Prostate: A gland in males that surrounds the neck of the URINARY BLADDER and the URETHRA. It secretes a substance that liquefies coagulated semen. It is situated in the pelvic cavity behind the lower part of the PUBIC SYMPHYSIS, above the deep layer of the triangular ligament, and rests upon the RECTUM.Prostatic Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the PROSTATE.Prostate-Specific Antigen: A glycoprotein that is a kallikrein-like serine proteinase and an esterase, produced by epithelial cells of both normal and malignant prostate tissue. It is an important marker for the diagnosis of prostate cancer.Antineoplastic Agents: Substances that inhibit or prevent the proliferation of NEOPLASMS.Cell Line, Tumor: A cell line derived from cultured tumor cells.Receptors, Androgen: Proteins, generally found in the CYTOPLASM, that specifically bind ANDROGENS and mediate their cellular actions. The complex of the androgen and receptor migrates to the CELL NUCLEUS where it induces transcription of specific segments of DNA.Androgens: Compounds that interact with ANDROGEN RECEPTORS in target tissues to bring about the effects similar to those of TESTOSTERONE. Depending on the target tissues, androgenic effects can be on SEX DIFFERENTIATION; male reproductive organs, SPERMATOGENESIS; secondary male SEX CHARACTERISTICS; LIBIDO; development of muscle mass, strength, and power.Androgen Antagonists: Compounds which inhibit or antagonize the biosynthesis or actions of androgens.Prostatectomy: Complete or partial surgical removal of the prostate. Three primary approaches are commonly employed: suprapubic - removal through an incision above the pubis and through the urinary bladder; retropubic - as for suprapubic but without entering the urinary bladder; and transurethral (TRANSURETHRAL RESECTION OF PROSTATE).Neoplasms: New abnormal growth of tissue. Malignant neoplasms show a greater degree of anaplasia and have the properties of invasion and metastasis, compared to benign neoplasms.Prostatic Hyperplasia: Increase in constituent cells in the PROSTATE, leading to enlargement of the organ (hypertrophy) and adverse impact on the lower urinary tract function. This can be caused by increased rate of cell proliferation, reduced rate of cell death, or both.Gene Expression Regulation, Neoplastic: Any of the processes by which nuclear, cytoplasmic, or intercellular factors influence the differential control of gene action in neoplastic tissue.Orchiectomy: The surgical removal of one or both testicles.Neoplasms, Hormone-Dependent: Certain tumors that 1, arise in organs that are normally dependent on specific hormones and 2, are stimulated or caused to regress by manipulation of the endocrine environment.Drug Resistance, Neoplasm: Resistance or diminished response of a neoplasm to an antineoplastic agent in humans, animals, or cell or tissue cultures.Mice, Nude: Mutant mice homozygous for the recessive gene "nude" which fail to develop a thymus. They are useful in tumor studies and studies on immune responses.Tumor Markers, Biological: Molecular products metabolized and secreted by neoplastic tissue and characterized biochemically in cells or body fluids. They are indicators of tumor stage and grade as well as useful for monitoring responses to treatment and predicting recurrence. Many chemical groups are represented including hormones, antigens, amino and nucleic acids, enzymes, polyamines, and specific cell membrane proteins and lipids.Prostatic Intraepithelial Neoplasia: A premalignant change arising in the prostatic epithelium, regarded as the most important and most likely precursor of prostatic adenocarcinoma. The neoplasia takes the form of an intra-acinar or ductal proliferation of secretory cells with unequivocal nuclear anaplasia, which corresponds to nuclear grade 2 and 3 invasive prostate cancer.Microsporum: A mitosporic Oxygenales fungal genus causing various diseases of the skin and hair. The species Microsporum canis produces TINEA CAPITIS and tinea corporis, which usually are acquired from domestic cats and dogs. Teleomorphs includes Arthroderma (Nannizzia). (Alexopoulos et al., Introductory Mycology, 4th edition, p305)Adenocarcinoma: A malignant epithelial tumor with a glandular organization.Apoptosis: One of the mechanisms by which CELL DEATH occurs (compare with NECROSIS and AUTOPHAGOCYTOSIS). Apoptosis is the mechanism responsible for the physiological deletion of cells and appears to be intrinsically programmed. It is characterized by distinctive morphologic changes in the nucleus and cytoplasm, chromatin cleavage at regularly spaced sites, and the endonucleolytic cleavage of genomic DNA; (DNA FRAGMENTATION); at internucleosomal sites. This mode of cell death serves as a balance to mitosis in regulating the size of animal tissues and in mediating pathologic processes associated with tumor growth.Disease Progression: The worsening of a disease over time. This concept is most often used for chronic and incurable diseases where the stage of the disease is an important determinant of therapy and prognosis.Neoplasm Metastasis: The transfer of a neoplasm from one organ or part of the body to another remote from the primary site.Early Detection of Cancer: Methods to identify and characterize cancer in the early stages of disease and predict tumor behavior.Drug Screening Assays, Antitumor: Methods of investigating the effectiveness of anticancer cytotoxic drugs and biologic inhibitors. These include in vitro cell-kill models and cytostatic dye exclusion tests as well as in vivo measurement of tumor growth parameters in laboratory animals.Tumor Cells, Cultured: Cells grown in vitro from neoplastic tissue. If they can be established as a TUMOR CELL LINE, they can be propagated in cell culture indefinitely.Tosyl CompoundsMolecular Targeted Therapy: Treatments with drugs which interact with or block synthesis of specific cellular components characteristic of the individual's disease in order to stop or interrupt the specific biochemical dysfunction involved in progression of the disease.Bone Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer located in bone tissue or specific BONES.Xenograft Model Antitumor Assays: In vivo methods of screening investigative anticancer drugs, biologic response modifiers or radiotherapies. Human tumor tissue or cells are transplanted into mice or rats followed by tumor treatment regimens. A variety of outcomes are monitored to assess antitumor effectiveness.Neoplasm Proteins: Proteins whose abnormal expression (gain or loss) are associated with the development, growth, or progression of NEOPLASMS. Some neoplasm proteins are tumor antigens (ANTIGENS, NEOPLASM), i.e. they induce an immune reaction to their tumor. Many neoplasm proteins have been characterized and are used as tumor markers (BIOMARKERS, TUMOR) when they are detectable in cells and body fluids as monitors for the presence or growth of tumors. Abnormal expression of ONCOGENE PROTEINS is involved in neoplastic transformation, whereas the loss of expression of TUMOR SUPPRESSOR PROTEINS is involved with the loss of growth control and progression of the neoplasm.Neoplasm Grading: Methods which attempt to express in replicable terms the level of CELL DIFFERENTIATION in neoplasms as increasing ANAPLASIA correlates with the aggressiveness of the neoplasm.Transurethral Resection of Prostate: Removal of all or part of the PROSTATE, often using a cystoscope and/or resectoscope passed through the URETHRA.Drug Discovery: The process of finding chemicals for potential therapeutic use.Neoplasm Staging: Methods which attempt to express in replicable terms the extent of the neoplasm in the patient.Neoplasm Invasiveness: Ability of neoplasms to infiltrate and actively destroy surrounding tissue.Androgen Receptor Antagonists: Compounds that bind to and inhibit the activation of ANDROGEN RECEPTORS.Signal Transduction: The intracellular transfer of information (biological activation/inhibition) through a signal pathway. In each signal transduction system, an activation/inhibition signal from a biologically active molecule (hormone, neurotransmitter) is mediated via the coupling of a receptor/enzyme to a second messenger system or to an ion channel. Signal transduction plays an important role in activating cellular functions, cell differentiation, and cell proliferation. Examples of signal transduction systems are the GAMMA-AMINOBUTYRIC ACID-postsynaptic receptor-calcium ion channel system, the receptor-mediated T-cell activation pathway, and the receptor-mediated activation of phospholipases. Those coupled to membrane depolarization or intracellular release of calcium include the receptor-mediated activation of cytotoxic functions in granulocytes and the synaptic potentiation of protein kinase activation. Some signal transduction pathways may be part of larger signal transduction pathways; for example, protein kinase activation is part of the platelet activation signal pathway.Antineoplastic Agents, Hormonal: Antineoplastic agents that are used to treat hormone-sensitive tumors. Hormone-sensitive tumors may be hormone-dependent, hormone-responsive, or both. A hormone-dependent tumor regresses on removal of the hormonal stimulus, by surgery or pharmacological block. Hormone-responsive tumors may regress when pharmacologic amounts of hormones are administered regardless of whether previous signs of hormone sensitivity were observed. The major hormone-responsive cancers include carcinomas of the breast, prostate, and endometrium; lymphomas; and certain leukemias. (From AMA Drug Evaluations Annual 1994, p2079)Breast Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the human BREAST.Steroid 16-alpha-Hydroxylase: A liver microsomal cytochrome P450 enzyme that catalyzes the 16-alpha-hydroxylation of a broad spectrum of steroids, fatty acids, and xenobiotics in the presence of molecular oxygen and NADPH-FERRIHEMOPROTEIN REDUCTASE. This enzyme is encoded by a number of genes from several CYP2 subfamilies.Dihydrotestosterone: A potent androgenic metabolite of TESTOSTERONE. It is produced by the action of the enzyme 3-OXO-5-ALPHA-STEROID 4-DEHYDROGENASE.Drug Design: The molecular designing of drugs for specific purposes (such as DNA-binding, enzyme inhibition, anti-cancer efficacy, etc.) based on knowledge of molecular properties such as activity of functional groups, molecular geometry, and electronic structure, and also on information cataloged on analogous molecules. Drug design is generally computer-assisted molecular modeling and does not include pharmacokinetics, dosage analysis, or drug administration analysis.Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction: A variation of the PCR technique in which cDNA is made from RNA via reverse transcription. The resultant cDNA is then amplified using standard PCR protocols.Genetic Predisposition to Disease: A latent susceptibility to disease at the genetic level, which may be activated under certain conditions.AnilidesFinasteride: An orally active 3-OXO-5-ALPHA-STEROID 4-DEHYDROGENASE inhibitor. It is used as a surgical alternative for treatment of benign PROSTATIC HYPERPLASIA.Gene Expression Profiling: The determination of the pattern of genes expressed at the level of GENETIC TRANSCRIPTION, under specific circumstances or in a specific cell.Prognosis: A prediction of the probable outcome of a disease based on a individual's condition and the usual course of the disease as seen in similar situations.Blotting, Western: Identification of proteins or peptides that have been electrophoretically separated by blot transferring from the electrophoresis gel to strips of nitrocellulose paper, followed by labeling with antibody probes.Watchful Waiting: Clinical management approach wherein immediate therapy is not provided but there is a period of observation during which periodic tests monitor patient and the progression of the illness. (Driffield T, Smith PC Med Decis Making. 2007 Mar-Apr;27(2):178-88)Risk Factors: An aspect of personal behavior or lifestyle, environmental exposure, or inborn or inherited characteristic, which, on the basis of epidemiologic evidence, is known to be associated with a health-related condition considered important to prevent.Cell Survival: The span of viability of a cell characterized by the capacity to perform certain functions such as metabolism, growth, reproduction, some form of responsiveness, and adaptability.RNA, Messenger: RNA sequences that serve as templates for protein synthesis. Bacterial mRNAs are generally primary transcripts in that they do not require post-transcriptional processing. Eukaryotic mRNA is synthesized in the nucleus and must be exported to the cytoplasm for translation. Most eukaryotic mRNAs have a sequence of polyadenylic acid at the 3' end, referred to as the poly(A) tail. The function of this tail is not known for certain, but it may play a role in the export of mature mRNA from the nucleus as well as in helping stabilize some mRNA molecules by retarding their degradation in the cytoplasm.Neoplasm Transplantation: Experimental transplantation of neoplasms in laboratory animals for research purposes.United StatesImmunohistochemistry: Histochemical localization of immunoreactive substances using labeled antibodies as reagents.Transplantation, Heterologous: Transplantation between animals of different species.Drug Delivery Systems: Systems for the delivery of drugs to target sites of pharmacological actions. Technologies employed include those concerning drug preparation, route of administration, site targeting, metabolism, and toxicity.Case-Control Studies: Studies which start with the identification of persons with a disease of interest and a control (comparison, referent) group without the disease. The relationship of an attribute to the disease is examined by comparing diseased and non-diseased persons with regard to the frequency or levels of the attribute in each group.Clinical Trials as Topic: Works about pre-planned studies of the safety, efficacy, or optimum dosage schedule (if appropriate) of one or more diagnostic, therapeutic, or prophylactic drugs, devices, or techniques selected according to predetermined criteria of eligibility and observed for predefined evidence of favorable and unfavorable effects. This concept includes clinical trials conducted both in the U.S. and in other countries.Metribolone: A synthetic non-aromatizable androgen and anabolic steroid. It binds strongly to the androgen receptor and has therefore also been used as an affinity label for this receptor in the prostate and in prostatic tumors.Flutamide: An antiandrogen with about the same potency as cyproterone in rodent and canine species.Carcinoma: A malignant neoplasm made up of epithelial cells tending to infiltrate the surrounding tissues and give rise to metastases. It is a histological type of neoplasm but is often wrongly used as a synonym for "cancer." (From Dorland, 27th ed)Drug Approval: Process that is gone through in order for a drug to receive approval by a government regulatory agency. This includes any required pre-clinical or clinical testing, review, submission, and evaluation of the applications and test results, and post-marketing surveillance of the drug.Prostatic Diseases: Pathological processes involving the PROSTATE or its component tissues.Biopsy: Removal and pathologic examination of specimens in the form of small pieces of tissue from the living body.Prostatic Neoplasms, Castration-Resistant: Tumors or cancer of the PROSTATE which can grow in the presence of low or residual amount of androgen hormones such as TESTOSTERONE.5-alpha Reductase Inhibitors: Drugs that inhibit 3-OXO-5-ALPHA-STEROID 4-DEHYDROGENASE. They are commonly used to reduce the production of DIHYDROTESTOSTERONE.Drug Industry: That segment of commercial enterprise devoted to the design, development, and manufacture of chemical products for use in the diagnosis and treatment of disease, disability, or other dysfunction, or to improve function.Cell Growth Processes: Processes required for CELL ENLARGEMENT and CELL PROLIFERATION.Cell Cycle: The complex series of phenomena, occurring between the end of one CELL DIVISION and the end of the next, by which cellular material is duplicated and then divided between two daughter cells. The cell cycle includes INTERPHASE, which includes G0 PHASE; G1 PHASE; S PHASE; and G2 PHASE, and CELL DIVISION PHASE.Biopsy, Needle: Removal and examination of tissue obtained through a transdermal needle inserted into the specific region, organ, or tissue being analyzed.Brachytherapy: A collective term for interstitial, intracavity, and surface radiotherapy. It uses small sealed or partly-sealed sources that may be placed on or near the body surface or within a natural body cavity or implanted directly into the tissues.Glutamate Carboxypeptidase II: A metallocarboxypeptidase that is predominantly expressed as a membrane-bound enzyme. It catalyzes the hydrolysis of an unsubstituted, C-terminal glutamyl residue, typically from PTEROYLPOLYGLUTAMIC ACIDS. It was formerly classified as EC 3.4.19.8.Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Risk: The probability that an event will occur. It encompasses a variety of measures of the probability of a generally unfavorable outcome.Neoplasm Recurrence, Local: The local recurrence of a neoplasm following treatment. It arises from microscopic cells of the original neoplasm that have escaped therapeutic intervention and later become clinically visible at the original site.Echocardiography, Doppler, Pulsed: Echocardiography applying the Doppler effect, with velocity detection combined with range discrimination. Short bursts of ultrasound are transmitted at regular intervals and the echoes are demodulated as they return.Prospective Studies: Observation of a population for a sufficient number of persons over a sufficient number of years to generate incidence or mortality rates subsequent to the selection of the study group.Sensitivity and Specificity: Binary classification measures to assess test results. Sensitivity or recall rate is the proportion of true positives. Specificity is the probability of correctly determining the absence of a condition. (From Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 2d ed)Follow-Up Studies: Studies in which individuals or populations are followed to assess the outcome of exposures, procedures, or effects of a characteristic, e.g., occurrence of disease.Dose-Response Relationship, Drug: The relationship between the dose of an administered drug and the response of the organism to the drug.Down-Regulation: A negative regulatory effect on physiological processes at the molecular, cellular, or systemic level. At the molecular level, the major regulatory sites include membrane receptors, genes (GENE EXPRESSION REGULATION), mRNAs (RNA, MESSENGER), and proteins.RNA, Small Interfering: Small double-stranded, non-protein coding RNAs (21-31 nucleotides) involved in GENE SILENCING functions, especially RNA INTERFERENCE (RNAi). Endogenously, siRNAs are generated from dsRNAs (RNA, DOUBLE-STRANDED) by the same ribonuclease, Dicer, that generates miRNAs (MICRORNAS). The perfect match of the siRNAs' antisense strand to their target RNAs mediates RNAi by siRNA-guided RNA cleavage. siRNAs fall into different classes including trans-acting siRNA (tasiRNA), repeat-associated RNA (rasiRNA), small-scan RNA (scnRNA), and Piwi protein-interacting RNA (piRNA) and have different specific gene silencing functions.Medical Oncology: A subspecialty of internal medicine concerned with the study of neoplasms.Cell Division: The fission of a CELL. It includes CYTOKINESIS, when the CYTOPLASM of a cell is divided, and CELL NUCLEUS DIVISION.Risk Assessment: The qualitative or quantitative estimation of the likelihood of adverse effects that may result from exposure to specified health hazards or from the absence of beneficial influences. (Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 1988)PTEN Phosphohydrolase: A lipid phosphatase that acts on phosphatidylinositol-3,4,5-trisphosphate to regulate various SIGNAL TRANSDUCTION PATHWAYS. It modulates CELL GROWTH PROCESSES; CELL MIGRATION; and APOPTOSIS. Mutations in PTEN are associated with COWDEN DISEASE and PROTEUS SYNDROME as well as NEOPLASTIC CELL TRANSFORMATION.Taxoids: A group of diterpenoid CYCLODECANES named for the taxanes that were discovered in the TAXUS tree. The action on MICROTUBULES has made some of them useful as ANTINEOPLASTIC AGENTS.Mice, SCID: Mice homozygous for the mutant autosomal recessive gene "scid" which is located on the centromeric end of chromosome 16. These mice lack mature, functional lymphocytes and are thus highly susceptible to lethal opportunistic infections if not chronically treated with antibiotics. The lack of B- and T-cell immunity resembles severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) syndrome in human infants. SCID mice are useful as animal models since they are receptive to implantation of a human immune system producing SCID-human (SCID-hu) hematochimeric mice.Castration: Surgical removal or artificial destruction of gonads.Retrospective Studies: Studies used to test etiologic hypotheses in which inferences about an exposure to putative causal factors are derived from data relating to characteristics of persons under study or to events or experiences in their past. The essential feature is that some of the persons under study have the disease or outcome of interest and their characteristics are compared with those of unaffected persons.Prostatitis: Infiltration of inflammatory cells into the parenchyma of PROSTATE. The subtypes are classified by their varied laboratory analysis, clinical presentation and response to treatment.Lung Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the LUNG.Drug Costs: The amount that a health care institution or organization pays for its drugs. It is one component of the final price that is charged to the consumer (FEES, PHARMACEUTICAL or PRESCRIPTION FEES).Survival Rate: The proportion of survivors in a group, e.g., of patients, studied and followed over a period, or the proportion of persons in a specified group alive at the beginning of a time interval who survive to the end of the interval. It is often studied using life table methods.Genotype: The genetic constitution of the individual, comprising the ALLELES present at each GENETIC LOCUS.Treatment Outcome: Evaluation undertaken to assess the results or consequences of management and procedures used in combating disease in order to determine the efficacy, effectiveness, safety, and practicability of these interventions in individual cases or series.Survival Analysis: A class of statistical procedures for estimating the survival function (function of time, starting with a population 100% well at a given time and providing the percentage of the population still well at later times). The survival analysis is then used for making inferences about the effects of treatments, prognostic factors, exposures, and other covariates on the function.Testosterone: A potent androgenic steroid and major product secreted by the LEYDIG CELLS of the TESTIS. Its production is stimulated by LUTEINIZING HORMONE from the PITUITARY GLAND. In turn, testosterone exerts feedback control of the pituitary LH and FSH secretion. Depending on the tissues, testosterone can be further converted to DIHYDROTESTOSTERONE or ESTRADIOL.Fees, Pharmaceutical: Amounts charged to the patient or third-party payer for medication. It includes the pharmacist's professional fee and cost of ingredients, containers, etc.Testosterone Congeners: Steroidal compounds related to TESTOSTERONE, the major mammalian male sex hormone. Testosterone congeners include important testosterone precursors in the biosynthetic pathways, metabolites, derivatives, and synthetic steroids with androgenic activities.Models, Biological: Theoretical representations that simulate the behavior or activity of biological processes or diseases. For disease models in living animals, DISEASE MODELS, ANIMAL is available. Biological models include the use of mathematical equations, computers, and other electronic equipment.Cohort Studies: Studies in which subsets of a defined population are identified. These groups may or may not be exposed to factors hypothesized to influence the probability of the occurrence of a particular disease or other outcome. Cohorts are defined populations which, as a whole, are followed in an attempt to determine distinguishing subgroup characteristics.Incidence: The number of new cases of a given disease during a given period in a specified population. It also is used for the rate at which new events occur in a defined population. It is differentiated from PREVALENCE, which refers to all cases, new or old, in the population at a given time.Cancer Vaccines: Vaccines or candidate vaccines designed to prevent or treat cancer. Vaccines are produced using the patient's own whole tumor cells as the source of antigens, or using tumor-specific antigens, often recombinantly produced.Enzyme Inhibitors: Compounds or agents that combine with an enzyme in such a manner as to prevent the normal substrate-enzyme combination and the catalytic reaction.Protein Kinase Inhibitors: Agents that inhibit PROTEIN KINASES.DNA, Neoplasm: DNA present in neoplastic tissue.Friends: Persons whom one knows, likes, and trusts.Toe Joint: The articulation between the head of one phalanx and the base of the one distal to it, in each toe.Transfection: The uptake of naked or purified DNA by CELLS, usually meaning the process as it occurs in eukaryotic cells. It is analogous to bacterial transformation (TRANSFORMATION, BACTERIAL) and both are routinely employed in GENE TRANSFER TECHNIQUES.Cell Movement: The movement of cells from one location to another. Distinguish from CYTOKINESIS which is the process of dividing the CYTOPLASM of a cell.3-Oxo-5-alpha-Steroid 4-Dehydrogenase: An enzyme that catalyzes the reduction of TESTOSTERONE to 5-ALPHA DIHYDROTESTOSTERONE.Ovarian Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the OVARY. These neoplasms can be benign or malignant. They are classified according to the tissue of origin, such as the surface EPITHELIUM, the stromal endocrine cells, and the totipotent GERM CELLS.Odds Ratio: The ratio of two odds. The exposure-odds ratio for case control data is the ratio of the odds in favor of exposure among cases to the odds in favor of exposure among noncases. The disease-odds ratio for a cohort or cross section is the ratio of the odds in favor of disease among the exposed to the odds in favor of disease among the unexposed. The prevalence-odds ratio refers to an odds ratio derived cross-sectionally from studies of prevalent cases.Naphthoquinones: Naphthalene rings which contain two ketone moieties in any position. They can be substituted in any position except at the ketone groups.Inhibitory Concentration 50: The concentration of a compound needed to reduce population growth of organisms, including eukaryotic cells, by 50% in vitro. Though often expressed to denote in vitro antibacterial activity, it is also used as a benchmark for cytotoxicity to eukaryotic cells in culture.Tumor Burden: The total amount (cell number, weight, size or volume) of tumor cells or tissue in the body.Epithelial Cells: Cells that line the inner and outer surfaces of the body by forming cellular layers (EPITHELIUM) or masses. Epithelial cells lining the SKIN; the MOUTH; the NOSE; and the ANAL CANAL derive from ectoderm; those lining the RESPIRATORY SYSTEM and the DIGESTIVE SYSTEM derive from endoderm; others (CARDIOVASCULAR SYSTEM and LYMPHATIC SYSTEM) derive from mesoderm. Epithelial cells can be classified mainly by cell shape and function into squamous, glandular and transitional epithelial cells.Oligonucleotide Array Sequence Analysis: Hybridization of a nucleic acid sample to a very large set of OLIGONUCLEOTIDE PROBES, which have been attached individually in columns and rows to a solid support, to determine a BASE SEQUENCE, or to detect variations in a gene sequence, GENE EXPRESSION, or for GENE MAPPING.Tissue Array Analysis: The simultaneous analysis of multiple samples of TISSUES or CELLS from BIOPSY or in vitro culture that have been arranged in an array format on slides or microchips.Up-Regulation: A positive regulatory effect on physiological processes at the molecular, cellular, or systemic level. At the molecular level, the major regulatory sites include membrane receptors, genes (GENE EXPRESSION REGULATION), mRNAs (RNA, MESSENGER), and proteins.United States Food and Drug Administration: An agency of the PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE concerned with the overall planning, promoting, and administering of programs pertaining to maintaining standards of quality of foods, drugs, therapeutic devices, etc.DNA Methylation: Addition of methyl groups to DNA. DNA methyltransferases (DNA methylases) perform this reaction using S-ADENOSYLMETHIONINE as the methyl group donor.Seminal Vesicles: A saclike, glandular diverticulum on each ductus deferens in male vertebrates. It is united with the excretory duct and serves for temporary storage of semen. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)Promoter Regions, Genetic: DNA sequences which are recognized (directly or indirectly) and bound by a DNA-dependent RNA polymerase during the initiation of transcription. Highly conserved sequences within the promoter include the Pribnow box in bacteria and the TATA BOX in eukaryotes.Androstenols: Unsaturated androstanes which are substituted with one or more hydroxyl groups in any position in the ring system.Colonic Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the COLON.Cell Transformation, Neoplastic: Cell changes manifested by escape from control mechanisms, increased growth potential, alterations in the cell surface, karyotypic abnormalities, morphological and biochemical deviations from the norm, and other attributes conferring the ability to invade, metastasize, and kill.Antigens, Neoplasm: Proteins, glycoprotein, or lipoprotein moieties on surfaces of tumor cells that are usually identified by monoclonal antibodies. Many of these are of either embryonic or viral origin.Combined Modality Therapy: The treatment of a disease or condition by several different means simultaneously or sequentially. Chemoimmunotherapy, RADIOIMMUNOTHERAPY, chemoradiotherapy, cryochemotherapy, and SALVAGE THERAPY are seen most frequently, but their combinations with each other and surgery are also used.Radiotherapy, Conformal: Radiotherapy where there is improved dose homogeneity within the tumor and reduced dosage to uninvolved structures. The precise shaping of dose distribution is achieved via the use of computer-controlled multileaf collimators.Disease-Free Survival: Period after successful treatment in which there is no appearance of the symptoms or effects of the disease.Phenylthiohydantoin: Thiohydantoin benzene derivative.Antineoplastic Agents, Phytogenic: Agents obtained from higher plants that have demonstrable cytostatic or antineoplastic activity.Cholestenone 5 alpha-Reductase: An oxidoreductase that catalyzes the conversion of 3-oxo-delta4 steroids into their corresponding 5alpha form. It plays an important role in the conversion of TESTOSTERONE into DIHYDROTESTOSTERONE and PROGESTERONE into DIHYDROPROGESTERONE.Predictive Value of Tests: In screening and diagnostic tests, the probability that a person with a positive test is a true positive (i.e., has the disease), is referred to as the predictive value of a positive test; whereas, the predictive value of a negative test is the probability that the person with a negative test does not have the disease. Predictive value is related to the sensitivity and specificity of the test.SEER Program: A cancer registry mandated under the National Cancer Act of 1971 to operate and maintain a population-based cancer reporting system, reporting periodically estimates of cancer incidence and mortality in the United States. The Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) Program is a continuing project of the National Cancer Institute of the National Institutes of Health. Among its goals, in addition to assembling and reporting cancer statistics, are the monitoring of annual cancer incident trends and the promoting of studies designed to identify factors amenable to cancer control interventions. (From National Cancer Institute, NIH Publication No. 91-3074, October 1990)Drug Resistance, Multiple: Simultaneous resistance to several structurally and functionally distinct drugs.Polymorphism, Genetic: The regular and simultaneous occurrence in a single interbreeding population of two or more discontinuous genotypes. The concept includes differences in genotypes ranging in size from a single nucleotide site (POLYMORPHISM, SINGLE NUCLEOTIDE) to large nucleotide sequences visible at a chromosomal level.Cost Sharing: Provisions of an insurance policy that require the insured to pay some portion of covered expenses. Several forms of sharing are in use, e.g., deductibles, coinsurance, and copayments. Cost sharing does not refer to or include amounts paid in premiums for the coverage. (From Dictionary of Health Services Management, 2d ed)European Continental Ancestry Group: Individuals whose ancestral origins are in the continent of Europe.Nitriles: Organic compounds containing the -CN radical. The concept is distinguished from CYANIDES, which denotes inorganic salts of HYDROGEN CYANIDE.Radiotherapy: The use of IONIZING RADIATION to treat malignant NEOPLASMS and some benign conditions.Racemases and Epimerases: Enzymes that catalyze inversion of the configuration around an asymmetric carbon in a substrate having one (racemase) or more (epimerase) center(s) of asymmetry. (Dorland, 28th ed) EC 5.1.Multivariate Analysis: A set of techniques used when variation in several variables has to be studied simultaneously. In statistics, multivariate analysis is interpreted as any analytic method that allows simultaneous study of two or more dependent variables.Gene Fusion: The GENETIC RECOMBINATION of the parts of two or more GENES resulting in a gene with different or additional regulatory regions, or a new chimeric gene product. ONCOGENE FUSION includes an ONCOGENE as at least one of the fusion partners and such gene fusions are often detected in neoplastic cells and are transcribed into ONCOGENE FUSION PROTEINS. ARTIFICIAL GENE FUSION is carried out in vitro by RECOMBINANT DNA technology.Radiotherapy Dosage: The total amount of radiation absorbed by tissues as a result of radiotherapy.African Americans: Persons living in the United States having origins in any of the black groups of Africa.Nomograms: Graphical representation of a statistical model containing scales for calculating the prognostic weight of a value for each individual variable. Nomograms are instruments that can be used to predict outcomes using specific clinical parameters. They use ALGORITHMS that incorporate several variables to calculate the predicted probability that a patient will achieve a particular clinical endpoint.Age Factors: Age as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or the effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from AGING, a physiological process, and TIME FACTORS which refers only to the passage of time.Pharmacopoeias as Topic: Authoritative treatises on drugs and preparations, their description, formulation, analytic composition, physical constants, main chemical properties used in identification, standards for strength, purity, and dosage, chemical tests for determining identity and purity, etc. They are usually published under governmental jurisdiction (e.g., USP, the United States Pharmacopoeia; BP, British Pharmacopoeia; P. Helv., the Swiss Pharmacopoeia). They differ from FORMULARIES in that they are far more complete: formularies tend to be mere listings of formulas and prescriptions.Proto-Oncogene Proteins c-akt: A protein-serine-threonine kinase that is activated by PHOSPHORYLATION in response to GROWTH FACTORS or INSULIN. It plays a major role in cell metabolism, growth, and survival as a core component of SIGNAL TRANSDUCTION. Three isoforms have been described in mammalian cells.National Cancer Institute (U.S.): Component of the NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH. Through basic and clinical biomedical research and training, it conducts and supports research with the objective of cancer prevention, early stage identification and elimination. This Institute was established in 1937.Polymerase Chain Reaction: In vitro method for producing large amounts of specific DNA or RNA fragments of defined length and sequence from small amounts of short oligonucleotide flanking sequences (primers). The essential steps include thermal denaturation of the double-stranded target molecules, annealing of the primers to their complementary sequences, and extension of the annealed primers by enzymatic synthesis with DNA polymerase. The reaction is efficient, specific, and extremely sensitive. Uses for the reaction include disease diagnosis, detection of difficult-to-isolate pathogens, mutation analysis, genetic testing, DNA sequencing, and analyzing evolutionary relationships.Otoacoustic Emissions, Spontaneous: Self-generated faint acoustic signals from the inner ear (COCHLEA) without external stimulation. These faint signals can be recorded in the EAR CANAL and are indications of active OUTER AUDITORY HAIR CELLS. Spontaneous otoacoustic emissions are found in all classes of land vertebrates.Stomach Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the STOMACH.Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols: The use of two or more chemicals simultaneously or sequentially in the drug therapy of neoplasms. The drugs need not be in the same dosage form.Registries: The systems and processes involved in the establishment, support, management, and operation of registers, e.g., disease registers.Gene Silencing: Interruption or suppression of the expression of a gene at transcriptional or translational levels.Estramustine: A nitrogen mustard linked to estradiol, usually as phosphate; used to treat prostatic neoplasms; also has radiation protective properties.Reproducibility of Results: The statistical reproducibility of measurements (often in a clinical context), including the testing of instrumentation or techniques to obtain reproducible results. The concept includes reproducibility of physiological measurements, which may be used to develop rules to assess probability or prognosis, or response to a stimulus; reproducibility of occurrence of a condition; and reproducibility of experimental results.Mutation: Any detectable and heritable change in the genetic material that causes a change in the GENOTYPE and which is transmitted to daughter cells and to succeeding generations.Genes, Tumor Suppressor: Genes that inhibit expression of the tumorigenic phenotype. They are normally involved in holding cellular growth in check. When tumor suppressor genes are inactivated or lost, a barrier to normal proliferation is removed and unregulated growth is possible.Logistic Models: Statistical models which describe the relationship between a qualitative dependent variable (that is, one which can take only certain discrete values, such as the presence or absence of a disease) and an independent variable. A common application is in epidemiology for estimating an individual's risk (probability of a disease) as a function of a given risk factor.Mass Screening: Organized periodic procedures performed on large groups of people for the purpose of detecting disease.Pyrimidines: A family of 6-membered heterocyclic compounds occurring in nature in a wide variety of forms. They include several nucleic acid constituents (CYTOSINE; THYMINE; and URACIL) and form the basic structure of the barbiturates.RNA, Neoplasm: RNA present in neoplastic tissue.Kaplan-Meier Estimate: A nonparametric method of compiling LIFE TABLES or survival tables. It combines calculated probabilities of survival and estimates to allow for observations occurring beyond a measurement threshold, which are assumed to occur randomly. Time intervals are defined as ending each time an event occurs and are therefore unequal. (From Last, A Dictionary of Epidemiology, 1995)Transcription Factors: Endogenous substances, usually proteins, which are effective in the initiation, stimulation, or termination of the genetic transcription process.Leuprolide: A potent synthetic long-acting agonist of GONADOTROPIN-RELEASING HORMONE that regulates the synthesis and release of pituitary gonadotropins, LUTEINIZING HORMONE and FOLLICLE STIMULATING HORMONE.RNA Interference: A gene silencing phenomenon whereby specific dsRNAs (RNA, DOUBLE-STRANDED) trigger the degradation of homologous mRNA (RNA, MESSENGER). The specific dsRNAs are processed into SMALL INTERFERING RNA (siRNA) which serves as a guide for cleavage of the homologous mRNA in the RNA-INDUCED SILENCING COMPLEX. DNA METHYLATION may also be triggered during this process.Neoplastic Stem Cells: Highly proliferative, self-renewing, and colony-forming stem cells which give rise to NEOPLASMS.Neovascularization, Pathologic: A pathologic process consisting of the proliferation of blood vessels in abnormal tissues or in abnormal positions.Drug Evaluation, Preclinical: Preclinical testing of drugs in experimental animals or in vitro for their biological and toxic effects and potential clinical applications.Androgen-Binding Protein: Carrier proteins produced in the Sertoli cells of the testis, secreted into the seminiferous tubules, and transported via the efferent ducts to the epididymis. They participate in the transport of androgens. Androgen-binding protein has the same amino acid sequence as SEX HORMONE-BINDING GLOBULIN. They differ by their sites of synthesis and post-translational oligosaccharide modifications.Genes, tat: DNA sequences that form the coding region for the protein responsible for trans-activation of transcription (tat) in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV).Goserelin: A synthetic long-acting agonist of GONADOTROPIN-RELEASING HORMONE. Goserelin is used in treatments of malignant NEOPLASMS of the prostate, uterine fibromas, and metastatic breast cancer.Gene Expression: The phenotypic manifestation of a gene or genes by the processes of GENETIC TRANSCRIPTION and GENETIC TRANSLATION.Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide: A single nucleotide variation in a genetic sequence that occurs at appreciable frequency in the population.Glutathione S-Transferase pi: A glutathione transferase that catalyzes the conjugation of electrophilic substrates to GLUTATHIONE. This enzyme has been shown to provide cellular protection against redox-mediated damage by FREE RADICALS.Prostatic Secretory Proteins: Proteins secreted by the prostate gland. The major secretory proteins from the human prostate gland include PROSTATE-SPECIFIC ANTIGEN, prostate-specific acid phosphatase, prostate-specific membrane antigen, and prostate-specific protein-94.Questionnaires: Predetermined sets of questions used to collect data - clinical data, social status, occupational group, etc. The term is often applied to a self-completed survey instrument.Tumor Suppressor Protein p53: Nuclear phosphoprotein encoded by the p53 gene (GENES, P53) whose normal function is to control CELL PROLIFERATION and APOPTOSIS. A mutant or absent p53 protein has been found in LEUKEMIA; OSTEOSARCOMA; LUNG CANCER; and COLORECTAL CANCER.Rectum: The distal segment of the LARGE INTESTINE, between the SIGMOID COLON and the ANAL CANAL.Radiotherapy, Intensity-Modulated: CONFORMAL RADIOTHERAPY that combines several intensity-modulated beams to provide improved dose homogeneity and highly conformal dose distributions.Tumor Suppressor Proteins: Proteins that are normally involved in holding cellular growth in check. Deficiencies or abnormalities in these proteins may lead to unregulated cell growth and tumor development.Protein Binding: The process in which substances, either endogenous or exogenous, bind to proteins, peptides, enzymes, protein precursors, or allied compounds. Specific protein-binding measures are often used as assays in diagnostic assessments.MicroRNAs: Small double-stranded, non-protein coding RNAs, 21-25 nucleotides in length generated from single-stranded microRNA gene transcripts by the same RIBONUCLEASE III, Dicer, that produces small interfering RNAs (RNA, SMALL INTERFERING). They become part of the RNA-INDUCED SILENCING COMPLEX and repress the translation (TRANSLATION, GENETIC) of target RNA by binding to homologous 3'UTR region as an imperfect match. The small temporal RNAs (stRNAs), let-7 and lin-4, from C. elegans, are the first 2 miRNAs discovered, and are from a class of miRNAs involved in developmental timing.Pancreatic Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the PANCREAS. Depending on the types of ISLET CELLS present in the tumors, various hormones can be secreted: GLUCAGON from PANCREATIC ALPHA CELLS; INSULIN from PANCREATIC BETA CELLS; and SOMATOSTATIN from the SOMATOSTATIN-SECRETING CELLS. Most are malignant except the insulin-producing tumors (INSULINOMA).Cisplatin: An inorganic and water-soluble platinum complex. After undergoing hydrolysis, it reacts with DNA to produce both intra and interstrand crosslinks. These crosslinks appear to impair replication and transcription of DNA. The cytotoxicity of cisplatin correlates with cellular arrest in the G2 phase of the cell cycle.Quality of Life: A generic concept reflecting concern with the modification and enhancement of life attributes, e.g., physical, political, moral and social environment; the overall condition of a human life.Radiotherapy Planning, Computer-Assisted: Computer-assisted mathematical calculations of beam angles, intensities of radiation, and duration of irradiation in radiotherapy.Molecular Sequence Data: Descriptions of specific amino acid, carbohydrate, or nucleotide sequences which have appeared in the published literature and/or are deposited in and maintained by databanks such as GENBANK, European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), National Biomedical Research Foundation (NBRF), or other sequence repositories.Phosphorylation: The introduction of a phosphoryl group into a compound through the formation of an ester bond between the compound and a phosphorus moiety.Urinary Bladder Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the URINARY BLADDER.Disease Models, Animal: Naturally occurring or experimentally induced animal diseases with pathological processes sufficiently similar to those of human diseases. They are used as study models for human diseases.Gene Knockdown Techniques: The artificial induction of GENE SILENCING by the use of RNA INTERFERENCE to reduce the expression of a specific gene. It includes the use of DOUBLE-STRANDED RNA, such as SMALL INTERFERING RNA and RNA containing HAIRPIN LOOP SEQUENCE, and ANTI-SENSE OLIGONUCLEOTIDES.Immunoenzyme Techniques: Immunologic techniques based on the use of: (1) enzyme-antibody conjugates; (2) enzyme-antigen conjugates; (3) antienzyme antibody followed by its homologous enzyme; or (4) enzyme-antienzyme complexes. These are used histologically for visualizing or labeling tissue specimens.
Moreover, the drug has demonstrated superior clinical effectiveness in the treatment of prostate cancer in a direct head-to- ... Figg W, Chau CH, Small EJ (14 September 2010). Drug Management of Prostate Cancer. Springer Science & Business Media. pp. 56, ... A review of its pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic properties, and therapeutic efficacy in prostate cancer". Drugs & Aging. 3 ... Rathkopf D, Scher HI (2013). "Androgen receptor antagonists in castration-resistant prostate cancer". Cancer Journal. 19 (1): ...
Drug Management of Prostate Cancer. Springer Science & Business Media. pp. 99-. ISBN 978-1-60327-829-4. Singh SM, Gauthier S, ... "Androgen deprivation therapy for prostate cancer: current status and future prospects". The Prostate. 61 (4): 332-53. doi: ... Contraindicated in prostate cancer due to weak androgenic activity and stimulation of tumor growth. Most commonly used as a ... Widely used in the treatment of prostate cancer in Japan, but little used for this purpose elsewhere. Has largely been replaced ...
Drug Management of Prostate Cancer. Springer Science & Business Media. pp. 96-98. ISBN 978-1-60327-829-4. Stephen Neidle (30 ... 171-. ISBN 978-3-540-26861-1. Waun Ki Hong; American Association for Cancer Research (2010). Holland-Frei Cancer Medicine 8. ... Cancer Drug Design and Discovery. Academic Press. pp. 341-. ISBN 978-0-12-397228-6. Fleseriu M, Castinetti F (2016). "Updates ... and ketoconazole has also been used to inhibit androgen production in the treatment of prostate cancer. 3β-Hydroxysteroid ...
William Figg; Cindy H. Chau; Eric J. Small (14 September 2010). Drug Management of Prostate Cancer. Springer Science & Business ... stimulate prostate cancer cells to grow. Therefore, blocking these androgens can provide powerful treatment for prostate cancer ... an Antiandrogen Prostate Cancer Drug". Journal of Chemical Education. 80 (12): 1439. doi:10.1021/ed080p1439. Baker, J. W.; ... Food and Drug Administration for the treatment of metastatic prostate cancer in combination with a gonadotropin-releasing ...
A review of its pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic properties, and therapeutic efficacy in prostate cancer". Drugs Aging. 3 (1 ... Drug Management of Prostate Cancer. Springer Science & Business Media. pp. 71-. ISBN 978-1-60327-829-4. Raynaud JP, Fiet J, Le ... Prostate Cancer. Demos Medical Publishing. pp. 81-. ISBN 978-1-935281-91-7. Jonathan Upfal (2006). The Australian Drug Guide: ... a review of its use in the treatment of locally advanced prostate cancer". Drugs. 66 (6): 837-50. doi:10.2165/00003495- ...
"Prostate cancer yields to a drug". The New York Times: 29. 1943. The Leuprolide Study Group (November 1984). "Leuprolide versus ... Prostate cancer and breast cancer Prevention of tall stature in tall adolescent girls As an emergency postcoital contraceptive ... the only approved indications for DES were treatment of advanced prostate cancer and treatment of advanced breast cancer in ... Hodges at the University of Chicago found DES to be the first effective drug for the treatment of metastatic prostate cancer. ...
It is also used in the treatment of prostate cancer in Japan. CMA is the acetate ester of chlormadinone, which, in contrast to ... Chlormadinone acetate is the generic name of the drug and its INN, USAN, BAN, and JAN. CMA is marketed under a variety of brand ... CMA has been widely used in the treatment of prostate cancer in Japan, but has seen little use for indication elsewhere in the ... 531-. ISBN 978-3-642-80859-3. Jack H. Mydlo; Ciril J. Godec (11 July 2003). Prostate Cancer: Science and Clinical Practice. ...
This action may reverse docetaxel resistance in prostate cancer cells by reducing transport of the drug out of these cells. All ... Multidisciplinary Management of Prostate Cancer: The Role of the Prostate Cancer Unit. Springer Science & Business Media. pp. ... Figg W, Chau CH, Small EJ (14 September 2010). Drug Management of Prostate Cancer. Springer Science & Business Media. pp. 56, ... effect on sex hormone levels in men with prostate cancer (notably providing indication that the drug has clinically-relevant ...
Prior to being discontinued, the drug was also administered by Roy Hertz to three patients with metastatic breast cancer and ... 161-. ISBN 978-0-19-984119-6. JORDAN V. CRAIG; B.J.A. Furr (5 February 2010). Hormone Therapy in Breast and Prostate Cancer. ... The drug was also evaluated for the purpose of ovulation induction and as a treatment of chronic mastitis and endometrial ... The drug, a derivative of the cholesterol-lowering agent triparanol (MER-29) (which itself was derived from the estrogen ...
... is used to treat prostate cancer. Triptorelin is marketed under the brand names Decapeptyl (Ipsen) and Diphereline ... Gonadotropin-releasing hormone receptor § Agonists "triptorelin (Intramuscular route)". drugs.com. Retrieved 11 November 2016. ...
p. 8. ISBN 978-0-07-005115-7. "FDA OKs pinpoint prostate cancer radiation drug Xofigo from Bayer, Algeta". Archived from the ... "FDA Approves Xofigo for Advanced Prostate Cancer". cancer.org. (2013-05-15) Maffioli, L.; Florimonte, L.; Costa, D. C.; Correia ... The main indication of treatment with Xofigo is the therapy of bony metastases from castration-resistant prostate cancer due to ... was approved by the United States Food and Drug Administration in 2013 for use in medicine as a cancer treatment of bone ...
Walker, Emily P. (February 7, 2012). "Benefit of Bone Drug in Prostate Cancer in Doubt". MedPage Today. ... Pollack, Andrew (19 October 2009). "F.D.A. Says No to an Amgen Bone Drug". The New York Times. "FDA Approval for Denosumab". ... In June 2010, denosumab was approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for use in postmenopausal women with risk ... osteoporosis in women and for the treatment of bone loss in men with hormone ablation therapy for prostate cancer. Denosumab ...
... a review of its use in chemotherapy-naïve metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer". Drugs Aging. 32 (3): 243-9. doi: ... "Pharmacokinetic Aspects of the Two Novel Oral Drugs Used for Metastatic Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer: Abiraterone ... El-Amm J, Patel N, Freeman A, Aragon-Ching JB (2013). "Metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer: critical review of ... an NSAA which is used as a hormonal antineoplastic agent in the treatment of metastatic prostate cancer. It has similar ...
"Sipuleucel-T: APC 8015, APC-8015, prostate cancer vaccine". Drugs R D. 7 (3): 197-201. 2006. doi:10.2165/00126839-200607030- ... "Scientists Say They've Found Gene That Causes Breast Cancer-Study Could Lead to Test For Those at High Risk Of Inheriting ... "A Stem-Cell-Based Drug Gets Approval in Canada". The New York Times. May 17 2012. Suskind, Ron (2011). Confidence Men: Wall ... The Immune Response Corporation patented the basis of the first FDA approved cancer vaccine, and pioneered the field of ...
... role in prostate cancer and drug discovery". Acta Pharmacologica Sinica. 36 (1): 3-23. doi:10.1038/aps.2014.18. ISSN 1671-4083 ... The drug has antigonadotropic properties via its progestogenic actions. Oxendolone, also known as 16β-ethyl-19-nortestosterone ... J. Elks (14 November 2014). The Dictionary of Drugs: Chemical Data: Chemical Data, Structures and Bibliographies. Springer. pp ... 2935-. ISBN 978-0-8155-1856-3. Martin Negwer; Hans-Georg Scharnow (2001). Organic-chemical drugs and their synonyms: (an ...
... including a recent blood test for lung cancer, currently in clinical trials. Creating the first drugs against cancers caused by ... and also as combination therapies for prostate, ovarian, prostate, and other cancers. Wistar scientists are developing new ... Identifying the genes associated with breast, lung, and prostate cancers. Pioneering the science of monoclonal antibodies used ... Since 1972, Wistar has been a National Cancer Institute (NCI)-designated Cancer Center and holds the NCI's highest rating of " ...
Scher was the lead clinical trial investigator for a rival prostate cancer drug from the biotech company Novacea. Their ... Pollack, Andrew (14 April 2009). "Promising Test for Dendreon's Prostate Cancer Drug". The New York Times. Retrieved 30 June ... Phase III clinical trial results demonstrating a survival benefit for prostate cancer patients receiving the drug were ... February 2009). "Glycomic Characterization of Prostate Specific Antigen and Prostatic Acid Phosphatase in Prostate Cancer and ...
... sometimes prostate cancer may also be associated with urinary incontinence. Moreover, drugs or radiation used to treat prostate ... It is common with prostate cancer treatments. Both women and men can become incontinent from neurologic injury, congenital ... Enlarged prostate is the most common cause of incontinence in men after the age of 40; ... In those with problems following prostate surgery there is little evidence regarding the use of surgery. Globally, up to 35% of ...
Morgentaler (2006). "Testosterone and prostate cancer: an historical perspective on a modern myth". European Urology. 50 (5): ... The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) stated in 2015 that neither the benefits nor the safety of testosterone have been ... men with prostate cancer risk were warned against testosterone therapy, that has shown to be a myth. Other side effects can ... Tavernise, Sabrina (March 3, 2015). "Drugs Using Testosterone Will Label Heart Risks". New York Times. Retrieved March 19, 2015 ...
Figg W, Chau CH, Small EJ (14 September 2010). Drug Management of Prostate Cancer. Springer. p. 71. ISBN 978-1-60327-829-4. ... Prostate Cancer: Prostate Cancer. Jones & Bartlett Publishers. p. 169. ISBN 978-1-4496-8695-6. Prostate Cancer Research ... A review of its pharmacology and therapeutic efficacy in prostate cancer". Drugs Aging. 5 (1): 59-80. PMID 7919640. Neumann F ( ... Schröder FH (1993). "Cyproterone acetate--mechanism of action and clinical effectiveness in prostate cancer treatment". Cancer ...
"FDA approves production of imaging agent that helps detect prostate cancer". U.S. Food and Drug Administration, Silver Spring, ... its value was found in detecting prostate cancer recurrence when it is the most deadly. In 2012, the U.S. Food and Drug ... Prostate cancer is another disease where carbon-11 choline PET imaging has found success. As with the brain, there is too much ... Hara, T; Kosaka, N; Kishi, H (June 1998). "PET imaging of prostate cancer using carbon-11-choline". Journal of Nuclear Medicine ...
Capromab is a mouse monoclonal antibody which recognizes prostate specific membrane antigen (PSMA) from prostate cancer cells ... WHO Drug Information Kahn, Daniel; J. Christopher Austin; Robert T. Maguire; Sara J. Miller; Jack Gerstbrein; Richard D. ... Yttrium-Capromab Pendetide in the Treatment of Men with Prostate Cancer Recurrence Following Radical Prostatectomy". Cancer ... Manyak, M. J. (2008). "Indium-111 capromab pendetide in the management of recurrent prostate cancer". Expert Review of ...
It is recommended that physicians screen for prostate cancer with a digital rectal exam and prostate-specific antigen (PSA) ... Staff (September 17, 2014). "Joint Meeting for Bone, Reproductive and Urologic Drugs Advisory Committee (BRUDAC) and the Drug ... Some studies argue that ART increases the risk of prostate cancer, although the results are not conclusive. As of September ... Other significant adverse effects of testosterone supplementation include acceleration of pre-existing prostate cancer growth ...
Chang, Chawnshang (2005). Prostate Cancer: Basic Mechanisms and Therapeutic Approaches. Singapore: World Scientific Publishing ... It is also used under the brand name Permixon in Europe as a pharmaceutical drug for the treatment of benign prostatic ... Finasteride (Proscar or Propecia) was the first steroidal 5α-reductase inhibitor approved by the U.S. Food and Drug ... ISBN 981-256-067-X. Kulig, Katarzyna., Malawska, Barbara (2006). "Trends in the Development of New Drugs for Treatment of ...
Cadmium exposure has been linked to lung, prostate and renal cancer. It is not a strong mutagen, but acts as a promoter through ... Cadmium (metallotherapeutic drug, metal-based drug) can induce apoptosis (programmed tumor cell death) in various cell types. ... The mean specific activity of SSAO was significantly elevated in the group of patients having prostate cancer with skeletal ... Huff J; Lunn RM; Waalkes MP; Tomatis L; Infante PF (2007). "Cadmium-induced cancers in animals and in humans". Int J Occup ...
Prostate cancer is classified as an adenocarcinoma, or glandular cancer, that begins when normal semen-secreting prostate gland cells mutate into cancer cells. The region of prostate gland where the adenocarcinoma is most common is the peripheral zone. Initially, small clumps of cancer cells remain confined to otherwise normal prostate glands, a condition known as carcinoma in situ or prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PIN). Although there is no proof that PIN is a cancer precursor, it is closely associated with cancer. Over time, these cancer cells begin to multiply and spread to the surrounding prostate tissue (the stroma) forming a tumor. Eventually, the tumor may grow large enough to invade nearby organs such as the ...
... is a bacterial infection of the prostate gland. It should be distinguished from other forms of prostatitis such as acute bacterial prostatitis and chronic pelvic pain syndrome (CPPS). Chronic bacterial prostatitis is a relatively rare condition that usually presents with an intermittent UTI-type picture. It is defined as recurrent urinary tract infections in men originating from a chronic infection in the prostate. Symptoms may be completely absent until there is also bladder infection, and the most troublesome problem is usually recurrent cystitis. Chronic bacterial prostatitis occurs in less than 5% of patients with prostate-related non-BPH lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS). Dr. Weidner, Professor of Medicine, Department of Urology, University of Gießen, has stated: "In studies of 656 men, we seldom found chronic bacterial prostatitis. It is truly a rare disease. Most of those were E-coli." In ...
... (GTx-007, S-4) is an investigational selective androgen receptor modulator (SARM) developed by GTX, Inc for treatment of conditions such as muscle wasting, osteoporosis and benign prostatic hypertrophy,[1] using the nonsteroidal antiandrogen bicalutamide as a lead compound.[2]. Andarine is an orally active partial agonist for androgen receptors. It is less potent in both anabolic and androgenic effects than other SARMs. In an animal model of benign prostatic hypertrophy, andarine was shown to reduce prostate weight with similar efficacy to finasteride, but without producing any reduction in muscle mass or anti-androgenic side effects.[3] This suggests that it is able to competitively block binding of dihydrotestosterone to its receptor targets in the prostate gland, but its partial agonist effects at androgen receptors prevent the side effects associated with the anti-androgenic drugs traditionally used for treatment of ...
... (commonly known as a TURP, plural TURPs, and rarely as a transurethral prostatic resection, TUPR) is a urological operation. It is used to treat benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). As the name indicates, it is performed by visualising the prostate through the urethra and removing tissue by electrocautery or sharp dissection. This is considered the most effective treatment for BPH. This procedure is done with spinal or general anaesthetic. A triple lumen catheter is inserted through the urethra to irrigate and drain the bladder after the surgical procedure is complete. Outcome is considered excellent for 80-90% of BPH patients. BPH is normally initially treated medically. This is done through alpha antagonists such as tamsulosin or 5-alpha-reductase inhibitors such as finasteride and dutasteride. If medical treatment does not reduce a patient's urinary symptoms, a TURP may be considered following a careful examination of the ...
A prostatic stent is a stent used to keep open the male urethra and allow the passing of urine in cases of prostatic obstruction and lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS). Prostatic obstruction is a common condition with a variety of causes. Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) is the most common cause, but obstruction may also occur acutely after treatment for BPH such as transurethral needle ablation of the prostate (TUNA), transurethral resection of the prostate (TURP), transurethral microwave thermotherapy (TUMT), prostate cancer or after radiation therapy. There are two types of prostatic stent: temporary and permanent. Although a permanent prostatic stent is not a medical treatment, it falls under the classification of a surgical procedure. Placement of a permanent prostatic stent is carried out as an outpatient treatment under local, topical or spinal anesthesia and usually takes about ...
... is a serious bacterial infection of the prostate gland. This infection is a medical emergency. It should be distinguished from other forms of prostatitis such as chronic bacterial prostatitis and chronic pelvic pain syndrome (CPPS). Men with acute prostatitis often have chills, fever, pain in the lower back, perineum, or genital area, urinary frequency and urgency often at night, burning or painful urination, body aches, and a demonstrable infection of the urinary tract, as evidenced by white blood cells and bacteria in the urine. Acute prostatitis may be a complication of prostate biopsy. Often, the prostate gland is very tender to palpation through the rectum. Acute prostatitis is relatively easy to diagnose due to its symptoms that suggest infection. The organism may be found in blood or urine, and sometimes in both. Common bacteria are Escherichia coli, Klebsiella, Proteus, Pseudomonas, ...
Treatment for prostate cancer may involve active surveillance, surgery, radiation therapy including brachytherapy (prostate brachytherapy) and external beam radiation therapy, high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU), cryosurgery, hormonal therapy, chemotherapy, or some combination. Which option is best depends on the stage of the disease, the Gleason score, and the PSA level. Other important factors are the man's age, his general health, and his feelings about potential treatments and their possible side effects. Because all treatments can have significant side effects, such as erectile dysfunction and urinary incontinence, treatment discussions often focus on balancing the goals of therapy with the risks of lifestyle alterations. The selection of treatment options may be a complex decision involving many factors. For example, radical prostatectomy after primary radiation failure is a very ...
In female human anatomy, Skene's glands or the Skene glands (/skiːn/ SKEEN; also known as the lesser vestibular glands, periurethral glands, paraurethral glands, or homologous female prostate) are glands located on the anterior wall of the vagina, around the lower end of the urethra. They drain into the urethra and near the urethral opening and may be near or a part of the G-spot. These glands are surrounded with tissue (which includes the part of the clitoris) that reaches up inside the vagina and swells with blood during sexual arousal. The location of the Skene's glands are the general area of the vulva, located on the anterior wall of the vagina around the lower end of the urethra. The Skene's glands are homologous with the prostate gland in males, containing numerous microanatomical structures in common with the prostate gland, such as secretory cells. Skene's glands are not, however, explicit ...
The Gleason grading system is used to help evaluate the prognosis of men with prostate cancer using samples from a prostate biopsy. Together with other parameters, it is incorporated into a strategy of prostate cancer staging which predicts prognosis and helps guide therapy. A Gleason score is given to prostate cancer based upon its microscopic appearance. Cancers with a higher Gleason score are more aggressive and have a worse prognosis. Pathological scores range from 2 through 10, with higher number indicating greater risks and higher mortality. A total score is calculated based on how cells look under a microscope, with the first half of the score based on the dominant, or most common cell morphology (scored 1-5), and the second half based off the non-dominant cell pattern with the highest grade (scored ...
... (7α-TMS; developmental code name SC-26519) is a steroidal antimineralocorticoid and antiandrogen of the spirolactone group and the major active metabolite of spironolactone.[1] Other important metabolites of spironolactone include 7α-thiospironolactone (7α-TS; SC-24813), 6β-hydroxy-7α-thiomethylspironolactone (6β-OH-7α-TMS), and canrenone (SC-9376).[2][3][1][4] Spironolactone is a prodrug with a short terminal half-life of 1.4 hours.[5][6][7] The active metabolites of spironolactone have extended terminal half-lives of 13.8 hours for 7α-TMS, 15.0 hours for 6β-OH-7α-TMS, and 16.5 hours for canrenone, and accordingly, these metabolites are responsible for the therapeutic effects of the drug.[5][6] 7α-TS and 7α-TMS have been found to possess approximately equivalent affinity for the rat ventral prostate androgen receptor (AR) relative to that of spironolactone.[8] The affinity of 7α-TS, 7α-TMS, and spironolactone for the rat ...
The location of the Skene's glands are the general area of the vulva, located on the anterior wall of the vagina around the lower end of the urethra. The Skene's glands are homologous with the prostate gland in males, containing numerous microanatomical structures in common with the prostate gland, such as secretory cells.[2][3] Skene's glands are not, however, explicit prostate glands themselves. The two Skene's ducts lead from the Skene's glands to the surface of the vulva, to the left and right of the urethral opening from which they are structurally capable of secreting fluid.[2] Although there remains debate about the function of the Skene's glands, one purpose is to secrete a fluid that helps lubricate the urethral opening, possibly contributing antimicrobial factors to protect the urinary tract from infections.[3]. The source of female ejaculation has not been proven.[4] It has been postulated that ...
Disabled homolog 2-interacting protein is a protein that in humans is encoded by the DAB2IP gene. DAB2IP is a Ras (MIM 190020) GTPase-activating protein (GAP) that acts as a tumor suppressor gene and is inactivated by methylation in prostate and breast cancers (Yano et al., 2005).[supplied by OMIM] DAB2IP has been shown to interact with DAB2. GRCh38: Ensembl release 89: ENSG00000136848 - Ensembl, May 2017 GRCm38: Ensembl release 89: ENSMUSG00000026883 - Ensembl, May 2017 "Human PubMed Reference:". "Mouse PubMed Reference:". Chen H, Pong RC, Wang Z, Hsieh JT (April 2002). "Differential regulation of the human gene DAB2IP in normal and malignant prostatic epithelia: cloning and characterization". Genomics. 79 (4): 573-81. doi:10.1006/geno.2002.6739. PMID 11944990. Wang Z, Tseng CP, Pong RC, Chen H, McConnell JD, Navone N, Hsieh JT (April 2002). "The mechanism of growth-inhibitory effect of DOC-2/DAB2 in prostate ...
Prostasin is a protein that in humans is encoded by the PRSS8 gene. This gene encodes a trypsinogen, which is a member of the trypsin family of serine proteases. This enzyme is highly expressed in prostate epithelia and is one of several proteolytic enzymes found in seminal fluid. The proprotein is cleaved to produce a light chain and a heavy chain which are associated by a disulfide bond. It is active on peptide linkages involving the carboxyl group of lysine or arginine. The protein is implicated in epithelial sodium channel regulation and may help regulate a variety of tissue functions that involve a sodium channel. GRCh38: Ensembl release 89: ENSG00000052344 - Ensembl, May 2017 GRCm38: Ensembl release 89: ENSMUSG00000030800 - Ensembl, May 2017 "Human PubMed Reference:". "Mouse PubMed Reference:". Yu JX, Chao L, Ward DC, Chao J (Mar 1996). "Structure and chromosomal localization of the human prostasin (PRSS8) gene". Genomics. 32 (3): 334-40. doi:10.1006/geno.1996.0127. ...
One drug in this class, finasteride, was evaluated in the first large-scale chemoprevention study, the Prostate Cancer ... prostate cancer (18% vs. 24% for the placebo group) [98]. Dutasteride was shown to decrease the risk of prostate cancer in the ... reduction in prostate cancer risk was seen primarily for less fatal subtypes of prostate cancer that are often not treated [100 ... level of 3 or 4 ng/mL in men at high risk of prostate cancer (e.g., black race, first-degree relative with prostate cancer).. ...
International Prostate Symptom Score - Prostate cancer screening - Tamsulosin - Doxazosin - Alfuzosin - 5α-Reductase - ... Prostate-specific antigen - Urination - Lower urinary tract symptoms - Dihydrotestosterone - Rectal examination - Dysuria - ... 5α-reductase inhibitor drugs are used in benign prostatic hyperplasia, prostate cancer, pattern hair loss (androgenetic ... prostatehormone-refractory prostate cancermetastatic prostate cancer. Although prostate specific antigen levels may be elevated ...
Prostate cancer is the second most common cancer in men worldwide. The American Cancer Society estimates that in 2018, there ... takes four pills of the prostate cancer drug apalutamide daily. New studies show it is one of two drugs that can stave off pain ... Prostate Cancer Drugs Can Delay the Spread of the Disease, Trials Show. Order Reprints , Todays Paper , Subscribe ... Still, some experts said enthusiasm about the new drugs should be tempered by other changes occurring in the prostate cancer ...
"Prostate cancer drug could provide two precious extra months of life to men in advanced stages of the disease," reported the ... Prostate cancer drug could provide two precious extra months of life to men in advanced stages of the disease ... This phase 3 clinical trial compared two drugs, mitoxantrone and cabazitaxel, for men with prostate cancer that had spread to ... "cabazitaxel is the first drug to improve survival in patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer with ...
... of patients with aggressive cancers, British researchers reported Tuesday.Although the ... An experimental cancer drug shrank prostate tumors dramatically and more than doubled survival in 70% to 80% ... Prostate cancer drug seen as possible breakthrough. The survival rate more than doubled among most men in the study. ... An experimental cancer drug shrank prostate tumors dramatically and more than doubled survival in 70% to 80% of patients with ...
... breast cancer in men, the UK medicines regulator has said. ... A drug taken by up to 100,000 men for enlarged prostate has ... Drug for enlarged prostate linked to male breast cancer. A drug taken by up to 100,000 men for enlarged prostate has been ... The drug is used for the treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia, also known as enlarged prostate, which is not cancerous but ... New warnings will be added to the packaging of Finasteride after five men in Britain taking the drug developed breast cancer. ...
Prostate cancer becomes resistant to anti-androgen drugs when cancer cells begin to increase production of the androgen ... The researchers tested the new drugs effectiveness in mice with tumors derived from drug-resistant prostate cancer cells. ... the Prostate Cancer Foundation and Medivation and was conducted through the Prostate Cancer Clinical Trials Consortium. ... known as castration-resistant prostate cancer, or CRPC. Also referred to as hormone-refractory prostate cancer, CRPC is ...
Amgen Incs experimental drug denosumab reduced the risk of osteoporosis and fracture in men being treated with prostate cancer ... Amgen Incs experimental drug denosumab reduced the risk of osteoporosis and fracture in men being treated with prostate cancer ... A three-year study of more than 1,400 men with non-metastatic prostate cancer undergoing androgen deprivation therapy showed ... But investors remain focused on upcoming data that will show whether the drug is effective in the larger market of osteoporosis ...
Healthy men screened regularly for prostate cancer who show no symptoms should talk with doctors about a drug, new U.S. ... 27 (UPI) -- Healthy men screened regularly for prostate cancer who show no symptoms should talk with doctors about a drug, new ... and examines the use of 5-alpha reductase inhibitors as a method of chemoprevention for prostate cancer. ... which can contribute to the growth of prostate cancer. Advertisement. ...
Researchers say a long-term study indicates the inexpensive drug is effective in reducing mens risk of developing prostate ... What if there was a drug that could significantly reduce the risk of developing prostate cancer? What if this drug was ... Hair Loss Drug Finasteride May Reduce Risk of Prostate Cancer. Written by Dan Gray on January 29, 2019 ... Gene-Targeting Drug Shows Promise Against Prostate Cancer. Researchers said the medication olaparib, which is used to treat ...
... was shown to extend the life of men with late-stage cancer by nearly five months. ... The Food and Drug Administration approved a new life-prolonging drug for men with late-stage prostate cancer on Friday, adding ... Before 2004, the only drug shown to prolong the survival of men with advanced prostate cancer was the chemotherapy drug ... New Drug For Prostate Cancer Gets F.D.A. Nod. By ANDREW POLLACK. AUG. 31, 2012. ...
A new drug combination may be effective in treating men with metastatic prostate cancer. Preliminary results of this new ... A new drug combination may be effective in treating men with metastatic prostate cancer. Preliminary results of this new ... The Drug Combination Actually Tested to Treat Metastatic Prostate Cancer (IMAGE) view more ... Promising drug combination for advanced prostate cancer. University of Montreal Hospital Research Centre (CRCHUM) ...
... apparently undercuts what certain aggressive cancer cells rely on to produce energy and sustain themselves. ... Prostate cancer is a growing global health concern and a leading cause of cancer deaths among men. The American Cancer Society ... Research shows diabetes drugs promise in zapping prostate cancer. The compound, marketed as metformin, apparently undercuts ... Trotman and his colleagues discovered the precise molecular mechanisms by which the drug forces aggressive prostate cancer ...
Johnsons drug Zytiga foradvanced prostate cancer to allow its use prior to treatmentwith chemotherapy. ... Johnsons drug Zytiga for advanced prostate cancer to allow its use prior to treatment with chemotherapy. ... approved in November 2011 to treat men whose prostate cancer had progressed following treatment with the chemotherapy drug ... director of the Office of Oncology Drug Products in the FDAs Center for Drug Evaluation and Research, said in a statement. ...
... most common type of cancer in men in the United States and accounts for more than one-quarter of all men diagnosed with cancer ... Stages of Prostate Cancer. If cancer is found in the prostate, the doctor needs to know the stage or extent of the disease.. ... Prostate cancer is rare in men younger than 40. *A family history of prostate cancer - Having a father or brother who has had ... Prostate cancer is the most common type of cancer in men in the United States (other than skin cancer). On average, one man in ...
1A and SI Appendix, Tables S1 and S2). These four prostate cancer cell lines represent different stages of prostate cancer ... Cell selection for aptamers with prostate cancer specificity yielded the E3 aptamer, which internalizes into prostate cancer ... Tunable cytotoxic aptamer-drug conjugates for the treatment of prostate cancer. Bethany Powell Gray, Linsley Kelly, Douglas P. ... Tunable cytotoxic aptamer-drug conjugates for the treatment of prostate cancer. Bethany Powell Gray, Linsley Kelly, Douglas P. ...
The latest clinical research in prostate cancer is being presented at the American Society of Clinical Oncology Genitorinary ... The question of whether steroids are helpful in the treatment of prostate cancer is, however, worth testing in well-controlled ... The latest clinical research in prostate cancer is being presented at the American Society of Clinical Oncology Genitorinary ... for ARN-509 in men with high risk castration-resistant prostate cancer that hasnt yet spread. This data was first presented at ...
... despite evidence from a large clinical trial showing that the drug significantly reduced the risk, a survey sho ... Physicians continue to shy away from prescribing finasteride to prevent prostate cancer, ... the Reduction by Dutasteride of Prostate Cancer Events (REDUCE) trial showed that a 23% reduction in prostate cancer with the ... When asked why, more than half of the urologists expressed concern that the drug might cause high-grade prostate cancer, and ...
Men with prostate cancer who take the diabetes drug metformin improve their chances of surviving the malignancy, new research ... Diabetes and prostate cancer are common in the United States. This year, about 239,000 new cases of prostate cancer will be ... Metformin, a widely used diabetes drug, may reduce the risk of dying from prostate cancer, according to new research. A study ... Metformin, a widely used diabetes drug, may reduce the risk of dying from prostate cancer, according to new research.. ...
Prostate cancer is one of the nations leading cancer killers, responsible for the deaths of 30,000 men in the U.S. each year, ... One response to "Prostate Cancer Drug Vaults OncoGenex Onto Investor Radar Screens". ... Since prostate cancer affects more than its share of wealthy, powerful men later in life (think Intel co-founder Andy Grove, ... For comparison, docetaxel was approved for prostate cancer based on its ability to prolong lives by just an extra 2.4 months. ...
... drug dutasteride (Avodart) for use in prostate cancer prevention. ... FDA Denies BPH Drug for Prostate Cancer Prevention. by Cole ... for use in prostate cancer prevention.. Drug manufacturer GlaxoSmithKline applied to have the drug approved for use in patients ... with high prostate-specific antigen levels, but who did not have prostate cancer in a biopsy. ... Dutasteride and Mercks BPH drug finasteride (Proscar) were both down-voted by an FDA advisory panel in December after the ...
... breast and prostate cancer, doctors reported at the worlds largest cancer conference.Among those who have benefited is Roszell ... Newer drugs are substantially improving the chances of survival for some people with hard-to-treat forms of lung, ... PROSTATE. The options keep expanding for men with prostate cancer that has spread beyond the gland. Standard treatment is drugs ... LUNG CANCER. Immunotherapy drugs such as Keytruda have transformed the treatment of many types of cancer, but theyre still ...
View reference source for the article along with the name of the writer and the editor for the article on Drugs for Prostate ... Drugs Used to Treat Prostate Cancer. Drugs Used to Treat Prostate Cancer ... Quiz on Prostate Cancer. Prostate cancer is fast gaining as a common cancer form among men; more threatening since its symptoms ... Decipher Test for Prostate Cancer. Decipher test a genomic test for prostate cancer that determines the aggressiveness of the ...
However, drug-resistant cancer cells can emerge during chemotherapy, limiting its effectiveness as a cancer-fighting agent. ... proven that a compound initially developed as a cholesterol-fighting molecule not only halts the progression of prostate cancer ... Standard treatment for prostate cancer can include chemotherapy that targets receptors on cancer cells. ... Standard treatment for prostate cancer can include chemotherapy that targets receptors on cancer cells. However, drug-resistant ...
... could deliver great help in treating advanced prostate... ... Popular in: Prostate / Prostate Cancer. * How to shrink the ... "Study: new drug found to further boost survival for advanced prostate cancer patients." Medical News Today. MediLexicon, Intl ... 2016, February 23). "Study: new drug found to further boost survival for advanced prostate cancer patients." Medical News Today ... Visit our Prostate / Prostate Cancer category page for the latest news on this subject, or sign up to our newsletter to receive ...
  • In addition to normal biological functions, DHT also plays an important causative role in a number of androgen-dependent conditions including hair conditions like hirsutism (excessive facial/body hair growth) and pattern hair loss (androgenic alopecia or pattern baldness) and prostate diseases such as benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) and prostate cancer. (hyperleap.com)
  • Source: [Reprinted with permission of Siegel RL, Miller KD, Jemal A. Cancer statistics, 2019. (netce.com)
  • A systematic review meta-analysis of the effect of voiding position on the quality of urination found that in elderly males with benign prostate hyperplasia, the sitting position was superior compared with the standing. (hyperleap.com)
  • Terazosin, sold under the brand name Hytrin among others, is a medication used to treat symptoms of an enlarged prostate and high blood pressure. (hyperleap.com)
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