1 CCNA2 CCND1 EDF1 EWSR1 FOS GFI1B GTF2A1 GTF2E1 GTF2F1 ... TAF1 TAF15 TAF1A TAF1B THAP7 TRIM24 TRIM33 TSSK6 UHRF1 UHRF2 VPRBP WHSC1 WWC1 YWHAB YWHAG YWHAZ ...
... a web resource for human protein-protein interactions. It shows genes and PPIs with information about pathways, protein-protein ... TAF1. EWSR1. Gene Name. TAF1 RNA polymerase II, TATA box binding protein (TBP)-associated factor, 250kDa. EWS RNA-binding ... Protein-Protein Interactions. 47 interactors: APC AR ASF1A ASF1B BRMS1 CCNA2 CCND1 EDF1 EWSR1 FOS GFI1B GTF2A1 GTF2E1 GTF2F1 ... TAF1 TFG TMSB4Y TONSL TPGS2 TRAF1 TRAF2 TRAF3 TRIM37 TRIM5 TRPV5 TSPAN3 TULP2 USP7 VPS72 WBP4 WDR37 WWP1 WWP2 YWHAG YY1AP1 ...
TATA Box Binding Protein Associated Factor 1 (TAF1). Polyclonal Antibody. Homo sapiens (Human). ... GATA Binding Protein 2 (GATA2). Polyclonal Antibody. Homo sapiens (Human). PW449Mu01. GATA Binding Protein 2 (GATA2). ... Protein Kinase Inhibitor Alpha (PKIa). Polyclonal Antibody. Homo sapiens (Human). PW446Hu01. Fatty Acid Binding Protein 6, ... Neutrophil Cytosolic Factor 4 (NCF4). Polyclonal Antibody. Homo sapiens (Human). PW452Mu01. Neutrophil Cytosolic Factor 4 (NCF4 ...
TATA Box Binding Protein Associated Factor 1 (TAF1). Polyclonal Antibody. Homo sapiens (Human). ... GATA Binding Protein 2 (GATA2). Polyclonal Antibody. Homo sapiens (Human). PW449Mu01. GATA Binding Protein 2 (GATA2). ... Protein Kinase Inhibitor Alpha (PKIa). Polyclonal Antibody. Homo sapiens (Human). PW446Hu01. Fatty Acid Binding Protein 6, ... Neutrophil Cytosolic Factor 4 (NCF4). Polyclonal Antibody. Homo sapiens (Human). PW452Mu01. Neutrophil Cytosolic Factor 4 (NCF4 ...
TAF1. TAF1 RNA polymerase II, TATA box binding protein (TBP)-associated factor, 250kDa. 0.804. ... TATA box binding protein (TBP)-associated factor, RNA polymerase I, A, 48kDa. 0.923. ... TATA box binding protein (TBP)-associated factor, RNA polymerase I, C, 110kDa. 0.898. ... TATA box binding protein (TBP)-associated factor, RNA polymerase I, B, 63kDa. 0.519. ...
  • Synthetic peptide conjugated to KLH derived from within residues 150 - 250 of Human KAT4/ TBP Associated Factor 1. (abcam.com)
  • TFIIF (two subunits, RAP30 and RAP74 , showing some similarity to bacterial sigma factors ) and Pol II enter the complex together. (wikipedia.org)
  • Mutations in RNA pol II include both overexpression of truncated forms of the two largest subunits (Rpb1 and Rpb2) and reduced levels of these proteins. (genetics.org)
  • Enok and Br140, another bromodomain protein, are orthologous to subunits of a mammalian MOZ/MORF acetyltransferase complex. (sdbonline.org)
  • Testing results showed that expression of TAF1L protein was higher in OSCC tissues than that in normal oral epithelial or paracancerous tissues. (ijbs.com)
  • Additionally, the level of TAF1L protein expression was upregulated in OSCC cell lines, compared to that in normal oral epithelial cells. (ijbs.com)
  • Moreover, that overexpression of TAF1L protein could promote the growth of OSCC cell xenografts was confirmed in nude mouse model. (ijbs.com)
  • TAF1 like (TAF1L) is a TAF1 homologue, and till now, it has been found that both of them have a similar function with histone acetyltransferase activity [ 9 , 10 ]. (ijbs.com)
  • In cancer researches, although it has known that TAF1 can play important roles on cell proliferation and apoptosis [ 11 ], little is known in regards to that is pathophysiological functions of TAF1L. (ijbs.com)
  • No evidence was obtained in yeast 2-hybrid assays for a direct interaction between either UVR8 or HY5 and several proteins involved in light-regulated histone modification, nor for the involvement of these proteins in UVR8-mediated responses in plants, although functional redundancy between proteins could influence the results. (deepdyve.com)
  • The interaction has functional aspects in terms of determining H3K9me2 and HP-1 deposition at the chromocentric heterochromatin. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Understanding the structural and functional peculiarities of these proteins molecular machineries will help in formulating structure-based drug design. (diva-portal.org)
  • For instance, most of these receptors are associated with corepressor proteins that silence their activity in the absence of ligands, and activation therefore involves displacement of the associated corepressors by coactivators, an event that permits the functional interaction of the receptor with the cellular transcription machinery ( 8 , 17 ). (asm.org)
  • Target selection requires an understanding of the functional relevance of a given protein in both physiological and pathophysiological conditions. (ox.ac.uk)
  • Chemical Biology combines chemistry and biology to generate small molecule tools, so-called " chemical probes ", that enable the functional exploration of cellular proteins with regard to their relevance for drug discovery. (ox.ac.uk)
  • However, whether or not RMT-1 gene has a functional role in these processes remains to be investigated. (labome.org)
  • Rb belongs to the pocket protein family , whose members have a pocket for the functional binding of other proteins. (wikipedia.org)
  • This article is reporting the crystal structure of the yeast TAF1/7 heterodimer and provides also a detailed biochemical analysis to probe its function. (moleculardevices.com)
  • These proteins have a 400-residue N-terminal region that is absent in yeast Gcn5, but their HAT functions are evolutionarily conserved with respect to the latter. (wikipedia.org)
  • Two other mutations were reported in TAF1 in two families with intellectual disability, although further clinical details were not reported. (wikipedia.org)
  • Immunofluorescence analysis of polytene chromosomes from trans-heterozygotes of RNA Pol II and different mutations of the small RNA pathways show decreased H3K9me2 and mislocalization of Heterochromatin protein-1. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Damage of DNA, hence potentially deleterious mutations, caused by such factors as UV, free radicals, and active transcription, needs to be repaired before these mutations are passed to daughter cells. (sigmaaldrich.com)
  • Mutations lead to a truncated Elovl4, lacking of a dilysine motif necessary for retention of transmembrane proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum. (arvojournals.org)
  • Five of 8 mutations in TAF1, a gene with no known role in CCEC, localized to the putative histone acetyltransferase domain and included 2 recurrently mutated residues. (cdc.gov)
  • Here, we present our approach that earned a shared first rank in the "ENCODE-DREAM in vivo Transcription Factor Binding Site Prediction Challenge" in 2017. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Maria Naranjo Arcos, Felix Maurer, Johannes Meiser, Stéphanie Pateyron , Claudia Fink-Straube, and Petra Bauer (2017) Dissection of iron signaling and iron accumulation by overexpression of subgroup Ib bHLH039 protein. (u-psud.fr)
  • 2017 Sep 1;123(17):3261-3268. (cdc.gov)
  • Finally, we explored the concepts of conformational selection in proteins as a possible key component for protein-mediated transcriptional regulation. (diva-portal.org)
  • Taken together, these studies substantially broaden our knowledge at a molecular level in protein interactions that are involved in transcriptional regulation and ubiquitination, studied by a carefully selected combination of complementary structural methods spanning different resolutions and time scales. (diva-portal.org)
  • In addition, there are also some weakly conserved features including the TFIIB-Recognition Element (BRE), approximately 5 nucleotides upstream (BRE u ) and 5 nucleotides downstream (BRE d ) of the TATA box. (wikipedia.org)
  • Here we report the development of a small molecule-based approach to covalently modify recombinant and endogenous bromodomain-containing proteins by targeting a conserved lysine and a tyrosine residue in the variable ZA or BC loops. (ox.ac.uk)
  • When Inr was disrupted by point mutation, a much weaker footprint was detected that was confined to TATA box. (blogspot.com)
  • p>When browsing through different UniProt proteins, you can use the 'basket' to save them, so that you can back to find or analyse them later. (uniprot.org)