Reoperation: A repeat operation for the same condition in the same patient due to disease progression or recurrence, or as followup to failed previous surgery.Retrospective Studies: Studies used to test etiologic hypotheses in which inferences about an exposure to putative causal factors are derived from data relating to characteristics of persons under study or to events or experiences in their past. The essential feature is that some of the persons under study have the disease or outcome of interest and their characteristics are compared with those of unaffected persons.Postoperative Complications: Pathologic processes that affect patients after a surgical procedure. They may or may not be related to the disease for which the surgery was done, and they may or may not be direct results of the surgery.Treatment Outcome: Evaluation undertaken to assess the results or consequences of management and procedures used in combating disease in order to determine the efficacy, effectiveness, safety, and practicability of these interventions in individual cases or series.Follow-Up Studies: Studies in which individuals or populations are followed to assess the outcome of exposures, procedures, or effects of a characteristic, e.g., occurrence of disease.Prospective Studies: Observation of a population for a sufficient number of persons over a sufficient number of years to generate incidence or mortality rates subsequent to the selection of the study group.Heart Valve Prosthesis: A device that substitutes for a heart valve. It may be composed of biological material (BIOPROSTHESIS) and/or synthetic material.Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Bioprosthesis: Prosthesis, usually heart valve, composed of biological material and whose durability depends upon the stability of the material after pretreatment, rather than regeneration by host cell ingrowth. Durability is achieved 1, mechanically by the interposition of a cloth, usually polytetrafluoroethylene, between the host and the graft, and 2, chemically by stabilization of the tissue by intermolecular linking, usually with glutaraldehyde, after removal of antigenic components, or the use of reconstituted and restructured biopolymers.Hemiarthroplasty: A partial joint replacement in which only one surface of the joint is replaced with a PROSTHESIS.Risk Factors: An aspect of personal behavior or lifestyle, environmental exposure, or inborn or inherited characteristic, which, on the basis of epidemiologic evidence, is known to be associated with a health-related condition considered important to prevent.Aortic Valve: The valve between the left ventricle and the ascending aorta which prevents backflow into the left ventricle.Heart Valve Prosthesis Implantation: Surgical insertion of synthetic material to repair injured or diseased heart valves.Prosthesis Failure: Malfunction of implantation shunts, valves, etc., and prosthesis loosening, migration, and breaking.Cardiac Surgical Procedures: Surgery performed on the heart.Mitral Valve: The valve between the left atrium and left ventricle of the heart.Recurrence: The return of a sign, symptom, or disease after a remission.Heart Valve Diseases: Pathological conditions involving any of the various HEART VALVES and the associated structures (PAPILLARY MUSCLES and CHORDAE TENDINEAE).Hospital Mortality: A vital statistic measuring or recording the rate of death from any cause in hospitalized populations.Length of Stay: The period of confinement of a patient to a hospital or other health facility.Cardiovascular Surgical Procedures: Surgery performed on the heart or blood vessels.Risk Assessment: The qualitative or quantitative estimation of the likelihood of adverse effects that may result from exposure to specified health hazards or from the absence of beneficial influences. (Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 1988)Data Collection: Systematic gathering of data for a particular purpose from various sources, including questionnaires, interviews, observation, existing records, and electronic devices. The process is usually preliminary to statistical analysis of the data.Femoral Neck Fractures: Fractures of the short, constricted portion of the thigh bone between the femur head and the trochanters. It excludes intertrochanteric fractures which are HIP FRACTURES.Aortic Valve Insufficiency: Pathological condition characterized by the backflow of blood from the ASCENDING AORTA back into the LEFT VENTRICLE, leading to regurgitation. It is caused by diseases of the AORTIC VALVE or its surrounding tissue (aortic root).Registries: The systems and processes involved in the establishment, support, management, and operation of registers, e.g., disease registers.Survival Rate: The proportion of survivors in a group, e.g., of patients, studied and followed over a period, or the proportion of persons in a specified group alive at the beginning of a time interval who survive to the end of the interval. It is often studied using life table methods.Suture Techniques: Techniques for securing together the edges of a wound, with loops of thread or similar materials (SUTURES).Incidence: The number of new cases of a given disease during a given period in a specified population. It also is used for the rate at which new events occur in a defined population. It is differentiated from PREVALENCE, which refers to all cases, new or old, in the population at a given time.Cohort Studies: Studies in which subsets of a defined population are identified. These groups may or may not be exposed to factors hypothesized to influence the probability of the occurrence of a particular disease or other outcome. Cohorts are defined populations which, as a whole, are followed in an attempt to determine distinguishing subgroup characteristics.Mitral Valve Insufficiency: Backflow of blood from the LEFT VENTRICLE into the LEFT ATRIUM due to imperfect closure of the MITRAL VALVE. This can lead to mitral valve regurgitation.Logistic Models: Statistical models which describe the relationship between a qualitative dependent variable (that is, one which can take only certain discrete values, such as the presence or absence of a disease) and an independent variable. A common application is in epidemiology for estimating an individual's risk (probability of a disease) as a function of a given risk factor.Infant, Newborn: An infant during the first month after birth.Prosthesis Design: The plan and delineation of prostheses in general or a specific prosthesis.Aortic Aneurysm: An abnormal balloon- or sac-like dilatation in the wall of AORTA.Postoperative Hemorrhage: Hemorrhage following any surgical procedure. It may be immediate or delayed and is not restricted to the surgical wound.Arthroplasty, Replacement, Hip: Replacement of the hip joint.Questionnaires: Predetermined sets of questions used to collect data - clinical data, social status, occupational group, etc. The term is often applied to a self-completed survey instrument.Age Factors: Age as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or the effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from AGING, a physiological process, and TIME FACTORS which refers only to the passage of time.Kaplan-Meier Estimate: A nonparametric method of compiling LIFE TABLES or survival tables. It combines calculated probabilities of survival and estimates to allow for observations occurring beyond a measurement threshold, which are assumed to occur randomly. Time intervals are defined as ending each time an event occurs and are therefore unequal. (From Last, A Dictionary of Epidemiology, 1995)EnglandVascular Surgical Procedures: Operative procedures for the treatment of vascular disorders.Laparoscopy: A procedure in which a laparoscope (LAPAROSCOPES) is inserted through a small incision near the navel to examine the abdominal and pelvic organs in the PERITONEAL CAVITY. If appropriate, biopsy or surgery can be performed during laparoscopy.Pulmonary Valve: A valve situated at the entrance to the pulmonary trunk from the right ventricle.Tetralogy of Fallot: A combination of congenital heart defects consisting of four key features including VENTRICULAR SEPTAL DEFECTS; PULMONARY STENOSIS; RIGHT VENTRICULAR HYPERTROPHY; and a dextro-positioned AORTA. In this condition, blood from both ventricles (oxygen-rich and oxygen-poor) is pumped into the body often causing CYANOSIS.Discrete Subaortic Stenosis: A type of constriction that is caused by the presence of a fibrous ring (discrete type) below the AORTIC VALVE, anywhere between the aortic valve and the MITRAL VALVE. It is characterized by restricted outflow from the LEFT VENTRICLE into the AORTA.Coronary Artery Bypass: Surgical therapy of ischemic coronary artery disease achieved by grafting a section of saphenous vein, internal mammary artery, or other substitute between the aorta and the obstructed coronary artery distal to the obstructive lesion.Multivariate Analysis: A set of techniques used when variation in several variables has to be studied simultaneously. In statistics, multivariate analysis is interpreted as any analytic method that allows simultaneous study of two or more dependent variables.Fracture Fixation, Internal: The use of internal devices (metal plates, nails, rods, etc.) to hold the position of a fracture in proper alignment.Device Removal: Removal of an implanted therapeutic or prosthetic device.Sternotomy: Making an incision in the STERNUM.Hospitals, Public: Hospitals controlled by various types of government, i.e., city, county, district, state or federal.Chi-Square Distribution: A distribution in which a variable is distributed like the sum of the squares of any given independent random variable, each of which has a normal distribution with mean of zero and variance of one. The chi-square test is a statistical test based on comparison of a test statistic to a chi-square distribution. The oldest of these tests are used to detect whether two or more population distributions differ from one another.United StatesSurvival Analysis: A class of statistical procedures for estimating the survival function (function of time, starting with a population 100% well at a given time and providing the percentage of the population still well at later times). The survival analysis is then used for making inferences about the effects of treatments, prognostic factors, exposures, and other covariates on the function.Blood Vessel Prosthesis Implantation: Surgical insertion of BLOOD VESSEL PROSTHESES to repair injured or diseased blood vessels.Outcome Assessment (Health Care): Research aimed at assessing the quality and effectiveness of health care as measured by the attainment of a specified end result or outcome. Measures include parameters such as improved health, lowered morbidity or mortality, and improvement of abnormal states (such as elevated blood pressure).Anastomosis, Surgical: Surgical union or shunt between ducts, tubes or vessels. It may be end-to-end, end-to-side, side-to-end, or side-to-side.Prognosis: A prediction of the probable outcome of a disease based on a individual's condition and the usual course of the disease as seen in similar situations.Treatment Failure: A measure of the quality of health care by assessment of unsuccessful results of management and procedures used in combating disease, in individual cases or series.Databases, Factual: Extensive collections, reputedly complete, of facts and data garnered from material of a specialized subject area and made available for analysis and application. The collection can be automated by various contemporary methods for retrieval. The concept should be differentiated from DATABASES, BIBLIOGRAPHIC which is restricted to collections of bibliographic references.Severity of Illness Index: Levels within a diagnostic group which are established by various measurement criteria applied to the seriousness of a patient's disorder.Cross-Sectional Studies: Studies in which the presence or absence of disease or other health-related variables are determined in each member of the study population or in a representative sample at one particular time. This contrasts with LONGITUDINAL STUDIES which are followed over a period of time.Colorectal Surgery: A surgical specialty concerned with the diagnosis and treatment of disorders and abnormalities of the COLON; RECTUM; and ANAL CANAL.Prosthesis-Related Infections: Infections resulting from the implantation of prosthetic devices. The infections may be acquired from intraoperative contamination (early) or hematogenously acquired from other sites (late).Recurrent Laryngeal Nerve Injuries: Traumatic injuries to the RECURRENT LARYNGEAL NERVE that may result in vocal cord dysfunction.Postoperative Care: The period of care beginning when the patient is removed from surgery and aimed at meeting the patient's psychological and physical needs directly after surgery. (From Dictionary of Health Services Management, 2d ed)Ethnobotany: The study of plant lore and agricultural customs of a people. In the fields of ETHNOMEDICINE and ETHNOPHARMACOLOGY, the emphasis is on traditional medicine and the existence and medicinal uses of PLANTS and PLANT EXTRACTS and their constituents, both historically and in modern times.Truncus Arteriosus: The arterial trunk arising from the fetal heart. During development, it divides into AORTA and the PULMONARY ARTERY.Surgical Procedures, Elective: Surgery which could be postponed or not done at all without danger to the patient. Elective surgery includes procedures to correct non-life-threatening medical problems as well as to alleviate conditions causing psychological stress or other potential risk to patients, e.g., cosmetic or contraceptive surgery.Thoracotomy: Surgical incision into the chest wall.Surgical Wound Infection: Infection occurring at the site of a surgical incision.Predictive Value of Tests: In screening and diagnostic tests, the probability that a person with a positive test is a true positive (i.e., has the disease), is referred to as the predictive value of a positive test; whereas, the predictive value of a negative test is the probability that the person with a negative test does not have the disease. Predictive value is related to the sensitivity and specificity of the test.Population Surveillance: Ongoing scrutiny of a population (general population, study population, target population, etc.), generally using methods distinguished by their practicability, uniformity, and frequently their rapidity, rather than by complete accuracy.Comorbidity: The presence of co-existing or additional diseases with reference to an initial diagnosis or with reference to the index condition that is the subject of study. Comorbidity may affect the ability of affected individuals to function and also their survival; it may be used as a prognostic indicator for length of hospital stay, cost factors, and outcome or survival.Pregnancy: The status during which female mammals carry their developing young (EMBRYOS or FETUSES) in utero before birth, beginning from FERTILIZATION to BIRTH.Diskectomy: Excision, in part or whole, of an INTERVERTEBRAL DISC. The most common indication is disk displacement or herniation. In addition to standard surgical removal, it can be performed by percutaneous diskectomy (DISKECTOMY, PERCUTANEOUS) or by laparoscopic diskectomy, the former being the more common.Odds Ratio: The ratio of two odds. The exposure-odds ratio for case control data is the ratio of the odds in favor of exposure among cases to the odds in favor of exposure among noncases. The disease-odds ratio for a cohort or cross section is the ratio of the odds in favor of disease among the exposed to the odds in favor of disease among the unexposed. The prevalence-odds ratio refers to an odds ratio derived cross-sectionally from studies of prevalent cases.Endocarditis: Inflammation of the inner lining of the heart (ENDOCARDIUM), the continuous membrane lining the four chambers and HEART VALVES. It is often caused by microorganisms including bacteria, viruses, fungi, and rickettsiae. Left untreated, endocarditis can damage heart valves and become life-threatening.Hyperparathyroidism: A condition of abnormally elevated output of PARATHYROID HORMONE (or PTH) triggering responses that increase blood CALCIUM. It is characterized by HYPERCALCEMIA and BONE RESORPTION, eventually leading to bone diseases. PRIMARY HYPERPARATHYROIDISM is caused by parathyroid HYPERPLASIA or PARATHYROID NEOPLASMS. SECONDARY HYPERPARATHYROIDISM is increased PTH secretion in response to HYPOCALCEMIA, usually caused by chronic KIDNEY DISEASES.Intraoperative Complications: Complications that affect patients during surgery. They may or may not be associated with the disease for which the surgery is done, or within the same surgical procedure.Cardiac Valve Annuloplasty: A type of heart valve surgery that involves the repair, replacement, or reconstruction of the annuli of HEART VALVES. It includes shortening the circumference of the annulus to improve valve closing capacity and reinforcing the annulus as a step in more complex valve repairs.Periprosthetic Fractures: Fractures around joint replacement prosthetics or implants. They can occur intraoperatively or postoperatively.Recovery of Function: A partial or complete return to the normal or proper physiologic activity of an organ or part following disease or trauma.Great BritainSex Factors: Maleness or femaleness as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from SEX CHARACTERISTICS, anatomical or physiological manifestations of sex, and from SEX DISTRIBUTION, the number of males and females in given circumstances.Heart Defects, Congenital: Developmental abnormalities involving structures of the heart. These defects are present at birth but may be discovered later in life.Acellular Dermis: Remaining tissue from normal DERMIS tissue after the cells are removed.Surgical Wound Dehiscence: Pathologic process consisting of a partial or complete disruption of the layers of a surgical wound.Decompression, Surgical: A surgical operation for the relief of pressure in a body compartment or on a body part. (From Dorland, 28th ed)Prevalence: The total number of cases of a given disease in a specified population at a designated time. It is differentiated from INCIDENCE, which refers to the number of new cases in the population at a given time.Patient Admission: The process of accepting patients. The concept includes patients accepted for medical and nursing care in a hospital or other health care institution.Blepharoplasty: Plastic surgery of the eyelid. (Cline et al., Dictionary of Visual Science, 4th ed)Biliary Tract Surgical Procedures: Any surgical procedure performed on the biliary tract.Anastomotic Leak: Breakdown of the connection and subsequent leakage of effluent (fluids, secretions, air) from a SURGICAL ANASTOMOSIS of the digestive, respiratory, genitourinary, and cardiovascular systems. Most common leakages are from the breakdown of suture lines in gastrointestinal or bowel anastomosis.Spinal Fusion: Operative immobilization or ankylosis of two or more vertebrae by fusion of the vertebral bodies with a short bone graft or often with diskectomy or laminectomy. (From Blauvelt & Nelson, A Manual of Orthopaedic Terminology, 5th ed, p236; Dorland, 28th ed)Rheumatic Heart Disease: Cardiac manifestation of systemic rheumatological conditions, such as RHEUMATIC FEVER. Rheumatic heart disease can involve any part the heart, most often the HEART VALVES and the ENDOCARDIUM.Replantation: Restoration of an organ or other structure to its original site.Surgical Procedures, Minimally Invasive: Procedures that avoid use of open, invasive surgery in favor of closed or local surgery. These generally involve use of laparoscopic devices and remote-control manipulation of instruments with indirect observation of the surgical field through an endoscope or similar device.Patient Selection: Criteria and standards used for the determination of the appropriateness of the inclusion of patients with specific conditions in proposed treatment plans and the criteria used for the inclusion of subjects in various clinical trials and other research protocols.Proportional Hazards Models: Statistical models used in survival analysis that assert that the effect of the study factors on the hazard rate in the study population is multiplicative and does not change over time.Heart Septal Defects, Ventricular: Developmental abnormalities in any portion of the VENTRICULAR SEPTUM resulting in abnormal communications between the two lower chambers of the heart. Classification of ventricular septal defects is based on location of the communication, such as perimembranous, inlet, outlet (infundibular), central muscular, marginal muscular, or apical muscular defect.Tricuspid Valve: The valve consisting of three cusps situated between the right atrium and right ventricle of the heart.Arthroplasty, Replacement, Knee: Replacement of the knee joint.Tissue Adhesions: Pathological processes consisting of the union of the opposing surfaces of a wound.WalesBlood Vessel Prosthesis: Device constructed of either synthetic or biological material that is used for the repair of injured or diseased blood vessels.Ileostomy: Surgical creation of an external opening into the ILEUM for fecal diversion or drainage. This replacement for the RECTUM is usually created in patients with severe INFLAMMATORY BOWEL DISEASES. Loop (continent) or tube (incontinent) procedures are most often employed.Lumbar Vertebrae: VERTEBRAE in the region of the lower BACK below the THORACIC VERTEBRAE and above the SACRAL VERTEBRAE.Sternum: A long, narrow, and flat bone commonly known as BREASTBONE occurring in the midsection of the anterior thoracic segment or chest region, which stabilizes the rib cage and serves as the point of origin for several muscles that move the arms, head, and neck.Polytetrafluoroethylene: Homopolymer of tetrafluoroethylene. Nonflammable, tough, inert plastic tubing or sheeting; used to line vessels, insulate, protect or lubricate apparatus; also as filter, coating for surgical implants or as prosthetic material. Synonyms: Fluoroflex; Fluoroplast; Ftoroplast; Halon; Polyfene; PTFE; Tetron.Internal Fixators: Internal devices used in osteosynthesis to hold the position of the fracture in proper alignment. By applying the principles of biomedical engineering, the surgeon uses metal plates, nails, rods, etc., for the correction of skeletal defects.Jehovah's Witnesses: Members of a religious denomination founded in the United States during the late 19th century in which active evangelism is practiced, the imminent approach of the millennium is preached, and war and organized government authority in matters of conscience are strongly opposed (from American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 4th ed). Jehovah's Witnesses generally refuse blood transfusions and other blood-based treatments based on religious belief.Reproducibility of Results: The statistical reproducibility of measurements (often in a clinical context), including the testing of instrumentation or techniques to obtain reproducible results. The concept includes reproducibility of physiological measurements, which may be used to develop rules to assess probability or prognosis, or response to a stimulus; reproducibility of occurrence of a condition; and reproducibility of experimental results.Aortitis: Inflammation of the wall of the AORTA.Socioeconomic Factors: Social and economic factors that characterize the individual or group within the social structure.Mitral Valve Stenosis: Narrowing of the passage through the MITRAL VALVE due to FIBROSIS, and CALCINOSIS in the leaflets and chordal areas. This elevates the left atrial pressure which, in turn, raises pulmonary venous and capillary pressure leading to bouts of DYSPNEA and TACHYCARDIA during physical exertion. RHEUMATIC FEVER is its primary cause.Tomography, X-Ray Computed: Tomography using x-ray transmission and a computer algorithm to reconstruct the image.Transposition of Great Vessels: A congenital cardiovascular malformation in which the AORTA arises entirely from the RIGHT VENTRICLE, and the PULMONARY ARTERY arises from the LEFT VENTRICLE. Consequently, the pulmonary and the systemic circulations are parallel and not sequential, so that the venous return from the peripheral circulation is re-circulated by the right ventricle via aorta to the systemic circulation without being oxygenated in the lungs. This is a potentially lethal form of heart disease in newborns and infants.Drainage: The removal of fluids or discharges from the body, such as from a wound, sore, or cavity.Esotropia: A form of ocular misalignment characterized by an excessive convergence of the visual axes, resulting in a "cross-eye" appearance. An example of this condition occurs when paralysis of the lateral rectus muscle causes an abnormal inward deviation of one eye on attempted gaze.Stroke: A group of pathological conditions characterized by sudden, non-convulsive loss of neurological function due to BRAIN ISCHEMIA or INTRACRANIAL HEMORRHAGES. Stroke is classified by the type of tissue NECROSIS, such as the anatomic location, vasculature involved, etiology, age of the affected individual, and hemorrhagic vs. non-hemorrhagic nature. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, pp777-810)Digestive System Fistula: An abnormal passage communicating between any components of the digestive system, or between any part of the digestive system and surrounding organ(s).Postoperative Period: The period following a surgical operation.Intensive Care Units: Hospital units providing continuous surveillance and care to acutely ill patients.Cardiopulmonary Bypass: Diversion of the flow of blood from the entrance of the right atrium directly to the aorta (or femoral artery) via an oxygenator thus bypassing both the heart and lungs.Sciatica: A condition characterized by pain radiating from the back into the buttock and posterior/lateral aspects of the leg. Sciatica may be a manifestation of SCIATIC NEUROPATHY; RADICULOPATHY (involving the SPINAL NERVE ROOTS; L4, L5, S1, or S2, often associated with INTERVERTEBRAL DISK DISPLACEMENT); or lesions of the CAUDA EQUINA.Mediastinitis: Inflammation of the mediastinum, the area between the pleural sacs.Feasibility Studies: Studies to determine the advantages or disadvantages, practicability, or capability of accomplishing a projected plan, study, or project.ScotlandCystic Duct: The duct that is connected to the GALLBLADDER and allows the emptying of bile into the COMMON BILE DUCT.Tricuspid Valve Insufficiency: Backflow of blood from the RIGHT VENTRICLE into the RIGHT ATRIUM due to imperfect closure of the TRICUSPID VALVE.Heart Diseases: Pathological conditions involving the HEART including its structural and functional abnormalities.Gastrectomy: Excision of the whole (total gastrectomy) or part (subtotal gastrectomy, partial gastrectomy, gastric resection) of the stomach. (Dorland, 28th ed)Cholecystostomy: Establishment of an opening into the gallbladder either for drainage or surgical communication with another part of the digestive tract, usually the duodenum or jejunum.Ventricular Outflow Obstruction: Occlusion of the outflow tract in either the LEFT VENTRICLE or the RIGHT VENTRICLE of the heart. This may result from CONGENITAL HEART DEFECTS, predisposing heart diseases, complications of surgery, or HEART NEOPLASMS.Pericardium: A conical fibro-serous sac surrounding the HEART and the roots of the great vessels (AORTA; VENAE CAVAE; PULMONARY ARTERY). Pericardium consists of two sacs: the outer fibrous pericardium and the inner serous pericardium. The latter consists of an outer parietal layer facing the fibrous pericardium, and an inner visceral layer (epicardium) resting next to the heart, and a pericardial cavity between these two layers.Patient Readmission: Subsequent admissions of a patient to a hospital or other health care institution for treatment.EuropeHernia, Hiatal: STOMACH herniation located at or near the diaphragmatic opening for the ESOPHAGUS, the esophageal hiatus.Spinal Stenosis: Narrowing of the spinal canal.Hospitalization: The confinement of a patient in a hospital.Hip Prosthesis: Replacement for a hip joint.Fractures, Ununited: A fracture in which union fails to occur, the ends of the bone becoming rounded and eburnated, and a false joint occurs. (Stedman, 25th ed)Gastroplasty: Surgical procedures involving the STOMACH and sometimes the lower ESOPHAGUS to correct anatomical defects, or to treat MORBID OBESITY by reducing the size of the stomach. There are several subtypes of bariatric gastroplasty, such as vertical banded gastroplasty, silicone ring vertical gastroplasty, and horizontal banded gastroplasty.Epidemiologic Methods: Research techniques that focus on study designs and data gathering methods in human and animal populations.House Calls: Visits to the patient's home by professional personnel for the purpose of diagnosis and/or treatment.Fundoplication: Mobilization of the lower end of the esophagus and plication of the fundus of the stomach around it (fundic wrapping) in the treatment of GASTROESOPHAGEAL REFLUX that may be associated with various disorders, such as hiatal hernia. (From Dorland, 28th ed)Parathyroid Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the PARATHYROID GLANDS.Aortic Aneurysm, Abdominal: An abnormal balloon- or sac-like dilatation in the wall of the ABDOMINAL AORTA which gives rise to the visceral, the parietal, and the terminal (iliac) branches below the aortic hiatus at the diaphragm.Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic: Works about clinical trials that involve at least one test treatment and one control treatment, concurrent enrollment and follow-up of the test- and control-treated groups, and in which the treatments to be administered are selected by a random process, such as the use of a random-numbers table.Aneurysm, Dissecting: Aneurysm caused by a tear in the TUNICA INTIMA of a blood vessel leading to interstitial HEMORRHAGE, and splitting (dissecting) of the vessel wall, often involving the AORTA. Dissection between the intima and media causes luminal occlusion. Dissection at the media, or between the media and the outer adventitia causes aneurismal dilation.Hospitals: Institutions with an organized medical staff which provide medical care to patients.Anemia, Hemolytic: A condition of inadequate circulating red blood cells (ANEMIA) or insufficient HEMOGLOBIN due to premature destruction of red blood cells (ERYTHROCYTES).Regression Analysis: Procedures for finding the mathematical function which best describes the relationship between a dependent variable and one or more independent variables. In linear regression (see LINEAR MODELS) the relationship is constrained to be a straight line and LEAST-SQUARES ANALYSIS is used to determine the best fit. In logistic regression (see LOGISTIC MODELS) the dependent variable is qualitative rather than continuously variable and LIKELIHOOD FUNCTIONS are used to find the best relationship. In multiple regression, the dependent variable is considered to depend on more than a single independent variable.Critical Illness: A disease or state in which death is possible or imminent.Surgical Mesh: Any woven or knit material of open texture used in surgery for the repair, reconstruction, or substitution of tissue. The mesh is usually a synthetic fabric made of various polymers. It is occasionally made of metal.Sutures: Materials used in closing a surgical or traumatic wound. (From Dorland, 28th ed)Tissue Adhesives: Substances used to cause adherence of tissue to tissue or tissue to non-tissue surfaces, as for prostheses.ItalyPatient Satisfaction: The degree to which the individual regards the health care service or product or the manner in which it is delivered by the provider as useful, effective, or beneficial.Fracture Healing: The physiological restoration of bone tissue and function after a fracture. It includes BONY CALLUS formation and normal replacement of bone tissue.Vagotomy, Proximal Gastric: Vagal denervation of that part of the STOMACH lined with acid-secreting mucosa (GASTRIC MUCOSA) containing the GASTRIC PARIETAL CELLS. Since the procedure leaves the vagal branches to the antrum and PYLORUS intact, it circumvents gastric drainage required with truncal vagotomy techniques.Knee Prosthesis: Replacement for a knee joint.Medical Audit: A detailed review and evaluation of selected clinical records by qualified professional personnel for evaluating quality of medical care.Equipment Failure: Failure of equipment to perform to standard. The failure may be due to defects or improper use.Marfan Syndrome: An autosomal dominant disorder of CONNECTIVE TISSUE with abnormal features in the heart, the eye, and the skeleton. Cardiovascular manifestations include MITRAL VALVE PROLAPSE, dilation of the AORTA, and aortic dissection. Other features include lens displacement (ectopia lentis), disproportioned long limbs and enlarged DURA MATER (dural ectasia). Marfan syndrome is associated with mutations in the gene encoding fibrillin, a major element of extracellular microfibrils of connective tissue.Bone Screws: Specialized devices used in ORTHOPEDIC SURGERY to repair bone fractures.Bone Nails: Rods of bone, metal, or other material used for fixation of the fragments or ends of fractured bones.Jejunostomy: Surgical formation of an opening through the ABDOMINAL WALL into the JEJUNUM, usually for enteral hyperalimentation.Fracture Fixation, Intramedullary: The use of nails that are inserted into bone cavities in order to keep fractured bones together.Graft Occlusion, Vascular: Obstruction of flow in biological or prosthetic vascular grafts.Pancreatectomy: Surgical removal of the pancreas. (Dorland, 28th ed)Health Services Research: The integration of epidemiologic, sociological, economic, and other analytic sciences in the study of health services. Health services research is usually concerned with relationships between need, demand, supply, use, and outcome of health services. The aim of the research is evaluation, particularly in terms of structure, process, output, and outcome. (From Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 2d ed)Body Mass Index: An indicator of body density as determined by the relationship of BODY WEIGHT to BODY HEIGHT. BMI=weight (kg)/height squared (m2). BMI correlates with body fat (ADIPOSE TISSUE). Their relationship varies with age and gender. For adults, BMI falls into these categories: below 18.5 (underweight); 18.5-24.9 (normal); 25.0-29.9 (overweight); 30.0 and above (obese). (National Center for Health Statistics, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention)Pain Measurement: Scales, questionnaires, tests, and other methods used to assess pain severity and duration in patients or experimental animals to aid in diagnosis, therapy, and physiological studies.Tibial FracturesAortic Valve Stenosis: A pathological constriction that can occur above (supravalvular stenosis), below (subvalvular stenosis), or at the AORTIC VALVE. It is characterized by restricted outflow from the LEFT VENTRICLE into the AORTA.Debridement: The removal of foreign material and devitalized or contaminated tissue from or adjacent to a traumatic or infected lesion until surrounding healthy tissue is exposed. (Dorland, 27th ed)Longitudinal Studies: Studies in which variables relating to an individual or group of individuals are assessed over a period of time.Data Interpretation, Statistical: Application of statistical procedures to analyze specific observed or assumed facts from a particular study.Statistics, Nonparametric: A class of statistical methods applicable to a large set of probability distributions used to test for correlation, location, independence, etc. In most nonparametric statistical tests, the original scores or observations are replaced by another variable containing less information. An important class of nonparametric tests employs the ordinal properties of the data. Another class of tests uses information about whether an observation is above or below some fixed value such as the median, and a third class is based on the frequency of the occurrence of runs in the data. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed, p1284; Corsini, Concise Encyclopedia of Psychology, 1987, p764-5)Actuarial Analysis: The application of probability and statistical methods to calculate the risk of occurrence of any event, such as onset of illness, recurrent disease, hospitalization, disability, or death. It may include calculation of the anticipated money costs of such events and of the premiums necessary to provide for payment of such costs.Catchment Area (Health): A geographic area defined and served by a health program or institution.Acute Disease: Disease having a short and relatively severe course.Life Tables: Summarizing techniques used to describe the pattern of mortality and survival in populations. These methods can be applied to the study not only of death, but also of any defined endpoint such as the onset of disease or the occurrence of disease complications.Ambulatory Care: Health care services provided to patients on an ambulatory basis, rather than by admission to a hospital or other health care facility. The services may be a part of a hospital, augmenting its inpatient services, or may be provided at a free-standing facility.Second-Look Surgery: A followup operation to examine the outcome of the previous surgery and other treatments, such as chemotherapy or radiation therapy.Hematoma, Epidural, Cranial: Accumulation of blood in the EPIDURAL SPACE between the SKULL and the DURA MATER, often as a result of bleeding from the MENINGEAL ARTERIES associated with a temporal or parietal bone fracture. Epidural hematoma tends to expand rapidly, compressing the dura and underlying brain. Clinical features may include HEADACHE; VOMITING; HEMIPARESIS; and impaired mental function.Methods: A series of steps taken in order to conduct research.Pancreaticoduodenectomy: The excision of the head of the pancreas and the encircling loop of the duodenum to which it is connected.Hip Fractures: Fractures of the FEMUR HEAD; the FEMUR NECK; (FEMORAL NECK FRACTURES); the trochanters; or the inter- or subtrochanteric region. Excludes fractures of the acetabulum and fractures of the femoral shaft below the subtrochanteric region (FEMORAL FRACTURES).Emergency Treatment: First aid or other immediate intervention for accidents or medical conditions requiring immediate care and treatment before definitive medical and surgical management can be procured.Program Evaluation: Studies designed to assess the efficacy of programs. They may include the evaluation of cost-effectiveness, the extent to which objectives are met, or impact.Quality Indicators, Health Care: Norms, criteria, standards, and other direct qualitative and quantitative measures used in determining the quality of health care.Community Health Services: Diagnostic, therapeutic and preventive health services provided for individuals in the community.Polyethylene Terephthalates: Polyester polymers formed from terephthalic acid or its esters and ethylene glycol. They can be formed into tapes, films or pulled into fibers that are pressed into meshes or woven into fabrics.North CarolinaMaternal Age: The age of the mother in PREGNANCY.Age Distribution: The frequency of different ages or age groups in a given population. The distribution may refer to either how many or what proportion of the group. The population is usually patients with a specific disease but the concept is not restricted to humans and is not restricted to medicine.Anastomosis, Roux-en-Y: A Y-shaped surgical anastomosis of any part of the digestive system which includes the small intestine as the eventual drainage site.
To find the essential prime implicants, we run along the top row. We have to look for columns with only 1 "✓". If a column has only 1 "✓", this means that the minterm can only be covered by 1 prime implicant. This prime implicant is essential. For example: in the first column, with minterm 4, there is only 1 "✓". This means that m(4,12) is essential. So we place a star next to it. Minterm 15 also has only 1 "✓", so m(10,11,14,15) is also essential. Now all columns with 1 "✓" are covered. The second prime implicant can be 'covered' by the third and fourth, and the third prime implicant can be 'covered' by the second and first, and neither is thus essential. If a prime implicant is essential then, as would be expected, it is necessary to include it in the minimized boolean equation. In some cases, the essential prime implicants do not cover all minterms, in which case additional procedures for chart reduction can be employed. The simplest "additional procedure" is trial and error, but a ...
MS Caribbean Princess is a modified Grand Class cruise ship owned and operated by Princess Cruises, with a capacity of over 3,600 passengers, the largest carrying capacity in the Princess fleet until June 2013 when the new Royal Princess, another Princess ship superseded its record. She has 900 balcony staterooms and a deck of mini-suites. She was the first modern cruise ship with an outdoor theater, which Princess bills as "Movies Under The Stars".[citation needed] Caribbean Princess is slightly larger than the other ships in her class (Star Princess, Golden Princess, and Grand Princess), due to the addition of an additional deck of cabins called the Riviera deck. Another difference is that, being initially designed to cruise the Caribbean year-round, there is no sliding roof over the pool area for shelter in poor weather. On March 12, 2012, Caribbean Princess suffered an issue to her port side propulsion engine, which required her to return to her home port of San Juan, Puerto Rico after a ...
In 2001 the Triebel group identified a LAG3-associated protein, called LAP, that seemed to participate in immune system down-regulation.[41] Also in 2001 the Triebel group reported finding LAG3 expression on CD8+ tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes, with this LAG3 contributing to APC activation.[42] In August 2002 the first phenotypic analysis of the murine LAG-3 was reported by a team at St. Jude Children's Research Hospital in Memphis.[43] Molecular analysis reported by the St. Jude Children's Research Hospital team in November 2002 demonstrated that the inhibitory function of LAG-3 is performed via the protein's cytoplasmic domain.[44] In 2003 the Triebel group was able to identify the MHC class II signal transduction pathways in human dendritic cells induced by LAG3.[45] while the St. Jude Children's Research Hospital team showed that the absence of LAG3 caused no defect in T cell function.[16] In May 2004 the St. Jude Children's Research Hospital team showed, through LAG3 knockout mice, that ...
... (NMH) is a nationally ranked academic medical center hospital located in downtown Chicago, Illinois. It is the primary teaching hospital for Northwestern University's Feinberg School of Medicine. Along with its Prentice Women's Hospital and Stone Institute of Psychiatry, the hospital provides a total of 894 inpatient beds and encompasses more than 3 million square feet of medical building space. Virtually every medical specialty is represented by the over 1,600 physicians on the medical staff at Northwestern Memorial who also carry faculty appointments with Feinberg. It is the third tallest hospital in the United States and the fifth tallest hospital in the world. Northwestern Memorial Hospital is ranked as the sixth best hospital in the United States, ranked number one in the Chicago metro area, and ranked number one in the state of Illinois according to the 2013-14 U.S. News & World Report America's Best Hospitals "Honor Roll" report. Northwestern Memorial is ...
... is a complication of diabetes. It is caused by infarcted muscle tissue, usually in the thigh. The mean age at presentation is thirty-seven years with a reported range of nineteen to sixty-four years. The mean age of onset since diagnosis of diabetes is fifteen years. The female:male ratio is 1.3:1. Other diabetic complications such as nephropathy, neuropathy, retinopathy and hypertension are usually present. Its major symptom is the acute onset muscle pain, usually in the thigh, in the absence of trauma. Signs include exquisite muscle tenderness and swelling. Tissue biopsy is the gold standard. Macroscopically this reveals pale muscle tissue. Microscopically infarcted patches of myocytes. Necrotic muscle fibers are swollen and eosinophilic and lack striations and nuclei. Small-vessel walls are thickened and hyalinized, with luminal narrowing or complete occlusion. Biopsy cultures for bacteria, fungi, acid-fast bacilli and stains are negative in simple myonecrosis. Creatine ...
... is a series of epistolary young adult novels written by Meg Cabot, and is also the title of the first volume, published in 2000. The series revolves around Amelia 'Mia' Thermopolis, a teenager in New York who discovers that she is the princess of a small European principality called Genovia. Meg Cabot quotes the series' inspiration on her website stating: "I was inspired to write The Princess Diaries when my mom, after the death of my father, began dating one of my teachers; they later went on to get married just as Mia's mom does in the book! I have always had a 'thing' for princesses (my parents used to joke that when I was smaller, I did a lot of insisting that my 'real' parents, the king and queen, were going to come get me soon, and that everyone had better start being a LOT nicer to me) so I stuck a princess in the book just for kicks... and VOILÀ! The Princess Diaries was born." The books are noted for containing many popular culture references, which include ...
Surgical Outcomes Analysis & Research, SOAR, is a research laboratory of the Department of Surgery at the Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center with expertise in outcomes research. SOAR investigates surgical diseases and perioperative outcomes. The group focuses on pancreatic cancer, other gastrointestinal and hepatobiliary malignancies, vascular disease, and transplant surgery. SOAR's goal is to examine quality, delivery, and financing of care in order to have an immediate impact on patient care and system improvements. The group members utilize national health services and administrative databases, as well as institutional databases, to investigate and to address factors contributing to disease outcomes and healthcare disparities. The work in SOAR incorporates advanced statistical techniques, including logistic regression, prediction score, and decision analysis modeling. Outcomes Research evaluates the impact of health care on the health ...
A teoría da resposta antitumoral do sistema inmunitario in vivo foi recoñecida polo físico William B. Coley. En 1968, o Dr. Gale A Granger da Universidade de California, Irvine, informou do descubrimento dun factor citotóxico producido polos linfocitos e denominouno linfotoxina (LT).[7] O mérito deste descubrimento compartiuno coa Dra. Nancy H. Ruddle da Universidade Yale, que informou da mesma actividade nunha serie de artigos consecutivos publicados nese mesmo mes.[8] Posteriormente, en 1975, o Dr. Lloyd J. Old do Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, de Nova York, informou sobre outros factores citotóxicos producidos polos macrófagos e usou a denominación factor de necrose tumoral (TNF).[9] Ambos os factores foron descritos baseándose na súa capacidade de matar células L-929 de fibrosarcoma de rato. Estes conceptos foron ampliados a doenzas sistémicas en 1981, cando Ian A. Clark, da Universidade Nacional de Australia, en colaboración con Elizabeth Carswell no grupo do Dr. Old, ...
A lipoma is a benign tumor made of fat tissue. They are generally soft to the touch, movable, and painless. They usually occur just under the skin but occasionally may be deeper. Most are less than 5 cm in size. Common locations include upper back, shoulders, and abdomen. A few people have a number of lipomas. The cause is generally unclear. Risk factors include family history, obesity, and not enough exercise. Diagnosis is typically based on a physical exam. Occasionally medical imaging or tissue biopsy is used to confirm the diagnosis. Treatment is typically by observation or surgical removal. Rarely the condition may recur following removal, however, this can generally be managed with repeat surgery. They are not generally associated with a future risk of cancer. About 2% of people are affected. Lipomas typically occur in adults between 40 to 60 years of age. Males are more often affected than females. They are the most common non-cancerous soft tissue tumor. The first use of the term ...
Complication, in medicine, is an unfavorable evolution or consequence of a disease, a health condition or a therapy. The disease can become worse in its severity or show a higher number of signs, symptoms or new pathological changes, become widespread throughout the body or affect other organ systems. A new disease may also appear as a complication to a previous existing disease. A medical treatment, such as drugs or surgery may produce adverse effects or produce new health problem(s) by itself. Therefore, a complication may be iatrogenic (i.e. literally brought forth by the physician).. Medical knowledge about a disease, procedure or treatment usually entails a list of the most common complications, so that they can be foreseen, prevented or recognized more easily and speedily.. Depending on the degree of vulnerability, susceptibility, age, health status, immune system condition, etc. complications may arise more easily. Complications affect adversely the prognosis of a disease. Non-invasive ...
In 1999, financial analyst Harry Markopolos had informed the SEC that he believed it was legally and mathematically impossible to achieve the gains Madoff claimed to deliver. According to Markopolos, it took him four minutes to conclude that Madoff's numbers did not add up, and another minute to suspect they were likely fraudulent.[75]. After four hours of failed attempts to replicate Madoff's numbers, Markopolos believed he had mathematically proved Madoff was a fraud.[76] He was ignored by the SEC's Boston office in 2000 and 2001, as well as by Meaghan Cheung at the SEC's New York office in 2005 and 2007 when he presented further evidence. He has since co-authored a book with Gaytri Kachroo (the leader of his legal team) titled No One Would Listen. The book details the frustrating efforts he and his legal team made over a ten-year period to alert the government, the industry, and the press about Madoff's fraud.[75]. Although Madoff's wealth management business ultimately grew into a ...
Marsden 2004. októberében vette el feleségét, Christy Hicks, akitől 2010. februárjában 2 gyereke született.[3] A család jelenleg a tennessee-i Nashville-ben lakik, szomszédjuk Marsden nagy barátja a bírkózókat támogató Jerry Jarrett.[4] ...
അദ്ദേഹത്തിന്റെ പിതാവ് ഒരു അപ്പോത്തിക്കെരി ആയിരുന്നു. കൂടാതെ ധാതുക്കൾ, നാണയങ്ങൾ, ജീവാശ്മങ്ങൾ, പ്രാണികൾ തുടങ്ങിയവയൊക്കെ ശേഖരിക്കുകയും ചെയ്യുമായിരുന്നു. സ്വാമ്മർഡാം പിതാവിനെ അദ്ദേഹത്തിന്റെ പ്രവർത്തികളിൽ സഹായിക്കുകയും അവയിൽ ആകർഷിതനാകാവുകയും ചെയ്തു. 1661-ൽ അദ്ദേഹം University of Leiden-ൽ വൈദ്യശാസ്ത്രം പഠിക്കാൻ തുടങ്ങി. അതോടൊപ്പം സ്വന്തമായി പ്രാണികളെ ശേഖരിക്കുകയും ചെയ്തു.[1] 1663-ൽ ...
Data regarding their operation was prospectively collected and retrospectively reviewed. All patients had successful ... No patient required laparotomy, reoperation or readmission. Patients weighed up to a maximum 175 kg (mean weight 116.7 kg). The ... From the data reported and discussed here, such a trial now would be indicated. ... They had three readmissions, three reoperations and one thromboembolic event. The mean postoperative stay was 1.1 days. ...
Data will be collected on patient-reported outcomes, results of knee examinations, and reoperations and revisions. ... It will enroll subjects prospectively (at the time of surgery) and retrospectively (those who have been previously implanted). ... DeNovo NT Longitudinal Data Collection (LDC) Knee Study. The safety and scientific validity of this study is the responsibility ... Post Market, Longitudinal Data Collection Study of DeNovo NT for Articular Cartilage Defects of the Knee. ...
... and reoperations data were prospectively collected. ... based on data collected and recorded on a prospective database ... Data analysis of the German bariatric surgery registry," Annals of Surgery, vol. 263, no. 5, pp. 949-955, 2016. View at ... The reoperation was followed by endoscopic gastrooesophageal stenting.. In all cases the endoluminal stent was a covered self- ... Current data shows a post-LSG incidence of leak ranging from 0.5% to 7% in different series [9]. ...
... and subsequently underwent one major reoperation before 31 December 2010 were retrieved from a prospectively collected ... Major reoperations were defined as band repositioning, band replacement and hiatal hernia repair. Demographic data, weight as ... The change in %EWL for the entire study population was -3.9 from reoperation to 12 months and -4.1 from reoperation to 24 ... Reoperation occurred 34.8 months after primary LAGB. Age at reoperation was 43.3 years, weight and BMI had decreased to 91.9kg ...
Their clinical data were collected in a prospectively fashion and retrospectively reviewed. The therapeutic effects of LHD were ... and frequency of reoperation. ...
For all patients, the following data was collected: gender, age and TSH, thyroid autoantibodies titers [TPO-Abs, Thyroglobulin ... Here we investigated the characteristics of DTC associated with GD, by reviewing our prospectively collected database of ... and need for reoperation. We also reviewed data for thyroid pathology and antibodies titers against Tg-Abs, TPO-Abs, TR-Abs ... AAK: Data analysis and helping in experimentation. SAMH: Drafting the article. NS: Data collection, analysis and drafting the ...
... and provides data to stratify patients based on risk factors for failure, including patients with high BMIs and history of ... This study suggests that patients who undergo osteochondral allograft transplantation also have high reoperation rates and ... A review of prospectively collected data of 224 consecutive patients who underwent OAT by a single surgeon with a minimum ... The reoperation rate, timing of reoperation, procedure performed, and findings at surgery were reviewed. Failure was defined by ...
Prospectively collected data from 9853 patients from the Quality and Outcomes Database (QOD; formerly known as the N2QOD [ ... Medicare patients , 65 years had a 30-day reoperation rate of 3.7%, whereas those ≥ 65 years had a 30-day reoperation rate of ... Baseline, 3-month, and 12-month follow-up data were collected and compared, including baseline clinical characteristics, ... data to measure the safety and quality of spine surgery. Registry data offer "real-world" insights into the utility of spinal ...
Prospectively collected data were retrospectively reviewed to evaluate the early complication rate and radiographic accuracy of ... The overall reoperation rate was 6.56% (4/61). No femoral or sciatic nerve injuries occurred, and no patient was diagnosed with ... Prospectively collected data were retrospectively reviewed to evaluate the early complication rate and radiographic accuracy of ... Prospectively collected data was retrospectively reviewed. Demographic information, intra- and postoperative complications, ...
There is paucity of data on Enhanced Recovery After Bariatric Surgery (ERABS) protocols. This feasibility study reports ... Data Collection Prospectively collected data included demographic details, baseline co-morbidities, operation performed and LOS ... Data on occurrence of complications, mortality, re-admissions and re-operations were extracted retrospectively from medical ... Data collected included demographics, co-morbidities, morbidity, mortality, length of stay (LOS) and re-admissions. A total of ...
... analysis of prospectively collected American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program data. All major ... Understanding Risk Factors Associated With Unplanned Reoperation in Major Head and Neck Surgery. ... analysis of prospectively collected American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program data. All major ... and reoperation. RESULTS: There were 1193 major head and neck operations in the American College of Surgeons National Surgical ...
... and in-hospital data are collected prospectively. Postdischarge data were collected retrospectively. Data are expressed as the ... Freedom from reoperation was 100% at 1 and 83.3±15.2% at 6 years (Figure 5). Other follow-up events included 1 dilatation of ... Between February 1st 1997 and May 1st 2006 prospective data were collected in 1024 patients who had mitral or tricuspid valve ... In addition, recent data have suggested a lower load of cerebral microemboli when using the endoaortic balloon as compared with ...
Prospectively collected data from the National Patient Registry covering a 2-year study period 1 January 2005 to 31 December ... Prolonged hospital stay was in 8.2 %, readmission in 2.1 %, reoperation in 0.7 %, and complications were observed in 1.1 %. One ... Automatic Data Processing Denmark - epidemiology Female Humans Male Registries - statistics & numerical data Regression ... Registries - statistics & numerical data Research Support, Non-U.S. Govt Risk Suicide - statistics & numerical data Survival ...
METHODS: Data on all patients undergoing surgery over a 12-month period were prospectively collected using a perioperative ... Morbidity and inhospital deaths, unplanned second surgeries during index admission, wound infections requiring reoperation, and ... operative data, hospital data, major and minor complications both medical and surgical, and deaths were recorded.. RESULTS: One ... Without strict adherence to a prospective data collection system, the true complexity of this surgery may be greatly ...
Two studies reported their data collection methods, one of which collected data prospectively. Patient inclusion criteria were ... Only 3% of patients suffered from treatment complications and 1% needed re-operation. Harston et al. [4] found that 19% of ... Due to the limited and incomplete data availability, no further subgroup analyses were conducted. Data were analysed using IBM ... Hence, for the analysis of both complications and pain relief in this review, data might be biased or incomplete. Notably, ...
Abstract STUDY DESIGN: Retrospective study of prospectively collected outcome data. OBJECTIVE: To investigate reoperation cases ... Five-Year Reoperation Rates and Causes for Reoperations Following Lumbar Microendoscopic Discectomy and Decompression. ...
... collected the data, performed statistical analysis, and prepared and reviewed the paper. Renata Pugliese, Marcel A. Benavides, ... 688 donors had records with complete data, which were retrospectively reviewed through patient charts and from a prospectively ... Table 4). Donors submitted to LL and RL resections had longer ICU and hospital stays as well as readmission and reoperation ... Logistic regression was applied to the data and those variables found to be significant at were selected for the multivariate ...
In a prospectively collected US Nationwide Inpatient Sample (NIS) data from 2010, RBS could be demonstrated in 17% of patients ... Interventions to remove postoperative pericardial and/or pleural fluid or blood and reoperations due to bleeding are captured ... The database manager will maintain contact will the data entry personnel from each site and ensure whether data capture is ... The Vanderbilt database study administrator will control database access, oversee data entry and data transfer from each ...
Outcome data will be prospectively collected during index hospitalization, and at 2 weeks and 3 months post discharge, and ... Includes a greater than 2g/dL drop in hemoglobin, blood transfusion, hematoma evacuation, re-operation for a deep surgical site ... Data Collection:. Patients meeting inclusion/exclusion criteria will be prospectively randomized to one of two treatment arms. ... Data Analysis:. All data will be reported as mean and standard deviations for continuous variables and proportions and ...
19 Data were collected prospectively (using an agreed data set and definitions) by surgeons, perfusionists, resident medical ... Again, cardiac re-operations, including those of the mitral valve were included in the sample. The role of PPM in patients ... Data were prospectively compiled as part of the Australasian Society of Cardiac and Thoracic Surgeons database project, which ... No other EOA data for the ATS valve could be obtained from the literature for verification. The data we have employed suggest a ...
Morbidity and quality of life in both groups has been outlined in this matched cohort from prospectively collected pediatric ... All of these complications required reoperation. Though reoperation rates were greater for adult idiopathic scoliosis (10.7% vs ... The data shows the patient with adult idiopathic scoliosis begins with worse quality of life and improves to a greater extent ... The data shows that the average patient with adult idiopathic scoliosis in the study, nearly 30 years older than their 15 years ...
Although a retrospective review of prospectively collected data for 91 shoulders undergoing revision anterior shoulder… ... Study identifies reoperation rate, characteristics of meniscal tears left during ACL reconstruction. July 11, 2015. ORLANDO, ... Award-winning research using data from the MOON study indicates most meniscal tears left in situ at the time of ACL… ...
... in the repair of abdominal wall defects.We prospectively collected data over a 3-year period. Primary or near-total primary ... Statistically significant factors (p < 0.05) that contributed to increased post-operative complications or re-operation rates ... These data are the first observations of CyCAP expression in skin and during wound repair. Our data indicates that CyCAP is ... Wound measurements and histologic data were collected for analysis.Bench measurement revealed nearly identical negative- ...
Patients and methods: Data was prospectively collected over 10 years, for a total of 106 men. The nature of the frenular ... The extra addition of our grading system allows patients to be risk-stratified as to the risk of re-operation depending on ... However, there is very little data in the urological literature regarding either technique or assessment. The only other ... showing high patient satisfaction scores and low complication and re-operation rates. This provides an evidence base from which ...
... and 4 or more re-operations. METHODS: Prospectively collected data on consecutive hypospadias repairs (tubularized incised ... Current data do not identify a clear preference between TIP and onlay flap for proximal repair when there is ventral curvature ... We reviewed our data of spina bifida patients to evaluate whether optimal treatment of the neurogenic bladder from birth ... This review summarizes data regarding commonly used surgical techniques to repair distal and proximal hypospadias. We review ...
  • Interpretation of published findings is limited by various methodological shortcomings, such as selected and heterogeneous study populations (e.g. single-institution, only patients over 60 years of age, or a mixture of hip and knee replacement, trauma and hip fracture patients), retrospective data collection, incomplete follow-up, insufficient confounder control, and small sample sizes. (biomedcentral.com)
  • We analyzed data from 2633 consecutive patients with GD, HT, EHT and non-Autoimmune Thyroid Disease (Non-AITD) for the presence of Differentiated Thyroid Cancer (DTC). (springer.com)
  • It presents a review of 40 collected studies (including 15 Western, 6 Asian and 19 Japanese articles), reached a wide variety of conclusions, defining Japan as eight different types: We point out that while the majority of Western studies tend to run statistical models including Japan among otherwise 'Western' welfare states with little theoretical justification, Japanese scholars tend to focus on Japan as a single case. (cambridge.org)
  • Data on self-reported screening behaviors (colonoscopy, and endometrial sampling and transvaginal ultrasound for women) and prophylactic surgery (colectomy, and hysterectomy and bilateral oophorectomy for women) were collected using postal questionnaires before (baseline) and 12 months after receipt of genetic test results. (pelvicfloordigest.org)
  • Our data indicate that mesalazine reduces frameshift mutations at a (CA)13 microsatellite in cultured colorectal cells independent of mismatch repair proficiency. (pelvicfloordigest.org)
  • The data shows the patient with adult idiopathic scoliosis begins with worse quality of life and improves to a greater extent in most domains than their adolescent counterpart but remains at a lower level in those same domains as preoperatively. (spineuniverse.com)
  • Patient-specific instrumentation potentially improves surgical precision and decreases operative time in total knee arthroplasty (TKA) but there is little supporting data to confirm this presumption. (clinorthop.org)
  • If the leak is major and the patient is unwell, urgent reoperation may be required. (cochrane.org)
  • Conclusion: According to our data, there is no evidence of impaired gastric emptying in early HD. (emilysstomach.com)
  • The proposed exclusion criteria utilize objective radiographic data (absence of gastric distention and passage of oral contrast) and presence of documented non-DGE conditions to determine genuine DGE. (nesurgical.org)
  • All patients were diagnosed with acute coronary syndrome preoperatively, and all of them had haemoglobin levels above 110 g/L. Patients who needed reoperation, combined procedures, or off-pump revascularization were excluded. (bjcvs.org)